Effect of the size of the pupae, adult diet, oviposition substrate and adult population density on egg production in Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae)

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Effect of the size of the pupae, adult diet, oviposition substrate and adult population density on egg production in Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) Powered By Docstoc
					                                                                                                      Eur. J. Entomol. 108: 587–596, 2011
                                                                                  http://www.eje.cz/scripts/viewabstract.php?abstract=1657
                                                                                               ISSN 1210-5759 (print), 1802-8829 (online)



    Effect of the size of the pupae, adult diet, oviposition substrate and adult
  population density on egg production in Musca domestica (Diptera: M
				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: In order to enhance the mass production of the house fly, Musca domestica, five aspects of its oviposition biology were analyzed. Oviposition substrate and the manner of its presentation, the composition of the diet of the adults, size of the pupae and numbers of flies in a cage were identified as critical. Females preferred to lay eggs on a substrate which was presented within a shelter and with increased linear edges against which the flies could oviposit. Different types of oviposition substrate resulted in comparable yields of eggs. The presence of an oviposition attractant (ammonia) in the manure was found to have a potentially positive effect on female fecundity. Egg yield increased when two protein sources (yeast and milk) were included in the adult diet. However, flies fed a mixture of sugar and yeast laid over 50% fewer eggs than those fed the same proportion of sugar and milk. The fecundity of flies decreased with increase in the number of flies per cage, but the highest total number of eggs per cage was obtained when the flies were most crowded (14.2 cm^sup 3^ per fly). The size of the pupae did not significantly affect egg production. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
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