Human Resources

Hire the Right Employee: Questions to Ask Candidates

Jason Nazar is CEO & Co-founder of Docstoc (docstoc.com). In this video he shares questions to ask candidates.

  1. Ask about their ideal position to discover goals
  2. Indicates potential compatibility
  3. Question their knowledge of your company
  4. Discover their desire to be hired
  5. Inquire about their strengths
  6. Helps identify communication skills
  7. Also ask about weaknesses
  8. Compare your job description to their past results
  9. Determine their salary expectations

There are five questions that I ask in every interview that are critical, making sure that you have the best interview to find the best candidate.

The first is, I ask generally and open-endedly. Tell me about the ideal position that you’re looking for, and the reason I asked that question is I want to hear from that candidate’s own words and own ideas what kind of job title they want, what kind of task they want to be doing during the day, what kind of company culture they want, what kind of compensation they’re looking for in an ideal world.

And if the job that we’re offering is different or too different than what they’re looking for, I know right away that it might not be a good fit and on the other hand if they describe without me going into the specifics of our job position exactly what I’m looking for, I know right up front that it could be a great candidate.

Next is I ask them this – ask them tell me what you know about our company. And the reason I do that is I’m testing the person to see how prepared they are. Anybody can read about a section in the website. Anybody can go over our job description and detail, but who is going to take the extra effort to read about press clippings and talk to people that work in the company and really find out everything you can about that company and product going into it and who spent a lot of time using the product or service. That’s a really important way that I’m able to distinguish job candidates.

Next is I like to ask people in general, what are you very best at. And it helps them self identify and communicate the things that they do better than anything else.

And most importantly here I’m trying to understand what their communication skills are, because I want to understand how well they understand their own strengths in relation to the job that I am hiring for. And often I’ll ask a follow up question is what are you weak – what are you not good at? And if they can’t tell me with some sincerity and honesty the things that they’re not good at, I know that it’s a big red flag.

I’ll always ask, tell me about a time you got this specific result, and so I’ll look at the job description of what we’re hiring for and see what results we need and I’ll ask them to tell me about a time in their past in their previous jobs that they got a similar result and exactly what they did because you don’t want to hire somebody that’s just going to take credit or was around the success that you want to look for.

You want to hire people that are directly responsible for that success and want to explain how they did it in specific detail, so you’ll know that you’ll be able to take their experience and plug it right away into your company.

And finally if you don’t publicize what the exact salary is for the job such that it’s really not going to be negotiable, ask them what salary range are you looking for and the reason this is really important is you may have 2 or 3 interviews with somebody before you realize that you have very different salary expectations and you want to find that out up front and right away and even when I use a recruiter to hire for roles whether they be for technical or business, I always ask the question myself what general salary you were looking for to make sure their expectations were aligned.

And if you make sure to follow the same five questions when you go to interview people, I think it’s going to help you find and identify the best talent and bring them into your company or organization.

Transcription: There are five questions that I ask in every interview that are critical in making sure that you have the best interview to find the best candidate. The first is: I ask generally and open endedly, “Tell me about the ideal position you are looking for?” and the reason I ask that question is I want to hear from that candidates own words and own ideas, what kind of job title they want? What kind of task they want to be doing during the day? What kind of company culture do they want? What kind of compensation they are looking for? In an ideal world. If the job that we’re offering is different or too different from what they’re looking for, I know right away it might not be a good fit and on the other hand if they describe without me going into the specifics of our job position exactly what im looking for, I know right up front that they could be a great candidate. Next is, I ask them “Tell me about what you know about our company?” and the reason I do that is, I’m testing the person to see how prepared they are. Anybody can read the about section on a website, anybody can go over a job description in detail, but whose going to really take the extra effort to read about press clippings? And talk to people that work in the company? And really find out everything you can about that company and product going into it and who spent a lot of time using the product or service? That’s a really important way to distinguish job candidates. Next is I like to ask people in general, what are you very best at? It helps them self identify and communicate the things they do better than anything else and most importantly, here I’m trying to understand what their communication skills are because I want to understand how well they understand their strengths in relation to the job I’m hiring for and often ill ask a follow up question what are you weak, what are you not good, at? And if they can’t tell me with some sincerity and honesty the things they’re not good at, I know that it’s a big red flag. I’ll always ask, tell me a time you got, this, specific result. So ill look at the job description of what were hiring for and see what results we need, and ill ask them to tell me about a time in their past and their previous jobs that they got a similar result and exactly what they did. Because you don’t want to just hire somebody that’s just going to take credit or was around the success that you want to look for. You want to hire people that were directly responsible for that success, and want to explain how they did it in specific detail, so you’ll know that you’ll be able to take their experience and plug it right away into your company. And finally, if you don’t publicize what the exact salary is for the job such that it’s really not going to be negotiable, ask them, what salary range are you looking for? And the reason this is really important is you may have two or three interviews with somebody before you realize that you have very different salary expectations. You want to find that out up front and right away. And even when I use a recruiter to hire for roles, whether they be for tech or business, I always ask the question myself, what general salary range you are looking for to make sure that our expectations are aligned. And if you make sure to follow these same five questions when you go to interview people, I think it’s going to help you find and identify the best talent and bring them into your company or organization

RELATED ARTICLESSEE ALL »
RELATED VIDEOSSEE ALL »
RELATED DOCUMENTS