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Columbia College Graduate Catalog

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Columbia College Graduate Catalog Powered By Docstoc
					STATEMENT OF MISSION
    Columbia College improves the lives of diverse undergraduate and graduate learners through exemplary
teaching.
    The liberal arts and sciences and professional programs of the College embrace and profess these values:

    •   Student-centrism
    •   Life long learning
    •   Ethics and citizenship
    •   Flexibility and innovation
    •   Quality and improvement
    •   Civility and respect
    •   Environmental and fiscal stewardship.

    Vision: A model institution.
                                                                                     Approved by the Board of Trustees
                                                                                                         May 1, 2009




DESCRIPTION
    Columbia College, a private, coeducational institution, offers associate, baccalaureate and master’s degrees
that prepare students of differing backgrounds for entry level or advanced positions in various occupations and
professions. Founded in 1851 by charter of the Missouri legislature and then named Christian Female College,
Columbia College assumed its current name and became coeducational in 1970. Although it retains a covenant
with the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ), Columbia College is a nonsectarian institution.
    The College is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission and is a member of the North Central Association
of Colleges and Schools and holds specialized accreditation in its Education program. Students may enroll in day,
evening or online education classes at the home campus in Columbia, Missouri, or in its Adult Higher Education
Division at one of the many Nationwide campuses.
    Columbia College educates 25,000 students each year and has more than 64,000 Christian College alumnae
and Columbia College alumni.
                                                                                                                      General Information   1


                                   COLUMBIA COLLEGE

            2010 – 2011 GRADUATE CATALOG


                                         TABLE OF CONTENTS
                                                                                                                  Page Number

               Mission Statement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Inside Front Cover
               Administrative Offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
               Map of Columbia College Campus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
               Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
               College Profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
               The Home Campus. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
               Admission Policy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
               Tuition and Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
               Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
               Campus Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
               Academic Policies, Regulations and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
               Academic Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
               Master of Arts in Teaching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
               MAT Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
               Education Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
               Master of Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
               Business Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
               Master of Science in Criminal Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
               Criminal Justice Course Descriptions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
               Personnel Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
               Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77




    Columbia College does not unlawfully discriminate on the basis of any status or condition protected
by applicable federal or state law to include race, religion, gender, nationality, ethnicity, age, sexual ori-
entation, marital, veteran status or disability, in the administration of its educational policies, admission,
financial assistance, employment, educational programs or activities.


    Columbia College reserves the right to change prices, policies, or practices as described in
this catalog as circumstances, efficiency of operation and fiscal contingencies may require.
2       General Information

                                           aDminiStratiVe officeS
columbia college Switchboard ..................................................................................................(573) 875-8700
General fax ...................................................................................................................................(573) 875-7209
Academic Affairs (Degree offerings, faculty, academic information, session dates, assessment) .........................(573)	875-7500
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	876-4493
Administrative	Services	(Room and event scheduling, building maintenance, parking permits) .........................(573)	875-7300
*Admissions (Requirements, application forms, campus tours, transfer information) ...................................................(573)	875-7352
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7506
Adult	and	Higher	Education	Division	(Campus locations, academic offerings, session dates) ..................... (573)	875-7661
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7660
Alumni	Relations	(Homecoming, alumni groups and activities, alumni records) ..............................................(573)	875-7586
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7733
Athletics (Intercollegiate sports, recreation) ..............................................................................................(573)	875-7433
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7415
Bookstore (textbooks, supplies) ............................................................................................................(573)	875-7341
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7415
Campus	Life	(Student activities, ADA services)........................................................................................(573)	875-7400
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7235
Campus	Safety	(Emergencies, safety) ..................................................................................................(573)	875-7315
Career	Services	(Career planning/placement off-campus jobs, career opportunities) .......................................(573)	875-7425
Counseling	Services	(Personal/group counseling) .................................................................................(573)	875-7423
Development	Office	(Donations, gifts, bequests)....................................................................................(573)	875-7563
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7559
Education	Office	(Teacher Certification requirements) ..............................................................................(573)	875-7632
*Evaluations	Office	(Credit evaluation, transfer information) ......................................................................(573)	875-7671
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7391
Evening	Campus	(Undergraduate course offerings) ................................................................................(573)	875-7610
Financial	Aid	(Information, application forms, assistance) ...........................................................................(573)	875-7390
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7452
Graduate Office (course schedules, general information) ..........................................................................(573)	875-7440
Health	Services	(Information, consultation, referral) .................................................................................(573)	875-7432
Library	(Reference information, library hours)............................................................................................(573)	875-7374
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7379
Marketing	(Advertising) ......................................................................................................................(573)	875-7230
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7331
Master	of	Arts	in	Teaching,	Graduate	Program	Coordinator	(Advising) ............................................(573)	875-7590
Master	of	Business	Administration,	Graduate	Program	Coordinator	(Advising) ...............................(573)	875-7640
Master	of	Science	in	Criminal	Justice,	Graduate	Program	Coordinator	(Advising) ..........................(573)	875-7472
Online Office (Online undergraduate and graduate courses) .......................................................................(573)	875-7246
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7445
President ........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7200
Public	Relations	(Publicity, publications) ...............................................................................................(573)	875-7230
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7331
*Registration	&	Financial	Services	Office	(Payment of fees, repayment of loans, general business policies, registration of classes) .(573)	875-7526
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7436
Student	Development	(Student activities, health-related issues)................................................................(573)	875-7420
Student	Records	and	Transcripts	(Assistance with eServices, loan deferments, VA benefits) .......................(573)	875-7252
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7262
Technology	Services	Center	(Helpdesk, email, internet access, computer resources)...................................(573)	875-7313
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7320
Transcripts ......................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7652
	    Fax ..........................................................................................................................................(573)	875-7392
                        *	These	offices	are	open	8:00	a.m.	to	6:00	p.m.	Monday	through	Thursday,	and	until	5:00	p.m.	on	Friday.	
                                     (Most	all	other	offices	are	open	8:00	a.m.	to	5:00	p.m.	Monday	through	Friday).

                                          General Web Site address: www.ccis.edu
                                  Graduate programs UrL: http://www.ccis.edu/graduate
                                                                                                                                       General Information       3

Atkins-Holman Student Commons                                St. Clair Hall
Bookstore • Campus Life • Cougar Cafe                        Administrative Offices • Alumni & Development
Career Services • Health Services                            Academic Affairs • Faculty • Human Resources
                                                             Classrooms
Brown Hall
Larson Gallery • Classrooms                                  Southwell
                                                             Arena • Courts
Dorsey Hall
Chapel • Jane Froman Studio • Classrooms                     Southy
                                                             Athletic Department
Dulany Hall
Dining Hall, Banquet, Cougar & Lee Room                      Wightman
                                                             Maintenance
Missouri Hall
Administrative Offices • Admissions • Evaluations
Registration & Financial Services • Evening Campus
Tutoring

Robnett-Spence
Campus Safety




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                                                                                                                                       E   Entrance
4	     General	Information



                                     Graduate classes
                                     2010-2011 academic calendar
august Session (10/m31) august 23 – october 14, 2010
Mon	     Jul	5 ................ Registration	begins	for	returning	and	new	graduate	students
Mon	     Aug	23 ............ Graduate classes begin
Aug	     23-27............... Late	registration	($35	fee)
Fri	     Aug	27 ............ Last	day	to	add	classes
Mon	     Aug	30 ............ Last	day	to	drop	a	course	without	academic	record	and	financial	liability	
Mon	     Sep	6	                 Labor	Day	Holiday;	classes	do	not	meet,	offices	and	library	closed	(library		
	        	                      closed	Sep	4-6)
Fri	     Oct	1 ............... Last	day	to	withdraw	from	classes	with	grade	of	W	
Thurs	   Oct	14 ............. Classes end
Mon	     Oct	18 ............. Grades	entered	by	12:00	noon

october Session (10/m32) october 18 – December 16, 2010
Mon	 Sep	13 ............ Registration	begins	for	returning	and	new	graduate	students
Mon	 Oct	18 ............. Graduate classes begin
Oct	 18-22............... Late	registration	($35	fee)
Fri	   Oct	22 ............. Last	day	to	add	classes
Mon	 Oct	25 ............. Last	day	to	drop	a	course	without	academic	record	and	financial	liability	
Thurs	 Nov	11............. Veterans	Recognition	Day
Nov	 22-26............... Thanksgiving	Break;	graduate	and	day	classes	do	not	meet;	evening	classes
	      	                    meet	Nov	22-23;	offices	and	library	open	Nov	22-24,	8:00	am-5:00	pm,
	      	                    offices	and	library	closed	Nov	25-27;	library	open	Nov	28,	2:00-10:00	pm
Mon	 Nov	29 ............ Classes resume
	      	                    Last	day	to	withdraw	from	classes	with	grade	of	W
Fri	   Dec	3 .............. Holiday	Lighting	Ceremony/Reception
Thurs	 Dec	16 ............ Classes end
Sat	 Dec	18 ............ COMMENCEMENT,	12:00	pm	(all	programs)
Mon	 Dec	20 ............ Grades	entered	by	12:00	noon
Dec	 23-26............... Offices and library closed
Dec	30-Jan	2 .............. Offices and library closed

January Session (10/m33) January 10 – march 3, 2011
Mon	   Nov	22 ............ Registration	begins	for	returning	and	new	graduate	students
Mon	   Jan	10 ............. Graduate classes begin
Jan	   10-14............... Late	registration	($35	fee)
Fri	   Jan	14 ............. Last	day	to	add	classes
Mon	   Jan	17 ............. Martin	Luther	King,	Jr.	Birthday	observance;	classes	do	not	meet;	offices	and	
       ........................ library closed
Tues	 Jan	18 ............. Last	day	to	drop	a	course	without	academic	record	and	financial	liability	
Fri	   Feb	18 ............ Last	day	to	withdraw	from	classes	with	grade	of	W	
Thurs	 Mar	3 .............. Classes end
Mon	 Mar	7 .............. Grades	entered	by	12:00	noon
                                                                                       General	Information						5

march Session (10/m34) march 7 – may 5, 2011
Mon	 Feb	14 ............ Registration	begins	for	returning	and	new	graduate	students
Mon	 Mar	7 .............. Graduate classes begin
Mar	 7-11 ................. Late	registration	($35	fee)
Fri	   Mar	11 ............. Last	day	to	add	classes.	
Mon	 Mar	14 ............ Last	day	to	drop	a	course	without	academic	record	and	financial	liability	
Mar	28	–	Apr	1............ Spring	Break;	graduate	and	day	classes	do	not	meet;	evening	classes	are	in	session
Fri	   Apr	15 ............. Last	day	to	withdraw	from	classes	with	grade	of	W	
Apr	 15-17............... Alumni	Reunion	Weekend
Thurs	 May	5 .............. Classes end
Sat	 May	7 .............. COMMENCEMENT,	12:00	pm
Mon	 May	9 .............. Grades	entered	by	12:00	noon
June Session (10/m35) may 31 – July 21, 2011
Mon	 Apr	25 ............. Registration	begins	for	returning	and	new	graduate	students
Thurs	 May	27 ............ Military	Recognition	Day
Mon	 May	30 ............ Memorial	Day	Holiday;	offices	and	library	closed
Tues	 May	31 ............ Graduate classes begin
May	31	–	Jun	3........... Late	registration	($35	fee)
	      	                      Library	summer	hours:	Monday-Thursday,	8:00	am-10:00	pm;	Friday,	
	      	                      8:00	am-8:00	pm;	Saturday,	9:00-5:00	pm;	Sunday,	2:00-10:00	pm
Fri	   Jun	3 ............... Last	day	to	add	classes
Mon	 Jun	6 ............... Last	day	to	drop	a	course	without	academic	record	and	financial	liability	
Mon	 Jul	4 ................ Independence	Day	Holiday;	classes	do	not	meet;	offices	and	library	closed
Fri		  Jul	8 ................ Last	day	to	withdraw	from	classes	with	grade	of	W	
Thurs	 Jul	21 .............. Classes end
Mon	 Jul	25 .............. Grades	entered	by	12:00	noon


                                 online education classes
                                 2010-2011 academic calendar
august Session (10/51) august 9 – october 2, 2010
Mon	     Jul	5 ...............Registration	begins	for	graduate	students,	seniors,	military	members	and	new	
                              students
Wed	     Jul	7 ...............Registration	begins	for	returning	juniors
Thurs	   Jul	8 ...............Registration	begins	for	returning	sophomores
Fri	     Jul	9 ...............Registration	begins	for	returning	freshmen
Fri	     Aug	6 .............Last	day	to	register/add	graduate	classes
Mon	     Aug	9 .............Classes begin
Fri	     Aug	13 ...........Last	day	to	register/add	undergraduate	classes
Mon	     Aug	16 ...........Last	day	to	drop	classes	without	academic	record	and	financial	liability
Mon	     Sep	6 .............Labor	Day	Holiday:		Offices	Closed
Mon	     Sep	13 ...........Registration	for	October	Session	begins	for	graduate	students,	seniors,	military	
	        	                    members	and	new	students
Wed	     Sep	15 ...........Registration	for	October	Session	begins	for	returning	juniors
Thurs	   Sep	16 ...........Registration	for	October	Session	begins	for	returning	sophomores
Fri	     Sep	17 ...........Last	day	to	withdraw	from	classes	with	grade	of	W	(ends	close	of	business)
	        	                    Registration	for	October	Session	begins	for	returning	freshmen
Sat	     Oct	2 ..............Classes end
6	     General	Information




october Session (10/52) october 18 – December 11, 2010
Mon	     Sep	13 ...........Registration	begins	for	graduate	students,	seniors,	military	members	and	new	
                            students
Wed	     Sep	15 ...........Registration	begins	for	returning	juniors
Thurs	   Sep	16 ...........Registration	begins	for	returning	sophomores
Fri	     Sep	17 ...........Registration	begins	for	returning	freshmen
Fri	     Oct	15 ............Last	day	to	register/add	graduate	classes
Mon	     Oct	18 ............Classes begin
Fri	     Oct	22 ............Last	day	to	add	undergraduate	classes
Mon	     Oct	25 ............Last	day	to	drop	classes	without	academic	record	and	financial	liability
Mon	     Nov	22 ...........Registration	for	January	Session	begins	for	graduate	students,	seniors,	military	
	        	                  members	and	new	students
Wed	     Nov	24 ...........Registration	for	January	Session	begins	for	returning	juniors
Nov		    25-26..............Thanksgiving	Break:	Offices	Closed
Thurs	   Nov	25 ...........Registration	for	January	Session	begins	for	returning	sophomores
Fri	     Nov	26 ...........Registration	for	January	Session	begins	for	returning	freshmen
Mon	     Nov	29 ...........Last	day	to	withdraw	from	classes	with	grade	of	W	
Sat	     Dec	11............Classes end

January Session (10/53) January 10 – march 5, 2011
Mon	     Nov	22 ...........Registration	begins	for	graduate	students,	seniors,	military	members	and	new	
                             students
Wed	     Nov	24 ...........Registration	begins	for	returning	juniors
Thurs	   Nov	25 ...........Registration	begins	for	returning	sophomores
Fri	     Nov	26 ...........Registration	begins	for	returning	freshmen
Fri	     Jan	7 ..............Last	day	to	register/add	graduate	classes
Mon	     Jan	10 ............Classes begin
Fri	     Jan	14 ............Last	day	to	register/add	undergraduate	classes
Mon			   Jan	17 ............Martin	Luther	King,	Jr.	Birthday	observance;	offices	closed
Tues	    Jan	18 ............Last	day	to	drop	classes	without	academic	record	and	financial	liability
Mon	     Feb	14 ...........Registration	for	March	Session	begins	for	graduate	students,	seniors,	military	
	        	                   members	and	new	students
Wed	     Feb	16 ...........Registration	for	March	Session	begins	for	returning	juniors
Thurs	   Feb	17 ...........Registration	for	March	Session	begins	for	returning	sophomores
Fri	     Feb	18 ...........Last	day	to	withdraw	from	classes	with	grade	of	W
	        	                   Registration	for	March	Session	begins	for	returning	freshmen
Sat	     Mar	5 .............Classes end

march Session (10/54) march 21 – may 15, 2011
Mon	   Feb	14 ...........Registration	begins	for	graduate	students,	seniors,	military	members	and	new	
                         students
Wed	 Feb	16 ...........Registration	begins	for	returning	juniors
Thurs	 Feb	17 ...........Registration	begins	for	returning	sophomores
Fri	   Feb	18 ...........Registration	begins	for	returning	freshmen
Fri	   Mar	18 ...........Last	day	to	register/add	graduate	classes
Mon	 Mar	21 ...........Classes begin
                                                                                         General	Information						7

Fri	     Mar	25 ...........Last	day	to	register/add	undergraduate	classes
Mon	     Mar	28 ...........Last	day	to	drop	classes	without	academic	record	and	financial	liability
Mon	     Apr	25 ............Registration	for	June	Session	begins	for	graduate	students,	seniors,	military	
	        	                  members,	and	new	students
Wed	     Apr	27 ............Registration	for	June	Session	begins	for	returning	juniors
Thurs	   Apr	28 ............Registration	for	June	Session	begins	for	returning	sophomores
Fri	     Apr	29 ............Last	day	to	withdraw	from	classes	with	grade	of	W
	        	                  Registration	for	June	Session	begins	for	returning	freshmen
Sat	     May	14 ...........Classes end

June Session (10/55) may 30 – July 23, 2011
Mon	     Apr	25 ............Registration	begins	for	graduate	students,	seniors,	military	members	and	new	
                              students
Wed	     Apr	27 ............Registration	begins	for	returning	juniors
Thurs	   Apr	28 ............Registration	begins	for	returning	sophomores
Fri	     Apr	29 ............Registration	begins	for	returning	freshmen
Fri	     May	27 ...........Last	day	to	register/add	graduate	classes
Mon	     May	30 ...........Memorial	Day	Holiday:	Offices	Closed
                              Classes begin
Fri	     Jun	3 ..............Last	day	to	register/add	undergraduate	classes
Mon	     Jun	6 ..............Last	day	to	drop	classes	without	academic	record	and	financial	liability
Mon	     Jul	4 ...............Independence	Day	Holiday:	Offices	Closed
	        	                    Registration	for	August	Session	begins	for	graduate	students,	seniors,	military	
	        	                    members	and	new	students
Wed	     Jul	6 ...............Registration	for	August	Session	begins	for	returning	juniors
Thurs	   Jul	7 ...............Registration	for	August	Session	begins	for	returning	sophomores
Fri	     Jul	8 ...............Registration	for	August	Session	begins	for	returning	freshmen
	        	                    Last	day	to	withdraw	from	classes	with	grade	of	W
Sat	     Jul	23 .............Classes end
8	       General	Information

coLLeGe profiLe
classification:		 Private,	 coeducational	 undergraduate	 and	 graduate-degree	 granting	 college	 with	 a	
                  liberal arts and sciences foundation. Carnegie	 Foundation	 classification:	 Master’s	
                  Level	College.
Location:		            Home	campus	in	Columbia,	Missouri	(population	88,000	plus	over	25,000	students	at	
                       three	separate	colleges)	on	Interstate	70,	halfway	between	St.	Louis	and	Kansas	City.	
                       Air	 service	 via	 major	 airline	 to	 Columbia	 Regional	 Airport.	 Nationwide	 campuses	
                       located	 throughout	 the	 United	 States	 and	 in	 Cuba:	 Alabama:	 Redstone	 Arsenal;	
                       California:	Coast	Guard	Island,	Lemoore,	Los	Alamitos,	San	Diego,	San	Luis	Obispo;	
                       Cuba:	Guantanamo	Bay;	Colorado:	Aurora;	Florida:	Jacksonville,	Jacksonville	Naval	
                       Air	Station,	Orlando,	Patrick	Air	Force	Base;	Georgia:	Fort	Stewart,	Hunter	Army	Air	
                       Field;	Illinois:	Crystal	Lake,	Elgin,	Freeport,	Lake	County;	Missouri: Christian County,
                       Fort	 Leonard	 Wood,	 Jefferson	 City,	 Kansas	 City,	 Lake	 Ozark,	 Moberly,	 Rolla,	 St.	
                       Louis;	 New York:	 Fort	 Drum,	 Hancock	 Field;	 Oklahoma:	 Fort	 Sill;	 South Carolina:
                       NWS	 Charleston;	Texas:	 Fort	 Worth;	 Utah:	 Salt	 Lake	 City;	 Washington:	 Marysville,	
                       Whidbey	Island.
Degrees
conferred: 	           Associate	 in	Arts,	Associate	 in	 General	 Studies,	Associate	 in	 Science,	 Bachelor	 of	
                       Arts,	Bachelor	of	General	Studies,	Bachelor	of	Science,	Bachelor	of	Fine	Arts,	Master	
                       of	 Arts	 in	 Teaching,	 Master	 of	 Business	 Administration	 and	 Master	 of	 Science	 in	
                       Criminal	Justice.
School code/
fice #:                002456

campus:		               21	buildings	on	a	33-acre	campus	four	blocks	from	downtown	Columbia.
Library:		              80,000	volumes,	250	periodicals,	2,500	audio-visual	items,	access	to	on-line	resourc-
                        es.		Member	of	MOBIUS	statewide	consortium.
enrollment:             More	than	1,000	full	and	part-time	day	students,	representing	25	states	and	27	for-
                        eign	 countries;	 more	 than	 1,300	 evening	 and	 graduate	 students	 and	 more	 than	
                        15,000	Nationwide	and	Online	students.
alumni:                 More	than	64,000	Christian	College	alumnae	and	Columbia	College	alumni.
athletics:			           Member,	American	Midwest	Conference	of	the	NAIA	(men's	soccer	and	basketball;	
                        women's	volleyball,	basketball	and	softball)	and	a	variety	of	intramural	sports.
accreditation/
approvals:             Accredited	by	the	Higher	Learning	Commission	and	a	member	of	the	North	Central	
                       Association	 of	 Colleges	 and	 Schools.	 Approved	 for	 teacher	 preparation	 by	 the	
                       Missouri	 State	 Department	 of	 Elementary	 and	 Secondary	 Education.	Associate	 in	
                       Science	degree	in	Nursing	approved	by	the	Missouri	State	Board	of	Nursing	and	is	a	
                       candidate	 for	 accreditation	 with	 the	 National	 League	 for	 Nursing	 Accrediting	
                       Commission	(NLNAC).

     	                 The	Higher	Learning	Commission
     	                 North	Central	Association	of	Colleges	and	Schools
                       Commission on Institutions
     	                 30	North	LaSalle	Street,	Suite	2400
     	                 Chicago,	IL	60602-2504
     	                 Telephone:	312/263-0456	or	1-800/621-7440
     	                 E-mail:	info@ncacihe.org
                                                           General	Information						9


        Department	of	Elementary	and	Secondary	Education
	       P.O.	Box	480
	       Jefferson	City,	MO	65102
	       Telephone:	573/751-6504
	       E-mail:	mlucas@mail.dese.state.mo.us

	   	   Missouri	State	Board	of	Nursing
	   	   3605	Missouri	Boulevard
	   	   P.O.	Box	656
	   	   Jefferson	City,	MO	65102-0656
	   	   Telephone:	573/751-0681
	   	   E-mail:	http://www.ecodev.state.mo.us/pr/nursing
10     General Information




                                   Nationwide Campuses
     ALABAMA
     Redstone Arsenal
     Mary Morgan, Director
     (256) 881-6181
     redstone@ccis.edu

     CALIFORNIA
     Coast Guard Island
     Tom Meehan, Director
     (510) 437-1280
     coastguard@ccis.edu

     NAS Lemoore
     Betsy Quade, Director
     (559) 998-8570
     lemoore@ccis.edu

     Los Alamitos
     Carl David, Director
     (562) 799-9630
     losalamitos@ccis.edu

     San Diego
     Diana Schriefer, Director
     (619) 866-8193
     sandiego@ccis.edu
                                    GUANTANAMO BAY, CUBA
     San Luis Obispo                011-5399-75555
     Theresa Genova, Director       guantanamo@ccis.edu
     (805) 593-0237                                               Moberly
     sanluisobispo@ccis.edu         ILLINOIS                      Dr. Bruce Jackson, Director
                                    Crystal Lake                  (660) 263-4110, ext. 336
     COLORADO                       Debra Hartman, Director       moberly@ccis.edu
     Aurora                         (815) 477-5440
     Andrea Wolff-Yackubovich,      crystallake@ccis.edu          Lake of the Ozarks
     Director                                                     Dr. John Keeney, Director     SOUTH CAROLINA
     (303) 340-8050                 Elgin                         (573) 348-6463                NWS Charleston
     aurora@ccis.edu                Karen Beckstrom, Director     lakeozark@ccis.edu            Keith McIver, Director
                                    (847) 214-7197                                              (843)764-4444
     FLORIDA                        elgin@ccis.edu                Christian County              nwscharleston@ccis.edu
     Jacksonville                                                 Kathy Gress, Director
     Gary Hall, Director            Freeport                      (417) 581-0367                TEXAS
     (904) 338-9150                 Elizabeth Koeller, Director   christiancounty@ccis.edu      Fort Worth
     jacksonville@ccis.edu          (815) 599-3585                                              John Hardy, Director
                                    freeport@ccis.edu             Rolla                         (817) 377-3276
     NAS Jacksonville                                             Dr. Greg Stratman, Director   ftworth@ccis.edu
     Lakeshia Lightner, Director    Lake County                   (573) 341-3350
     (904) 778-9769                 Stephen Stephany, Director    rolla@ccis.edu                UTAH
     nasjacksonville@ccis.edu       (847) 336-6333                                              Salt Lake
                                    lakecounty@ccis.edu           St. Louis                     Jewly Harris, Director
     Orlando                                                      Debra Shrout, Director        (801) 972-6898
     Dr. Alan Hilliard, Director    MISSOURI                      (314) 429-5500                saltlake@ccis.edu
     (407) 293-9911/9919            Columbia - Evening Campus     stlouis@ccis.edu
     orlando@ccis.edu               Patti Skinner, Director                                     WASHINGTON
                                    (573) 875-7610                NEW YORK                      NS Everett/Marysville
     Patrick Air Force Base                                       Fort Drum                     Tom Larsen, Director
     Jeff Musgrove, Director        Fort Leonard Wood             Wanda Lancaster, Director     (425) 304-4480
     (321) 783-5506/3548            Dr. David King, Director      (315) 775-0128                marysville@ccis.edu
     pafb@ccis.edu                  (573) 329-4050                ftdrum@ccis.edu
                                    ftwood@ccis.edu                                             NAS Whidbey Island
     GEORGIA                                                      Hancock Field                 MarJean Knokey, Director
     Fort Stewart                   Jefferson City                John Hammill, Director        (360) 279-9030
     Richard Conroy, Director       Kim Bonine, Director          (315) 455-0690                whidbey@ccis.edu
     (912) 877-3406                 (573) 634-3250                syracuse@ccis.edu
     ftstewart@ccis.edu             jeffcity@ccis.edu                                           ONLINE CAMPUS
                                                                  OKLAHOMA                      Michael Grissom,
     Hunter Army Airfield           Kansas City                   Fort Sill                     Assistant Dean
     Ron Aiken, Director            Cindy Miller, Director        Rocky Pines, Director         (573) 875-7246
     (912) 352-8635                 (816) 795-1515                (580) 353-7884                (800) 231-2391, ext. 7246
     hunter@ccis.edu                kansascity@ccis.edu           ftsill@ccis.edu               onlinecampus@ccis.edu
                                                                                                      General	Information						11



the home campUS
atkins-holman Student commons. Located	at	1009	Rogers	Street.		Completed	in	2004,	this	building	is	named	
for	 the	 parents	 of	 Linda	 Holman	 Atkins,	 Christian	 College	 alumna,	 and	 Thomas	 Atkins,	 Trustee	 Emeritus	 of	
Columbia	 College.	 	The	 Commons	 houses	 Campus	 Life	 offices,	 Career	 Services,	 Student	 Health	 Services,	 the	
ADA	Office,	Barnes	and	Noble	Bookstore,	the	Penny	Carroll	Braun	Scholar’s	Alcove,	a	snack	bar	and	coffee	shop	
and a recognition gallery featuring distinguished alumni. It also provides study and lounge areas for both day and
evening students.

Banks hall. 	A	residence	hall	completed	in	1967,	Banks	houses	110	students	in	double	rooms.	There	are	com-
munity baths, special study rooms, and activity lounges on each floor. A computer lab is located on the second
floor.		Originally	named	North	Hall	and	subsequently	named	in	honor	of	Hartley	Banks,	Sr.,	chairman	of	the	board	
and	trustee	from	1945	to	1971.		

Bass commons.		Dedicated	in	1978,	the	front	campus	area	is	a	park-like	setting	and	location	for	the	Ivy	Chain	
ceremony.		Named	in	honor	of	Mary	Machir	Dorsey	Bass,	class	of	1901.

Brown hall.		Constructed	in	1995,	this	building	houses	studios	for	painting,	design,	ceramics,	drawing,	printmaking	
and	photography,	as	well	as	art	faculty	offices.	General	classrooms,	including	the	multimedia	classroom,	are	also	
located	on	the	lower	level.		Named	in	honor	of	Emma	Jean	Brown	Ballew,	class	of	1923,	to	commemorate	her	
generous	bequest	to	the	College.

Buchanan hall.	 	 Constructed	 in	 1977	 and	 renovated	 in	 2007,	 this	 building	 is	 named	 for	 Genevieve	 Koontz	
Buchanan,	class	of	1938,	because	of	her	generosity.		This	building	provides	general	classrooms	and	student	com-
puter labs.

Dorsey hall.		Attached	to	the	east	wing	of	St.	Clair	Hall	by	a	covered	walkway,	Dorsey	Hall	is	primarily	a	classroom	
building,	completed	in	1911.		Dorsey	Hall	also	houses	the	chapel	and	the	Jane	Froman	Studio.		Dorsey	Gym	is	
used	for	receptions,	conferences	and	other	special	events.		Named	through	the	benevolence	of	trustee	Robert	M.	
Stockton,	for	Jerimiah	Spires	Dorsey,	trustee	from	1863	to	1908.

Dulany hall.		Built	in	1965,	Dulany	Hall	contains	dining	facilities.		It	is	also	used	as	a	multipurpose	area	for	social	
functions	and	receptions	and	houses	the	Lee	Room	and	the	Cougar	Room.		Named	for	William	H.	Dulany,	trustee	
from	1922	to	1948,	in	honor	of	his	bequest	to	the	College.		

hinshaw Building. Located	at	710	Rangeline,	the	building	houses	science	laboratories.

hughes hall.		Built	in	a	traditional	English	design	in	1939,	Hughes	Hall	houses	72	women	in	double-room	suites.	
Kitchen	facilities	are	located	on	each	floor	and	a	formal	parlor	is	on	the	main	floor.		A	computer	lab	is	also	available	
on the main floor.

Kirkman house (music).	 	 Located	 at	 410	 North	 Tenth	 Street,	 the	 building	 houses	 music	 practice	 rooms	 and	 faculty	
offices.

Larson Gallery.	 	 Dedicated	 in	 May	 1996,	 Larson	 Gallery	 is	 located	 on	 the	 first	 floor	 of	 Brown	 Hall.	 It	 features	
periodic	exhibitions	of	visual	art	including	works	from	practicing	artists	and	various	collections.	It	is	free	and	open	
to	 the	 public.	 	 Named	 in	 honor	 of	 distinguished	 professor	 emeritus	 Sidney	 Larson	 (Honorary	Alumnus	 Class	 of	
2001),	an	art	faculty	member	for	50	years.

Launer auditorium.		Launer	Auditorium,	built	in	1903	and	attached	to	St.	Clair	Hall	by	a	covered	walkway,	was	
renovated	in	1992	and	again	in	1997.	It	seats	over	500	for	convocations	and	artistic	performances.		Named	in	1972	
in	honor	of	Franklin	B.	Launer,	the	director	of	the	conservatory	of	music	for	37	years.
12    General Information




miller hall.	 	 Completed	 in	 1960,	 Miller	 Hall	 is	 the	 largest	 residence	 hall	 on	 campus,	 housing	 156	 students	 in	
double-room	suites	connected	by	full	baths.		It	contains	kitchen	facilities,	study	rooms	and	a	computer	lab.		Named	
in	honor	of	former	president	James	C.	Miller,	who	led	the	College	from	1938	to	1956.

missouri hall.		Completed	in	1920	and	renovated	in	2006,	Missouri	Hall	houses	the	Evening	Campus	offices,	the	
Ousley	Family	Veterans	Service	Center,	the	Florence	Larsh	‘49	Center	for	Registration	and	Financial	Services,	
Andrew	 J.	 Bass	 Center	 for	 Admissions,	 Ether	 L.	 Bruce	 Math	 Center,	 Elizabeth	 Toomey	 Seabrook	 ‘42	 Writing	
Center,	The	Carol	Vinkemulder	Frobish	‘49	Parlors,	Don	and	Betty	Landers	English	Parlor,	Janet	Carter	Wright	‘58	
Foyer,	 Frances	 Thompson	 Dillingham	 ‘29	 Conference	 Room	 (First	 Floor)	 and	 the	 Diane	 (Berry	 ‘59)	 and	 David	
O’Hagan	Conference	Room	(Third	Floor).		Also	located	within	are	Student	Records	and	Transcripts,	Enrollment	
Management,	Accounting,	Institutional	Research,	Evaluations,	Student	Support	Services	and	Payroll.

nursing education center.		Located	at	709	North	Eighth	Street.		This	building	houses	the	Nursing	practice	labo-
ratory, classrooms and faculty offices.

online education center.		Located	at	310	North	Tenth	Street,	this	building	houses	the	offices	of	the	Online	Campus,	
including the Testing Center.

owens Soccer Stadium.		Named	for	R.	Marvin	Owens	in	recognition	of	his	service	to	the	College	as	a	board	
member	since	1975.		Renovated	in	2005.

robnett-Spence Laboratories and Security office.		Built	in	1969,	Robnett-Spence	houses	science	laboratories	
and	the	Security	Office.		Named	to	honor	a	gift	from	Mittie	Robnett	Spence,	class	of	1904,	and	housing	the	James	
L.	“Bud”	Walton	Science	Laboratories.

St. clair hall.		The	main	administration	building,	St.	Clair	Hall	was	built	in	1900	from	pressed	brick	and	Bedford	
stone	in	an	Elizabethan	style.	Many	administrative	and	faculty	offices	are	located	on	the	first	and	second	floors.	
The	 third	 floor	 houses	 faculty	 offices,	 general	 classrooms	 and	 the	 college	 archive.	 Mail	 and	 print	 services	 is	
located	on	the	garden	level.			Named	to	recognize	the	contributions	and	leadership	of	College	presidents	Luella	
St.	Clair	Moss	and	her	husband,	Frank	St.	Clair.

Southwell complex.	 	 Dedicated	 in	 1988,	 the	 Southwell	 Gymnasium	 is	 home	 to	 the	 Columbia	 College	 Cougar	
basketball	and	volleyball	squads.		Southwell	also	houses	tennis	courts,	locker	rooms	and	the	sports	information	
coordinator’s	 office.	An	 addition/arena	 was	 completed	 in	 Fall	 2002.	 	 Named	 in	 recognition	 of	 a	 major	 gift	 from	
Virginia	Southwell	Singletary,	class	of	1939,	a	board	of	trustees	member	from	1968	until	her	death	in	1989.		

Southy Building.		Built	in	1986,	this	building	houses	athletic	offices	and	the	indoor	fitness	center.		Named	in	rec-
ognition	of	a	major	gift	from	Virginia	Southwell	Singletary,	class	of	1939,	a	board	of	trustees	member	from	1968	
until	her	death	in	1989.	

Stafford Library.		Completed	in	fall	of	1989,	the	J.W.	“Stan”	and	Lois	Stafford	Library	houses	all	library	collections	
and	audiovisual	materials.	The	Curriculum	Resource	Center	and	one	classroom	are	also	located	in	this	building.

Wightman maintenance Building. This building houses the maintenance and housekeeping departments.
Named	in	honor	of	Maurice	Wightman,	superintendent	of	grounds	for	62	years.

Williams hall.		Purchased	in	1851,	Williams	Hall	is	the	oldest	college	building	in	continuous	use	for	educational	
purposes	 west	 of	 the	 Mississippi	 River	 and	 has	 been	 designated	 a	 historic	 site.	 Previously	 the	 music	 building,	
Williams	Hall	now	houses	business	administration	faculty	offices	and	general	classrooms.		Named	in	1969	in	honor	
of	the	first	College	president,	John	A.	Williams.
                                                                                                   Admissions						13



aDmiSSion poLicY
     The standards of admission to Columbia                 full program admission
College	 graduate	 programs	 require	 evidence	 of	
personal integrity and responsibility, academic                  Students	who	meet	the	admission	criteria	and	
preparation and leadership potential. Applicants            wish	 to	 pursue	 a	 graduate	 degree	 are	 classified	
must	 present	 a	 minimum	 3.0	 cumulative	 under-          as	 full	 program	 admits.	 	 Fully	 admitted	 graduate	
graduate grade point average from a regionally              students may enroll for undergraduate or gradu-
accredited	 institution(s)	 (3.0	 must	 be	 cumulative	     ate	 courses	 for	 which	 they	 have	 met	 prerequi-
for	 all	 colleges	 attended)	 or	 a	 departmentally	       sites.
approved	GRE	or	GMAT	score.	(Cumulative	grade	                    MAT	Full	Program:		Students	applying	for	Full	
point average calculation is done using a straight                Program	 admission	 must	 complete	 steps	 1-6	
4.0	grading	system	with	no	consideration	of	plus-
                                                                  listed	under	Application	Procedures	(page	12).
es	 and	 minuses	 in	 the	 calculation.)	 Criteria	 for	
admission apply to all categories of any graduate                 MBA	Full	Program:		Students	applying	for	Full	
program	 at	 Columbia	 College	 unless	 otherwise	                Program	 admission	 must	 complete	 steps	 1-5	
specified.                                                        listed	under	Application	Procedures	(page	12).
     Graduate applicants are expected to present                  MSCJ	Full	Program: 	Students	applying	for	Full	
undergraduate	 coursework	 achievement	 com-                      Program	 admission	 must	 complete	 steps	 1-5	
mensurate	 with	 graduate	 program	 requirements.	     	          listed	under	Application	Procedures	(page	12).
It is expected that applicants have completed a
sound undergraduate degree program from a                   Student-at-Large
regionally	 accredited	 institution(s).	 	 Each	 appli-
cant’s record is carefully examined to determine if             Students	 who	 hold	 a	 baccalaureate	 degree	
the student has potential for successful comple-            from a regionally accredited college or university
tion of a master’s degree program at Columbia               may	be	admitted	as	a	Student-at-Large	and	enroll	
College.                                                    in	courses	for	which	they	have	met	the	prerequi-
                                                            sites.	 	 Students-at-Large	 may	 complete	 a	 maxi-
	    Students	entering	graduate	school	at	Columbia	         mum	 of	 twelve	 (12)	 graduate	 semester	 hours	
College are expected to possess computer skills             without	full	program	acceptance	and are not eli-
equivalent	 to	 those	 obtained	 from	 a	 basic	 com-       gible for financial aid. After completion of
puter	 applications	 course,	 such	 as	 CISS	 170	          twelve	 graduate	 semester	 hours,	 Students-at-
Introduction	 to	 Computer	 Information	 Systems.	          Large	 must	 have	 submitted	 complete	 application	
This	 includes	 competency	 with	 word	 processing,	        materials to be considered for full program admis-
spreadsheets, and computer presentation soft-               sion	 and	 subsequent	 enrollment.	 	 Students-at-
ware.                                                       Large	 are	 subject	 to	 the	 same	 academic	 regula-
	   Students	 not	 meeting	 graduate	 program	              tions	 and	 requirements	 as	 all	 degree-seeking	
admission standards may petition for admittance.            students.
Petitions	 must	 be	 accompanied	 by	 written	 justifi-           MAT	 Student-at-Large:	 Students	 applying	
cation and substantiating documentation to sup-                   as	 Student-at-Large	 must	 submit	 a	 com-
port	 the	 candidate’s	 request.	 Consideration	 for	             pleted and signed application for graduate
admission	will	be	at	the	discretion	of	the	respec-                admission,	 accompanied	 by	 a	 non-refund-
tive academic department. It is important that                    able	 $55	 application	 fee,	 official	 transcripts	
applicants	 read	 and	 understand	 requirements	                  from	 all	 degree-granting	 institutions	 and	 a	
before applying for admission.                                    notarized	affidavit	of	moral	character.
aDmiSSion cateGorieS                                              MSCJ	Student-at-Large:		Students	applying
    All categories are not available in every pro-                as	 Student-at-Large	 must	 submit	 a	 com-
gram.		Refer	to	the	categories	below	for	admission	               pleted and signed application for graduate
options	 for	 the	 Master	 of	Arts	 in	 Teaching	 (MAT),	         admission,	 accompanied	 by	 a	 non-refund-
Master	 of	 Business	 Administration	 (MBA)	 and	                 able	 $55	 application	 fee,	 and	 official	 tran-
Master	of	Science	in	Criminal	Justice	(MSCJ).                     scripts	from	all	degree-granting	institutions.
14    Admissions

non-Degree Seeking                                               MBA	 Post-Baccalaureate:	 Students	 apply-
                                                                 ing	 for	 Post-Baccalaureate	 status	 must	
    Students	who	hold	a	baccalaureate	degree	but	
                                                                 complete	steps	1-5	listed	under	Application	
do	not	wish	to	earn	a	graduate	degree	at	Columbia	
                                                                 Procedures (page	15).		Students	must	earn	
College	 may	 enroll	 in	 graduate	 courses	 as	 non-
                                                                 a	grade	of	B	or	higher	in	each	undergradu-
degree	 seeking	 students.	 Non-degree	 seeking	
                                                                 ate	 prerequisite	 in	 order	 to	 be	 considered	
students	may	complete	a	maximum	of	twelve	(12)	
                                                                 for	full	admission	to	the	MBA	program.		
semester	 hours	 of	 graduate-level	 coursework	 and	
are not eligible for financial aid.	 Non-degree	                 MSCJ	Post-Baccalaureate:		Students	apply-
application	requirements	vary	among	programs.	                   ing	 for	 Post-Baccalaureate	 status	 must	
                                                                 complete	steps	1-5	listed	under	Application	
     MAT	 Non-Degree:	 	 Those	 applying	 as	 Non-
                                                                 Procedures (page	15).		Students	must	earn	
     Degree	 Seeking	 students	 must	 submit	 a	
                                                                 a	grade	of	B	or	higher	in	each	undergradu-
     completed and signed application for gradu-
                                                                 ate	 prerequisite	 in	 order	 to	 be	 considered	
     ate	 admission,	 accompanied	 by	 a	 non-
                                                                 for	full	admission	to	the	MSCJ	program.		
     refundable	 $55	 application	 fee,	 official	 tran-
     scripts	 from	 all	 degree-granting	 institutions	
     and	a	notarized	affidavit	of	moral	character.         pre-Graduate
     MBA	Non-Degree:		Non-Degree	Seeking	stu-              	    Students	who	have	earned	over	ninety	under-
     dents	 must	 complete	 steps	 1-5	 listed	 under	     graduate	 semester	 hours	 toward	 the	 baccalaure-
     Application Procedures (page	 15), complete           ate degree at a regionally accredited college or
     all	 prerequisite	 coursework	 (see	 course	          university	who	wish	to	start	their	graduate	studies	
     descriptions)	 and	 present	 a	 minimum	 3.0	         early	may	apply	for	admission	in	the	Pre-Graduate	
     undergraduate cumulative grade point aver-            category.		Pre-Graduate	students	may	complete	a	
     age.                                                  maximum	 of	 nine	 (9)	 graduate	 hours	 without	 full	
     MSCJ	 Non-Degree:	 	 Non-Degree	 Seeking	             program acceptance. After completion of the bac-
     students must submit a completed and signed           calaureate degree and up to nine graduate semes-
     application for graduate admission, accom-            ter	 hours,	 Pre-Graduate	 students	 must	 submit	
     panied	 by	 a	 non-refundable	 $55	 application	      complete application materials to be considered
     fee, and submit official transcripts from all         for	 full	 program	 admission.	 	 Pre-Graduate	 stu-
     degree-granting	institutions.                         dents	 are	 subject	 to	 the	 same	 academic	 regula-
                                                           tions	 and	 requirements	 as	 all	 degree-seeking	
post-Baccalaureate                                         students.		MAT	and	MSCJ	Pre-Graduate	students	
                                                           may	 enroll	 in	 designated	 courses	 only.	 	 MSCJ	
	    Students	 who	 hold	 a	 baccalaureate	 degree	
                                                           Pre-Graduate	 status	 is	 limited	 to	 main	 campus	
from a regionally accredited college or university
                                                           students only.
but	 who	 have	 not	 completed	 necessary	 under-
graduate	prerequisites	for	the	respective	graduate	
program may enroll in undergraduate courses.               alternative certification
      MAT	Post-Baccalaureate:		Students	applying	          	   Students	 who	 hold	 a	 baccalaureate	 degree	
      for	Post-Baccalaureate	status	must	complete	         from a regionally accredited college or university
      steps	1-6	listed	under	Application	Procedures	       with	a	major	in	Art,	Biology,	Business,	Chemistry,	
      (page	 15). Post-Baccalaureate	 students	            Language	 Arts	 (English),	 Social	 Studies	 or	
      seeking	the	MAT	degree	and/or	teacher	cer-           Mathematics	may	pursue	teacher	certification	(at	
      tification	may	enroll	in	graduate	courses	with	      the	 Secondary	 level	 only	 under	 Alternative	
      permission	from	the	MAT	Graduate	Program	            Certification)	if	all	criteria	are	met.
      Coordinator.	 	 Post-Baccalaureate	 students	              MAT	 Alternative	 Certification:	 	 Students	
      must	earn	a	grade	of	B	or	higher		 in	under-               applying as Alternative Certification must
      graduate       and      graduate     courses.              complete	steps	1-6	listed	under	Application	
      consequences for earning grades of c or                    Procedures	(page	15).	See	pages	44-49	for	
      lower in undergraduate courses for mat                     MAT	Alternative	Certification	applicant	qual-
      post-Baccalaureate students are the same                   ifications.
      as those listed for graduate courses (See
      page 36 – “Dismissal”).
                                                                                                     Admissions						15

appLication proceDUreS                                            Specific	standards	for	admission	to	the	Master	
                                                              of	Arts	in	Teaching	program	are	listed	on	page	45,	
    To be considered for full admission to the                to	the	Master	of	Business	Administration	program	
Columbia College Graduate Program, an appli-                  on	page	61	or	to	the	Master	of	Science	in	Criminal	
cant’s file must include the materials outlined               Justice	program	on	page	65.
below.	All	documents	should	be	sent	to	Graduate	
Admissions,	 Columbia	 College,	 1001	 Rogers	
Street,	Columbia,	MO	65216.                                   eSerViceS
                                                                   Applicants are assigned a Columbia College
    Graduate programs and individual graduate
                                                              eServices	 account,	 including	 the	 official	 Columbia	
level courses may be offered at some Adult
                                                              College	 email	 address.	 	 Information	 on	 how	 to	 set	
Higher	 Education	 Campuses.	 	 Applications	 for	
                                                              up	 an	 eServices	 account	 is	 sent	 shortly	 after	 the	
admission for these programs or courses must be
                                                              application	 for	 admission	 is	 submitted.	 	 eServices	
submitted	 through	 the	 AHE	 Campus	 director.	 	
                                                              provides a variety of electronic student services
Students	interested	in	taking	graduate	courses	at	
                                                              including application status check, financial aid
Adult	Higher	Education	Campuses	should	contact	
                                                              information,	web-based	registration	and	ePayment.
the respective location for information. Go to
www.ccis.edu/nationwide/	for	a	map	of	nationwide	
locations.                                                    Beacon anD DAYSTAR
1.	   A	 completed	 and	 signed	 application	 for	
                                                              proGramS
      graduate	admission,	accompanied	by	a	non-               	    Undergraduate	students	seeking	teacher	cer-
      refundable	 $55	 application	 fee.	 Checks	             tification	 are	 enrolled	 in	 either	 the	 BEACON	 or	
      should be made payable to Columbia                      DAYSTAR	 education	 program.	 	 Students	 should	
      College.	 	 The	 application	 fee	 is	 waived	 for	     apply	 for	 Post-Baccalaureate	 admission	 (refer	 to	
      students	 who	 earn	 a	 baccalaureate	 degree	          page	15	for	application	process)	during	their	last	
      from Columbia College.                                  semester as an undergraduate student.

2.    Official transcripts from each undergraduate
      and graduate college or university attended.
                                                              internationaL StUDentS
                                                                  International	 students	 are	 required	 to	 submit	
3.    Three completed Columbia College gradu-
                                                              the	following	materials	to	be	considered	for	grad-
      ate program recommendation forms. All
                                                              uate admission. All documents and fees must be
      should attest to the applicant’s ability to suc-
                                                              received	 before	 Columbia	 College	 will	 issue	 an	
      cessfully	perform	graduate	work	and	at	least	
                                                              I-20	Form.	Application	materials	should	be	sent	to	
      80%	of	the	quantified	descriptors	should	be	
                                                              Graduate	 Admissions,	 Columbia	 College,	 1001	
      in	the	two	highest	categories.
                                                              Rogers	Street,	Columbia,	MO	65216.
4.	   A	personal	goal	statement	which	establishes	
                                                              1.	 A	completed	and	signed	application	for	gradu-
      a	correlation	between	the	goals	of	the	grad-
                                                                  ate	admission,	accompanied	by	a	non-refund-
      uate degree program and the applicant’s
                                                                  able	$55	(U.S.	dollars)	application	fee.	Checks	
      personal and professional goals.
                                                                  should be made payable to Columbia
5.	   Current	resumé.                                             College.
6.	   MAT	 applicants	 must	 also	 submit	 a	 nota-           2.	 Proof	 of	 English	 language	 proficiency	 as	 evi-
      rized	 affidavit	 of	 moral	 character	 and,	 if	           denced by a	TOEFL	 score	 of	 at	 least	 550	 on	
      available, proof of teacher certification.                  the	paper-based	exam,	213	on	the	computer-
                                                                  based	 exam	 or	 79-80	 on	 the	 internet-based	
    To be guaranteed consideration for enroll-                    exam.		The	minimum	IELTS	score	required	to	
ment in a session, the completed file needs to be                 demonstrate	 English	 language	 proficiency	 is	
received		no	later	than	two	(2)	weeks	prior	to	the	               an	overall	band	score	of	6.5	with	no	individual	
beginning	 of	 any	 academic	 session.	 	 Review	 of	             band	below	a	6.
graduate	 application	 files	 will	 not	 begin	 until	 six	
                                                              3. Official original transcripts in the native lan-
months prior to the intended term of enrollment.
                                                                 guage from each undergraduate and graduate
    A	completed	application	file	is	required	before	             college	 or	 university	 attended,	 as	 well	 as	
Columbia College may process an application for                  English	translations	that	are	notarized	by	the	
financial aid.                                                   translator.
16    Admissions

4.	 Three	 completed	 Columbia	 College	 graduate	             mission	will	govern	all	decisions	regarding	subse-
    program recommendation forms. All should                   quent	procedures	and	requirements.
    attest to the applicant’s ability to successfully
    perform	 graduate	 work	 and	 at	 least	 80%	 of	
    the	quantified	descriptors	should	be	in	the	two	           prereQUiSiteS
    highest categories.                                        	   Students	 must	 check	 prerequisite	 require-
5.	 A	 personal	 goal	 statement	 which	 establishes	          ments	carefully	(see	Course	Descriptions).		Failure	
    a	correlation	between	the	goals	of	the	gradu-              to	meet	prerequisite(s)	will	result	in	being	dropped	
    ate degree program and the applicant’s per-                from	the	respective	course(s).
    sonal and professional goals and a summary
    of	 relevant	 work	 experience.	Applicants	 must	
    also submit a current resume.
6.	 MAT	 applicants	 must	 also	 submit	 a	 notarized	
    affidavit of moral character and, if available,
    proof of teacher certification.
7.	 Official	bank	documents	attesting	to	the	appli-
    cant’s or the sponsor’s ability to pay tuition,
    books, supplies, fees, and living expenses for
    one	 year.	 Students	 must	 also	 complete	 a	
    SEVIS	Supplement	form
8.	 Students	 transferring	 to	 Columbia	 College	
    from	 an	 institution	 within	 the	 United	 States	
    must	complete	a	Transfer	Eligibility	Form	and	
    furnish	 a	 copy	 of	 a	 passport,	 valid	 visa,	 I-94	
    and	I-20	from	the	last	school	attended.

     Students	 that	 have	 studied	 graduate-level	
work	 at	 international	 universities/colleges	 may	
petition to receive graduate transfer credit.
International	 institutions	 will	 be	 checked	 for	
regional	 accreditation;	 if	 an	 institution	 does	 not	
have regional accreditation, then the institution
will	be	evaluated	per	the	Evaluations	Department	
international	 credentialing	 process	 (see	 Transfer	
of Credits from Another Institution or Columbia
College	 Degree	 Program	 for	 additional	 informa-
tion	on	the	transfer	process.)


tranSfer/reaDmiSSion
     Students	who	have	earned	graduate	credit	at	
Columbia	College	but	have	voluntarily	withdrawn	
for five sessions or more must apply for readmis-
sion	 through	 the	 Admissions	 Office.	 	 Updated	
supporting	 documents	 may	 be	 requested	 by	 the	
department	 in	 which	 the	 student	 is	 reapplying.	      	
Returning	 students	 who	 have	 earned	 graduate	
credit at another institution must submit a
transcript(s)	 for	 evaluation	 of	 transfer	 credit.	 	 No	
more than nine semester hours of graduate
degree	 requirements	 may	 be	 fulfilled	 by	 transfer	
coursework.	 Catalog	 policies,	 procedures	 and	
degree	requirements	in	effect	at	the	time	of	read-
                                                                                                                               Fees						17



tUition anD feeS
                       tuition and fees                                            	    Educational	 expenses	 may	 include	 tuition,	
                                                                                   textbooks, lab fees and any miscellaneous fee
                                                                         	
Application	Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	 55	
                                                                                   related	 to	 the	 course(s).	 	 The	 personal	 payment	
Audit	Fee	(per	semester	hour) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $			90
Course	Extension	Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	 100* 	       portion of the student’s educational expenses
Credit	for	Prior	Learning	Assessment	Fee                                           (educational	expenses	less	financial	aid	or	assis-
	      (per	semester	hour) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	 75             tance	awarded)	is	due	in	full	at	the	time	of	regis-
Graduate	Tuition	(per	semester	hour):                                              tration	 (for	 additional	 information	 concerning	
	      MAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	299     financial	aid,	please	refer	to	the	Financial	Aid	sec-
	      MBA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	310     tion	of	the	Graduate	Catalog).	
	      MSCJ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	310	
Graduation	Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	120       Deferred payment plan
Health	Insurance	Plan	(required	for	International                                       If full payment is not possible, students may
	      students	in	F-1	and	F-2	status) . . . . . . . . .$	 ,000**       1          request	 a	 deferred	 payment	 plan.	 	 The	 arrange-
Late	Registration	Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $			35
                                                                                   ment	requires	payment	of	one	half	of	the	personal	
Online	Graduate	Tuition	(per	semester	hour):
                                                                                   payment portion at the time of registration. The
	      MAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	320
	      MBA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	330
                                                                                   student must enroll in a deferred payment plan for
	      MSCJ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	330      the	 remaining	 half	 with	 a	 maturity	 date	 no	 later	
Online	Undergraduate	Tuition	(per	semester	hour) $	225                             than the last day of the session before registering
Returned	Check	Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $	 25           for	 a	 subsequent	 session.	 	 Deferred	 payment	
Student	Yearly	Parking	Permit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $			40               plans are valid for only one session and must be
Transcript	Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $		 .50
                                                                             7     requested	for	each	individual	session.
Undergraduate	Day	Tuition	(per	sem.	hour) . . . $	334-487
                                                                                      Students	 with	 pending	 financial	 aid	 are	
Undergraduate	Evening	Tuition	(per	sem.	hour) . . . $	195
                                                                                   required	to	enroll	in	a	deferred	payment	plan.
         *Course Extension Fee applies to EDUC 508E Integrative
         Project and culminating experience in the Master of Arts                  failure to pay
         in Teaching.
         All fees are subject to change without notice.                                  Students	 are	 financially	 responsible	 for	 the	
         **Approximation – premiums adjusted annually.                             payment of all fees charged to their accounts such
                                                                                   as tuition, textbooks, lab fees, and all miscella-
    Students	enrolled	as	graduate	students	pay	grad-
                                                                                   neous	 fees.	 	 Students	 may	 not	 register	 or	 attend	
uate tuition for courses receiving graduate credit, and
                                                                                   future sessions if the financial obligations for
undergraduate tuition for courses receiving under-
                                                                                   which	 the	 student	 is	 responsible	 are	 not	 paid	 in	
graduate credit. Charges vary depending on the com-
                                                                                   full.
bination of graduate and undergraduate courses.
                                                                                      The personal payment portion of a student’s
      Payment	 plans	 are	 available;	 contact	 the	
                                                                                   account that remains unpaid after the end of the
Registration	 and	 Financial	 Services	 Office	 for	 more	
                                                                                   session	 may	 be	 assessed	 a	 1%	 finance	 charge	
information.		Late	registration	for	all	sessions	begins	
                                                                                   each month until the account is paid in full.
on	the	first	day	of	classes.		A	$35	late	registration	fee	
is charged to all students registering on or after the                                 Failure	to	comply	with	the	payment	policies	of	
first day of classes.                                                              the College may result in further collection activity
                                                                                   by	an	outside	collection	agency	or	attorney.		When	
poLicieS on paYmentS,                                                              this action occurs, students are responsible for
creDitS anD refUnDS                                                                paying	all	collection	expenses	which	can,	in	some	
	   When	 an	 applicant	 is	 admitted	 to	 the	 graduate	                          cases,	exceed	50%	of	the	original	balance	owed.	        	
program, the student, the parents or the guardians                                 Although every effort is made to contact a student
accept the standard payment policy of Columbia                                     prior to submission to a collection agency, Columbia
College.		Students	incur	financial	liability	when	they	                            College reserves the right to submit a student’s
complete and sign an official Columbia College                                     account	 for	 collection	 at	 any	 time	 when	 the	 stu-
course	registration	form.		Full	payment	is	due	at	that	                            dent fails to remit the personal payment portion of
time.	Liability	is	not	dependent	upon	a	student	receiv-                            the account balance.
ing a billing statement.
18	    Fees

applying federal financial aid                                   Administration	(VA).	Eligible	students	must	complete	
     If	the	student	has	applied	for	and	been	awarded	            paperwork	 required	 to	 establish	 VA	 eligibility	 at	 the	
financial assistance, the aid, excluding college employ-         time of registration. The VA pays benefits directly to
                                                                 eligible	 individuals.	 	 Students	 receiving	 VA	 benefits	
ment	programs,	is	subtracted	from	the	balance	owed	
                                                                 are, therefore, personally responsible for payment for
to determine the amount to be paid or deferred. Aid in
                                                                 all	of	their	educational	fees	and	are	required	to	follow	
the	form	of	a	Stafford	(subsidized	and	unsubsidized)	
                                                                 the standard payment policy of the College.
Loan	is	considered	on	the	deferred	payment	plan	only	
if	awarded	by	the	Financial	Aid	Office.                          Dropping a class
employer tuition assistance                                           Financial	liability	is	assessed	at	the	completion	of	
     Students	 who	 receive	 employer	 tuition	 assis-           the drop period for each session. If students drop a
tance may have the costs of educational expenses                 class prior to the end of the drop period, no financial
paid by their employer through direct billing or                 or academic liability is incurred. If students drop a
through	reimbursement.		Students	should	check	with	              class after the drop period, they are financially liable
their	employers	to	determine	which	plan	is	appropri-             for	the	full	amount	of	tuition.		No	reduction	of	charges	
ate for them.                                                    is	made	for	laboratory/course	fees,	etc.	
1.	 Direct Billing:	A	 student	 whose	 employer	 offers	
                                                                 Withdrawal from college
    direct payment to the College must ensure that
                                                                     After	 classes	 begin,	 tuition	 charges	 (if	 applica-
    the College receives a letter from the employer
                                                                 ble)	 are	 determined	 by	 the	 following	 schedule	
    which	authorizes	and	describes	the	conditions	of	
                                                                 should	the	student	complete	a	total	withdrawal	from	
    such an arrangement. The letter must be on file
                                                                 Columbia College:
    in	the	Registration	and	Financial	Services	Office.
                                                                 time frame                                 charge
2.    Reimbursement: A student attending under
                                                                 (Count	all	days,	including	weekends)
      employer	 reimbursement	 is	 required	 to	 follow	
      the standard payment policy and then receive               Before	the	1st	day	
      reimbursement	 following	 guidelines	 established	         through	the	6th	business	day	of	term..... No	charge
      by	his/her	employer.                                       After	the	6th	business	day	of	term ......... 100%	of	original
                                                                                                              charges
     Under	either	form	of	tuition	assistance,	students	
are responsible for any portion of the educational                      for students who are recipients of federal
                                                                 title iV student aid, refunds will be made in accor-
fees	 not	 paid	 by	 their	 employers.	 	 Students	 whose	       dance with federal regulation 34 cfr 668.22. a
employers	have	contingencies	on	payments	(such	as	               current schedule is available in the registration
attaining	 a	 certain	 grade)	 are	 required	 to	 pay	 as	 if	   and financial Services office and in the financial
they	did	not	have	employer	tuition	assistance	and	will	          aid portion of the course catalog.
be reimbursed after the employer makes payment.                      Students	 receiving	 financial	 assistance	 should	
                                                                 be	 aware	 that	 their	 financial	 aid	 package	 could	 be	
military tuition assistance (mta)                                affected	should	they	elect	to	drop	a	course.		For	addi-
      Students	 receiving	 military	 tuition	 assistance	        tional	 information,	 please	 refer	 to	 the	 Financial	 Aid	
(MTA)	are	required	to	present	an	approved	MTA	form	              portion of the catalog.
at	 the	 time	 of	 registration.	 	 Students	 are	 personally	
responsible for any tuition or miscellaneous fees                active Service
not	 paid	 by	 the	 military	 and	 are	 required	 to	 follow	          Columbia	 College	 recognizes	 that	 individuals	
the standard payment policy for their portion of                 serving	in	both	National	Guard	and	Reserve	units	may	
educational	 fees.	 Students	 may	 not	 register	 for	 a	        be in need of tuition refunds or credits if called to
subsequent	session	if	they	have	a	balance	due	from	              active	 service.	 Columbia	 College	 will	 assist	 students	
previous sessions. It is recommended that military               called	to	active	military	service	with	options	regarding	
students contact the appropriate educational ser-                their registration in classes including, but not limited
vices officer for guidance and assistance in complet-            to,	 course	 work	 completion,	 tuition	 refunds	 or	 tuition	
ing	MTA	paperwork.                                               credits.
Veterans educational assistance
    An	 individual	 who	 is	 currently	 serving	 or	 has	
served in our nation’s armed forces may be eligible
for educational assistance from the Veterans
                                                                                                     Financial	Aid						19


financiaL aiD
     Columbia College’s financial aid program exists               Students	must	also	complete:
to	 make	 education	 affordable	 for	 all	 students	 who	      	   a.	 Entrance	 Counseling	 (first	 time	 Columbia	
qualify.		The	College	believes	that	if	students	desire	            	 College	borrower	only).
to attend college they should not be prevented from            	   b.	 Stafford	Loan	Master	Promissory	Note	(first-
doing so simply because they lack sufficient funds.                		 time	Columbia	College	borrower	only).
Financial	 aid	 is	 not	 intended	 to	 cover	 all	 student	    	   Students	 may	 access	 these	 forms	 in	 eServices	
expenses.		While	the	primary	financial	responsibility	             under	the	Financial	aid	section.
for	education	rests	with	the	students	and	their	fami-
                                                               5.	 Parents	 (for	 students	 who	 are	 deemed	 depen-
lies, Columbia College is committed to helping stu-
                                                                                                                      	
                                                                   dent	according	to	federal	financial	aid	guidelines)	
dents	 bridge	 the	 gap	 between	 the	 cost	 of	 a	 college	
                                                                   who	 are	 interested	 in	 applying	 for	 additional	
education	and	what	the	student	can	afford	to	pay.	
                                                                   assistance for their students through federal
     Financial	aid	is	monetary	assistance	to	help	the	     	
                                                                   Stafford	Plus	loan	programs	should	complete:
student meet the expenses of attending college. Aid
                                                                   a.	 Plus	Loan	data	sheet
may be in the form of grants, student employment,
                                                                   b.	 Plus	Loan	Master	Promissory	Note	(first	time	
loans, scholarships, types of outside assistance, or a
                                                                       Columbia	College	borrower	only)
combination thereof.
                                                                   Students	 may	 access	 these	 forms	 under	 the	
applying for federal financial aid                             	   Financial	aid	section	of	eServices.
    To apply for federal financial assistance at               6.	 Students	who	are	interested	in	applying	for	addi-
Columbia College:                                              	   tional	 assistance	 through	 federal	 GRAD	 PLUS	
                                                               	   Loan	programs	should	complete:	
1.	 Complete	an	application	for	admission	and	sub-
    mit	 the	 required	 one	 time	 non-refundable	 appli-          a.	 GRAD	Plus	Loan	data	sheet
    cation	 fee	 to	 the	 Admissions	 Office.	 Students	           b.	 GRAD	Plus	Loan	Master	Promissory	Note
    must be accepted to a graduate program before                  Students	 may	 access	 these	 forms	 under	 the	
    aid	is	awarded.                                            	   Financial	aid	section	of	eServices.
2.	 Complete	the	Free	Application	for	Federal	Student	         	   Students	 must	 reapply	 each	 year	 for	 all	 federal	
    Aid	(FAFSA),	and	indicate	the	Columbia	College	            and state grants, loans and student employment.
    federal school code, 002456. Completing the
    FAFSA	electronically	is	recommended.		Students	            eligibility for federal and State financial
    may	apply	electronically	by	accessing	the	FAFSA	           aid
    through	 Columbia	 College’s	 Financial	 Aid	 web-            To receive aid from the federal student aid pro-
    site, www.ccis.edu/financialaid,	or	the	Department	        grams, a student must meet certain criteria:
    of	 Education’s	 website,	 www.fafsa.gov. Paper                •	 U.S.	citizenship	or	eligible	non-citizen	status.
    FAFSA	applications	may	be	obtained	through	the	                •	 Pursuing	a	degree	and	enrolling	in	coursework	
    Federal	 Student	 Aid	 Information	 Center	 at	                   required	for	the	degree.		If	a	student	is	consid-
    1-800-4-FED-AID.	The	FAFSA	must	be	complet-                       ered	non-degree	seeking,	he/she	is	not	eligible	
    ed for each academic year. The priority deadline                  for	 financial	 aid.	 Students	 admitted	 as	 non-
    for	all	financial	aid	is	March	1	of	the	year	the	stu-             degree	seeking,	student-at-large	or	pre-gradu-
    dent	plans	to	attend	college	(i.e.,	March	1,	2010	                ate are not considered to be seeking a degree.
    for	2010-2011	academic	year.)		All	returning	stu-                 Post-baccalaureate	 students	 must	 see	 “Post-
    dents	 should	 have	 the	 2010-2011	 FAFSA	 com-                  Baccalaureate”	section	for	eligibility.
    pleted	and	all	other	paperwork	submitted	by	May	               •	 Making	 Financial	 Aid	 satisfactory	 academic	
    2010	to	avoid	registration	delays	for	Fall	2010.		                progress.	 (See	 Financial	 Aid	 Standards	 of	
3.	 The	 Financial	Aid	 Office	 corresponds	 with	 appli-             Academic	Progress.)
    cants primarily via email regarding the status of              •	 Other	 eligibility	 factors	 that	 are	 identified	
    their	financial	aid	application	and	award	estimates.	             based upon individual student circumstances
    Notification	 of	 missing	 information	 is	 sent	 to	 a	          as	 determined	 by	 the	 results	 of	 the	 Free	
    student’s	CougarMail	account,	the	email	address	                  Application	for	Federal	Student	Aid	(FAFSA).
    assigned to each student by Columbia College.                      •	 The	 Financial	Aid	 Office	 communicates	
                                                                            what	necessary	documentation	is	need-
4.	 Students	receive	their	maximum	federal	Stafford	
                                                                            ed to resolve eligibility issues. This com-
    loan	award	through	their	electronic	award	letter.	
                                                                            munication	will	be	sent	via	CougarMail.
20	     Financial	Aid

           •	   Examples	of	eligibility	issues	include	veri-     Please	note	the	following:
                fication,	selective	service,	citizenship,	etc.   repeated courses add total hours attempted but
	    Federal	aid	programs	have	varying	requirements	                not	 hours	 completed;	 the	 grade	 is	 simply	
of	 eligibility	 in	 terms	 of	 required	 enrollment;	 please	      replaced.	 The	 new	 grade	 is	 included	 in	 	 the	
see individual aid types for more information.                      cumulative	GPA	calculation,	which	is	considered	
                                                                    when	 progress	 is	 again	 checked;	 therefore	 the	
Summer aid                                                          repeated	 course	 is	 included	 in	 both	 qualitative	
Financial	aid	is	available	during	the	summer	program	               and	quantitative	calculations.
in	the	form	of	Federal	Pell	Grant,	Student	Employment	
                                                                 Withdrawals, including	 excused	 withdrawals,	 count	
(if	funding	permits),	and	the	Federal	Loan	Programs.	
                                                                    toward	 hours	 attempted	 for	 the	 Cumulative	
Specific	 information	 and	 application	 materials	 for	
                                                                    Completion	Rate.	
summer assistance may be obtained in the
Registration	and	Financial	Services	Office.                      remedial, enrichment and english as a Second
                                                                    Language courses	count	toward	the	Cumulative	
financiaL aiD StanDarDS of                                          Completion	Rate	as	well	as	cumulative	GPA.

acaDemic proGreSS                                                audit and pass/fail courses	 counts	 toward	 the	
                                                                    Cumulative	Completion	Rate.
	   According	 to	 the	 United	 States	 Department	 of	
Education	 regulations	 and	 Missouri	 Department	 of	           transfer credit	(including	credit	received	during	con-
Higher	 Education	 policy,	 all	 students	 applying	 for	           sortium	study)	does	not	count	toward	the	calcula-
federal	 and/or	 state	 financial	 assistance	 (as	 well	 as	       tion of cumulative attempted semester hours and
some	 private,	 credit-based	 loans)	 must	 meet	 and	              cumulative completed semester hours. Transfer
maintain satisfactory academic progress in a degree                 credit	 does	 not	 count	 toward	 the	 Cumulative	
program to receive funding.                                         Completion	Rate.	Transfer	credit	does	not	count	
	   Satisfactory	 progress	 is	 measured	 in	 terms	 of	            in the calculation of GPA. Transfer credit does not
qualitative,	 quantitative	 and	 maximum	 time	 stan-               count	toward	Maximum	Time	Frame	Measure.
dards.	 All	 prior	 coursework	 at	 Columbia	 College	 is	
applied to these standards.                                      maximum time frame measure
                                                                 	    Financial	Aid	recipients	must	complete	an	edu-
Qualitative measure                                              cational	program	within	a	time	frame	no	longer	than	  	
	   The	quality	of	a	student’s	progress	is	measured	by	          150%	 of	 the	 published	 length	 of	 the	 educational	
grade	 point	 average	 (cumulative	 GPA).	The	 minimum	          program.	 All	 attempted,	 withdrawn,	 and/or	 trans-
cumulative GPA for financial aid recipients is the same          ferred	credits	count	toward	this	maximum	time	limit.	 	
as the academic standard for Columbia College:                   For	example,	a	student	pursuing	a	master’s	degree	
           cumulative        minimum cumulative Grade            requiring	36	semester	hours	may	attempt	up	to	54	
                 hours       point average                       hours before financial aid eligibility is suspended
	                0-30.9	     1.75                                (36	x	150%	=	54).
	               31-45.9	     1.90                                	    At	 150%	 the	 student	 is	 no	 longer	 eligible	 to	
	           46	or	more	      2.00                                receive	 federal	 financial	 aid.	 The	 Financial	 Aid	
	     Graduate	Program	      3.00                                Office	 reviews	 the	 academic	 progress	 of	 financial	
Quantitative measure                                             aid	 recipients	 twice	 per	 academic	 year;	 once	 in	
                                                                 December	and	again	in	May.		A	student	may	appeal	
	    The	quantity	of	a	student’s	progress	is	measured	
                                                                 (see	Appeal	Procedure).	
by	 the	 Cumulative	 Completion	 Rate	 (hours	 earned	
divided	by	hours	attempted).		Students	are	required	
to	complete	2/3	of	attempted	hours	while	at	Columbia	            financiaL aiD proBation anD
College.		Students	who	receive	an	I	(Incomplete),	F	             SUSpenSion
(Failing),	 W	 (Withdrawing)	 or	 WE	 (Excused	                  	     Failure	to	meet	the	minimum	academic	progress	
Withdrawal)	for	a	course	in	a	semester	or	session	will	
                                                                 requirements	 results	 in	 financial	 aid	 probation	 and	
have those courses included in the cumulative
                                                                 suspension. The first time a student fails to meet the
attempted	hours	(for	definition	of	grades	please	see	
                                                                 minimum	 (quantitative	 or	 qualitative)	 requirement,	
Academic	 Policies,	 Regulations,	 and	 Procedures).	
                                                                 he/she	is	placed	on	financial	aid	probation.		Probation	
The	 Cumulative	 Completion	 Rate	 is	 calculated	 in	
                                                                 is	 a	 warning,	 in	 writing	 via	 CougarMail,	 that	 subse-
December	and	May	to	determine	eligibility	for	finan-
cial	aid	for	the	following	term.		All	courses	are	includ-        quent	 failure	 to	 meet	 the	 minimum	 requirement	 will	
ed	 in	 the	 Cumulative	 Completion	 Rate	 calculated.	  	       result in financial aid suspension. The second and
                                                                                                            Financial	Aid						21

subsequent	time	a	student	fails	to	meet	the	minimum	            Determination of feDeraL
requirement	results	in	loss	of	financial	aid	for	the	fol-
                                                                financiaL aiD aWarD
lowing	terms	of	enrollment.	
                                                                	   Financial	 need	 for	 federal	 and	 state	 aid	 is	
     If placed on financial aid suspension, notification
                                                                determined	in	the	following	manner:
is sent to the student and all forms of Title IV federal
and	state	aid	is	withdrawn	for	the	next	terms		in	which	        Cost	of	Attendance	(from	August,	2010	to	May,	2011):
the	student	enrolls.		The	Financial		Aid	Office	reviews	                                               post-
                                                                    expense            master      Baccalaureate
the	academic	progress	of	financial	aid	recipients	twice	
per	 academic	 year;	 once	 in	 December	 and	 again	 in	            Tuition . . . . . . . . . $5,672 . . . . . . . $3,548
May.	Notification	of	suspension	is	sent	via	email	to	a	             	Books . . . . . . . . . . . .856 . . . . . . . . . .856
student’s	CougarMail	address	and	via	postal	mail.	                  	Room	&	Board. . . . 7,720 . . . . . . . . 7,720
 reinstatement                                                       Transportation . . . . 2,916 . . . . . . . . 2,916
     Financial	Aid	can	be	reinstated	when	one	of	the	                Personal . . . . . . . . 5,468 . . . . . . . . 5,468
following	conditions	has	been	met:                                  	TOTAL:	               $22,632	              $20,508
1.	 The	 student	 completes	 courses	 in	 one	 or	 more	            Cost of Attendance:		Estimated	allowances	for	tuition,	
    terms	 at	 Columbia	 College	 with	 the	 cumulative	                books, room and board, transportation, and per-
    GPA and the cumulative completion rate at the                       sonal	expenses.	Cap	on	amount	of	aid	(from	any	
    required	standards;	or                                              source)	that	a	student	can	receive.

2. The student files an appeal and the appeal is                    EFC:	 Estimated	 Family	 Contribution.	 EFC	 is	 deter-
   approved	(see	appeal	procedures	below).                             mined	by	FAFSA.

    it is the student’s responsibility to notify the                Financial	need:	Cost	of	Attendance	minus	EFC.
registration and financial Services office when                     Unmet	 need:	 Cost	 of	 Attendance	 minus	 EFC	 minus	
reinstatement conditions have been met.                                awarded	need-based	aid.
                                                                    Unmet	cost:	Cost	of	Attendance	minus	aid	awarded.
appeal procedure
     Students	who	have	been	suspended	from	finan-               	   Once	 the	 Expected	 Family	 Contribution	 (EFC)	
cial	aid	may	make	a	written	appeal	for	reinstatement	           and financial need have been determined, the stu-
of eligibility if extenuating circumstances have con-           dent’s	information	is	reviewed.	The	student	is	offered	
tributed	to	their	inability	to	meet	the	requirements	for	       an aid package that may consist of grants, scholar-
satisfactory	 progress.	 Extenuating	 circumstances	            ships,	 outside	 assistance,	 loans	 and/or	 Federal	
include,	but	are	not	limited	to,	the	following:                 Work-Study.	 A	 federal	 aid	 recipient’s	 aid	 package	
  •	   Death	of	an	immediate	family	member                      may not exceed cost of attendance.
  •	   Severe	 injury	 or	 illness	 of	 the	 student	 or	 an	   	    Students	 are	 responsible	 for	 reporting	 to	 the	
       immediate family member                                  Registration	 and	 Financial	 Services	 office	 all	 assis-
  •	   Emergency	situations	such	as	fire	or	flood               tance	received	from	outside	sources,	as	federal	law	
                                                                requires	that	all	outside	assistance	be	considered	as	
  •	   Legal	separation	from	spouse	or	divorce
                                                                a part of the financial aid package. These types of
  •	   Military	reassignment	or	required	job	transfers	         assistance	 include	 such	 aid	 as	 Veteran’s	 Benefits,	
       or shift changes
                                                                outside scholarships, military or corporate tuition
    Students	who	do	not	meet	the	above	criteria	and/            assistance, vocational rehabilitation or other state
or cannot thoroughly document such situations, must             aid.	 Federal	 guidelines	 require	 that	 a	 student	 not	
reestablish eligibility through reinstatement before            exceed the cost of attendance in the amount of aid
any	additional	federal	or	state	aid	will	be	disbursed.
                                                                they receive.
   Students	 who	 have	 extenuating	 circumstances	
                                                                     A student’s loan amount is determined as a part
may	appeal	using	the	following	procedures:
                                                                of the aid package. A student’s loan eligibility is
1.	 Submit	a	completed	appeal	form	available	under	
                                                                based on factors that include annual loan limits,
    the	Financial	Aid	Section	of	eServices.		
                                                                unmet need, and federal aggregate limits. In addi-
2.	 The	completed	appeal	is	presented	for	review.
                                                                tion, if a student has less than an academic year
3.	 The	student	is	notified	in	writing	via	CougarMail	
                                                                remaining in the degree program, the loan is prorat-
    of the decision and recommendations. The deci-
                                                                ed, per federal guidelines.
    sion is final.
22	   Financial	Aid

       federal Stafford Loan annual Limits                  attendance
Dependent             Subsidized     total                       Financial	 aid	 is	 awarded	 to	 a	 student	 with	 the	
Undergraduate                        (Subsidized &          expectation	that	the	student	will	attend	school	for	the	
                                     Unsubsidized)          period	 for	 which	 the	 assistance	 is	 awarded.	 	 If	 a		
                                                            student does not begin attendance in all of his or her
Post-Baccalaureate	 $	5,500	            $					5,500         classes, the aid must be recalculated based on the
                                                            actual	 attendance.	 	 Students	 who	 are	 not	 in	 atten-
independent           Subsidized     total                  dance	for	the	courses	in	which	they	enrolled	are	not	
Undergraduate                        (Subsidized &          eligible to receive financial aid.
(and dependents                      Unsubsidized)
whose parents                                               aid Disbursement
are unable to
borrow under the                                                  A	 student’s	 financial	 aid	 (except	 Federal	 Work-
PLUS program)                                               Study)	 is	 credited	 directly	 to	 his/her	 student	 account	
                                                            and applied to tuition and fees each term. Aid funds are
Post-Baccalaureate	 	$	5,500	            $		12,500	         credited	 for	 other	 charges	 with	 authorization	 from	 the	
Graduate	            $	8,500	            $		12,000	         student	 through	 the	 electronic	 award	 notification	 pro-
                                                            cess.	Federal	Work-Study	funds	are	paid	in	the	form	of	
 aggregate Limits (Limit of all loans combined)             a	paycheck	on	the	15th	and	last	workday	of	the	month.	
                 Subsidized       total                     Funds	are	paid	for	authorized	hours	worked.
                                  (Subsidized &             	     When	 a	 student	 registers	 for	 courses,	 he/she	
                                  Unsubsidized)
                                                            may	deduct	the	amount	of	aid	that	has	been	awarded	
Dependent                                                   (except	 Federal	 Work-Study)	 from	 what	 is	 owed	 to	
Undergraduate	          $23,000	         $		31,000          the	college.	If	a	student’s	financial	aid	awards	exceed	
Independent                                                 his/her	 charges,	 the	 student	 receives	 a	 refund.	 	 A	
Undergraduate	          $23,000	         $		57,500          student may use excess financial aid prior to the start
                                                            of a term to purchase books by using a book voucher.
Graduate	               $65,000	         $138,500
                                                            Refund	dates	are	posted	on	the	Financial	Aid	website	
                                                            under	 "Important	 Dates"	 and	 are	 available	 from	 the	
notification of financial aid Status and                    Registration	and	Financial	Services	office.
awards
    College email addresses are assigned to all             retUrn of titLe iV fUnDS
Columbia	College	applicants	(see	Special	Academic	          	     This	 policy	 applies	 to	 students	 who	 complete	
Facilities).	The	Financial	Aid	Office	corresponds	with	     60%	or	less	of	the	enrollment	period	(i.e.,	Fall,	Spring	
students primarily via email regarding the status           or	Summer	session)	for	which	they	received	Federal	       	
of their financial aid application and notification of      Title	IV	aid.	A	student	who	withdraws	from	a	class	but	
financial	 aid	 estimated	 awards.	 Correspondence	         still	completes	one	or	more	classes	does	not	require	
sent	via	email	is	not	sent	via	postal	mail.		Students	      a	Return	of	Title	IV	calculation.	The	term		“Title	IV	aid”	
should check their college email on a regular basis         refers	to	the	following	Federal	financial	aid	programs:	
and	are	responsible	for	information	sent	even	when	         Unsubsidized	 Federal	 Stafford	 loans,	 Subsidized	
school is not in session.                                   Federal	Stafford	loans,	Federal	PLUS	(Parent)	loans,	
	    Students	 may	 access	 their	 financial	 aid	 award	   Federal	 Pell	 Grants,	 Federal	 SEOG	 (Supplemental	
estimate(s)	 through	 the	 eServices	 link	 on	 Columbia	   Educational	 Opportunity	 Grant)	 and	 Federal	 SSS	
College’s	 website	 at	 www.ccis.edu/eservices.	 	 The	     (Student	Support	Services)	Grant.
financial	aid	electronic	award	notifications	and	asso-          To conform to the policy, Columbia College must
ciated links in the notification discuss eligibility        determine	 the	 student’s	 withdrawal	 date.	 	The	 with-
requirements	 and	 other	 important	 information.	          drawal	date	is	defined	as	the	date	the	student	began	
Students	 should	 carefully	 review	 their	 electronic	     the	withdrawal	process	or	officially	notified	Columbia	  	
award	notifications	and	are	responsible	to	read	and	        College	of	his/her	intent	to	withdraw.
understand	all	included	information.	Students	should	
                                                            	    For	all	other	withdrawals	without	notification,	the	
accept or decline the aid that is offered to them
                                                            withdrawal	 date	 is	 the	 mid-point	 or	 the	 last	 date	 of	
through	 the	 electronic	 award	 notification	 process.	
                                                            attendance	 at	 an	 academically-related	 activity	 by	 a	
Students	 must	 provide	 documentation	 if	 they	 are	
                                                            student. The last date of attendance at an academi-
receiving an outside form of financial assistance not
                                                            cally-related	 activity	 is	 defined	 as	 attendance	 and	
listed	in	the	award	notification.	
                                                                                                        Financial	Aid						23

participation in class as defined by the instructor.              student’s	 overpayment	 with	 a	 student’s	 upcoming	
	    The	 calculation	 required	 determines	 a	 student’s	        disbursement of aid.
earned and unearned Title IV aid based on the per-                      If a student is unable to pay the overpayment in
centage of the enrollment period completed by the                 full,	he/she	can	set	up	a	repayment	plan	with	the	U.S.	
student. The percentage of the period that the student            Department	of	Education.		Before	doing	so,	the	stu-
remained enrolled is derived by dividing the number of            dent	 should	 contact	 Registration	 and	 Financial	
days the student attended by the number of days in                Services	to	confirm	the	situation	has	been	referred	to	
the	period.		Calendar	days	(including	weekends)	are	              the	U.S.	Department	of	Education	before	any	repay-
used, but breaks of at least five days are excluded               ment plan can be arranged.
from both the numerator and denominator.                          	   U.S.	Department	of	Education
	    Until	a	student	has	passed	the	60%	point	of	an	              	   Student	Financial	Assistance	Programs
enrollment period, only a portion of the student’s aid            	   P.O.	Box	4222
has	 been	 earned.	 	A	 student	 who	 remains	 in	 atten-         	   Iowa	City,	IA	52245
dance	 beyond	 the	 60%	 point	 is	 considered	 to	 have	         	   Phone:	1-800-621-3115		
earned	all	awarded	aid	for	the	enrollment	period.                 	   Email:	DCS_HELP@ed.gov.
    The College’s refund policy and return of Title IV                For	 examples	 of	 the	 Return	 of	 Title	 IV	 Funds	
Funds	 procedures	 are	 independent	 of	 one	 another.		          calculations	or	questions	regarding	the	overpayment	
A	student	who	withdraws	may	be	required	to	return	                policy,	please	contact	the	Registration	and	Financial	
unearned	aid	and	still	owe	the	College	for	the	course	            Services		Office.
(see	Fees	section).
     The responsibility to repay unearned Title IV aid            SchoLarShipS
is	shared	by	Columbia	College	and	the	student.		For	              	     Scholarships,	 awards	 and	 grants	 are	 forms	 of	
example,	 the	 calculation	 may	 require	 Columbia	               "gift"	 assistance	 that	 do	 not	 require	 repayment.	
College	 to	 return	 a	 portion	 of	 Federal	 funds	 to	 the	     Institutional aid is generally intended for tuition assis-
Federal	 Title	 IV	 programs.	 	 In	 addition,	 the	 student	     tance.	Endowed	scholarships	and	awards	are	made	
may	 also	 be	 required	 to	 return	 funds	 based	 on	 the	       through the generous gifts of alumni and friends of
calculation.	 A	 student	 returns	 funds	 to	 the	 Federal	       Columbia	 College.	 These	 awards	 are	 competitive	
Stafford	 Loan	 programs	 based	 on	 the	 terms	 and	             and are primarily based on academic performance.
conditions of the promissory note of the loan. A stu-             Generally,	scholarships,	awards	and	grants	are	non-
dent	 who	 receives	 a	 Federal	 Pell	 Grant	 may	 be	            need based forms of financial assistance.
required	 to	 repay	 50%	 of	 the	 funds	 received.	 	 The	             Due to federal regulations, scholarships and
return	of	Federal	aid	is	in	the	following	order:	Federal	         awards may be affected if you are receiving fed-
Unsubsidized	 loans,	 Federal	 Subsidized	 loans,	                eral and/or state financial aid.
Federal	PLUS	loans,	Federal	Pell	Grants	and	Federal	
SEOG	(Supplemental	Educational	Opportunity	Grant).                poSt-BaccaLaUreate
      A	student	who	owes	funds	to	a	grant	program	is	                  Post-baccalaureate	 programs	 at	 Columbia	
required	 to	 make	 payment	 of	 those	 funds	 within	 45	        College	 are	 programs	 that	 require	 a	 student	 be	
days	 of	 being	 notified	 of	 the	 overpayment.	 	 During	       enrolled	in	some	type	of	undergraduate	coursework	
the	45-day	period	students	remain	eligible	for	Title	IV	          before being fully admitted to the master’s program.
funds. If no positive action is taken by the student              Federal	 financial	 aid	 regulations	 require	 that	 the	
within	 45	 days	 of	 being	 notified,	 Columbia	 College	        Financial	 Aid	 Office	 differentiate	 these	 students	
will	 notify	 the	 U.S.	 Department	 of	 Education	 of	 the	      from	fully	admitted	masters	students	when	awarding	
student’s overpayment situation. The student is no                aid.	 While	 post	 baccalaureate	 students	 are	 not	   	
longer	 eligible	 for	 Title	 IV	 funds	 until	 he/she	 enters	   considered degree seeking they do have eligibility for
into	 a	 satisfactory	 repayment	 agreement	 with	 the	           some types of aid.
U.S.	Department	of	Education.
      During	the	45-day	period,	the	student	can	make	             m a s t e r o f a r t s i n te a c h i n g po s t -
full payment of the overpayment to Columbia College.              Baccalaureate or master of arts in
The	 College	 will	 forward	 the	 payment	 to	 the	 U.S.	         teaching alternative certification
Department	 of	 Education	 and	 the	 student	 remains	                 Master	 of	 Arts	 in	 Teaching	 Post-Baccalaureate	
eligible for Title IV funds. If a student is enrolled in a        program	 (MAT.PB)	 and	 Master	 of	 Arts	 in	 Teaching	
future	 session	 within	 the	 45-day	 period	 and	 has	           Alternative	 Certification	 (MAT.AC)	 are	 programs	
financial	 aid,	 the	 Financial	Aid	 office	 may	 cover	 the	     for	 students	 who	 have	 completed	 a	 bachelor’s	
24	    Financial	Aid

degree and are interested in receiving their teacher            baccalaureate	 courses.	 	 MBA.PB	 students	 are	 con-
certification.	A	student	who	is	interested	in	teaching	         sidered to be undergraduate students for federal
elementary,	middle-level	or	high	school	usually	must	           financial	 aid	 purposes;	 these	 students	 also	 must	
have teacher certification before being fully admitted          complete	the	following	items	to	be	eligible	for	aid.
to	the	Master	of	Arts	in	Teaching	Program.		MAT.PB	         	       1.	 	Be	fully	admitted	to	the	MBA.PB	program.
students are considered to be undergraduate stu-
dents	 for	 federal	 financial	 aid	 purposes;	 these	 stu-         2.	 Complete	the	FAFSA.	Students	must	answer	
dents	 also	 must	 complete	 the	 following	 items	 to	 be	             the	following	questions	as	indicated	below:
eligible for aid:                                                        a.	 Question	29,	“When	you	begin	the	2010-
     1.	 	Be	admitted	to	the	MAT.PB	program.                                 2011	school	year,	what	degree	or	certifi-
      2.	 Complete	the	FAFSA.	Students	must	answer	                          cate	will	you	be	working	on?”	will	need	to	
          the	following	questions	as	indicated	below:                        be	answered	“other/undecided.”
         a.	 Question	29,	“When	you	begin	the	2010-                      b.	 Question	28,	“When	you	begin	the	2010-
             2011	school	year,	what	degree	or	certifi-                       2011	 school	 year,	 what	 will	 be	 your	
             cate	will	you	be	working?”	will	need	to	be	                     grade	 level?”	 will	 need	 to	 be	 answered	
             answered	 “Teaching	 credential	 (non-                          “5th	year	other/undergraduate.”
             degree	program).”                                           c.	 Question	 48,	 “At	 the	 beginning	 of	 the	
         b.	 Question	28,	“When	you	begin	the	2010-                           2010-2011	school	year,	will	you	be	work-
             2011	 school	 year,	 what	 will	 be	 your	                       ing	 on	 a	 Master’s	 or	 Doctoral	 program	
             grade	level	?”	will	need	to	be	answered“5th	                     (such	 as	 MA,	 MBA,	 MD,	 JD,	 Ph.D.,	
             year	other/undergraduate.”                                       Ed.D.,	or	graduate	certificate,	etc.)?	will	
         c.	 Question	 48,	 “At	 the	 beginning	 of	 the	                     need	to	be	answered	“no”	for	not	work-
             2010-2011	school	year,	will	you	be	work-                         ing on a master’s program.
             ing on a master’s or doctoral program              	    Once	the	12	month	period	of	time	is	over	a	stu-
             (such	 as	 MA,	 MBA,	 MD,	 JD,	 Ph.D.,	            dent	must	be	fully	admitted	into	the	MBA	program	in	
             Ed.D.,	or	graduate	certificate,	etc.)?	will	       order to continue receiving federal aid. Once the
             need	to	be	answered	“No”	for	not	work-             student	is	fully	admitted	to	the	MBA	program	the	stu-
             ing on a master’s program.                         dent	should	contact	the	Financial	Aid	Office	to	have	
    3. Have a list of classes that must be completed            aid processed at graduate levels. Once a student is
         for completion of teacher certification submit-        fully	 admitted	 to	 the	 MBA	 program	 the	 student	 will	
         ted	 from	 Columbia	 College’s	 Education	             need	to	update	the	answers	on	the	FAFSA	to	the	fol-
         Office.                                                lowing	questions.
    MAT.PB	students	must	have	a	list	of	classes	that	                    1.	 Question	29,	“When	you	begin	the	2010-
are needed to complete teacher certification in their                        2011	school	year,	what	degree	or	certifi-
financial	aid	file.		An	MAT.PB	student	may	only	take	                        cate	will	you	be	working	on?”	will	need	to	
courses that are on the list of classes from the                             be	 answered	 “Graduate	 or	 professional	
Education	 Office	 while	 receiving	 financial	 aid.	                        degree.”
Enrolling	in	a	course	that	is	not	on	the	list	will	affect	               2.	 Question	28,	“When	you	begin	the	2010-
the student’s financial aid.                                                 2011	 school	 year,	 what	 will	 be	 your	
                                                                             grade	 level?”	 will	 need	 to	 be	 answered	
master of Business administration post-                                      “first	year	graduate/professional.”
Baccalaureate                                                            3.	 Question	 48,	 “At	 the	 beginning	 of	 the	
      Master	 of	 Business	 Administration	 Post-                            2010-2011	school	year,	will	you	be	work-
Baccalaureate	 program	 (MBA.PB)	 is	 a	 program	 for	                       ing on a master’s or doctoral program
students	 who	 have	 completed	 a	 bachelor’s	 degree	                       (such	 as	 MA,	 MBA,	 MD,	 JD,	 Ph.D.,	
but	must	complete	undergraduate	prerequisite	cours-                          Ed.D.,	or	graduate	certificate,	etc.)?	will	
es	 before	 becoming	 fully	 admitted	 to	 the	 Master	 of	                  need	 to	 be	 answered	 “yes”	 for	 working	
Business	 Administration	 program	 (MBA).	 MBA.PB	                           on a master’s program.
students may be eligible for federal loans. Their fed-
eral loan eligibility begins at the time of enrollments         master of Science in criminal Justice
in	 the	 first	 post	 baccalaureate	 course.	 From	 the	        post-Baccalaureate
beginning	 of	 federal	 loan	 eligibility	 an	 MBA.PB	 stu-         Master	 of	 Science	 in	 Criminal	 Justice	 Post	
dent	 has	 12	 months	 to	 complete	 all	 required	 post	       Baccalaureate	program	(MSCJ.PB)	is	a	program	for	
                                                                                                    Financial	Aid						25

students	 who	 have	 completed	 a	 bachelor’s	 degree	                     (such	 as	 MA,	 MBA,	 MD,	 JD,	 Ph.D.,	
but	must	complete	undergraduate	prerequisite	cours-                        Ed.D.,	or	graduate	certificate,	etc.)?	will	
es	 before	 becoming	 fully	 admitted	 in	 the	 Master	 of	                need	 to	 be	 answered	 “yes”	 for	 working	
Science	in	Criminal	Justice	program	(MSCJ).		MSCJ.                         on a master’s program.
PB	students	may	be	eligible	for	federal	loans.	Their	
federal loan eligibility begins at the time of enrollment     tYpeS of aiD
in	 the	 first	 post-baccalaureate	 course.	 	 From	 the	     	   Financial	aid	is	monetary	assistance	to	help	the	
beginning	of	federal	loan	eligibility	an	MSCJ.PB	stu-         student meet the expenses of attending college. Aid
dent	 has	 12	 months	 to	 complete	 all	 required	 post-     may be in the form of grants, student employment,
baccalaureate	 courses.	 	 MSCJ.PB	 students	 are	            loans, scholarships, types of outside assistance or a
considered to be undergraduate students for federal           combination thereof.
financial	 aid	 purposes;	 these	 students	 also	 must	
                                                              Grants
complete	the	following	items	to	be	eligible	for	aid:
                                                              federal pell Grant
    1.	 	Be	fully	admitted	to	the	MSCJ.PB	program.
                                                              	    The	 Federal	 Pell	 Grant	 is	 available	 to	 under-
    2.	 Complete	the	FAFSA.	Students	must	answer	
                                                              graduate	students	and	ranges	from	$550	to	$5,550	
        the	following	questions	as	indicated	below:
                                                              per academic year, based on the financial need of
         a.	 Question	29,	“When	you	begin	the	2010-           the	student.	The	Federal	Pell	is	applied	for	through	
             2011	school	year,	what	degree	or	certifi-        the	 Free	 Application	 for	 Federal	 Student	 Aid	
             cate	will	you	be	working	on?”	will	need	to	      (FAFSA).	 Only	 MAT.PB	 students	 may	 be	 eligible	
             be	answered	“Teaching	credential	(non-           for	the	Federal	Pell	Grant.
             degree	program).”
                                                                   A student may be eligible for the Pell grant
         b.	 Question	28,	“When	you	begin	the	2010-           with	 less	 than	 full	 time	 enrollment	 depending	 on	
             2011	 school	 year,	 what	 will	 be	 your	       student's	award.	You	may	not	receive	Pell	at	more	
             grade	 level?”	 will	 need	 to	 be	 answered	    than	 one	 school	 at	 a	 time.	 New	 recipients	 of	 Pell	
             “5th	year	other/undergraduate.”                  Grants	on	or	after	July	1,	2008	are	limited	to	nine	
        c.	 Question	 48,	 “At	 the	 beginning	 of	 the	      Scheduled	Awards	(maximum	amount	for	full-time	
              2010-2011	school	year,	will	you	be	work-        enrollment	for	a	full	academic	year).
              ing on a master’s or doctoral program           	    Pell	 Grant	 recipients	 who	 successfully	 com-
              (such	 as	 MA,	 MBA,	 MD,	 JD,	 Ph.D.,	         plete	 24	 semester	 hours	 from	 August	 2010-May	
              Ed.D.,	or	graduate	certificate,	etc.)?	will	    2011	have	Pell	Grant	Eligibility	for	the	June	Session	
              need	to	be	answered	“no”	for	not	work-          2011.	 (Students	 must	 be	 enrolled	 in	 a	 minimum	 of	
              ing on a master’s program.                      three	semester	hours	for	the	June	Session).
	    Once	the	12	month	period	of	time	is	over	a	stu-
                                                              iran and afghanistan Service Grant
dent	must	be	fully	admitted	into	the	MSCJ	program	in	
order to continue receiving federal aid. Once the             	    This	is	a	grant	for	post-baccalaureate	students	
student	 is	 fully	 admitted	 to	 the	 MSCJ	 program	 the	    who	are	not	eligible	for	a	Pell	grant	whose	parent	
student should contact the financial aid office to have       or guardian died as a result of military service in
aid processed at graduate levels. Once a student is           Iraq	or	Afghanistan	after	9/11/01.	Students	who,	at	
fully	admitted	to	the	MSCJ	program	the	student	will	          the	 time	 of	 the	 parent's	 or	 guardian's	 death	 were	
need	to	update	the	answers	on	the	FAFSA	to	the	fol-           less	 than	 24	 years	 old	 or	 were	 enrolled	 at	 least	
lowing	questions.                                             part-time	at	an	institution	of	higher	education.	This	
                                                              amount is the same as Pell Grant amount and is
        1.	 Question	 29,	 “When	 you	 begin	 the	
                                                              adjusted	for	less	than	full-time	enrollment.
              2010-2011	school	year,	what	degree	or	
              certificate	 will	 you	 be	 working?”	 will	    federal Supplemental educational opportunity
              need	to	be	answered	“Graduate	or	pro-           Grant (SeoG)
              fessional	degree.”                              	    SEOG	is	a	grant	available	based	on	the	finan-
         2.	 Question	28,	“When	you	begin	the	2010-           cial	need	of	the	student.		Federal	SEOG	is	applied	
             2011	 school	 year,	 what	 will	 be	 your	       for	 through	 the	 Free	 Application	 for	 Federal	
             grade	 level?”	 will	 need	 to	 be	 answered	    Student	Aid	(FAFSA).	Awarding	of	SEOG	is	limit-
             “first	year	graduate/professional.”              ed by federal funding.
         3.	 Question	 48,	 “At	 the	 beginning	 of	 the	
                                                              Student employment
             2010-2011	school	year,	will	you	be		work-
                                                              	   The	 College	 provides	 jobs	 for	 students	 on	
             ing on a master’s or doctoral program
26	   Financial	Aid

campus through institutional and federally funded           interest	 rate	 for	 the	 subsidized	 loan	 is	 4.5%	 and	
programs.	 	 Student	 employment	 is	 limited	 based	       6.8%	for	unsubsidized	loans.		
on	positions	that	are	available.		Students	are	paid	
                                                            federal pLUS Loan program
minimum	wage	or	above.		Information	is	available	
from	the	Student	Employment	Coordinator.                    	    This	is	a	credit-based	unsubsidized	loan	made	
                                                            to	 graduate	 students	 (Graduate	 PLUS)	 and	 par-
federal Work-Study program                                  ents	 of	 dependent	 	 post-baccalaureate	 students.	    	
	    This	program	provides	jobs	for	students	who	           This loan must be repaid. The interest rate for the
demonstrate financial need through a federally              PLUS	 Loan	 program	 is	 7.9%.	 Students	 must	
funded	 program.	 Federal	 Work-Study	 program	             access	 their	 Stafford	 loan	 eligibility	 first	 before	
has	jobs	on	campus	and	through	specific	commu-              they	 are	 eligible	 for	 the	 Graduate	 PLUS	 loans.	   	
nity service entities.                                      Graduate	PLUS	loan	award	amounts	are	available	
                                                            for	the	difference	between	the	Cost	of	Attendance	
iran and afghanistan Service Grant
                                                            less	other	aid	and	Stafford	loans.		Graduate	PLUS	
     This is a grant for undergraduate students             Loans	 are	 only	 available	 to	 Full	 and	 Conditional	
who	are	not	eligible	for	a	Pell	grant	whose	parent	         Admit graduate students.
or guardian died as a result of military service in
Iraq	or	Afghanistan	after	9/1/01.	Students	who,	at	         private, credit-Based Loan (also Known as
the	 time	 of	 the	 parent's	 or	 guardian's	 death	 was	   alternative Loans)
less	 than	 24	 years	 old	 or	 was	 enrolled	 at	 least	   	   This	is	a	credit-based	loan	for	students	to	help	
part-time	 at	 an	 institute	 of	 higher	 education.	The	   with	 college	 financing	 beyond	 federal	 aid.	 	A	 stu-
amount is the same as the Pell Grant amount and             dent	 does	 not	 have	 to	 complete	 the	 FAFSA	 to	
is	adjusted	for	less	than	full-time	enrollment.             apply	for	and	receive	a	private,	credit-based	loan.	      	
                                                            Various products are available for students.
college Work program
	   College	Work	Program	provides	jobs	for	stu-
dents on	campus	through	an	institutionally-funded	
                                                            oUtSiDe SoUrceS
program.                                                    Vocational rehabilitation Benefits
                                                                 Students	 with	 physical	 or	 mental	 disabilities	
Loans                                                       may be eligible to receive benefits from the
      A loan is a type of financial assistance that                                                   A
                                                            Department	of	Vocational	Rehabilitation.		 ssistance	
must	be	repaid	when	students	graduate	or	are	no	            may	 include	 counseling;	 training	 for	 vocational,	
longer enrolled in college at least half time, depend-      technical	or	professional	employment;	and	funding	
ing	on	the	terms	of	the	loan.	Students	must	sign	a	         for books, supplies, maintenance, medical services
promissory	note	(legal	agreement	to	repay)	for	any	         and transportation. To apply, students should con-
loan monies received. The promissory note con-              tact	 the	 regional	 Department	 of	 Vocational	
tains detailed information about terms, responsi-           Rehabilitation.	Missouri	residents	may	write	to	the	
bilities and repayment of loans.                            Division	 of	 Vocational	 Rehabilitation,	 Jefferson	
                                                            City,	MO	65101.
federal family education Loans
     A loan is a type of financial assistance that          Gi educational Benefits
must	be	repaid	when	students	graduate	or	are	no	                 Columbia College is approved for enrollment
longer enrolled in college, depending on the terms          certification of students eligible to receive educa-
of	the	loan.	Students	must	sign	a	promissory	note	          tional	assistance	(GI	Bill)	from	the	U.S.	Department	
(legal	 agreement	 to	 repay)	 for	 any	 loan	 monies	      of	 Veterans	 Affairs.	 	 Eligibility	 requirements	 vary	
received. The promissory note contains detailed             for	veterans	education	benefit	programs.		For	addi-
information about terms, responsibilities and               tional information and application materials, con-
repayment of loans.                                         tact the Veterans Certifying Official, Columbia
                                                            College,	(573)	875-7504	or	vacert@ccis.edu.
federal Stafford Loan program
	 This	 program	 provides	 to	 students	 subsidized	        Students with questions about financial aid
or	unsubsidized	loans.		The	government	pays	the	            should call registration and financial Services
interest	 on	 a	 subsidized	 Stafford	 loan	 while	 the	    office for assistance (573) 875-7390. additional
student is enrolled. The student is responsible for         financial aid information is available at the
paying the interest that accrues on an unsubsi-             columbia college website:
dized	 Stafford	 loan.	 	 Loans	 must	 be	 repaid.	 	The	   www.ccis.edu/financialaid
                                                                                                         Campus	Life					27


campUS Life
food Services                                                 agencies	 as	 well	 as	 campus	 constituents.	 	 The	
     The	 College	 offers	 three	 meal	 plan	 options:	 1)	   Director	 counsels	 students,	 faculty,	 staff	 and	 the	
20	meals	per	week	plan;	2)	14	meals	per	week	plan;	           administration on current global issues affecting
or	 3)	 lunch	 only	 plan.	 	 Students	 can	 change	 their	   international	education.		The	staff	disseminates	up-
meal plan option up to the first day of class in the          to-date	information	regarding	changes	in	the	United	
Campus	 Life	 Office.	 	 Meals	 are	 served	 in	 Dulany	      States	immigration	law	to	students	and	the	campus	
Dining	Hall.		Students	can	use	the	value	exchange	            community;	 advises	 students	 of	 their	 responsibili-
option	 associated	 with	 their	 meal	 plan	 at	 Cougar	      ties	 to	 abide	 by	 these	 laws	 and	 regulations;	 and	
Café	 in	 the	 Student	 Commons.	 	 There	 are	 limited	      assists	 students	 in	 achieving	 their	 goals	 within	 the	
hours	 when	 the	 value	 exchange	 option	 can	 be	           context	of	the	applicable	laws	and	regulations.	They	
used.                                                         also provide information to students, faculty and
                                                              staff on changes in institutional policies and prac-
DULanY haLL information                                       tices affecting international education. Through
                                                              ongoing programming and communication,
     Dinner	 is	 generally	 served	 in	 Dulany	 Hall	 5:30	
                                                              International Programs promotes an environment of
to	7:00	p.m.	Mondays	through	Thursdays	and	5:00	
                                                              cross-cultural	awareness,	diversity	and	understand-
to	 6:00	 p.m.	 Fridays	 when	 classes	 are	 in	 session.		
                                                              ing in all aspects of campus life.
There are abbreviated hours during the months of
June	and	July.
                                                              international Students
     An	 “all	 you	 can	 eat”	 meal	 is	 very	 reasonably	         Students	 in	 F-1	 student	 status	 must	 adhere	 to	
priced.		Spouses,	family	and	friends	are	welcome.             the	 regulatory	 requirements	 outlined	 in	 the	 United	
    The	 Cougar	 Café,	 located	 in	 the	 Student	            States	 Federal	 Register,	 Part	 8	 of	 the	 Code	 of	
Commons,	 is	 open	 from	 7:30	 a.m.	 to	 8:30	 p.m.	         Federal	Regulations.		
Mondays	through	Thursdays	and	7:30	a.m.	to	4:00	                    To assure that nonimmigrant students are able
p.m.	on	Fridays,	when	classes	are	in	session.		The	           to	cover	any	medical	expenses	in	the	United	States,	
menu consists of a variety of grab and go items.              it	is	required	that	all	international	students	purchase	
Summer	hours	may	vary.                                        the insurance plan provided through Columbia
                                                              College.		Students	in	F-1	status	will	be	charged	for	
health Services                                               this insurance on their Columbia College student
    The Health Center is located on the second                account upon enrollment for any number of credit
floor	 of	 the	 Atkins-Holman	 Student	 Commons	              hours.		Students	pursuing	Optional	Practical	Training	
(AHSC).	 Health	 services	 are	 available	 to	 day	 and	                                                              	
                                                              will	 also	 be	 enrolled	 for	 the	 insurance	 coverage.	
evening students, faculty, and staff. The Health              The	insurance	premium	will	be	divided	in	two	seg-
Center	 is	 a	 nurse	 practitioner-directed	 clinic	 that,	   ments	 and	 charged	 to	 the	 student's	 account.	      	
along	with	a	consulting	physician,	provides	care	for	         Payment	will	be	due	at	the	beginning	of	the	early	fall	
minor	illnesses	and	injuries,	health	care	counseling	         and	 winter	 sessions.	 	 For	 questions	 and	 details	
and community referral services. Visits to the clinic         about the mandatory insurance program, please
are	 free;	 however,	 payment	 for	 off	 campus	 labs,	       contact	the	Director	of	International	Programs.
medicine	 and	 physician	 visits,	 when	 referred,	 are	          Upon	arrival	on	campus,	international	students	
the client’s responsibility. There may also be mini-          must	report	to	the	Director	of	International	Programs.	        	
mal charges for supplies and vaccines.                        The	 Director	 is	 the	 Principal	 Designated	 School	
                                                              Official	 for	 Columbia	 College.	 	 Students	 need	 to	
international programs                                        bring	 the	 following	 documents:	 a	 valid	 passport,	
     The International Programs office, located on            visa	 (stamp	 located	 inside	 the	 passport),	 I-94	 card	
the	 second	 floor	 of	 the	 Atkins-Holman	 Student	          and	 all	 I-20	 forms	 (Certificate	 of	 Eligibility	 for	 Non-
Commons, strives to maintain the integrity of the             Immigrant	 Student)	 issued	 to	 them	 throughout	 the	
college through the recruitment, admission, integra-          duration	of	their	studies	in	the	United	States.		These	
tion and retention of international students. The             documents	will	be	reviewed	and	photocopied	for	the	
staff serves as an advocate and liaison for interna-          student’s	file.		At	this	time,	the	Director	will	register	
tional students at Columbia College concerning                the	 student	 in	 the	 Student	 and	 Exchange	 Visitor	
interactions	 with	 various	 federal,	 state	 and	 local	     Information	System	(SEVIS).
28	     Campus	Life

     Under	 SEVIS	 reporting	 requirements,	 the	                  3.	 Country	of	citizenship
Designated	School	Official	(DSO)	must	report	the	         	        4.	 Residential	address,	both	in	the	United	
following	 information	 for	 each	 student	 no	 later	                 States	and	abroad
than	 30	 days	 after	 the	 deadline	 for	 course	 regis-
                                                                   5.	 Enrollment	status:	Full/Part-time
tration:
                                                                   6.	 Date	of	beginning	of	activities
      1.	 Full-time	Enrollment
                                                                   7.	 Degree	program	and	field	of	study
      2.		 Student	 dropped	 below	 full-time	 without	
           prior		approval	by	the	DSO                              8.	 Practical	training	recommendations

      3.			Student	failed	to	enroll                                9.	 Termination	date	and	reason

      4.	 Current	 address	 –	 defined	 as	 where	 the	            10.	Documents	required	for	admission	to	
          student is physically residing                               Columbia College

      5.	 Start	date	of	next	term	or	semester                      11.	 Credits	completed	each	term/semester

    For	 students	 in	 initial	 status,	 the	 deadline	 for	       12.	Photocopy	of	Form	I-20
reporting	 is	 30	 days	 from	 the	 report	 date	 on	 the	
                                                                    In	 order	 to	 maintain	 F-1	 status	 and	 ensure	
SEVIS	 I-20	 form.	 	 For	 continuing	 students,	 the	
                                                               compliance	with	U.S.	immigration	law,	it	is	impera-
deadline	is	30	days	from	the	beginning	date	of	the	
term.                                                          tive	that	students	communicate	with	the	Director	of	
                                                               International Programs through the duration of
    The	DSO	at	Columbia	College	enters	data	and	               their studies at the College.
keeps	records	on	all	international	students	as	well	
as	their	dependents.	The	DSO	is	required	to	report	
information related to an individual student or the
                                                               recreation
dependent	 spouse/child	 in	 SEVIS	 within	 a	 given	              The	 AHS	 Commons,	 Southwell	 Sports	
period of time. These reportable events include,               Complex,	 Southy	 Fitness	 Center,	 common	 areas	
but are not limited to:                                        and residence hall lounges are available for a
                                                               variety	 of	 recreational	 activities.	 	 The	 Fitness	
      1.	 Change	of	legal	name
                                                               Center	 is	 located	 in	 Southy	 Building.	 	 It	 includes	
      2.	 Change	 of	 address,	 both	 in	 the	 United	
                                                               free	 weights,	 machine	 weights	 and	 cardio	 equip-
          States	and	abroad
                                                               ment.	 	 The	 courts	 at	 Southwell	 Sports	 Complex	
      3.	 Failure	to	maintain	status	or	complete	the	          are available for basketball, tennis and volleyball.
          educational program                                  Other	college	facilities,	such	as	Launer	Auditorium,	
      4.	 Early	 completion	 of	 the	 program	 prior	 to	      the	 Jane	 Froman	 Dance	 Studio,	 classrooms,	
          the	end	date	on	SEVIS	Form	I-20                      Dulany	Hall	and	the	AHS	Commons	are	available	
      5.	 Disciplinary	 action	 taken	 by	 the	 school	        upon	approval	to	any	officially	recognized	student	
          against the student as a result of a convic-         organization	 for	 meetings	 and	 programs.	
          tion of a crime                                      Reservations	 are	 made	 on	 a	 first-come,	 first-
      6.	 Any	 other	 notification	 about	 the	 student’s	     served	basis.		More	information	is	available	in	the	
          status                                               Student	Activities	Office.

    Students	 must	 report	 a	 change	 of	 name	 or	
address	to	the	International	Programs	office	within	                              hours of operation
                                                                                Southy	Fitness	Center	
10	days	of	the	change.		The	DSO	then	is	required	                       and	Southwell	Building	(Courts	&	Arena)
to	 update	 this	 information	 in	 SEVIS	 within	 21	
                                                                                            Open                    Close
days.                                                          	    Monday ...............6:30	a.m. ............. 10:00	p.m.
     As	 part	 of	 the	 record-keeping	 requirements	               Tuesday ..............6:30	a.m. ............. 10:00	p.m.
under	 the	 F-1	 regulations,	 the	 College	 must	 main-       	    Wednesday.........6:30	a.m. ............. 10:00	p.m.
                                                                    Thursday.............6:30	a.m. ............. 10:00	p.m.
tain	the	following	information	about	each	student:
                                                               	    Friday..................6:30	a.m. ............. 8:00	p.m.
      1.	 Name                                                 	    Saturday .............11:00	a.m. ............ 8:00	p.m.
      2.	 Date	and	place	of	birth                              	    Sunday ...............11:00	a.m. ............ 8:00	p.m.
                                                                                                      Campus	Life					29

counseling Services                                            used textbooks are available.
	     Counseling	 Services	 provides	 confidential	                Textbooks	 for	 both	 day	 and	 evening	 on-cam-
counseling	 free	 of	 charge	 to	 assist	 students	 with	      pus	 courses	 are	 available	 for	 purchase	 a	 few	
personal, developmental or psychological con-                  weeks	 before	 classes	 begin.	 	 When	 obtainable,	
cerns	 related	 to	 their	 academic	 progress	 and/or	         used	texts	are	sold	at	25%	less	than	the	cost	of	a	
personal	 growth.	 Counseling	 is	 short-term,	 solu-          new	 text.	 Students	 can	 now	 reserve	 textbooks	
tion-focused	 with	 session	 limits	 set	 per	 term.	 For	     online	 at:	 http://ccis.bncollege.com or whywaitfor-
chronic mental health issues or those that may                 books.com.
require	 more	 extensive	 counseling,	 referrals	 to	              Students	may	receive	textbook	refunds	based	
community	resources	are	provided.		Students	may	               on	 the	 policies	 listed	 below.	 No	 refund	 will	 be	
seek	assistance	with	or	assessment	of	the	follow-              issued	 without	 a	 valid	 receipt	 for	 all	 textbooks.
ing	 issues:	 anxiety/panic,	 depression,	 stress	 and	        Textbooks must be in the original condition.
time management, relationships, conflict resolu-
tion, eating disorders, and drug and alcohol abuse,
                                                               refUnD poLicY:
as	well	as	others.		Counseling	sessions	are	avail-
able	Monday	through	Friday	by	appointment.		More	                  For	 all	 courses	a	full	refund	will	be	given	with
information is available at www.ccis.edu/offices/              a receipt	if	the	textbook	is	returned	within	the	first	
campuslife/counseling/.		For	more	information	call	            week	of	classes.
Terri	Zeilenga,	M.A.,	LPC	at	573-875-7423.                         Textbooks must be in original condition, includ-
                                                               ing all components in packages.
career Services center                                             Merchandise	 other	 than	 textbooks	 may	 be	
     The center has trained personnel to assist                refunded	with	a	valid	receipt	within	thirty	days.
students	 with	 all	 aspects	 of	 career	 planning	 and	          Merchandise	 must	 be	 in	 original	 condition,	
development.	 Specific	 services	 designed	 to	 pro-           unopened	with	tags.
mote professional and personal success include a
                                                                                                                        	
                                                                  Refunds	 will	 be	 issued	 in	 the	 original	 form	 of	
carefully guided assessment of their skills, abilities,
                                                               payment.
values, achievements and interests as aids to effec-
tive	 career	 planning;	 a	 library	 of	 information	 about	      The textbook buyback period is during finals
occupations, corporations, agencies and govern-                week.	 	 This	 is	 the	 best	 time	 to	 sell	 back	 text-
ment	 organizations;	 salary	 surveys;	 employment	            books.
qualifications	and	employment	trends;	development	                TI-83	 calculators	 will	 not	 be	 considered	 for	
and	maintenance	of	placement	documents;	listings	              buyback.
of	 full-time,	 part-time,	 and	 summer	 employment	
opportunities	 and	 internships;	 and	 services	 for	          BooKStore hoUrS:
graduate	 and	 pre-professional	 school	 placement.	               Regular	Semester:
Programs are provided to inform and train the indi-                	  9:00	a.m.	–	8:00	p.m.,	Monday-Thursday
                                                                   	  9:00	a.m.	–	5:00	p.m.,	Friday
vidual	in	such	areas	as	interviewing,	resume/cover-
                                                                   	  Closed:	Saturdays	and	Sundays
letter	 construction,	 job	 hunting	 and	 sourcing,	 net-
                                                                   Summer	/	Winter	Break	/	Holiday	Hours:
working,	 decision	 making	 and	 salary	 negotiation.	     	
                                                                   	  Will	be	posted	on	Bookstore	door	and	
The	Career	Services	Center	is	located	on	the	sec-                  	  available	via	phone	greeting	at	(573)	875-7341.
ond	floor	of	the	Atkins-Holman	Student	Commons.                    Contact Information:
                                                                   	  Address:	 Atkins-Holman	Student	Commons
Bookstore                                                          	  	          1009	Rogers	Street
                                                                   	  	          Columbia,	MO	65216
     The Campus bookstore, located on the main                     	  Phone	Number:	(573)	875-7341
floor	 of	 the	 Student	 Commons,	 carries	 a	 wide	               	  FAX	Number:	(573)	442-0747
range of textbooks, trade books, art supplies,                     	  Email:	ccis@bkstore.com
study materials, college memorabilia, personal                     	  Website:	http://ccis.bncollege.com

grooming	 products	 and	 snacks.	 Both	 new	 and	
30	   Campus	Life

Students with Disabilities                                     receipt	is	required	to	pick	up	parking	hang	tags	at	
                                                               Registration	 and	 Financial	 Services	 located	 in	
	     The	 Rehabilitation	 Act	 of	 1973	 (public	 law	
                                                               Missouri	 Hall,	 room	 205.	 The	 price	 for	 a	 full	 year	
93-112)	 section	 504,	 provides	 that	 “no	 otherwise	
                                                               starting	 in	August	 is	 $40,	 $35	 when	 purchased	 in	
qualified	 disabled	 individual	 in	 the	 United	 States	
                                                               December	and	$30	for	the	summer	session.
shall	 solely	 by	 reason	 of	 his/her	 disability,	 be	
excluded from participation in, be denied the bene-
fits	 of,	 or	 be	 subject	 to	 discrimination	 under	 any	
program or activity receiving federal financial assis-
tance.”

1.	 It	 is	 the	 student’s	 responsibility	 to	 notify	 the	
    institution	of	a	disability	that	would	require	aca-
    demic	 adjustments	 in	 accordance	 with	 the	
    Americans	 with	 Disabilities	 Act	 (ADA)	 in	 sec-
    tion	 504.	 To	 self-identify	 as	 a	 student	 with	 a	
    disability,	 the	 student	 must	 register	 with	 the	
    Coordinator	of	Disability	Services	two	weeks	in	
    advance of the date accommodations are
    needed. Although students are encouraged to
    discuss	their	needs	with	their	instructors,	regis-
    tration	 with	 the	 Coordinator	 of	 Disability	
    Services	 is	 necessary	 in	 order	 to	 receive	
    accommodations. All disabilities must be appro-
    priately documented.

2.	 While	students	are	encouraged	to	self-identify	
    at the earliest possible time, students may not
    know	 or	 choose	 to	 self-identify,	 but	 may	 still	
    receive	 services	 at	 any	 time	 once	 they	 self-
    disclose and document.

3.	 Students	with	disabilities	have	the	right	to	have	
    access	and	accommodation	complaints	addres-
    sed through a formal appeals procedure.
    Students	wishing	to	file	a	grievance	must	com-
    plete	 the	 Disabilities	 Grievance	 Form	 in	 its	
    entirety, attach a description of the circum-
    stances leading to the complaint as directed on
    the	 Disabilities	 Grievance	 Form,	 and	 submit	
    both	documents	to	the	Campus	Life	Office.		

D
	 isabilities	 Grievance	 Forms	 are	 available	 in	 the	
Campus	 Life	 Office,	 the	 Academic	 Affairs	 Office,	
the	ADA	Coordinator’s	Office	and	the	Administrative	
Services	Office.	

parking permits
    All vehicles parking on campus must be regis-
tered	with	the	Campus	Safety	Office.	Parking	per-
mit registration is available online by going to the
Quick	 Links	 under	 Day,	 Graduate,	 Online	 and	
Evening	 Programs	 at	 www.ccis.edu.	 A	 printed	
                                                                Academic	Policies,	Regulations,	and	Procedures						31


acaDemic poLicieS, reGULationS anD
proceDUreS
     Graduate	students	enroll	for	course	work	prior	to	         Students	desiring	to	take	a	course	from	a	depart-
the	beginning	of	each	session.		Post	Baccalaureate	          ment	 outside	 the	 one	 to	 which	 they	 were	 admitted
students	 are	 allowed	 to	 register	 for	 undergraduate	    must obtain permission from the Chair of the
courses during the registration period for seniors.          Department	for	that	course.
Late	 registrations	 are	 accepted	 through	 the	 add	
period for each main campus graduate session. The            online registration
late registration fee begins on the first day of gradu-
ate	 classes.	 Five	 eight-week	 sessions	 are	 offered	          Graduate	Students	have	the	ability	to	register	via	
each	year	beginning	in	January,	March,	June,	August	         the	web	at	www.ccis.edu/students.		Students	should	
and October.                                                 log	into	eServices	and	click	on	the	appropriate	regis-
     Students	may	register	online	or	in	the	Registration	    tration	 link.	 Students	 may	 choose	 an	 Express
and	Financial	Services	Office.                               Registration	 format,	 used	 when	 the	 exact	 course	
     Students	 who	 are	 fully	 admitted	 to	 a	 graduate	   number	 and	 section	 is	 known,	 or	 the	 Search and
degree	program	or	with	written	permission	from	the	          register for sections method	 allowing	 a	 search	 for	
respective graduate program coordinator may be               classes based on specified criteria. This method
eligible to enroll in undergraduate and graduate             also	allows	students	to	view	seat	availability.		Either	
courses	 for	 which	 they	 have	 met	 the	 prerequisites.	
                                                         	   method	will	place	selected	section(s)	on	a	preferred	
Students	may	enroll	in	undergraduate	and	graduate	           sections	 list	 where	 students	 will	 complete	 the	
courses	within	the	same	session	or	semester,	how-            registration process. The student may choose to
ever financial aid may be affected.                          register from this screen immediately or in the future
                                                             as	 sections	 will	 remain	 on	 the	 preferred	 section	 list	
advising                                                     until the student either removes a section or registers
                                                             for it. It is important to note that the appearance of
     Students	are	encouraged	to	meet	regularly	with	
                                                             a section on this screen does not guarantee eligibility
their	advisor.		The	importance	of	the	advisor/	advisee	
                                                             to	 register	 for	 the	 section	 or	 that	 a	 seat	 will	 be	
relationship	 cannot	 be	 overemphasized.	 	 Both	 per-
                                                             available.		Eligibility	screening	takes	place	when	the	
sonal and academic concerns should be addressed
                                                             student	 actually	 registers.	 	 Students	 may	 return	 to	
at these meetings.
                                                             this screen to complete the registration process by
                                                             clicking on the Register and Drop Sections link.
course Load
                                                                  If an error message is received during any part of
     Students	 may	 take	 a	 maximum	 of	 six	 graduate	     the registration process, please make a note of the
semester	hours	per	session.		Students	taking	fewer	          contents of the message and contact the appropriate
than	three	graduate	semester	hours	(six	undergradu-          office	for	assistance.		Students	may	also	contact	the	
ate	 semester	 hours)	 per	 session	 are	 classified	 as	    Student	Records	and	Transcripts	Office	at	573/875-
part-time	students.		Students	who	desire	to	enroll	in	       7526	or	800/231-2391	ext.	7526	during	normal	busi-
more than six graduate hours per session must                ness	hours.		Students	who	have	trouble	logging	into	
obtain the permission of the appropriate graduate            eServices	 should	 call	 the	 Help	 Desk	 at	 573/875-
program	 coordinator	 by	 written	 petition	 and	 the	       4357or	800/231-2391	ext.	4357.
Academic Affairs Office.
                                                             adding a course
	   3	Graduate	Semester	Hours ...................Full-time
                                                                   Graduate students may add courses through the
	   1.5-2	Graduate	Semester	Hours .............Half-time
                                                             first	five	days	of	the	session.		Forms	are	available	in	
	   below	1.5	Graduate	Semester	Hours......Less	than	        the	 Registration	 and	 Financial	 Services	 Office	 or	
	   	   	       	       	       	          Half-time         courses may be added online. Courses are added to
                                                             the	student’s	schedules	if	space	is	available.		Note:	
    MAT	Post-Baccalaureate	students	may	enroll	in	           Students	 registering	 for	 a	 graduate	 class	 at	 the	
up	to	18	semester	hours	of	coursework	per	16	week	           Online	Campus	or	at	any	of	the	Nationwide	Campuses	
semester	 (not	 to	 exceed	 six	 hours	 of	 graduate	        may not add classes once the session has started.
coursework	in	any	eight-week	session).
32	      Academic	Policies,	Regulations,	and	Procedures

Dropping a course                                              WE .... Excused	from	the	course	for	extraordinary	
                                                                       circumstances.	 Generally,	 “extraordinary	   	
      Graduate	 students	 may	 drop	 courses	 without	
                                                                       circumstances”	 is	 narrowly	 interpreted	 to	
academic record and financial liability through the
                                                                       mean the development of unforeseen,
first	business	day	of	the	second	week	of	the	session.	 	
                                                                       unexpected circumstances beyond a stu-
Drop	 forms	 are	 available	 in	 the	 Registration	 and	
                                                                       dent’s ability to control that prevent contin-
Financial	 Services	 Office	 or	 they	 may	 be	 dropped	
                                                                       ued attendance in all	classes	(death	of	an	
online.
                                                                       immediate family member, a change in the
Withdrawal from courses                                                student’s employment, and mental or
                                                                       physical illness befalling the student or a
     Graduate	students	who	withdraw	from	a	course	
                                                                       member	of	his/her	immediate	family).
or	courses	between	the	end	of	the	drop	period	and	
the	 end	 of	 the	 sixth	 week	 of	 a	 session	 receive	 a	           A	 request	 for	 a	 grade	 of	 WE	 must	 be	
grade	of	W.		Students	do	not	receive	grade	points	for	                accompanied by a letter from the student
withdrawn	 grades,	 but	 the	 notation	 appears	 on	 the	             explaining the circumstances. In addition,
transcript.                                                           substantiating documentation must be pro-
     To	 withdraw,	 a	 student	 must	 complete	 a	 with-              vided. a grade of We may be requested
drawal	form	and	submit	the	form	to	Registration	and	                  anytime during the term of enrollment,
Financial	 Services	 or	 to	 the	 Student	 Records	 and	              and all courses currently enrolled in
Transcripts	Office.	Withdrawals	may	also	be	initiated	                must be included in the We request.
by	submitting	the	Course	Withdrawal	Form	in	eSer-
                                                               	      A	grade	of	WE	is	not	automatic	and	is	sub-
vices.	Withdrawals	become	effective	the	date	a	staff	
                                                                      ject	to	review	and	approval.
member	 at	 the	 appropriate	 office	 receives	 the	 with-
drawal	 form	 from	 the	 student.	 	 Discontinuing	 class	     S ......Awarded	to	a	student	showing	satisfactory	
attendance	 does	 not	 constitute	 withdrawal	 and	 stu-               progress on culminating experience.
dents	remain	academically	liable;	those	who	do	not	
                                                               I........ Assignment of an Incomplete is reserved
complete	 the	 withdrawal	 process	 as	 outlined	 above	
                                                                         for extraordinary circumstances that pre-
are	in	danger	of	receiving	an	F	in	the	course.
                                                                         vent	a	student	from	completing	the	require-
     Financial	liability	is	not	reduced	when	a	student	
                                                                         ments of a course by the end of the
withdraws	from	a	course.	Students	who	receive	any	
                                                                         session.	 	 Extraordinary	 circumstances	 is	
form	 of	 Federal	 Title	 IV	 assistance,	 and	 who	 with-
                                                                         narrowly	 interpreted	 to	 mean	 unforeseen,	
draw	may	be	required	by	federal	regulations	to	return	
                                                                         unexpected circumstances beyond the
some or all of the federal aid received. This includes
                                                                         student's	 control	 that	 prevents	 continued	
the	Federal	Pell	and	SEOG	grants,	and	the	Federal,	
                                                                         attendance	 in	 all	 classes	 (death	 of	 an	
Stafford	and	PLUS	loans.		See	the	Financial	Aid	por-
                                                                         immediate family member, a change in the
tion of the College catalog for additional information.
                                                                         student’s employment, mental or physical
Graduate Grading System                                                  illness befalling the student or a member
                                                                         of	 the	 immediate	 family).	 	 In	 such	 cases	
     Columbia College records letter grades for                          instructors	 make	 specific	 written	 arrange-
course	work.	Grades	for	graduate	courses	include:                        ments	 with	 students	 for	 completion	 of	 the	
      A . . . Outstanding performance                                    course.
      B . . . Average performance                              	      If	 a	 student	 receives	 an	 Incomplete,	 he/
      C. . . Less	than	acceptable	performance                         she	 must	 complete	 required	 course	 work	
                                                                      by	the	end	of	the	following	eight-week	ses-
                                                         	
      F . . . Significant	 performance	 failure	 with	 no	            sion.	 	 Extensions	 beyond	 one	 session	
              academic	credit	or	quality	points	awarded               must	 be	 approved	 by	 the	 Executive	 Vice	
                                                                      President	 and	 Dean	 for	Academic	Affairs.	  	
other grades include                                                  Incompletes that are not finished are to be
      W	 ....Withdrawn.	 	Awarded	 when	 a	 student	 offi-            permanently recorded by the instructor as
             cially	 withdraws	 from	 a	 course,	 or	 when	           I or any other grade assigned by the
             an	 instructor	 withdraws	 a	 student	 from	 a	          instructor.
             course.	 	 Students	 may	 not	 withdraw	 from	
                                                               	      When	incomplete	work	in	a	course	is	com-
             a	 course	 after	 the	 sixth	 week	 has	 been	
                                                                      pleted, the instructor is responsible for
             completed.
                                                                     Academic	Policies,	Regulations,	and	Procedures						33

           reporting the letter grade that replaces the           may be transferred from regionally accredited institu-
           I on the student’s permanent record.                   tions only. International institutions that do not have
                                                                  regional	 accreditation	 will	 be	 evaluated	 per	 the	
   	       Students	enrolled	in	EDUC	508	Integrative	
                                                                  Evaluations	 Department	 International	 credentialing	
           Project	are	exempt	from	this	policy.
                                                                  process. Petitions for consideration of transfer
	   Graduate	credit	is	awarded	only	for	courses	des-              credit must be made prior to the successful comple-
ignated as graduate courses and the graduate grade                tion	of	12	hours	of	graduate	course	work	at	Columbia	
point average is computed based on those courses.                 College.		A	maximum	of	9	semester	hours	of	transfer	
Undergraduate	credit	is	given	only	for	courses	desig-             credit,	with	the	grade	of	B	or	higher,	may	be	allowed	
nated	 as	 undergraduate	 courses.	 	 A	 grade	 of	 B	 or	        for graduate students. In all instances, the culminat-
higher is expected in all graduate and undergraduate              ing experience must be taken at Columbia College.
course	work.		                                                          After being admitted to a graduate program at
                                                                  Columbia College, a student at Columbia College
repeating a course                                                who	 wishes	 to	 take	 courses	 at	 another	 college	 or	
    Courses may be repeated at Columbia College                   university	 while	 pursuing	 a	 graduate	 degree	 at	
in an attempt to improve grades. The grade earned                 Columbia	 College	 must	 first	 obtain	 written	 permis-
the second time the course is taken is used to deter-             sion for the transfer of these courses from the appro-
mine	the	grade-point	average,	and	the	first	grade	is	             priate graduate program coordinator.
identified	 as	 R	 (Repeat)	 on	 the	 transcript.	 	The	 first	   	     The	 Graduate	 Transfer	 Credit	 Form	 is	 located	
grade	does	not	figure	in	the	total	hours	or	the	grade-            on	 the	 Columbia	 College’s	 Evaluations	 Department	
point average. In all cases, the second grade is the              web	 page	 under	 Forms	 at:	 www.ccis.edu/offices/
one	that	is	recorded.		No	duplicate	credit	is	given.              Evaluations	
                                                                        An official transcript from each college and uni-
audit                                                             versity attended must be submitted to the College
     Students	wishing	to	audit	graduate	courses	must	             before transfer of credit can be accomplished. An
be properly admitted to the Graduate Program and                  official transcript is marked as such and sent directly
complete	the	Audit	Approval	Request	Form.			                      from the institution attended to the Columbia College
     Students	 may	audit	 a	regularly	 scheduled	 class	          campus	where	the	applicant	plans	to	attend.		A	tran-
for	no	grade	and	no	credit;	however,	participation	in	            script marked official and hand delivered in a sealed
the course is noted on their official records. Acceptable         envelope	 of	 the	 institution	 by	 the	 applicant	 will	 be	
performance and attendance is defined by all instruc-             accepted as official. Transcripts marked unofficial or
tors of the course. Audit enrollments do not fulfill              student	 copy	 will	 not	 be	 considered	 official	 even	 if	
requirements	for	course	work	for	degree	completion	               delivered	 in	 a	 sealed	 institution	 envelope.	 	 Faxed	
or	financial	aid	awards.		The	cost	to	audit	is	$90	per	           transcripts	are	not	considered	official.		Credit	will	not	
semester hour.                                                    be evaluated for one institution from another institu-
                                                                  tion’s transcript.
transfer of credits from another                                        Appeals may be made for an exception to having
institution or columbia college Degree                            all	transcripts/credit	documents	submitted.		An	appeal	
program                                                           must	include	a	statement	of	why	the	transcript/credit	
                                                                  document is unavailable.
     Applicants must inform the College of all institu-                 A
                                                                        	 ppeals	 will	 not	 be	 approved	 or	 exceptions	
tions	of	higher	learning	attended	and	whether	or	not	             made	 for	 the	 following	 reasons:	 applicant	 owes	
academic	 credit	 was	 earned	 at	 these	 institutions.	   	      money at another institution and is therefore unable
Falsification	 of	 application	 information,	 including	          to	 procure	 an	 official	 transcript;	 poor	 grades	 at	 the	
failure	 to	 identify	 all	 post-secondary	 institutions	         previous institution and therefore courses may not be
attended, may result in denial of admission or dis-               transferable	to	Columbia	College;	applicant	does	not	
missal if discovered after enrollment.                            believe	 that	 previous	 coursework	 is	 applicable	 to	
	    Upon	 petition	 by	 the	 student	 to	 the	 appropriate	      Columbia	 College;	 applicant	 does	 not	 want	 to	 pay	
graduate program coordinator, credit may be given                 transcript fees.
for graduate hours taken at another institution or                      Applicants that are unable to obtain transcripts
another Columbia College degree program within	the	               because the previous institution has closed, had a
last seven years. Petitions must include an official              fire or some other records catastrophe may include a
course description from the transferring college cata-            letter	 from	 the	 institution	 or	 the	 Department	 of	
log	and/or	course	syllabus	to	be	considered.		Credit	             Education	 for	 the	 state	 where	 the	 school	 is	 located	
34	    Academic	Policies,	Regulations,	and	Procedures

indicating that the transcript is not available. If the          to sign up for participation by the deadline date
letter	is	provided	along	with	the	application	and	other	         results in a later commencement opportunity.
transfer documents, then an appeal is not necessary
and	there	will	be	no	delay	in	the	evaluation	process.
     Applicants may also submit a letter of appeal if a
                                                                 main campus commencement cere-
previous institution attended is not currently nor has
ever been accredited by one of the accrediting bod-              mony participation
ies	recognized	by	Columbia	College.                                   Students	 who	 complete	 their	 degrees	 in	 March	
     Once a document has been submitted it becomes               and	 May	 are	 eligible	 to	 participate	 in	 the	 May	 com-
the	property	of	Columbia	College.		Neither	the	origi-            mencement	 ceremonies	 of	 the	 same	 year.	 July	
nal	nor	a	copy	will	be	given	to	the	applicant.                   graduates	who	request	to	participate	in	the	May	cer-
                                                                 emony	of	the	same	year	are	allowed	to	do	so	without	
change in Degree program                                         appeal	(see	detailed	information	below).
   A	 student	 wishing	 to	 pursue	 a	 graduate	 degree	              Students	who	complete	their	degrees	in	October	
or program other than the one originally sought                  and	 December	 are	 eligible	 to	 participate	 in	 the	
should contact the Admissions Office to determine                December	 commencement	 ceremony	 of	 the	 same	
whether	additional	materials	need	to	be	submitted.               year.		March	graduates	who	request	to	participate	in	
                                                                 the	 preceding	 year’s	 December	 ceremony	 are	
Second Degrees                                                   allowed	to	do	so	without	appeal	(see	detailed	infor-
     A	student	who	desires	a	second	masters	degree	              mation	 below).	 	 July	 graduates	 who	 request	 to	 par-
from	Columbia	College	may	receive	a	maximum	of	9	                ticipate	in	the	December	Ceremony	of	the	same	year	
hours	credit	from	the	first	degree	toward	the	second	            are	 allowed	 to	 do	 so	 without	 appeal	 (see	 detailed	
degree, if the credit is deemed applicable by the aca-           information	below).
demic	 department	 in	 which	 the	 second	 degree	 is	                Students	 with	 degree	 completion	 dates	 other	
sought.	All	other	requirements	for	the	second	degree,	           than the ones listed must appeal to participate in a
including the culminating experience, must be com-               different	ceremony.		Students	who	request	to	partici-
pleted.                                                          pate after the deadline date must appeal. Appeals
                                                                 are	 filed	 in	 the	 Evaluations	 Department	 and	 coordi-
candidacy for Degree                                             nated	with	the	Executive	Vice	President	and	Dean	for	
                                                                 Academic Affairs.
	    Declaration	of	candidacy	for	degree	must	occur	
no later than one session prior to the last session of
                                                                 July Graduates
enrollment.	 File	 the	 form	 by	 the	 early	 spring	 if	 you	
anticipate	an	October	or	December	degree	comple-                 Guidelines for July Graduates to participate in
tion	date.	File	the	form	by	early	Fall	if		you	anticipate	       the may commencement ceremony
a	March,	May	or	July	degree	completion	date.		 	                      To	 be	 eligible	 to	 participate	 in	 a	 May	
	    Candidacy	forms	are	to	be	filed	in	the	Evaluations	         Commencement Ceremony, students anticipating a
Department	after	payment	of	the	graduation	process-              July	degree	completion	date	must	file	a	Declaration
ing	 fee	 has	 been	 made	 in	 the	 Registration	 and	           of Candidacy for Degree	 form	 prior	 to	 the	 May	
Financial	 Services	 Office.	 	 Candidacy	 forms	 are	           ceremony	participation	deadline.		A	degree	audit	will	
available	 in	 the	 Evaluations	 Department	 and	 online	        determine	 eligibility.	 	 Students	 who	 are	 not	 cleared	
via	the	Evaluations	Department	webpage.                          for	a	July	degree	completion	date	will	not	be	eligible	
     Responsibility	 for	 understanding	 and	 meeting	           for	 participation	 in	 the	 May	 ceremony.	 	 They	 will	
graduation	 requirements	 rests	 entirely	 with	 the	 stu-       default	to	a	later	date	as	well	as	a	later	commence-
dent.                                                            ment	opportunity.		Any	exceptions	will	be	via	written	
     Filing	 the	 Declaration	 of	 Candidacy	 for	 Degree	       appeal,	 submitted	 via	 the	 Evaluations	 Department	
form indicates anticipated degree completion. It does            and	 coordinated	 with	 the	 Executive	 Vice	 President	
not confirm participation in a commencement cere-                and	Dean	for	Academic	Affairs.
mony. Ceremony participation is a separate process                    July	 graduates	 who	 do	 not	 participate	 in	 a	 pre-
that	 also	 occurs	 via	 the	 Evaluations	 Department.	      	   ceding	May	ceremony	are	eligible	to	participate	in	the	
Deadline	 to	 sign	 up	 to	 participate	 in	 the	 December	      following	December	ceremony.		Graduates	must	con-
Commencement	 Ceremony	 is	 in	 mid-October.	 	 The	             tact	 the	 Evaluations	 Department	 in	 October	 to	 sign	
deadline	 to	 sign	 up	 to	 participate	 in	 a	 May	             up for participation.
Commencement	Ceremony	is	in	mid-March.		Failure	
                                                                Academic	Policies,	Regulations,	and	Procedures						35

march Graduates                                                   the student’s education records, except to
                                                                  the extent that ferpa authorizes disclosure
Guidelines for march Graduates to participate in
                                                                  without consent.		One	exception,	which	permits	
the December commencement ceremony
                                                                  disclosure	 without	 consent,	 is	 disclosure	 to	
     To be eligible to participate in the preceding               school	officials	with	legitimate	educational	inter-
December	 Commencement	 Ceremony,	 students	                      ests. A school official is defined as a person
anticipating	 a	 March	 degree	 completion	 date	 must	           employed by the College in an administrative,
file	a	Declaration	of	Candidacy	for	Degree	form	prior	            supervisory, academic or support staff position
to	the	December	ceremony	participation	deadline.	A	               (including	law	enforcement	unit	and	health	staff);	
degree	audit	will	determine	eligibility.		Students	who	           a	person	or	company	with	whom	the	College	has	
are	 not	 cleared	 for	 a	 March	 degree	 completion	 will	       contracted	 (such	 as	 an	 attorney,	 auditor	 or	      	
not	be	eligible	for	participation	in	the	December	cer-            collection	agent);	a	person	serving	on	the	Board	
emony.		They	will	default	to	a	later	degree	completion	           of	 Trustees;	 or	 a	 student	 serving	 on	 an	 official	
date	 as	 well	 as	 a	 later	 commencement	 opportunity.	         committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance
Any	exceptions	will	be	via	written	appeal,	submitted	             committee, or assisting another school official in
via	the	Evaluations	Department	and	coordinated	with	              performing his or her tasks. A school official has
the	Executive	Vice	President	and	Dean	for	Academic	               a legitimate educational interest if the official
Affairs.                                                          needs	to	review	an	education	record	in	order	to	
    March	graduates	who	do	not	participate	in	a	pre-              fulfill	his	or	her	professional	responsibility.		Upon	
ceding	 December	 ceremony	 are	 eligible	 to	 partici-           request,	the	College	discloses	education	records	
pate	in	the	following	May	ceremony.		Graduates	must	              without	 consent	 to	 officials	 of	 another	 school	 in	
contact	 the	 Evaluations	 Department	 in	 February	 to	          which	a	student	seeks	or	intends	to	enroll.
sign up for participation.                                    4.	 the right to file a complaint with the U.S.
                                                                  Department of education concerning alleged
Student’s right to privacy
                                                                  failures by the college to comply with the
	    The	 Family	 Educational	 Rights	 and	 Privacy	Act	
                                                                  requirements of ferpa. The name and address
(FERPA)	affords	students	certain	rights	with	respect	
                                                                  of	the	Office	that	administers	FERPA	is:
to their education records. These rights include:
1.	 the right to inspect and review their educa-                  	        Family	Compliance	Office
    tion record within 45 days of the day the                     	        U.S.	Department	of	Education
    college receives a request for access.                        	        400	Maryland	Avenue,	SW
    Students	 should	 submit	 to	 the	 Registrar	 or	             	        Washington,	DC	20202-4605
    Executive	Vice	President	and	Dean	for	Academic	           release of Directory information	–	Under	the	provi-
    Affairs	written	requests	that	identify	the	record(s)	     sions	of	the	Act,	Columbia	College	is	allowed	to	dis-
    they	wish	to	inspect.		The	student	will	be	notified	      close	 “Directory	 Information”	 without	 consent.	       	
    of	 a	 time	 and	 place	 where	 the	 records	 may	 be	    “Directory	Information”	is	described	as	name,	address,	
    inspected.                                                telephone	 number,	 e-mail	 address,	 dates	 of	 atten-
2. the right to request the amendment of that                 dance,	status	(full-time,	part-time,	etc.),	class,	previ-
   part of a student’s education record that the              ous	institutions	attended,	major	field	of	study,	awards,	
   student believes is inaccurate or misleading.              honors	 (including	 dean’s	 list),	 degree(s)	 conferred	
   The	student	should	write	to	the	Registrar,	clearly	        (including	 dates),	 past	 and	 present	 participation	 in	
   identifying	 the	 part	 of	 the	 record	 he/she	 wants	    officially	 recognized	 sports	 and	 activities,	 physical	
   changed	and	specify	why	it	is	inaccurate	or	mis-           factors	 (height	 and	 weight	 of	 athletes)	 picture	 and	
   leading. If Columbia College decides not to                date	 and	 place	 of	 birth.	 “Directory	 Information”	 is	
   amend	the	record	as	requested,	the	College	will	           released	at	the	discretion	of	the	institution.		However,	
   notify the student of the decision and advise the          students	who	do	not	wish	any	or	all	of	this	information	
   student of his or her right to a hearing regarding         to be released may prevent such release by complet-
   the	request	for	amendment.		Additional	informa-            ing and signing a Request to Prevent Disclosure of
   tion	 regarding	 the	 hearing	 procedures	 will	 be	       Directory Information available	in	the	Registration	and	
   provided	to	the	student	when	notified	of	the	right	        Financial	 Services	 Office.	 Also	 available	 in	 the	
   to a hearing.                                              Registration	and	Financial	Services	Office	are	forms	
                                                              a	 student	 may	 complete	 granting	 access	 of	 non-
3. the right to consent to disclosures of per-
                                                              directory	 information	 (such	 as	 student’s	 account	 or	
   sonally identifiable information contained in
                                                              grades)	to	parents	or	other	individuals.	
36	   Academic	Policies,	Regulations,	and	Procedures

transcripts                                                     5.	 Students	 not	 completing	 the	 graduate	 degree	
                                                                    program		within	a	seven-year	period	will	be	dis-
     Columbia College transcripts of permanent
                                                                    missed.
student records are confidential and cannot be
released to anyone, except Columbia College instruc-            6.	 Students	who	are	dismissed	will	not	be	readmit-
tors	and	officials,	without	the	written	permission	from	            ted to Columbia College graduate programs.
the student. Columbia College accepts transcript                    Students	having	extenuating	circumstances	may	
requests	via	mail,	fax	or	in	person.		All	requests	must	            appeal the academic dismissal to the Graduate
include	the	signature	of	the	student	whose	record	is	               Council. Appeals should be directed to the Chair
being released. Payment may be made by cash,                        of	the	Graduate	Council	within	one	session	after	
check, money order or credit card. The transcript fee               dismissal.	 	 Students	 will	 be	 informed	 by	 the	
is	$7.50	per	transcript.                                            Chair	of	the	Graduate	Council,	in	writing,	of	the	
    Requests	 must	 include	 the	 student’s	 full	 name,	           action taken.
maiden or former name if applicable, dates of atten-
                                                                Grade appeals
dance,	 ID	 or	 SS	 number,	 birth	 date,	 the	 student’s		
current address and phone number, the address                       Students	may	file	appeals	when	they	believe	that	
where	 the	 transcript	 should	 be	 sent,	 the	 number	 of	                                                          	
                                                                an	 incorrect	 or	 unfair	 grade	 has	 been	 awarded.	
copies to be issued and the payment. A student’s                Documentation	 which	 demonstrates	 compelling	
current account balance must be clear prior to the              objective	evidence	is	required	in	all	grade	appeals.
release of the transcript.                                           In	general,	students	should	follow	this	procedure	
                                                                for grade appeals:
probation
                                                                1.	 Discuss	 the	 problem	 with	 the	 faculty	 member	
     Students	whose	cumulative	grade	point	average	
                                                                    involved.
falls	below	the	3.0	minimum	for	courses	within	their	
degree	program	will	be	placed	on	probation.		Students	          2.	 If	not	satisfied	with	that	faculty	member’s	expla-
placed on probation must earn sufficient grade                      nation,	 seek	 mediation	 from	 the	 Department	
points,	within	their	degree	program,	during	their	pro-              Chair.
bationary term, to raise their cumulative grade point           3.	 Failing	resolution	of	the	problem,	request	a	grade	
average	 to	 3.0	 within	 the	 next	 9	 semester	 hours.	           appeal	 hearing	 with	 the	 Hearing	 Board.	 	 This	
Failure	to	do	so	will	result	in	dismissal.                          request	must	be	filed	in	writing	with	the	Executive	
                                                                    Vice	 President	 and	 Dean	 for	 Academic	 Affairs	
Dismissal                                                           within	60	calendar	days	after	grades	have	been	
     Students	 will	 be	 dismissed	 from	 the	 graduate	            posted	 by	 the	 Registrar.	 	 The	 Executive	 Vice	
program and not considered as having met gradua-                    President	 and	 Dean	 for	 Academic	 Affairs	 may	
tion	requirements	for	any	of	the	following:                         inform students that their submitted materials do
1.	 Receipt	of	a	grade	of	C	in	two	or	more	graduate	                not	support	requests	for	changes	in	grades	and/
    courses.		(Also	applies	to	undergraduate	courses	               or	 forward	 the	 appeals	 to	 the	 Campus	 Hearing	
    for	 MAT	 Post-Baccalaureate	 students.)	 	 Note:	              Board.	 The	 decision	 of	 the	 Campus	 Hearing	
    Although students may repeat a course in order                  Board	is	final.	The	chair	of	the	Campus	Hearing	
    to	 replace	 a	 C	 with	 a	 higher	 grade,	 receiving	 a	       Board	communicates	decisions	to	the	student	and	
    second	 C	 prior	 to	 repeating	 the	 first	 C	 with	 a	        other parties involved in the appeal. If a change in
    grade	of	B	or	higher	will	cause	the	student	to	be	              grade or academic standing results, the chair of
    dismissed.                                                      the	Campus	Hearing	Board	notifies	the	Registrar	
                                                                    of	the	new	grade	or	change	in	standing.
2.	 Receipt	 of	 a	 grade	 of	 F	 in	 any	 one	 graduate	
                                                                4.	 In	 the	 event	 that	 new	 evidence	 becomes	 avail-
    course.	(Also	applies	to	undergraduate	courses	
                                                                    able,	 a	 request	 may	 be	 made	 in	 writing	 to	 the	
    for	MAT	Post-Baccalaureate	students.)		
                                                                    Executive	Vice	President	and	Dean	for	Academic	
3.	 Failure	to	remove	themselves	from	probation	as	                 Affairs,	 who	 determines	 if	 the	 	 appeal	 is	 to	 be	
    described above.                                                reconsidered.		If	a	question	arises	regarding	pro-
4.	 Recommendation	 of	 the	 academic	 department,	                 cedural correctness or impartiality, the issue may
    based on proven academic dishonesty, or ethical                 be	brought	to	the	Executive	Vice	President	and	
    or professional misconduct.                                     Dean	 for	 Academic	 Affairs,	 who	 has	 the	 final	
                                                                    authority		in	passing	judgment	on	these	matters.
                                                                Academic	Policies,	Regulations,	and	Procedures						37

Student conduct                                               live	 and	 is	 considered	 a	 serious	 offense	 subject	 to	
                                                              strong disciplinary actions. Academic misconduct
     The	 College	 has	 adopted	 a	 Student	 Conduct	
                                                              includes,	but	is	not	limited	to	the	following:
Code to protect the rights of students, faculty, staff
and the College itself. This code ensures that                  •	   Knowingly	furnishing	false	or	misleading	infor-
the Columbia College learning community is one                       mation.
                                                        	
characterized	 by	 mutual	 respect,	 civility	 and	 good	
                                                                •	   Falsification,	 alteration	 or	 misuse	 of	 College	
citizenship.
                                                                     forms or records.
    Columbia College students, as members of the
academic community, are expected to accept and                  •	   Any	 joint	 effort	 in	 examinations,	 assignments	
adhere to these high standards of personal conduct.                  or	 other	 academic	 activity	 unless	 authorized	
Students	shall:                                                      by the instructor.

1.	 Treat	all	members	of	the	College	community	with	            •	   Plagiarism	in	any	form;	using	another’s	phrase,	
    courtesy, respect and dignity.                                   sentence	 or	 paragraph	 without	 quotation	
                                                                     marks;	using	another’s	ideas	or	structure	with-
2.	 Comply	with	directions	of	College	officials	acting	              out	properly	identifying	the	source;	or	using	the	
    in the performance of their duties.                              work	 of	 someone	 else	 and	 submitting	 it	 as	
3.	 Treat	 the	 campus	 itself	 with	 respect,	 including	           one’s	own.
    buildings, grounds and furnishings.
                                                                •	   Willfully	aiding	another	in	any	act	of	academic	
4.	 Respect	 the	 rights	 and	 property	 of	 other	 mem-             dishonesty.		Columbia	College	is	equally	con-
    bers of the College community.                                   cerned about the interpersonal social relation-
5.	 Fulfill	their	obligations	through	honest	and	inde-               ships that affect the learning environment.
    pendent effort and integrity in academic and                     Respect	 for	 the	 conditions	 necessary	 to	
    personal conduct.                                                enhance	learning	is,	therefore,	required.

6.	 Accept	 responsibility	 for	 and	 the	 consequences	      procedures:
    of their actions and shall encourage responsible          	    Generally,	the	faculty	will	handle	offenses	relat-
    conduct in others.                                        ed to academic misconduct and assign appropriate
                                                              penalties	without	involving	others.		In	such	cases,	the	
7.	 Respect	the	prohibition	of	possession,	consump-
                                                              following	procedures	will	be	followed:
    tion, distribution and provision of alcohol on
    campus and the illegal possession, use, distribu-           1.	 The	 faculty	 member	 who,	 upon	 investigation,	
    tion and provision of controlled substances.                    suspects	academic	misconduct	will,	if	possible,	
                                                                    confer	with	the	student	suspected.
8.	 Abide	by	all	published	policies	including,	but	not	
    limited to those that appear in the College                      a. If the faculty member determines the stu-
    Catalog, Student Handbook, Residential Life                         dent is not responsible for engaging in
    Handbook and Code for Computer Users.                               academic	 misconduct,	 the	 matter	 will	 be	
                                                                        dropped.
9.	 Refrain	 from	any	 contact	with	 firearms	on	 cam-
    pus	 and	 from	 tampering	 with	 fire	 safety	 equip-            b. If the faculty member determines the unac-
    ment in College buildings.                                          ceptable	 behavior	 was	 unintentional,	 the	
                                                                        violation	will	be	explained	and	an	alterna-
10.	 Have	 no	 firearms,	 weapons	 or	 any	 other	 item	
                                                                        tive	penalty	will	be	imposed	at	the	discre-
     designed to inflict harm or damage on campus.
                                                                        tion of the investigating faculty member.
    The	Student	Conduct	Code,	as	well	as	the	pre-                       The	Executive	Vice	President	and	Dean	for	
ceding	 guidelines	 outlining	 the	 adjudication	 of	 con-              Academic	Affairs	and	the	Dean	for	Campus	
duct-related	offenses,	applies	to	all	Columbia	College	                 Life	 must	 be	 notified	 in	 writing	 of	 the	 inci-
students.                                                               dent and the outcome.

academic integrity                                                   c. If the student admits responsibility for
                                                                        academic misconduct, or if the faculty
     The College expects students to fulfill their aca-
                                                                        member	 determines	 there	 was	 intentional	
demic obligations through honest and independent
                                                                        unacceptable behavior, the faculty mem-
effort. In a community of scholars committed to truth,
                                                                        ber may impose the penalty stated in
dishonesty	 violates	 the	 code	 of	 ethics	 by	 which	 we	
                                                                        the course syllabus. In the absence of a
38	   Academic	Policies,	Regulations,	and	Procedures

           penalty stated in the course syllabus, the                ly conduct may result in a student being asked to
           penalty	will	be	a	grade	of	F	on	that	activity,	           leave the classroom. Persistent misconduct on the
           which	will	be	factored	into	the	final	grade.	         	   part	 of	 a	 student	 is	 subject	 to	 disciplinary	 action	 as	
           The	Executive	Vice	President	and	Dean	for	                outlined in the Student Handbook and in the course
           Academic	Affairs	and	the	Dean	for	Campus	                 syllabus.		Some	examples	of	classroom	misconduct	
           Life	 must	 be	 notified	 in	 writing	 of	 the	 inci-     that	will	not	be	tolerated	include,	but	are	not	limited	
           dent and the action taken.                                to	the	following:
  2.	 A	 student	 wishing	 to	 challenge	 or	 appeal	 the	                •	   Disorderly	conduct
      accusation of academic misconduct should
      seek	 the	 counsel	 of	 the	 Department	 Chair.	   	                •	   Harassment
      The	 Executive	 Vice	 President	 and	 Dean	 for	                    •	   Verbal	abuse
      Academic Affairs must be notified of the results
                                                                          •	   Assault
      of this informal disposition.
  3. If either the student or the faculty member is                       •	   Interference	with	the	educational	opportunity	
     not	 satisfied	 with	 the	 informal	 disposition,	 he/                    of other students
     she	 may	 request	 a	 formal	 hearing.	 	The	 indi-                  •	   Attending	 class	 under	 the	 influence	 of	 alco-
     vidual must initiate the hearing procedure                                hol or other drugs
     by	 filing	 an	 Appeal	 Request	 Form	 with	 the	
     Executive	 Vice	 President	 and	 Dean	 for	                     personal conduct:
     Academic	 Affairs	 within	 one	 (1)	 school	 day	               	    Students	may	be	disciplined	for	conduct,	which	
     after the informal disposition meeting. The                     constitutes	 a	 hazard	 to	 the	 health,	 safety,	 or	 well-
     written	 request	 will	 be	 forwarded	 to	 the	                 being	of	members	of	the	College	community	or	which	
     Executive	 Vice	 President	 and	 Dean	 for	                     is deemed detrimental to the interests of the College.
     Academic	 Affairs	 and	 the	 Dean	 for	 Campus	
                                                                     These	sanctions	apply	whether	or	not	such	conduct	
     Life.
                                                                     occurs	on	campus,	off	campus,	at	College-sponsored	
  4.	 The	 Executive	 Vice	 President	 and	 Dean	 for	               or	non-College-sponsored	events.		Disciplinary	action	
      Academic	 Affairs	 and	 the	 Dean	 for	 Campus	                may be taken regardless of the existence of any
      Life	 will	 review	 the	 request	 and	 determine	 if	          criminal proceedings that may be pending.
      there are proper grounds for appeal and
      whether	 the	 evidence	 submitted	 warrants	                   procedures:
      reconsideration of the decisions. All parties                      Generally, allegations regarding a student’s per-
      involved	 will	 be	 notified.	 	 Generally,	 most	             sonal	conduct	will	be	adjudicated	through	processes	
      incidents of academic dishonesty, such as                      governed	by	Campus	Life.
      plagiarism,	 cheating	 and	 grade	 appeals,	 will	             1.	 The	Assistant	 Dean	 for	 Campus	 Life	 or	 another	
      be resolved through processes governed by                          appropriate	 College	 official	 will	 investigate	 the	
      Academic	Affairs.		Most	incidents	of	personal	                     situation	 and	 review	 it	 with	 the	 student.	 	 If	 it	 is	
      conduct related allegations, such as disorderly                    determined that no violation occurred, then the
      classroom	 conduct,	 will	 be	 resolved	 through	                  matter is closed. If the student admits responsi-
      processes	governed	by	Campus	Life.                                 bility	 or	 the	 Assistant	 Dean	 for	 Campus	 Life	
                                                                         determines	 there	 was	 a	 violation,	 College	 disci-
     It is important to note that there are those cases
                                                                         plinary	 action	 will	 ensue.	 	 The	 student	 will	 be	
where	 the	 allegations	 and	 potential	 consequences	
                                                                         notified	 in	 writing	 of	 the	 finding	 of	 fact	 and	 the	
are	 so	 serious	 and	 complex	 that	 the	 matter	 will	 be	
                                                                         recommended disciplinary sanction recommend-
submitted,	at	the	outset,	to	Campus	Life	for	investi-
                                                                         ed	by	the	Assistant	Dean	for	Campus	Life.
gation, informal disposition, and if necessary, formal
disposition through a campus hearing board.                          2. If facing disciplinary action, the student has the
Decisions	 regarding	 case	 jurisdiction	 ultimately	 rest	             right	to	accept	the	Assistant	Dean’s	finding	of	fact	
with	 the	 Executive	 Vice	 President	 and	 Dean	 for	                  and	 recommended	 sanction,	 at	 which	 time	 the	
Academic	Affairs	and	the	Dean	for	Campus	Life.	                         matter	is	closed;	or	the	student	may	appeal	to	the	
                                                                        Dean	for	Campus	Life	for	a	review	of	the	finding	
class conduct:                                                          of	fact	and/or	the	recommended	sanction.	If	the	
    Students	are	expected	to	conduct	themselves	on	                     proposed sanction involves a disciplinary sus-
campus and in class so others are not distracted                        pension	 or	 dismissal	 for	 a	 period	 equal	 to	 or	
from	the	pursuit	of	learning.	Discourteous	or	unseem-                   longer	than	16	weeks	(two	eight	week	terms),	the	
                                                             Academic	Policies,	Regulations,	and	Procedures						39

   student	 can	 request	 that	 the	 Dean	 for	 Campus	
   Life	 refer	 the	 case	 to	 a	 Campus	 Hearing	 Board	
   for	adjudication.
3. To initiate an appeal, the student must file an
   Appeal	Request	Form	with	the	Dean	for	Campus	
   Life	within	one	(1)	school	day	of	the	informal	dis-
   position	 meeting	 with	 the	 Assistant	 Dean	 for	
   Campus	 Life.	 	 The	 Dean	 for	 Campus	 Life	 will	
   review	the	request	and	determine	if	there	are	suf-
   ficient grounds for appeal and if evidence submit-
   ted	warrants	reconsideration	of	the	decision.		All	
   parties	will	be	notified.	
4.	 If	 a	 decision	 is	 made	 to	 reconsider,	 a	 campus	
    hearing	 board	 will	 be	 empanelled	 to	 hear	 the	
    matter.		Decisions	made	by	the	Campus	Hearing	
    Board	are	final.
40	    Special	Academic	Facilities


acaDemic SUpport SerViceS
LiBrarY                                                       technology Solutions center
	     The	 J.W.	 and	 Lois	 Stafford	 Library	 provides	 a	        The	Technology	Solutions	Center	is	available	to	
                                                              students	 via	 phone	 or	 face-to-face.	 Help	 desk	 ana-
place for students to study individually or in groups.
                                                              lysts	 are	 available	 to	 assist	 students	 with	 Internet	
The	library	is	open	more	than	80	hours	a	week	and	
                                                              connectivity and telephone issues in the residence
staff members are available to provide assistance
                                                              halls,	issues	with	accessing	email	and	eServices	and	
and	answer	questions	at	all	times.		Library	instruction	
                                                              general	computer	related	questions.		
is provided to individuals or to classes.
      The library’s collection supports the curriculum        hoUrS of operation *
of	Columbia	College	with	over	80,000	items	(books,	               phone Support:
videos,	 compact	 discs,	 etc.)	 and	 more	 than	 250	        	   Monday	– Thursday . . 7:00	a.m.	–10:00	p.m.
magazine,	 journal,	 and	 newspaper	 titles	 in	 paper.	  	   	   Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7:00	a.m.	–	8:00	p.m.
Arthur, the library’s catalog, is available on the            	   Saturday . . . . . . . . . . 10:00	a.m.	–	6:00	p.m.
Internet. The library classroom is used for group             	   Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon	–	6:00	p.m.
study and library instruction. Copy machines and                  Walk-in Support:
other	equipment	are	available	for	student	use.                	   Monday	–	Thursday . . 8:00	a.m.	–	7:00	p.m.
	    Library	computers	provide	access	to	a	variety	of	        	   Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8:00	a.m.	–	5:00	p.m.
databases and the Internet. Over forty online data-           	   Saturday . . . . . . . . . . 11:00	a.m.	–	5:00	p.m.
bases	are	available	to	search	for	full-text	or	indexed	       	   Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Noon	–	5:00	p.m.
articles	from	professional	journals,	legal	publications,	     *	Hours	subject	to	change	during	breaks	and	
newspapers,	magazines	and	reference	publications.	        	   holidays.
Students	are	able	to	access	the	databases	from	off	
campus	using	their	eServices	account.		                       email, internet access and anti-Virus
	     Columbia	College	is	a	member	of	the	MOBIUS	             Software
Consortium	(Missouri	Bibliographic	Information	User	
                                                                   Students	 are	 assigned	 email	 accounts	 for	 all	
System).	 	 This	 membership	 provides	 Columbia	
                                                              college-related	 communications.	 	 Students	 must	
College students access to the collections of more
                                                              authenticate	 their	 accounts	 using	 their	 student	 ID	
than	sixty	academic	libraries	in	the	state	of	Missouri.	  	
                                                              number	 at:	 http://accounts.ccis.edu.	 	 An	 alternate	
Students	 can	 borrow	 books	 by	 using	 the	 MOBIUS	
                                                              path	would	be	to	click	on	eServices on the main page
online catalog or visiting a participating library.
                                                              of	the	web	site.		CougarMail,	an	Internet	application,	
Students	 taking	 classes	 at	 Missouri	 extended	 cam-       is	 a	 free	 service	 to	 all	 students	 and	 is	 a	 life-time	
puses	can	use	MOBIUS	libraries	in	the	area.	                  account for graduates. The system is accessible
     LiBrarY hoUrS: *                                         using	 any	 web	 browser	 from	 any	 location	 with	 the	
	   Monday	–	Thursday . 8:00	a.m.	–	10:00	p.m.                exception of military bases. Internet access is avail-
	   Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . .8:00	a.m.	–		8:00	p.m.    able to students for use as a resource in the student
	   Saturday . . . . . . . . . . . 9:00	a.m.	–	5:00	p.m.      Open	Lab	and	lab	classrooms,	Stafford	Library	 and	
	   Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . 2:00	p.m.	–	10:00	p.m.       the	residence	halls.		A	wireless	network	is	available	
	   Finals	Week . . . . . . . . . . Open until midnight       for laptop users.
*	Hours	subject	to	change	during	breaks	and	                       Students	 using	 computers	 on	 the	 College	 net-
holidays.                                                     work	must	have	the	latest	version	of	anti-virus	soft-
                                                              ware.
Laptop availability
    Laptops	 can	 be	 checked	 out	 from	 the	 Stafford	      computer classrooms
Library	circulation	desk	to	be	used	in	the	library	only.	         Two	 classrooms	 for	 instructional	 use	 are	 main-
Students	must	have	their	ID	card	and	a	loan	agree-            tained	 by	 Technology	 Services	 in	 Buchanan	 Hall.	  	
ment form must be signed to check out a laptop.               Classes using computing resources, such as English,	
Students	 using	 these	 laptops	 are	 responsible	 for	       Computer Programming and Accounting are con-
damage	to	or	theft	of	the	computer.	Laptops	may	not	          ducted in these facilities. Students	 are	 able	 to	
be reserved in advance.                                       complete assignments outside of class using the
                                                              computer	resources	in	the	Open	Lab.
                                                                                      Special	Academic	Facilities						41

open Lab Use                                                  	     harass	others,	or	to	interfere	with	their		 	
     Technology	 Services	 maintains	 an	 open	 lab	          	     work	on	the	computer.	“Computing	system/					
equipped	with	computers,	scanners,	a	copy	machine	            	     network	 resources”	 include	 but	 are	 not									
and	a	high	speed	laser	printer.		This	lab	in	Buchanan	        	     limited	 to	 all	 computers,	 networks,	 voice,	    	
Hall is available to currently enrolled students on a               video, email, and other applications.
walk-in	 basis.	 	 Software	 used	 in	 classroom	 instruc-      •	 It is prohibited to share CC login credentials
tion is available to students for use in completing           	    with	others.	All	users	are	responsible	for							
assignments.		Email	and	Internet	access	is	also	pro-          	    activities	carried	out	with	the	use	of	these						
vided.                                                             credentials.
     Within	the	Open	Lab	is	a	multi-media	room.	The	
room	 is	 equipped	 with	 two	 Dell	 computers	 and	 one	         •	 Comply	with	all	College	policies.
Apple computer. In addition, a color printer, a black             •	 Comply	with	all	federal,	state,	and	other			
and	white	printer,	and	scanners	are	available	for	stu-        	      applicable	laws	including	copyright		      	
dent use. These computers have video and photo                       regulations.
editing	 software	 installed.	This	 room	is	available	 for	
use as a group study room.                                        •	 Intentional	unauthorized	use	is	prohibited,		
     The	 Open	 Lab	 has	 one	 digital	 still	 camera	 and	          including any modification or disruption to
two	 digital	 video	 cameras	 available	 for	 check	 out.	           computing resources and systems.
Cameras	 may	 be	 checked	 out	 for	 a	 period	 of	 24	       	    Use	 of	 any	 Columbia	 College	 computing	
hours.	 	 For	 more	 information,	 contact	 the	 Student	     resource constitutes full acceptance of the terms
Computer	Lab	at	875-7333.
                                                              and conditions of Columbia College policies,
computer purchase                                             including	 the	 Investigation	 and/or	 Monitoring	 of	
      Students	who	anticipate	buying	a	computer	for	          Employee	 Electronic	 Communications	 or	 Files	
use at college are encouraged to purchase a stan-             policy. Violations of the terms and conditions of
dard laptop model through the Columbia College                this policy could result in revocation of system
website,	http://www.cdwg.com/columbia	college.                privileges and may result in further disciplinary
                                                              actions up to and including immediate student
                                                              dismissal and employee termination from the
coLUmBia coLLeGe                                              College.
compUter USe poLicY                                                Columbia College reserves the right to change
     The computer resources at Columbia college               this	policy	without	notice.
support the academic and administrative activities
of	the	College.	Use	of	resources	for	academic	and	
                                                              coLUmBia coLLeGe GLoBaL
administrative	 objectives	 takes	 precedence	 over	
                                                              StUDent emaiL poLicY
personal	 reasons.	 Use	 of	 any	 Columbia	 College	
                                                                   assignment of email address	–	Individuals	
(CC)	 computing	 resource	 is	 considered	 a	 privi-
                                                              will	 be	 issued	 an	 official	 Columbia	 College	 stu-
lege, and all users are expected to adhere to the
                                                              dent email 	 address	 (CougarMail)	 when	 they	
following	acceptable	use	policy	(AUP).	This	policy	
                                                              apply	 to	 the	 College.	 	 This	 email	 account	 will	
applies	to	any	person	or	organization	utilizing	CC	
                                                              become a lifetime account upon enrollment and
computing resources.
                                                              subsequent	attendance.	 	
  all users of college computing resources
must adhere to the following:                                      Student responsibilities	 –	 Official	 corre-
    •	 Ensure	the	security	and	confidentiality	of	all		       spondence	 from	 faculty	 and	 staff	 will	 be	 commu-
       College data and information.                          nicated through the Columbia College email
  •	 College technology resources shall not be                address.	 	 Students	 are	 responsible	 for	 the	 infor-
     used for commercial purposes unless                      mation	received	and	are	required	to	monitor	their	
	    authorized	by	the	college.                               email	account	on	a	regular	basis.	Since	students	
                                                              are	 required	 to	 monitor	 their	 email account, and
    •	 It is prohibited to use college computing
	      system/network	resources	to	store,	access				          for the student’s convenience, Columbia College
       or send material that is obscene, illegal,             email addresses	 may	 be	 forwarded	 to	 another	
       discriminating, or intended to defame or               email account as desired. If a student opts to for-
42	    Special	Academic	Facilities

ward	 his/her	 account	 to	 another	 email	 address,	                Security	 –	 CougarMail	 provides	 a	 secure	
he/she	assumes	responsibility	for	the	reliability	of	            sign-on	 and	 secure	 transfer	 of	 email within	 the	
this	 address	 and	 will	 be	 held	 responsible	 for	 the	       Cougar	Mail	system.		However,	alumni	should	be	
information	sent	over	CougarMail,	even	if	there	is	              aware	 that	 Columbia	 College	 cannot	 be	 respon-
a	problem	with	the	alternate	email service.                      sible	 for	 the	 security	 of	 information	 forwarded	 to	
                                                                 other accounts.
	    Users	are	expected	to	have	read	the	Columbia	
College	 Computer	 Use	 Policy	 prior	 to	 use	 of	 the	         columbia college Global Student e-mail
email	system.	Use	of	the	email	system	constitutes	               policy
full acceptance of the terms and conditions of the
                                                                     assignment of email address –	Individuals	will	
policy and consent to monitoring. The conse-
                                                                 be issued an official Columbia College student email
quences	 for	 not	 complying	 with	 the	 conditions	 of	         address	(CougarMail)	when	they	apply	to	the	College.	   	
the policy could result in disciplinary action includ-           This	 email	 account	 will	 become	 a	 lifetime	 account	
ing revocation of system privileges.                             upon	enrollment	and	subsequent	attendance.		

    Student rights –	 Students	 may	 use	 their	                      Student responsibilities – Official correspon-
account for personal email in	accordance	with	the	               dence	 from	 faculty	 and	 staff	 will	 be	 communicated	
Columbia	College	Computer	Use	Policy.		                          through the Columbia College email address.
                                                                 Students	are	responsible	for	the	information	received	
    Security	 –	 CougarMail	 provides	 a	 secure	                and	are	required	to	monitor	their	email account on a
sign-on	 and	 secure	 transfer	 of	 email within	 the	           regular	basis.		Since	students	are	required	to	monitor	
Cougar	 Mail	 system.	 	 However,	 students	 should	             their email account,	 and	 for	 the	 student's	 conve-
be	aware	that	Columbia	College	cannot	be	respon-                 nience, Columbia College email addresses may be
sible	 for	 the	 security	 of	 information	 forwarded	 to	       forwarded	to	another	email account as desired. If a
                                                                 student	 opts	 to	 forward	 his/her	 account	 to	 another	
other accounts.
                                                                 email	address,	he/she	assumes	responsibility	for	the	
                                                                 reliability	of	this	address	and	will	be	held	responsible	
coLUmBia coLLeGe GLoBaL                                          for	the	information	sent	over	CougarMail,	even	if	there	
aLUmni emaiL poLicY                                              is	a	problem	with	the	alternate	email service.
                                                                 	    Users	 are	 expected	 to	 have	 read	 the	 Columbia	
    alumni eligibility	 –	 All	 alumni	 who	 have	               College	Computer	Use	Policy	prior	to	use	of	the	email	
received degrees from the College are eligible to                system.	 	 Use	 of	 the	 email	 system	 constitutes	 full	
receive	a	lifetime	CougarMail	account	                           acceptance of the terms and conditions of the policy
                                                                 and	consent	to	monitoring.		The	consequences	for	not	
    alumni responsibilities	 –	 Official	 College	               complying	 with	 the	 conditions	 of	 the	 policy	 could	
correspondence may be communicated through                       result in disciplinary action including revocation of
the Columbia College email address. Columbia                     system privileges.
College	 email	 addresses	 may	 be	 forwarded	 to	
                                                                      Student rights –	Students	may	use	their	account	
another email account as desired.
                                                                 for personal email in	 accordance	 with	 the	 Columbia	
	    Users	are	expected	to	have	read	the	Columbia	               College	Computer	Use	Policy.		
College	 Computer	 Use	 Policy	 prior	 to	 use	 of	 the	              Security	 –	 CougarMail	 provides	 a	 secure	 sign-
email 	system.		Use	of	the	email system constitutes              on and secure transfer of email within	 the	 Cougar	
full acceptance of the terms and conditions of the               Mail	 system.	 	 However,	 students	 should	 be	 aware	
policy	and	consent	to	monitoring.		The	consequenc-               that Columbia College cannot be responsible for the
es	for	not	complying	with	the	conditions	of	the	policy	          security	of	information	forwarded	to	other	accounts.		
could result in revocation of system privileges.
                                                                 columbia college Global alumni email
     alumni rights	–	Alumni	may	use	their	account	
                                                                 policy
for personal email in	accordance	with	the	Columbia	
College	Computer	Use	Policy.                                           alumni eligibility	–	All	alumni	who	have	received	
                                                                 degrees from the College are eligible to receive a
*	Microsoft	Exchange	has	an	Options	feature	permitting	delayed
  delivery of a message.                                         lifetime	CougarMail	account	
                                                            Special	Academic	Facilities						43

    alumni responsibilities	 –	 Official	 College	 cor-
respondence may be communicated through the
Columbia College email address. Columbia College
email	addresses	may	be	forwarded	to	another	email
account as desired.
	   Users	 are	 expected	 to	 have	 read	 the	 Columbia	
College	Computer	Use	Policy	prior	to	use	of	the	email
system.	 	 Use	 of	 the	 email system constitutes full
acceptance of the terms and conditions of the policy
and	consent	to	monitoring.		The	consequences	for	not	
complying	 with	 the	 conditions	 of	 the	 policy	 could	
result in revocation of system privileges.
     alumni rights	 –	Alumni	 may	 use	 their	 account	
for personal email in	 accordance	 with	 the	 Columbia	
College	Computer	Use	Policy.
     Security	 –	 CougarMail	 provides	 a	 secure	 sign-
on and secure transfer of email within	 the	 Cougar	
Mail	system.		However,	alumni	should	be	aware	that	
Columbia College cannot be responsible for the secu-
rity	of	information	forwarded	to	other	accounts.
44    Academic Programs


maSter of artS in teachinG
coordinator: Kristina miller, ph.D.
kmiller@ccis.edu, (573) 875-7590


proGram DeScription                                           endorsements
    For	 the	 Master	 of	 Arts	 in	 Teaching	 Program,	            M
                                                                   	 ild/Moderate	 Cross	 Categorical	 Special	
Columbia	 College	 and	 the	 Education	 Faculty	 have	        Education,	Gifted	Education,	and	Reading	Specialist	
endorsed national certification of teachers, and have         endorsements	 are	 available	 to	 students	 who	 are	
adopted	the	core	proposals	of	the	National	Board	for	         certified	 teachers.	 	 Students	 wishing	 to	 pursue	 an	
Professional	Teaching	Standards	as	goals	of	the	pro-          endorsement	 need	 to	 work	 closely	 with	 their	 aca-
gram.		When	conducting	best	practice,	teachers:               demic	advisors	to	fulfill	endorsement	requirements.

1.	 Are	committed	to	students	and	their	learning;             tuition reimbursement
2.	 Know	the	subjects	they	teach	and	how	to	teach	                 Pending state funding, tuition reimbursement
    those	subjects	to	students;					                          may	be	available	from	the	Department	of	Elementary	
                                                              and	 Secondary	 Education	 for	 paraprofessionals	
3. Are responsible for managing and monitoring
                                                              and	 contracted	 certified	 teachers	 who	 qualify	 and	
   student	learning;
                                                              take	 courses	 in	 the	 area	 of	 Mild/Moderate	 Cross	
4.	 Think	 systematically	 about	 their	 practice	 and	       Categorical	Special	Education.	Additional	information	
    learn	from	experience;	and                                is	 available	 from	 the	 MAT	 Graduate	 Program	
5.	 Are	members	of	learning	communities.                      Coordinator.

                                                              focused academic Sequence
     All MAT students who are public school teachers
are encouraged to use their program of study as a             	     A	 Focused	 Academic	 Sequence	 (FAS)	 can	 be	
springboard to obtaining national certification.              developed	 and	 implemented	 to	 quickly	 and	 effec-
                                                              tively respond to a student’s specific needs. Any
     To help students reach these goals, Columbia
                                                              student	may	request	an	FAS	to	meet	any	baccalaure-
College believes that truly effective teaching must be
                                                              ate	or	graduate	academic	need	for	which	there	is	no	
modeled,	 not	 just	 taught.	 	 Therefore	 faculty	 are	
                                                              present	 academic	 degree,	 major,	 minor,	 concentra-
encouraged to engage students in active learning,
                                                              tion, emphasis or endorsement.
research in field situations, problem solving, interac-
                                                                    In a formal business memorandum, addressed
tive	dialogue	and	questioning,	and	constant	explora-
                                                              to	 the	 academic	 department	 chair(s),	 and	 jointly	
tion	 of	 what	 is	 and	 what	 could	 be.	 	 Students	 are	
                                                              signed	by	the	student	and	the	faculty	member	work-
supported in their efforts: to identify and evaluate
                                                              ing	with	the	student,	an	FAS	must	be	requested.		An	
relevant issues as they relate to various aspects of
                                                              FAS	 request,	 taking	 the	 form	 of	 a	 specific	 educa-
teaching	and	learning;	to	engage	in	critical	and	cre-
                                                              tional	objective,	or	objectives,	and	specification	of	the	
ative	thinking	with	colleagues,	peers	and	professors;	
                                                              completed	 coursework	 necessary	 for	 meeting	 the	
to	 develop	 as	 whole	 persons,	 valuing	 individualism,	
                                                              objective,	 or	 objectives,	 must	 be	 approved	 by	 the	
uniqueness	 and	 diversity	 of	 others;	 to	 consistently	
                                                              department	chair(s)	of	the	department(s)	in	which	the	
use reflection and research as the foundation for
                                                              coursework	 is	 to	 be	 completed.	 	 The	 chair	 of	 the	 	
decision	making;	and,	to	value	and	promote	profes-
                                                              academic	department	in	which	the	student	is	pursu-
sionalism	 and	 a	 commitment	 to	 learning	 which	 is	
                                                              ing	an	academic	major	is	responsible	for	monitoring	
never ending.
                                                              the	 student’s	 FAS	 progress,	 and	 for	 notifying	 the	
emphasis areas                                                Executive	 Vice	 President	 and	 Dean	 for	 Academic	
                                                              Affairs	when	the	FAS	has	been	completed	and	a	let-
    Courses are grouped into three areas: curricu-
                                                              ter	 of	 completion	 is	 justified.	 	 The	 Executive	 Vice	
lum and instruction, psychological and philosophical
                                                              President	and	Dean	for	Academic	Affairs	issues	the	
foundations, and measurement and evaluation.
                                                              “Letter	 of	 Completion”	 and	 authorizes	 the	 Student	
Students	may	elect	to	structure	an	academic	empha-
                                                              Records	and	Transcripts	Office	to	enter	notice	of	the	
sis	by	taking	12	hours	from	one	area.
                                                              letter in the student’s academic transcript.
                                                                                            Academic	Programs						45

Kappa Delta pi                                               Non-Degree	Student:	A	person	applying	as	a	“Non-
                                                             Degree	Student”	is	not	eligible	for	financial	aid	and	
	    Kappa	Delta	Pi	is	a	national	education	honorary	
                                                             may	complete	a	maximum	of	twelve	(12)	semester	
society.	Eligibility	for	membership	requires	enroll-
                                                             hours	 of	 graduate-level	 coursework	 (see	 pages	
ment in an institution offering an education degree
                                                             13-14).	 Non-degree	 seeking	 applicants	 do	 not	
and having the intent to continue academically and
                                                             need to submit a personal goal statement as a part
professionally	in	the	field	of	education;	demonstra-
                                                             of their application.
tion of leadership attributes and evidence of com-
pletion	of	a	bachelor's	degree	in	education	with	a	          Student-at-Large:	A	 person	 applying	 as	 a	 "Student-
minimum cumulative GPA of 3.2.                               at-Large"	 is	 not	 eligible	 for	 financial	 aid	 and	 may	
                                                             complete	a	maximum	of	twelve	(12)	graduate	semes-
aDmiSSion                                                    ter	hours	without	program	acceptance	(see	page	13).	
                                                             Student-at-large	applicants	do	not	need	to	submit	a	
admission categories                                         personal goal statement as a part of their applica-
    In addition to the application procedures and            tion.
requirements	for	admission	previously		listed	(pages	        Alternative Certification:	 	 Students	 who	 hold	 a	 bac-
14-15),	applicants	for	the	MAT	must	submit:                  calaureate degree from a regionally accredited col-
1.	   A	personal	career	goal	summary	which	demon-            lege	 or	 university	 with	 a	 major	 in	 Art,	 Biology,	
      strates that the applicant has goals and per-          Business,	 Chemistry,	 General	 Science,	 Language	
      sonal	 qualities	 which	 are	 compatible	 with	 the	   Arts	 (English),	 Social	 Studies	 or	 Mathematics	 may	
      goals and competencies focused upon in the             pursue	teacher	certification	at	the	Secondary	level	if	
      program;	and                                           all	criteria	are	met	(see	page	48).

2.	   A	notarized	Affidavit	of	Moral	Character	(avail-       Pre-Graduate:	 	 Students	 in	 the	 BEACON	 and	
      able	from	the	Admissions	Office).                      DAYSTAR	 programs	 who	 have	 earned	 90	 hours	 or	
                                                             more credit and are finishing their bachelor’s degrees
	     Applicants	 who	 have	 successfully	 completed	
                                                             through these programs at Columbia College may
admission	procedures	required	by	Columbia	College	
                                                             apply	for	Pre-Graduate	status.		The	applicants	must	
will	 be	 evaluated	 by	 the	 Education	 Department	 for	
                                                             meet	 all	 other	 qualifications	 for	 the	 Teacher	
acceptance	 into	 the	 Master	 of	 Arts	 in	 Teaching	
                                                             Certification Program including cumulative GPA of
Degree	Program.		To	be	considered,	applicants	must	
                                                             3.0,	 passing	 scores	 on	 all	 sections	 of	 the	 C-BASE	
also	have	earned	a	cumulative	GPA	of	3.0	or	higher	
                                                             exam,	ACT/SAT	score	higher	than	the	national	aver-
on	a	4.0	scale	from	a	regionally	accredited	degree-
                                                             age,	 and	 passing	 score	 on	 appropriate	 PRAXIS	 II	
granting institution, or a cumulative score of at least
                                                             exam.
1600	 or	 500	 each	 on	 the	 verbal,	 quantitative,	 and	
                                                             	    Students	 applying	 for	 the	 Pre-Graduate	 status	
analytical	 sections	 of	 the	 Graduate	 Record	
                                                             must submit a completed and signed application for
Examination.			
                                                             graduate	 admission	 accompanied	 by	 a	 non-refund-
	   Students	 not	 meeting	 these	 criteria	 may	 be	 eli-   able	$55	application	fee,	notarized	affidavit	of	moral	
gible for conditional admission.                             character and transcripts from all colleges and uni-
Full Admission:	 A	 person	 applying	 for	 "Full	            versities attended.
Admission" must have a valid teaching certificate,           	    Those	accepted	as	Pre-Graduate	students	may	
or a signed statement indicating that the student            take	 up	 to	 nine	 (9)	 semester	 hours	 of	 graduate	
will	not,	at	any	time,	pursue	teacher	certification.	        course	work	towards	certification	which	is	limited	to	
Note:	 Students	 applying	 to	 the	 Online	 MAT	             EDUC	 516	 Reading	 and	 Writing	 Across	 the	
Program must have a valid teaching certificate.              Curriculum,	 EDUC	 562	 Behavior	 Management	
                                                             Techniques	 and	 EDUC	 613	 Practicum	 in	 Mild/
Post-Baccalaureate	 Student: A person applying               Moderate	 Cross-Categorical	 Special	 Education.	 	 In	
as	a	“Post-Baccalaureate	Student”	intends	to	pur-            order	 to	 complete	 EDUC	 699	 Student	 Teaching	
sue teacher certification and must meet the                  Internship,	students	admitted	under	the	Pre-Graduate	
requirements	 for	 admission	 to	 the	 Teacher	              status must complete their bachelor’s degrees and
Certification	 Program.	 Post-Baccalaureate	 stu-            submit a revised application form to be considered
dents may enroll in undergraduate or graduate                for	 Post-Baccalaureate	 admission	 to	 the	 MAT	
education	 courses.	 (See	 page	 14	 for	 additional	        Program.
Post-Baccalaureate	program	information).
46    Academic Programs

Conditional Admission:	 	 Students	 not	 meeting	 the	               mendation	of	the	Education	Department.		After	
department	 admission	 requirements	 may	 be	                        being admitted, the student must complete all
approved	 for	 “conditional	 admission”	 at	 the	 discre-            course	work	at	Columbia	College,	unless	spe-
tion	 of	 the	 	 MAT	 Graduate	 Program	 Coordinator,	               cific	 permission	 is	 obtained	 from	 the	 MAT	
based	on	appropriate	professional	work	at	teaching	                  Graduate Program Coordinator. A maximum
experience, potential for academic success at the                    of nine graduate hours may be accepted in
graduate	level,	and/or	strong	recommendation	from	                   transfer. Petitions for consideration of transfer
school	 administrators.	 	 Students	 who	 are	 granted	              credit must be made prior to the successful
conditional	admission	are	limited	to	one-course	per	                 completion	 of	 12	 hours	 of	 graduate	 course	
session	 until	 a	 GPA	 of	 3.0	 has	 been	 maintained	              work	at	Columbia	College.
through	twelve	hours	of	coursework.		Students	may	
                                                               4.	   To	complete	the	program,	students	are	expect-
then	 petition	 for	 Post	 Baccalaureate	 or	 Full	
                                                                     ed	to	do	the	following:
Admission.
                                                                     a.	 Within	 the	 first	 session	 on	 campus,	 meet	
financial aid                                                            with	an	advisor	to	discuss	career	goals	and	
                                                                         program outcomes. The advisor’s signa-
    Please	 refer	 to	 the	 Financial	 Aid	 section	 to	
                                                                         ture	 on	 the	 registration	 form	 is	 required	
determine financial aid eligibility for the different
                                                                         until an approved course of study is on
admissions	 categories.	 Contact	 the	 Financial	 Aid	
                                                                         file.
Office for more information.
                                                                     b.	 Complete	 EDUC	 500	 Research	 Design,	
                                                                         and	 EDUC	 504	 Curriculum	 Design	 and	
mat program requirements                                                 Evaluation	as	early	in	the	program	as	pos-
1.	   Students	must	meet	the	satisfactory	academic	                      sible.
      progress	requirements	of	the	College.                          c.	 Upon	completion	of	nine	semester	hours,	
2.	   Students	 must	 complete	 a	 minimum	 of	 thirty-                  file	 an	 intended	 program	 of	 study,	 which	
      six graduate semester hours in an approved                         includes	course	work	to	be	taken	and	per-
      course of study. The program is comprised                          sonal goals and outcomes to be achieved.
      of	 a	 core	 of	 three	 courses	 required	 of	 all	                Once approved, students are expected to
      students,	 and	 at	 least	 two	 courses	 in	 each	 of	             follow	 this	 program;	 any	 changes	 should	
      the three areas of curriculum and instruction,                     be approved by the advisor.
      psychological and philosophical foundations,                   d.	 Students	may	not	register	for	EDUC	508	
      and measurement and evaluation.                                    Integrative	 Project	 until	 they	 are	 within	
      Required	MAT	Core	Courses	(9	hours)                                one	 session	 of	 completion	 of	 the	 MAT	
	     EDUC	500	 Research	Design		                    3	hrs               and have approval of the course instruc-
	     EDUC	504	 Curriculum	Design	                                       tor.	 	 Students	 who	 register	 for	 EDUC	
	     	  	      and	Evaluation	                      3	hrs               508,	 but	 do	 not	 complete	 the	 course	 in	
	     EDUC	508	 Integrative	Project		                3	hrs               one	 session,	 will	 receive	 a	 grade	 of	
                                                                         Incomplete.	Subsequently,	students	must	
      Support	Courses	in	each	area	(18	hours)                            continue	to	register	each	session	(except	
	     Curriculum	and	Instruction	            6	hrs                       for	 Summer	 session)	 until	 the	 project	 is	
      Psychological and                                                  completed and accepted. Alternative
	     					Philosophical	Foundations	        6	hrs                       Certification	 students	 completing	 EDUC	
	     Measurement	and	Evaluation	            6	hrs                       508	in	order	to	earn	teacher	certification	
      Elective	or	emphasis	courses	(9	hours)                             may	 repeat	 EDUC	 508	 for	 an	 additional	
	     Course	1	                              3	hrs                       three hours of credit in order to serve as
      Course 2                               3 hrs                       a	 culminating	 experience	 for	 the	 MAT	
      Course 3                               3 hrs                       degree.
                                                                     e. Clinical experiences are available for a
      minimum total hours                          36 hrs
                                                                        maximum of six hours of graduate credit.
3.    Transfer credit for courses already completed                     The purpose of clinical experiences is to
      before admittance to the program may be                           provide an opportunity to do field research
      substituted	 for	 required	 courses	 upon	 recom-                 or	 to	 conduct	 professional	 practice;	 the	
                                                                                             Academic	Programs						47

           experience must not duplicate previous             are	required	to	meet	requirements	and	seek	admis-
           experience or be a part of a regular teach-        sion to the Teacher Certification Program as early as
           ing assignment.                                    possible.
                                                                  Students	 who	 seek	 admission	 to	 the	 program	
5.	   Completion	 of	 the	 degree	 means	 more	 than	
                                                              must have:
      the	accumulation	of	the	required	course	hours.	  	
      Students	 must	 be	 aware	 that	 the	 integrative	      •	   Completed	 the	 Post-Baccalaureate	 core	 at	
      project	 requires	 acceptance	 as	 demonstrated	             Columbia	 College	 which	 includes	 EDUC	 505,	
      by	a	satisfactory	oral	presentation	before	a	jury	           EDUC	542,	EDUC	560	and	EDUC	563	(or	their	
      of faculty and peers.                                        undergraduate	equivalents);
6.	   Students	 must	 participate	 in	 a	 final	 review,	     •	   Attained	a	cumulative	GPA	of	at	least	2.5	(includes	
      which	 includes	 a	 portfolio	 that	 documents	              all	coursework,	Columbia	College	and	other)	with	
      progress	 toward	 exit	 competencies	 and	 pro-              no grade of less than C in the professional edu-
      gram	 goals,	 a	 self-evaluation	 which	 demon-              cation	and	content	area	courses;	(see	page	36–	
      strates an ability to reflect and use analytic and           “Dismissal”)
      creative	skills,	a	collaborative	assessment	with	
                                                              •	   Demonstrated	 competencies	 in	 all	 content	 and	
      faculty and an evaluation of the program.
                                                                   skill	 areas	 (written	 and	 oral	 communication,	
                                                                   English,	 mathematics,	 social	 sciences,	 natural	
aSSeSSment                                                         sciences)	 by	 obtaining	 a	 satisfactory	 rating	 on	
                                                                   the	 Missouri	 College	 Basic	 Academic	 Subjects	
     The	five	core	propositions	of	the	National	Board	
                                                                   Examination	(CBASE);
for	 Professional	 Teaching	 Standards	 (NBPTS)	 pro-
vide	 the	 goals	 for	 the	 Master	 of	 Arts	 in	 Teaching	   •	   ACT	or	SAT	score	higher	than	the	national	aver-
Program. These core propositions are:                              age	 as	 required	 by	 the	 Education	 Department	
                                                                   (currently	 22)	 or	 a	 CBASE	 with	 a	 composite	 of	
1.	 Teachers	 are	 committed	 to	 students	 and	 their	
                                                                   300	or	above;
    learning.
2.	 Teachers	know	the	subjects	they	teach	and	how	            •	   Completion	 of	 application	 materials	 for	 admis-
    to	teach	those	subjects	to	students.                           sion	to	the	Teacher	Certification	Program	(to	be	
                                                                   obtained from the Certification Officer by appoint-
3. Teachers are responsible for managing and                       ment)	 and	 will	 include:	 Request	 for	 Admission,	
   monitoring student learning.                                    GPA	Worksheet,	and	two	letters	of	recommenda-
4.	 Teachers	think	systematically	about	their	practice	            tion	 (one	 from	 Education	 Department	 and	 one	
    and learn from experience.                                     from	outside	the	Education	Department).
5.	 Teachers	are	members	of	learning	communities.             retention criteria:
     Students	 completing	 the	 MAT	 program	 docu-           •	   Complete	at	least	6	hours	of	professional	educa-
ment	their	professional	growth	and	accomplishment	                 tion each year.
of the propositions through portfolios. The portfolio
                                                              •	   Complete	 required	 field	 experiences	 (in	 EDUC	
is evaluated by a committee of faculty members.
                                                                   505,	EDUC	542,	EDUC	560	and	EDUC	563)	and	
A portfolio must also be presented in a public forum
                                                                   receive favorable evaluations from cooperating
attended by the committee and interested parties. A
                                                                   teachers and faculty supervisors.
grade	of	B	or	higher	is	required.		Outcomes	data	are	
collected	in	an	exit	interview.		These	data	are	used	to	      •	   Maintain	a	cumulative	GPA	of	2.5	or	above	after	
guide appropriate changes and improvements in the                  acceptance to the program.
MAT	program	in	order	to	better	meet	students’	needs	          •	   Maintain	 a	 cumulative	 GPA	 of	 2.8	 or	 above	 in	
for course scheduling, course offerings, learning                  professional education and content area cours-
activities	 for	 the	 accomplishment	 of	 course	 objec-           es.
tives, use of technology, etc.
                                                              other coursework:
teacher certification                                         •	   Content	 area	 coursework	 not	 completed	 in	 BA	
                                                                   must	 also	 be	 taken	 to	 meet	 State	 certification	
proGram                                                            requirements.
    Students	 seeking	 teacher	 certification	 through	
                                                              •	   Any	 content	 area	 or	 professional	 education	
the	State	of	Missouri	with	Post-Baccalaureate	status	
                                                                   course(s)	 with	 grade	 of	 “D”	 or	 lower	 must	 be	
48     Academic Programs

     repeated	until	a	grade	of	“C”	or	above	is	obtained	          •	    Completion	of	a	two-year	Academic	Contract	
     (see	page	37	–	“Dismissal”).		                                     outlining	the	Program	of	Study	and	require-
other important information:                                            ments to be met.
                                                             *		Evidence	of	experience	may	include	letters	from	former	employ-
	    Post	 Baccalaureate	 certification	 students	 com-         ers	detailing	job	responsibilities	and	time	of	employment.	Similar	
pleting	the	FAFSA	to	receive	financial	aid	for	certifi-         information	 from	 colleagues	 may	 serve	 as	 well	 to	 meet	 this	
cation	must	complete	the	following	questions	on	the	            requirement.	 Any	 other	 documents	 supporting	 employment	
FAFSA	accordingly:                                              experience	may	be	submitted	similarly.	Regardless	of	form,	all	    	
                                                                evidence of employment must be submitted at the same time
Question	#28.	What	will	your	grade	level	be?		Student	          admission is sought and must be on file in the office of the
   must	answer,	“5th	year/other	undergraduate.”                 Teacher Certification Program prior to the beginning of course-
                                                                work.	 Program	 completers	 will	 have	 a	 minimum	 of	 five	 years	
Question	 #29.	 What	 degree	 or	 certificate?	 	 Student	      professional	work	experience.
   must	answer,	“Teaching	Credential	Program.”	              ** A copy of the contract must be on file in the office of the Teacher
                                                                Certification Program prior to acceptance into the Alternative
Question	 #48. Are you a master’s or doctorate stu-             Certification Program.
   dent?	Student	must	answer,	“No.”	
                                                             	 Required	in	the	program of Study	(18	hours)	for	
                                                             Alternative Certification are:
other mat proGramS                                           	         EDUC	505	 Instructional	Theory	and	
DeSe aLternatiVe roUte to                                    	         	         Techniques

certification proGram                                        	         EDUC	508	 Integrative	Project	
                                                             	         	         (continuous	 enrollment	 in	 EDUC	
     Certain students having a baccalaureate degree
                                                             	         	         508E	is	required)
relating to secondary certification areas, may be
eligible for a Temporary Certificate to teach in             	         EDUC	525	 Educating	Exceptional	Individuals
Missouri	and	may	be	eligible	to	negotiate	a	program	         	         EDUC	560	 Theories	of	Learning
of study at Columbia College to maintain Temporary
                                                             	         EDUC	563	 Managing	Classroom		
Certification. This is a program defined by the
                                                             	         	         Environments
Missouri	 Department	 of	 Elementary	 and	 Secondary	
Education	(DESE).	                                           	         EDUC	580	 Methods	of	Effective	Academic	
	    Students	seeking	the	alternative	route	to	certifi-      	         	         Evaluation
cation	 must	 apply	 as	 Post	 Baccalaureate	 within	 the	   	         PRAXIS	II	 The	 appropriate	 examination	
Graduate Program.                                                                 must be successfully taken by the
                                                                                  end of the first year of the
aLternatiVe certification pro-
                                                             	         	          Academic	 Contract,	 or	 the	 con-
Gram of StUDY                                                                     tract is void.
    A candidate for alternative certification must           	     A	 supervising	 professor	 from	 the	 College	 will	
present	evidence	of	the	following:                           observe the candidate teach at least once per
    •	 A	baccalaureate	degree	(2.5	GPA	minimum)	             semester	 and	 will	 be	 available	 to	 counsel	 or	 assist	
        with	 a	 major	 in	 Art,	 Biology,	 Business,	       the candidate as needed via email, fax or telephone.
        Chemistry,	General	Science,	Language	Arts	           The	supervising	professor	will	meet	annually	with	the	
        (English),	 Social	 Studies	 or	 Mathematics	        candidate’s principal to determine the teaching prog-
        discipline. Included in the degree must be           ress and performance of the candidate. Teaching
        general	education	coursework	that	has	been	          progress and performance is defined as 56 of 80
        determined	 by	 the	 Evaluations	 Department	        points on the First-Year Principal’s Evaluation, and
        to be sufficient to meet Columbia College            as 60 of 80 points on the Second-Year Principal’s
        standards;                                           Evaluation. Failure to annually demonstrate
    •	 Three	 years	 of	 professional	 (post-baccalau-       teaching progress and performance voids the
        reate)	employment	experience*;                       Academic Contract.
    •	 A	 valid	 current	 contract	 with	 a	 school	 dis-
                                                                    The	school	at	which	the	candidate	is	employed	
        trict**;
                                                             must	provide	an	on-site	teacher/mentor	in	the	area	of	
    •	 Admission	as	an	Alternative	Certification	stu-
                                                             certification being sought. The school must provide
        dent	 into	 the	 Master	 of	 Arts	 in	 Teaching	
                                                             to the Columbia College Teacher Certification
        Program	 (no	 other	 admission	 category	 is	
                                                             Program the name of the mentor and a brief descrip-
        applicable);	and
                                                             tion of the mentoring process. The school also must
                                                                                            Academic	Programs						49

provide the candidate professional development                  admitted to the Teacher Certification Program
opportunities	throughout	the	two-year	program.		Proof           within	the	first	24	hours	of	coursework.	
of participation in professional development must               Columbia College offers Teacher Certification
take the form of evidence that the candidate is suc-         Programs in:
cessfully participating in a performance-based teach-           Art	Education	K-12
er evaluation process. Failure to annually provide              Special	Education	K-12
proof of successful participation voids the                     Elementary	(grades	1-6)
Academic Contract.                                              Middle	School	(grades	5-9)
     the program of Study is a two-year pro-                        (Content	 areas:	 Language	 Arts,	 Mathe-
cess. if the process is not completed in two                        matics,	Science,	or	Social	Studies)
years, the academic contract is void.                           Secondary	(grades	9-12)
                                                                    (Content	 areas:	 Biology,	 Business	 (non-
poSt BaccaLaUreate                                                  vocational),	 Chemistry,	 English,	 General	
                                                                    Science,	 Mathematics,	 or	 Social	
certification proGram                                               Studies)
    Certain students having a baccalaureate degree           	    Post	 Baccalaureate	 students	 seeking	 teacher	
may be eligible for admission to Columbia College’s          certification may take certification courses at the
Post	Baccalaureate	Program	for	Teacher	Certification.	       graduate	level	when	available.	The	graduate	equiva-
A	 candidate	 for	 Post	 Baccalaureate	 Teacher	             lent	courses	are	listed	on	the	following	checklists	in	
Certification	must	present	evidence	of	the	following:        brackets after the course title.
•	   Complete	 the	 MAT	 Post-Baccalaureate	 Core	
                                                                    note:	Not	all	certification	courses	have	graduate-
     within	the	first	18	hours:                                     level	equivalencies.
	    EDUC	542/200	 Law,	Ethics	and	Education	 3	hrs
	    EDUC	560/230	 Theories	of	Learning	           3	hrs     post Baccalaureate certification
	    EDUC	505/300	 Instructional	Theory	and	 3	hrs           checklists
	    	             Techniques
	    EDUC	563/311	 Managing	Classroom	          3	hrs        art (Grades K-12)
	    	               Environments                            Post	Baccalaureate	students	are	only	eligible	to	take	
•	   A	 baccalaureate	 degree	 (2.5	 GPA	 minimum).	         courses	required	for	certification.
     Included in the degree must be general educa-           content area requirements
     tion	coursework	that	has	been	determined	by	the	
     Evaluations	Department	to	be	sufficient	to	meet	        i.     Design and composition
     Columbia	College	standards;                             	      	 ARTS	140	2-Dimensional	Design	or
                                                             	      	 ARTS	141	3-Dimensional	Design
•	   Admission	as	a	Post	Baccalaureate	student	into	
     the	Master	of	Arts	in	Teaching	Program.                 ii.    two-Dimensional art
                                                             	      1.	 ARTS	120	Drawing	I
Once	admitted,	Post	Baccalaureate	students	must:
                                                             	      2.	 ARTS	130	Painting	I
•	   Maintain	a	minimum	GPA	of	2.8	in	all	Professional	      	      3.	 ARTS	150	Creative	Photography	or
     Education	 courses	 with	 no	 grade	 lower	 than	 B	    	      	 ARTS	262	Printmaking	I
     (See	page	36	–	“Dismissal”);
                                                             iii.   three-Dimensional art
•	   Maintain	 a	 minimum	 GPA	 of	 2.8	 in	 all	 content	
     area	 courses	 with	 no	 grade	 lower	 than	 B	 (See	   	      1.	 ARTS	141	3-Dimensional	Art
     page	36	–	“Dismissal”);                                 	      2.	 ARTS	271	Ceramics	I
                                                             	      3.	 ARTS	345	Teaching	Art	K-12
•	   Complete	application	materials	for	admission	to	
     the	Teacher	Certification	Program	(to	be	obtained	      iV. history, theory, and criticism
     from	 the	 Certification	 Officer	 by	 appointment)	    	   1.	 ARTS	111	Art	and	Ideas	I	or
     that	 includes:	 Request	 for	 Admission,	 GPA	         	   	 ARTS	112	Art	and	Ideas	II	or
     Worksheet,	 and	 two	 letters	 of	 recommendation	              Another approved Art History course
     (one	 from	 the	 Education	 Department	 and	 one	
                                                             V. art for elementary Grades
     from	 outside	 the	 Education	 Department).	
                                                             	  1.	 EDUC	345	Teaching	Art	K-12
     Admission to the Teacher Certification Program
     also	requires	a	satisfactory	rating	on	the	Missouri	    Vi. electives
     College	 Base	 Academic	 Subjects	 Examination	         	   	 Art	Electives	(if	30	hour	minimum	has	not	
     (CBASE).	Post	Baccalaureate	students	must	be	           	   	 been	met	above)
50    Academic Programs

professional education requirements                         ii.    arts and humanities
                                                            	      1.	 MUSI	122	Music	Appreciation
     EDUC	555/	 Development,	Gender	               3	hrs
                                                            	      2.	 ARTS	105	Art	Appreciation	or
      SOCI	270		 and	Cultural	Differences
                                                            	      	 ARTS	111	Art	and	Ideas	I	or
     EDUC	102      Introduction	to	Education	I*	    1	hr    	      	 ARTS	112	Art	and	Ideas	II
     EDUC	103	     Introduction	to	Education	II* 1	hr       iii.   Social and Behavioral Sciences
                   (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)	     	      1.	 PSYC	101	General	Psychology
     EDUC	542/	 Law,	Ethics,	and	Education 3 hrs            	      2.	 ECON	293	Macroeconomics
	    	   	200	 (Includes	a	20-hr	field	experience)          	      3.	 GEOG	101	Introduction	to	Geography
     EDUC	560/	 Theories	of	Learning	         3	hrs         professional education requirements
     	   	230	 (Includes	a	20-hr	field	experience)
                                                                   EDUC	555/	 Development,	Gender	              3	hrs
	    EDUC	505/	 Instructional	Theory	and		         3	hrs	           SOCI	270	 	 and	Cultural	Differences
	    	   	300	 Techniques*	                                        EDUC	102     Introduction	to	Education	I*	    1	hr
                   (includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)             EDUC	103	    Introduction	to	Education	II* 1	hr
	    EDUC	563/	 Management	of	the		            3	hrs                            (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
	    	   	311		 Classroom	Environment                              EDUC	105		 Human	Health	                     3	hrs
	    	   	      (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)                EDUC	542/    Law,	Ethics	and	Education	 3	hrs
	    EDUC	580/	 Methods	of	Effective	              3	hrs    	      	   	200	    (Includes	a	20-hr	field	experience)
	    	   	322	 Academic	Evaluation                                 EDUC	560/	 Theories	of	Learning	         3	hrs
	    EDUC	516/	 Reading	and	Writing	Across	 3	hrs           	      	   	230	 (Includes	a	20-hr	field	experience)
	    	   	338	 the	Curriculum                                       EDUC	518/	 Literature	Across	the			         3	hrs
	    	   	      (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)                	    	270	 Curriculum
	    EDUC	345	     Teaching	Art	K-12	             4	hrs            EDUC	505/	 Instructional	Theory	and		     3	hrs
	    	   	         (Includes	a	35-hr	field	experience)      	      	   	300	 Techniques*
                                                                              (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
	    EDUC	525/	 Educating	Exceptional		            3	hrs
	    	   	390	 Individuals                                         EDUC	562/	   Behavior	Management	          3	hrs
                                                                   	   	311	    Techniques
	    EDUC	550/	 Human	Development	                 3	hrs
                                                            	      	   	        (Field	experience	included	in		 	
	    	   	392
                                                            	      	   	        EDUC	311	only)
	    EDUC	400	     Senior	Seminar	                 3	hrs    	      EDUC	563/	 Management	of	the		            3	hrs
	    EDUC	422	     Student	Teaching	in	the		 8	hrs          	      	   	311	 Classroom	Environment
	    	   	         Secondary	Schools                        	      	   	      (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
                                             	
                   (Elementary	and	Secondary		 	            (If	taking	EDUC	311,	EDUC	562	and	563	are	not	required)
                   	placement	required)
                                                                    EDUC	331	   Teaching	of	Reading	           3	hrs
*If	taking	EDUC	300,	EDUC	102	&	103	are	required;	if	              	            (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
taking	EDUC	505	(graduate	equivalent	of	EDUC	300)	
                                                                   EDUC	358	    Teaching	Mathematics	in	       3	hrs
August	2010	or	later,	then	EDUC	102	and	EDUC	103	
                                                                   	            the	Elementary	Schools
are not	required
                                                                   	            (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
note: to take any course listed with a field experience
                                                                   EDUC	590/	 Analysis	and	Correction	of	 3	hrs
component, student must submit application forms by
                                                            	      	   	380	 Reading	Disabilities
the deadline (semester Before desired enrollment).
See education office for deadline information.
                                                            	      	   	      (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
                                                                   EDUC	525/	   Educating	Exceptional		         3	hrs
Special education (Grades K-12)                                    	   	390	    Individuals
Post	Baccalaureate	students	are	only	eligible	to	take	             EDUC	550/	 Human	Development	                1		hr
courses	required	for	certification.                                 	PSYC	330
General education requirements                              	      EDUC	514	     Mathematics	for	the	Special	 3	hrs
i.   Basic Studies                                                 	             Needs	Child	(Remedial)
	    1.	 CISS	170	Introduction	to	Computer	                        EDUC	515	     Language	Development	for		 3	hrs
	    	 Information	Systems                                                       the	Exceptional	Child
                                                                                             Academic	Programs						51

	      EDUC	528	     Methods	of	Teaching	Mild/	 3	hrs             EDUC	542/       Law,	Ethics	and	Education	 3	hrs
	      	             Moderate	Cross-Categorical	              	   	   	200	       (Includes	a	20-hr	field	experience)
	      	             Students
                                                                  EDUC	560/	 Theories	of	Learning	         3	hrs
	      EDUC	547	     Career	Counseling	             3	hrs     	   	   	230	 (Includes	a	20-hr	field	experience)
	      	             Including	Children	with	
	      	             Special	Needs                                 EDUC	518/	 Literature	Across	the			            3	hrs
                                                                  	    	270	 Curriculum
	      EDUC	548	     Communications-	               3	hrs
                     Counseling Conferencing,                     EDUC	505/	 Instructional	Theory	and		     3	hrs
                     and Confronting                          	   	   	300	 Techniques*
	      EDUC	572	     Individual	Ability/Intelligence	 3	hrs                  (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
                     Testing                                      EDUC	302	       Teaching	Skills	              3	hrs
	      EDUC	574	     Evaluation	of	Individual	 3	hrs          	   	               (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
                     Achievement and Aptitude
                                                              	   EDUC	563/	 Management	of	the		            3	hrs
	      EDUC	400	     Senior	Seminar	                 3	hrs    	   	   	311	 Classroom	Environment
	      EDUC	426	     Student	Teaching	in	    3	hrs            	   	   	      (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
	      	             Special	Education	
                                                                  EDUC	580/	 Methods	of	Effective	                3	hrs
	      	             (Elementary	and	Secondary		
                                                              	   	   	322	 Academic	Evaluation**
	      	             placement	required)
                                                                   EDUC	331	      Teaching	of	Reading	           3	hrs
*If	taking	EDUC	300,	EDUC	102	&	EDUC	103	are
                                                                  	               (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
required;	if	taking	EDUC	505	(graduate	equivalent	of	
EDUC	300)	August	2010	or	later,	then	EDUC	102	                    EDUC	521/	      Language,	Literature,	and		 3	hrs
and	EDUC	103	are not	required                                     	    	336	      the	Creative	Arts	for	Elementary
note: to take any course listed with a field experience           	    	          and	Middle	school
component, student must submit application forms by               	    	          (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
the deadline (semester Before desired enrollment).                EDUC	516/	 Reading	and	Writing	Across	3	hrs
See education office for deadline information.                	   	   	338	 the	Curriculum**
                                                              	   	   	      (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
elementary (Grades 1-6)
Post	Baccalaureate	students	are	only	eligible	to	take	            EDUC	358	       Teaching	Mathematics	in		 3	hrs
courses	required	for	certification.                               	   	           the	Elementary	Schools
                                                                  	   	           (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
General education/mathematics requirements
                                                                  EDUC	590/	      Analysis	and	Correction	of	 1	hr
i.     Basic Studies/mathematics
                                                                   	  	380	       Reading	Disabilities
	      1.	 MATH	102	Mathematics	for	the	Elementary		
                                                                   	  	           (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
       	 School	Teacher
	      2.	 MATH	150	College	Algebra	                          	   EDUC	525/	      Educating	Exceptional		         3	hrs
                                                                  	   	390		      Individuals
ii.    arts and humanities
	      1.	 MUSI	122	Music	Appreciation	or                         EDUC	550/	      Human	Development		             3	hrs
	      	 ARTS	105	Art	Appreciation	or                         	   	   	391	
	      	 ARTS	111	Art	and	Ideas	I	or                          	   EDUC	400	       Senior	Seminar	                 3	hrs
	      	 ARTS	112	Art	and	Ideas	II
                                                              	   EDUC	420	       Student	Teaching	in	the		      3	hrs
iii.   Social and Behavioral Sciences                         	   	               Elementary	Schools
	      1.	 PSYC	101	General	Psychology
                                                              *If	taking	EDUC	300,	EDUC	102	&	103	are	required;	if	
	      2.	 ECON	293	Macroeconomics
                                                              taking	EDUC	505	(graduate	equivalent	of	EDUC	300)	
	      3.	 GEOG	101	Introduction	to	Geography                 August	2010	or	later,	then	EDUC	102	and	EDUC	103	
professional education requirements                           are not	required
       EDUC	555/	 Development,	Gender	               3	hrs    **	EDUC	322/580	and	EDUC	338/516	are	required	for	those	
        SOCI	270	 	 and	Cultural	Differences
                                                              who	began	Elementary	certification	August	2009	and	after.
       EDUC	102     Introduction	to	Education	I*	     1	hr
                                                              note: to take any course listed with a field experience
       EDUC	103	    Introduction	to	Education	II* 1	hr        component, student must submit application forms by
                    (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)       the deadline (semester Before desired enrollment).
       EDUC	105		 Human	Health	                     3	hrs     See education office for deadline information.
52       Academic Programs

middle School (Grades 5-9)                                      EDUC	550/	     Human	Development		           3	hrs
Post	Baccalaureate	students	are	only	eligible	to	take	      	   	   	392	
courses	required	for	certification.                         	   EDUC	400	      Senior	Seminar	               3	hrs
possible certification areas: (See middle School            	   EDUC	424	      Student	Teaching	in	the		     3	hrs
content checklists - approximately 21 hours)
                                                            	   	              Middle-Level	Schools
	    Language	Arts	(English)
                                                            *If	taking	EDUC	300,	EDUC	102	&	103	are	required;	if	
	    Mathematics
                                                            taking	EDUC	505	(graduate	equivalent	of	EDUC	300)	
	    Social	Studies	(History)                               August	2010	or	later,	then	EDUC	102	and	EDUC	103	
	    Science	(Biology/Chemistry/General	Science)            are not	required

professional education requirements                         note: to take any course listed with a field experience
                                                            component, student must submit application forms by
     EDUC	555/	 Development,	Gender	                3	hrs   the deadline (semester Before desired enrollment).
      SOCI	270	 	 and	Cultural	Differences                  See education office for deadline information.
     EDUC	102       Introduction	to	Education	I*	    1	hr
     EDUC	103	      Introduction	to	Education	II* 1	hr      middle School content checklists
                    (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)     Language arts                       minimum 27 hrs.
     EDUC	542/      Law,	Ethics	and	Education	 3	hrs            COMM	110	Introduction	to	Speech	or           3 hrs
	    	   	200	      (Includes	a	20-hr	field	experience)         			COMM	203	Understanding	Human
     EDUC	560/	 Theories	of	Learning	         3	hrs                       Communication
	    	   	230	 (Includes	a	20-hr	field	experience)              COMM	360	Oral	Interpretation	of	             3	hrs
      EDUC	518/	 Literature	Across	the	             3	hrs       	        Literature
     	    	270	 Curriculum                                      ENGL	111	 English	Composition	I		            3	hrs
     EDUC	505/	 Instructional	Theory	and		     3	hrs            ENGL	112	 English	Composition	II	            3	hrs
	    	   	300	 Techniques*                                      ENGL	311	 Descriptive	Grammar	of		           3	hrs
                (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)             	         the	English	Language	or
	    EDUC	563/	 Management	of	the		            3	hrs            			ENGL	312	The	History	of	the
	    	   	311	 Classroom	Environment                            	          English	Language
	    	   	      (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)             EDUC	336	 Creative	and	Language	             3	hrs
     EDUC	580/	 Methods	of	Effective	               3	hrs       	         Arts	in	Elementary	and
	    	   	322	 Academic	Evaluation                              	         Middle	Schools
	    EDUC	326	      Middle	School	Methods	         3	hrs        Literature	Elective	                         3	hrs
	    	              (Includes	a	10-hr	field	experience)         English/Language	Arts	Electives	             6	hrs
      EDUC	331	     Teaching	of	Reading	           3	hrs
                                                            mathematics                         minimum 23 hrs.
     	              (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
     EDUC	521/	     Language,	Literature,	and		 3	hrs           CISS	170	 Introduction	to	Computer	          3	hrs
                                                                	         Information	Systems
     	    	336	     the	Creative	Arts	for	Elementary
     	    	         and	Middle	school                           MATH	102	 Mathematics	for	the	Ele-	          3	hrs
     	    	         (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)         	         mentary	School	Teacher
     EDUC	516/	 Reading	and	Writing	Across	3	hrs                MATH	150	 College	Algebra	                   3	hrs
	    	   	338	 the	Curriculum                                   MATH	201	 Calculus	and	Analytic	             5	hrs
	    	   	      (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)                       Geometry I
Teaching	Methods	Course:                                        MATH	250	 Statistics	I	                      3	hrs
     	              Mathematics-359,	Social		 	 	               Mathematics	Electives	(above	MATH	106)	      6	hrs
     	              Studies-362,	Science-365,		 	 	
     	              English-367                             Science                             minimum 21 hrs.
     	              (Includes	a	35-hr	field	experience)         BIOL	110	 Principles	of	Biology	I	or         3 hrs
	    EDUC	525/	     Educating	Exceptional		         3	hrs       			ENVS	115	Introduction	to	
     	   	390		     Individuals                                 	          Environmental	Science
                                                                                       Academic	Programs						53

    BIOL	110L	 Principles	of	Biology	I	           2	hrs       EDUC	560/	 Theories	of	Learning	         3	hrs
    	          Laboratory	or                              	   	   	230	 (Includes	a	20-hr	field	experience)
    			ENVS	115L	Environmental	Science	                       EDUC	505/	 Instructional	Theory	and		     3	hrs
    	          Laboratory                                 	   	   	300	 Techniques*
    CHEM	109	 Chemistry	for	Biological	and	       3	hrs                  (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
    	         Health-Related	Sciences                     	   EDUC	563/	 Management	of	the		            3	hrs
    CHEM	111L	Introductory	Chemistry		            2	hrs   	   	   	311	 Classroom	Environment
    	        Laboratory	Experience                        	   	   	      (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)

    GEOL	110	 Introduction	to	Physical	           3	hrs       EDUC	580/	 Methods	of	Effective	             3	hrs
              Geology                                     	   	   	322	 Academic	Evaluation

    GEOL	110L		Introduction	to	Physical	          2	hrs       EDUC	516/	 Reading	and	Writing	Across	3	hrs
    	         Geology	Laboratory                          	   	   	338	 the	Curriculum
                                                          	   	   	      (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)
    Science	Elective	                             3	hrs
                                                          Teaching	Methods	Course:
Social Studies                     minimum 27 hrs.
                                                              	              Mathematics-360,	Social		 	 	
    HIST	101	 Western	Civilization	I	             3	hrs       	              Studies-362,	Science-365,		 	 	
                                                              	              English-367,	Business-369
    HIST	102	 Western	Civilization	II	            3	hrs
                                                              	              (Includes	a	35-hr	field	experience)
    HIST	121	 American	History	to	1877	           3	hrs
                                                          	   EDUC	525/	     Educating	Exceptional		       3	hrs
    HIST	122	 American	History	Since	1877	 3	hrs              	   	390		     Individuals
    GEOG	101	Introduction	to	Geography	           3	hrs       EDUC	550/	     Human	Development		           3	hrs
    POSC	111	 American	National		                 3	hrs   	   	   	392	
              Government                                  	   EDUC	400	      Senior	Seminar	               3	hrs
    POSC	215	 State	and	Local	Government	 3	hrs           	   EDUC	422	      Student	Teaching	in	the		     3	hrs
    PSYC	101	 General	Psychology	                 3	hrs   	   	              Secondary	Schools
    SOCI	111	 General	Sociology	                  3	hrs   *If	taking	EDUC	300,	EDUC	102	&	103	are	required;	if	
                                                          taking	EDUC	505	(graduate	equivalent	of	EDUC	300)	
Secondary (Grades 9-12)                                   August	2010	or	later,	then	EDUC	102	and	EDUC	103	
Post	Baccalaureate	students	are	only	eligible	to	take	    are not	required
courses	required	for	certification.
                                                          note: to take any course listed with a field experience
possible certification areas: (See Secondary              component, student must submit application forms by
content checklists - 30-40 hours)                         the deadline (semester Before desired enrollment).
                                                          See education office for deadline information.
	   Biology
	   Business	Education	(non-vocational)
    Chemistry                                             Secondary content checklists
	   English                                               Biology (9-12)                      minimum 32 hrs.
	   General	Science
                                                              BIOL	290	 Cell	Biology	                      3	hrs
	   Mathematics
	   Social	Studies	(History)                                  BIOL	300	 Evolution	                         3	hrs	

professional education requirements                           BIOL	342	 Genetics	                          3	hrs
                                                              BIOL	343	 Botany	                            5	hrs
    EDUC	555/	 Development,	Gender	               3	hrs
                                                              BIOL	353	 Zoology	                           5	hrs
    SOCI	270	 	 and	Cultural	Differences
                                                              CHEM	109	 Chemistry	for	Biological	and		 3	hrs
    EDUC	102      Introduction	to	Education	I*	    1	hr       	         Health-Related	Sciences
    EDUC	103	     Introduction	to	Education	II*    1	hr       ENVS	115	 Introduction	to	Environ-	          3	hrs
                  (Includes	a	15-hr	field	experience)         	         mental	Science
    EDUC	542/ Law,	Ethics	and	Education	 3	hrs                GEOL	110		Introduction	to	Physical	          3	hrs
	   	   	200	 (Includes	a	20-hr	field	experience)                       Geology
54      Academic Programs

     HIST/PHIL	303		History	and	Philosophy	                       3	hrs      CHEM/BIOL	420L	Biochemistry		                2	hrs
     	         of	Modern	Science                                             	        Laboratory	
     PHYS	111	 College	Physics	I	                                 3	hrs      ENVS	115	 Introduction	to	Environmental	 3	hrs
                                                                             	         Science
Business education                            minimum 30 hrs.
non-Vocational (9-12)                                                        GEOL	110	 Introduction	to	Physical	          3	hrs
                                                                                       Geology
     ACCT	280	 Accounting	I		                                     3	hrs
                                                                             HIST/PHIL	303	History	and	Philosophy	        3	hrs
     ACCT	385	 Accounting	Information	                            3	hrs                of Modern	Science
     	         Systems	or
                                                                             PHYS	111	 College	Physics	I	                 3	hrs
     An approved Computer Technology Course
     Implementing	Business	Education	Programs**                           english (9-12)                      minimum 30 hrs.
     **This	 course	 is	 not	 offered	 at	 Columbia	 College;	
     course	 can	 be	 taken	 online	 with	 the	 Department	 of	              EDUC	270	 Literature	for	Children	and	       3	hrs
     Elementary	 and	 Secondary	 Education	 via	 the	                                  Adolescents
     Consortium Agreement.
                                                                             EDUC	367	 Teaching	Middle	School	and		 3	hrs
     CISS	170	 Introduction	to	Computer	                          3	hrs
                                                                             	         Secondary	English
     	         Information	Systems
                                                                             ENGL	111	 English	Composition	I	             3	hrs
     ECON	293	 Macroeconomics	or                                  3 hrs
                                                                             ENGL	112	 English	Composition	II	            3	hrs
     			ECON	294	Microeconomics	
                                                                             Electives:		 Writing/Criticism	Courses	      6	hrs
     EDUC	369	 Teaching	Business	                          3	hrs
           (This	 course	 must	 include	 a	 resume	 that	 will	              ENGL	311	 Descriptive	Grammar	of		           3	hrs
           document	 1	 year	 or	 2,000	 hours	 of	 approved	                	         the	English	Language
           occupational experience or appropriate intern-
           ship. The approval is determined by the nature                    ENGL	312	 The	History	of	the	                3	hrs
           of employment in a business occupation. Copy                      	         English	Language
           of	resume	needed	for	student	file).
                                                                             ENGL	241	 American	Literature	I	or        3 hrs
     MGMT	254	Business	Communication	                             3	hrs
                                                                               ENGL	242	 American	Literature	II	          3	hrs
     MGMT	265	Business	Law	I	                                     3	hrs
                                                                             ENGL	450	       Minority	and	Ethnic	         3	hrs
     MGMT	330	Principles	of	Management	                           3	hrs
                                                                              	 	            Literature	of	the	U.S.
     MGMT	393	Business	Information		                              3	hrs
     	        Systems                                                        One course selected from:

     MKTG	310	 Principles	of	Marketing	                           3	hrs        ENGL	231	 English	Literature	I	            3	hrs

     Business	Electives	Recommended	                         0-6	hrs           ENGL	232	 English	Literature	II	           3	hrs

          ACCT	281	 Accounting	II                                              ENGL	263	 World	Literature	I	              3	hrs

          FINC	298	 Personal	Financial	Planning                                ENGL	264	 World	Literature	II	             3	hrs

          MGMT	338	 International	Business                                   Elective	in	World/English	Literature	        3	hrs
          MKTG	410		Global	Marketing                                         Elective:	    English	Credit	              0-2	hrs

chemistry (9-12)                              minimum 32 hrs.
                                                                          General Science (9-12)              minimum 32 hrs.
     BIOL	110	 Principles	of	Biology	I	                           3	hrs
                                                                             ASTR	108	 Introduction	to	Astronomy	         3	hrs
     CHEM	210	 Organic	Chemistry	I	                               3	hrs
                                                                             BIOL	110	 Principles	of	Biology	I	           3	hrs
     CHEM	210L	Organic	Chemistry	I	                               2	hrs
                                                                             BIOL	110L	 Principles	of	Biology	I	          2	hrs
     	        Laboratory
                                                                             	          Laboratory
     CHEM	301	 Quantitative	Analysis	                             5	hrs
                                                                             CHEM	109	 Chemistry	for	Biological	and	      3	hrs
     CHEM	322	 Inorganic	Chemistry	                               3	hrs      	         Health-Related	Sciences
     CHEM/PHYS	401	Introduction	to	                               3	hrs      CHEM	111L	Introductory	Chemistry		           2	hrs
              Physical Chemistry/	                                           	        Laboratory	Experience
              Chemical Physics
                                                                             ENVS/BIOL	115		Introduction	to		             3	hrs
     CHEM/BIOL	420		Biochemistry	                                 3	hrs
                                                                             	        Environmental	Science
                                                                                   Academic	Programs						55

   ENVS/BIOL	115L		Introduction	to	             2	hrs      Linear	Algebra		                        2-3	hrs
   	        Environmental	Science                            MATH	303	 Linear	Algebra	
   	        Laboratory                                       	         (Recommended)
   GEOL	110	 Introduction	to	Physical	          3	hrs
             Geology                                    Social Studies (9-12)             minimum 40 hrs.
   HIST/PHIL	303	History	and	Philosophy	        3	hrs      Electives	in	American	History	(6	hrs)
   	         of	Modern	Science	                            HIST	121	 American	History	to	1877		       3	hrs
   PHYS/CHEM	108	Physical	Science	              3	hrs      HIST	122	 American	History	Since	1877	 3	hrs
   	       Survey	
                                                           Electives	in	World	History	(3	hrs)
   PHYS/CHEM	108L		Physical	Science	            2	hrs
                                                           HIST	101	 Western	Civilization	I	          3	hrs
   	       Survey	Laboratory	
                                                           HIST	102	 Western	Civilization	II	         3	hrs
   Electives:	 From	any	of	the	above	       3	hrs
               listed	 categories.	 Recommen-              ECON	293	 Macroeconomics	or                3 hrs
               ded	 Elective:	 ENVS/EDUC	 372	             			ECON	294		Microeconomics
               Environmental	Education.
                                                           GEOG	101	Introduction	to	Geography	        3	hrs
mathematics (9-12)                  minimum 30 hrs.        POSC	111	 American	National		              3	hrs
                                                                     Government
   MATH	150	 College	Algebra	                   3	hrs
                                                           POSC	215	 State	and	Local	Government	 3	hrs
   MATH	201	 Calculus	and	Analytic	             5	hrs
             Geometry I                                    PSYC	101	 General	Psychology		             3	hrs
   MATH	222	 Calculus	and	Analytic	             5	hrs      SOCI	111	 General	Sociology	or             3 hrs
             Geometry II
                                                             SOCI	270	 Minority	Cultures	and	         3	hrs
   MATH	331	 Foundations	of	Geometry	           3	hrs        	         Relations
   Electives	from	above	categories	             4	hrs      Electives	from	any	of	the	above		        1-3	hrs
                                                           categories.
   At	least	3	from	the	following	areas:	(10	hrs)
   History	of	Mathematics	                   2-3	hrs
   Structure	of	the	Real	Number	System	      2-3	hrs
     MATH	102	 Mathematics	for	the	Ele-	
     	         mentary	School	Teacher
     	         (Recommended)
   Number	Theory	                            2-3	hrs
   Completion	Calculus	Sequence	             2-5	hrs
     MATH	300	 Multivariate	Calculus	Pro-	
     	         babilty	and	Statistics
     	         (Recommended)
     MATH	250	 Statistics	I	(Recommended)	or
       MATH	251	 Statistics	II	or
       MATH	340	 Introduction	to	Probability	
                 Theory
   Computer	Science	                         2-5	hrs
     CISS	240	 Introduction	to	Programming
     	         (Recommended)
   Mathematics	for	Exceptional	Children	 2-3	hrs
     EDUC	514	 Mathematics	for	the	
     	         Special	Needs	Child	(Remedial)
     	         (Recommended)
56    Academic Programs

coUrSe DeScriptionS
core courses                                                   curriculum and instruction
eDUc 500 research Design                              3 hrs    eDUc 505        instructional theory           3 hrs
The study of educational research from a com-                                  and techniques
prehensive perspective.             Included are: tech-        The study of instructional planning, including
niques	 and	 concepts	 of	 social	 and	 behavioral	            goals	 and	 objectives,	 techniques	 and	 activities,	
research;	writing	in	the	APA	format;	ethical	stan-             and	 evaluation.	 Students	 produce	 and	 present	
dards	 governing	 educational	 research;	 experi-              lessons	 containing	 defensible	 techniques,	 strate-
ences	in	the	use	of	internal	and	external	critique	            gies and methods of evaluation. Includes a
methods;	 readings	 in	 curriculum,	 assessment,	              15-hour	 field	 experience.	 Prerequisite:	 Graduate	
philosophical and psychological research prod-                 standing.
ucts;	 experiences	 accessing	 and	 using	 archival	
and	 web-based	 data	 sources;	 evaluation	 of	                eDUc 512 the integrated curriculum 3 hrs
descriptive,	 true-experimental	 and	 quasi-experi-            The study of research, theorists and proponents of
mental	 research	 designs;	 identification	 and	 use	          the integrated curriculum and instruction in the
of appropriate parametric and nonparametric                    elementary, middle level and secondary schools.
statistical	 analyses;	 computation	 and	 interpreta-          Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.	
tion	 of	 effect	 size	 tests	 of	 practical	 significance;	
conducting primary and secondary source litera-                eDUc 514      mathematics for the Special 3 hrs
ture	 reviews;	 demonstration	 of	 research	 design-                         needs child (remedial)
ing;	and	use	of	portfolio	research.		Prerequisite:	            The study of specific theories and strategies of
Graduate standing.                                             teaching	 mathematics	 to	 children	 with	 special	
                                                               needs.	 	 Techniques	 of	 remediation	 and	 interven-
eDUc 504 curriculum Design and           3 hrs                 tion in math instruction at various ability levels are
             evaluation                                        discussed. There is a strong application compo-
The study of curriculum design from historical                 nent	to	this	course.		Developmentally	appropriate	
precedent to current models of curriculum con-                 practices are presented. This course is specifi-
struction, implementation, and evaluation.                     cally	 designed	 for	 teachers	 of	 children	 with	 mild/
Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.	                              moderate	 disabilities.	 Prerequisite:	 Graduate	
                                                               standing.
eDUc 508 integrative project                        3 hrs
The application of portfolio research skills needed            eDUc 515        Language Development           3 hrs
to document the accomplishments of program goals.                              of the exceptional child
The	integrative	project	must	meet	quality	standards	           Study	 of	 the	 stages	 and	 characteristics	 of	 lan-
for	graduate	research,	and	requires	acceptance	by	             guage	 development	 with	 an	 emphasis	 on	 the	
the	 graduate	 faculty,	 following	 a	 satisfactory	 oral	     needs of exceptional children and learners of
presentation	 and	 defense.	 	 Students	 must	 partici-        English	as	a	second	language.		The	courses	focus	
pate	 in	 a	 final	 review	 which	 includes	 the	 portfolio	   is	to	allow	practicing	classroom	teachers	to	apply	
presentation,	 self-evaluation	 and	 program	 evalua-          this	knowledge	to	the	acquisition	and	development	
tion.	 	 All	 must	 demonstrate,	 in	 an	 exit	 interview,	    of exceptional children in various educational set-
reflective analysis, analytic and creative skills.             tings.		Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.
Students	should	consult	their	advisor	in	the	semes-
ter prior to enrollment to begin planning this experi-         eDUc 516         reading and Writing                3 hrs
ence.	 	 Completion	 may	 require	 more	 than	 one	                             across the curriculum
enrollment session. Alternative Certification stu-             The	study	of	the	theoretical	framework	for	directed	
dents	enrolled	in	EDUC	508	in	order	to	earn	teacher	           language	 use	 in	 all	 content	 areas,	 with	 emphasis	
certification may repeat the course for an additional          on establishing a consistent set of language stan-
three hours of credit in order to serve as a culminat-         dards, practices and uses. Applications in various
ing	experience	for	the	MAT	degree.		Prerequisites:	            contents,	 curricula	 and	 with	 various	 ability	 levels	
EDUC	 500,	 an	 approved	 plan	 of	 completion	 and	           are developed. Includes	 a	 15-hour	 field	 experi-
instructor's	permission.	                                      ence. Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.	.
                                                                                            Academic	Programs						57

eDUc 518         Literature across                 3 hrs     eDUc 526        teaching and Supervising            3 hrs
                 the curriculum                                              pre-Service and in-Service
The study of potential contributions of literature,                          teachers
including traditional and more broadly defined               Study	 of	 the	 role	 of	 the	 practicing	 professional	 in	
categories, in all teaching and learning situations.         the	 instruction	 and	 supervision	 of	 pre-service	
Familiarity	with	the	literature	available	and	appro-         teachers in clinical settings. Variables studied
priate by genre, content and age group, criteria by          include: the relational roles of the college supervi-
which	 to	 evaluate	 written	 materials	 for	 appropri-      sor,	cooperating	teacher	and	pre-service	teacher;	
ateness,	 and	 applications	 within	 specific	 subject	      the developmental process and procedures appro-
areas and developmental stages, is stressed.                 priate	for	pre-service	teachers	at	various	stages	of	
Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.		                           professional	development;	the	roles	of	the	cooper-
                                                             ating	 teacher	 (model,	 teacher,	 demonstrator,	
                                                             coach,	 critic,	 evaluator,	 supporter,	 mentor).	 	 The	
eDUc 521         Language, Literature,             3 hrs
                                                             phases	 of	 instruction	 (planning,	 implementation	
                 and the creative arts
                                                             and	 evaluation),	 and	 the	 methods	 of	 instruction,	
                 for elementary and
                 middle Schools                              including	 inquiry,	 direct,	 interactive	 and	 coopera-
                                                             tive, individual and group, as they relate to clinical
The	 study	 of	 the	 creative	 arts	 (music	 and	 art)	
                                                             experiences,	are	utilized	as	one	component	of	this	
and	 language	 arts	 curricula	 emphasizing	 devel-
                                                             course. Presentation and evaluation skills used
opmentally appropriate literature. This study                by	teachers	in	in-service	situations	and	in	profes-
includes instructional decisions, teaching tech-             sional conferences are addressed.
niques,	and	narrative	and	expository	text	related	
to aesthetic and language modes of listening,                eDUc 527       introduction to mild to        3 hrs
speaking,	reading	and	writing.	Includes	a	15-hour	                          moderate cross-categorical
field experience.	 Prerequisite:	 Graduate	 stand-           An	overview	of	mild/moderate	disabilities,	specifi-
ing.                                                         cally the characteristics, etiology, diagnosis and
                                                             assessment.	Includes	examination	of	the	laws	that	
eDUc 523        critical and creative              3 hrs     govern	special	education.	Prerequisite:	EDUC	300.	 	
                problem Solving
The study of critical and creative problem solving           eDUc 528         methods of teaching            3 hrs
as it applies to teaching and learning. Cognitive                             mild/moderate cross-
understanding	 of	 the	 major	 models	 of	 critical	                          categorical Students
thinking	and	creativity	will	be	reinforced	by	expe-          A study of the methods, materials, resources,
riences	 	 which	 require	 higher	 levels	 of	 thinking,	    requirements	 and	 responsibilities	 of	 teachers	
including	 analysis,	 evaluation	 and	 creating;	 cre-       working	 with	 students	 with	 mild	 to	 moderate	 dis-
ative	 problem	 solving,	 self-expression	 and	 origi-       abilities, including learning disabilities, behavioral
nal	 synthesis	 of	 design	 within	 content	 or	 interest	   disorders, mental retardation, and physical dis-
areas.                                                       abilities and other health impairments. Course
                                                             content focuses on developing instructional strate-
eDUc 525        educating exceptional             3 hrs      gies to provide effective programs in a range of
               individuals                                   placements.	 	 Emphasis	 is	 on	 the	 team	 model	 of	
A study of all components affecting the education            planning and delivery, including parents, regular
of exceptional individuals. Variables addressed              education teachers, administration and support
include: the type and extent of the handicapping             specialists.	Prerequisite:	EDUC	527.		
condition;	 the	 legal	 conditions	 and	 constraints	
influencing	placement	and	instruction;	the	roles	of	         eDUc 529          curriculum and instruction 3 hrs
                                                                                for Gifted Students
the	 personnel	 who	 work	 with	 exceptional	 stu-
dents, including special teachers, classroom                 The	course	will	investigate	topics	which	include	the	
teachers, parents, administrators, and counsel-              historical background of education for the gifted
                                                             and	 talented;	 the	 concept	 of	 giftedness	 and	 char-
ors;	 methods	 and	 materials	 used	 in	 instruction;	
                                                             acteristics	 of	 the	 gifted	 and	 talented;	 assessment	
classroom management. The role of the class-
                                                             of	the	gifted	and	talented;	various	models	and	pro-
room	teacher	will	be	emphasized.	
                                                             grams for education of the gifted and talented.
58    Academic Programs

eDUc 530          administration and Super- 3 hrs            eDUc 546       perspectives on parental,        3 hrs
                  vision of the Gifted program                              community, and political
The study of the gifted program administration.                             involvement in public Schools
Focused	 upon	 are	 the	 understanding	 of,	 and	 the	       The	 study	 of	 relationships	 between	 the	 schools	
skills needed for, the supervising and administer-           and professional educators and the people and
ing a gifted program in elementary and second-               agencies	outside	the	schools	which	influence	and	
ary	schools.	This	class	will	include	a	study	of	the	     	   affect	them.		Formal	and	informal	relationships	are	
origins	 of	 gifted	 education;	 identifying	 giftedness;	   identified and positive and negative effects dis-
the	instructional	models	in	use;	and	the	selection	          cussed.	 	 Strategies	 for	 fostering	 and	 improving	
of	staff.		Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.		                cooperative involvement and support are devel-
                                                             oped	 and	 a	 practical	 application	 is	 required.	 	
eDUc 531       Survey of the Gifted               3 hrs      Prerequisite:	Graduate	Standing.	
               and talented
Overview	 of	 the	 intellectual,	 social	 and	 emotional	    eDUc 547       career counseling including 3 hrs
characteristics of the gifted and talented. An inves-                       children With Special needs
tigation of the concept of giftedness, assessment            The study of and application of theory, procedures
of	the	gifted	and	talented	which	include:	cognitive,	        and	techniques	of	career	counseling.	Career	iden-
affective, physical and intuitive functions.                 tification	 and	 decision	 making	 are	 emphasized.	  	
                                                             Techniques	 for	 preparing	 students	 with	 special	
eDUc 532        technology in education          3 hrs       needs to make the transition from special educa-
The study of instructional media and its use in the          tion	to	community	living	are	discussed.		Prerequisite:	
classroom. Traditional media and the latest tech-            Graduate	Standing.	
nology are investigated. Provided are opportuni-
ties	 to	 work	 with	 the	 various	 mediums,	 produce	       eDUc 548       communications-counseling 3 hrs
materials, and integrate mediated experiences                               conferencing, and confronting
into	instruction.	Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.	          The	 study	 of	 communications	 within	 the	 context	
                                                             of	 interpersonal	 transactions	 within	 educational	
eDUc 533        topics                          1-3 hrs      settings. Counseling, counseling theories, mediat-
                                                             ing,	conferring	and	advocating	are	studied.		Special	
psychological and philosophical                              attention is given to community resource agen-
                                                             cies,	 multidisciplinary	 teams	 and	 their	 work	 with	
foundations
                                                             families	of	children	with	disabilities.		Prerequisite:	
eDUc 542       Law, ethics and education 3 hrs               Graduate	Standing.		
The	study	of	practices	within	education	from	both	
the legal and ethical perspectives. Values, moral-           eDUc 550 human Development 3 hrs
ity and ethics are addressed from historical and             The	study	of	human	development.		Students	must	
current	frameworks	and	applied	to	legal	and	prac-            complete	 the	 Course	 Core	 Component	 and	 two	
tical	 questions	 of	 practical	 importance	 to	 educa-      Specialized	 Components.	 The	 Core	 Component	
tors. Includes	 a	 20-hour	 field	 experience.               addresses human development from the theoreti-
Prerequisite:	Graduate	Standing.		                           cal perspectives of psychoanalysis, behaviorism
                                                             and	 phenomenology.	 	 Specialization	 Components	
                                                             focus	 on	 the	 unique	 physiological,	 cognitive,	 and	
eDUc 544      current issues and               3 hrs
                                                             affective/social	characteristics	of	human	beings	in	
              philosophical precedents
                                                             age-graded,	 	 developmental	 eras,	 and	 on	 how	
The study of current issues in education, and                these	characteristics	modify	practice	requirements.	   	
education	 reform,	 such	 as:	 educational	 practice;	       Prerequisite:	Graduate	Standing.	
specialization	and	professionalization;	governance;	
finance;	legal	precedents;	cultural,	social	and	eth-         eDUc 555        Development, Gender           3 hrs
nic	 influences;	 and	 equal	 opportunity	 demands.	 	                       and cultural Differences
Issues are explored from the philosophical prece-
                                                             The study of diversity as it pertains to gender and
dents formed in idealism, realism, perennialism,
                                                             cultural differences. Issues examined include top-
essentialism, pragmatism, progressivism, social
                                                             ics such as economic, social, cultural, political,
constructivism, humanism, existentialism, philo-             religious, ethnic, racial, and gender influences.
sophical analysis and emerging reform philoso-               Other factors considered include: macro and micro
phies.	Prerequisite:	Graduate	Standing.	                     systems and interpersonal differences in areas
                                                                                           Academic	Programs						59

such	as	attraction,	affiliation,	conformity,	prejudice	       eDUc 572       individual ability/               3 hrs
and sexism. Processes such as social change,                                 intelligence testing
urban	 and	 rural	 socialization,	 intergender	 and	          The study and practice of individual intelligence
intragender communication, and the balance of                 and	 achievement	 tests.	 	 Using	 the	 major	 assess-
work,	health,	relationships	and	leisure	pursuits	are	         ment tools, the administration, scoring and evalu-
explored.	Prerequisite:	Graduate	Standing.	                   ation	 of	 individual	 tests	 will	 be	 emphasized.	  	
                                                              Contemporary	 assessment	 issues	 also	 will	 be	
eDUc 556        emotional Disorders in               3 hrs    addressed.		Prerequisite:	Graduate	Standing.	
                children and adolescents
The study of the effects of emotional disorders on            eDUc 574       evaluation of individual       3 hrs
children's	 cognitive,	 affective,	 and	 psychomotor	                        achievement and aptitude
behaviors,	 as	 well	 as	 remedial	 and	 rehabilitative	      The study and practice of individual aptitude and
strategies.	 	 Students	 will	 identify	 those	 strategies	   achievement	testing.		Using	the	major	assessment	
that	 are	 effective	 in	 the	 classroom	 with	 students	     tools, the administration, scoring and evaluation of
exhibiting	 emotional	 disorders.	 Prerequisite:	             individual	 tests	 are	 emphasized.	 Contemporary	
Graduate	Standing.	                                           assessment issues also are discussed.
                                                              Prerequisite:	Graduate	Standing.		
eDUc 560 theories of Learning                  3 hrs
The	 study	 of	 major	 learning	 theories	 including	         eDUc 580       methods of effective             3 hrs
those	 proposed	 by	 Skinner,	 Pavlov,	 Bandura,	                            academic evaluation
Piaget,	 Bruner,	 Sternberg	 and	 others.	 	 Current	         A study of formative, placement, diagnostic and
and historical research into the application of the-          summative	evaluation.		Emphasis	is	on	the	devel-
oretical	 knowledge	 in	 education	 systems	 are	             opment,	 administration,	 interpretation	 and	 utiliza-
addressed. Includes	 a	 20-hour	 field	 experience.	          tion	 of	 informal,	 teacher-made	 evaluation	 mea-
Prerequisite:	Graduate	Standing.		                            sures,	 to	 include	 paper-pencil	 and	 observation	
                                                              instruments.		These	measures	may	be	norm-refer-
eDUc 562        Behavior management              3 hrs
                                                              enced, criterion referenced or learner referenced.
                techniques
                                                              Additionally, students learn to read and interpret
A study of the theories of behavior management                formal assessment data produced by either para-
as	 applied	 to	 school	 environments	 with	 teachers,	       metric	 or	 nonparametric	 statistics.	 	 Prerequisite:	
children, support personnel, parents and special              Graduate	Standing.	
needs personnel as contributing variables.
Prevention, supportive and corrective aspects are
                                                              eDUc 582      evaluation of                      3 hrs
included.		Prerequisite:	Graduate	Standing.		
                                                                            teaching effectiveness
eDUc 563      management of the               3 hrs           The study of methods, models and materials
              classroom environment                           which	 can	 be	 used	 to	 analyze	 teaching	 effective-
                                                              ness. Variables studied include: input and output
The	study	of	classroom	management	techniques.	      	
                                                              measures	as	standards;	the	relationship	between	
Students	 analyze	 classroom	 variables	 related	 to	
                                                              goals	and	measurements;	criterion,	norm	and	self-
organization	and	governance;	study	theories	rele-
                                                              referencing;	intended	use-formative	or	summative;	
vant to classroom motivation, discipline and com-
                                                              sources-peer,	supervisor,	self	and	client;	personal	
munications	to	evaluate	classroom	practices;	and	
                                                              or	mediated;	formal	or	informal;	systematic	or	ran-
develop a management system. Includes	a	15-hour	
                                                              dom;	 planned	 or	 spontaneous.	 	 Prerequisite:	
field experience.	Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.	
                                                              Graduate	Standing.	
measurement and evaluation
                                                              eDUc 590      analysis and correction       3 hrs
eDUc 570       Statistics for the               3 hrs                       of reading Disabilities
               Behavioral Sciences                            The study of current commercially prepared instru-
The study of parametric and nonparametric statis-             ments for reading evaluation, construction of
tics	used	in	the	behavioral	sciences.		Included	will	         instruments for classroom and specialist use, and
be	 analyses	 of	 relationship	 and	 variance	 as	 well	      analysis and interpretation of testing results.
as	effect	sizes	associated	with	each.		Prerequisite:	         Includes	a	15-hour	field	experience.	Prerequisite:	
Graduate	Standing.	                                           Graduate	Standing.		
60    Academic Programs

related area: field experiences                               eDUc 633       topics                             1-3 hrs

eDUc 610 practicum                             1-6 hrs        *eDUc 699 internship                          6 hrs
A	 field	 based	 experience	 in	 which	 students	 apply	      Students	 engage	 in	 professional	 practice.	       	
the	concepts	being		studied	within	a	particular	class	        Education	students	practice	under	the	supervision	
to a real situation under the direction and supervi-          of a master teacher and a faculty member. A
sion of a master teacher and a faculty member.                seminar experience accompanies practice to facil-
Designed	 primarily	 for	 students	 who	 are	 not	 cur-       itate reflection and study of the Internship experi-
rently	 teaching	 or	 who	 do	 not	 have	 access	 to	 a	      ence. The Internship is generally a culminating
classroom setting, the practicum is a focused expe-           experience in the program of study and may be
rience that must be developed and approved prior              taken	 concurrently	 with	 EDUC	 508.	 The	 applica-
to	enrollment.	Prerequisite:	Graduate	Standing.	              tion must be completed one semester prior to
                                                              beginning	 student	 teaching.	 Prerequisite:	
eDUc 613         practicum: mild/moderate           3 hrs     Completion	 of	 all	 coursework	 and	 specifications	
                 cross categorical Special                    listed	 on	 the	 Student	 Teaching	 Requirement	
                 education                                    Verification.
Application	theory	of	special	education	as	well	as	
legal	 requirements	 for	 students	 and	 teachers	 in	        *	 A	 portfolio	 documenting	 competency	 in	 MoSTEP	
authentic teaching situations. A supervised intro-               Standards	 is	 required	 before	 students	 who	 complete	
duction	to	the	multi-faceted	role	of	a	special	edu-              EDUC	699	will	be	recommended	for	certification.
cation teacher, including consultant and care
manager.			Students	spend	120	clock	hours	in	the	
field	and	24	hours	in	seminar	to	meet	the	require-
ments	 of	 the	 course.	 	 May	 be	 repeated	 one	 time	
for	 a	 total	 of	 6	 hours	 of	 credit.	 	 Prerequisites/
Corequisites:	 Graduate	 Standing;	 completion	 of	
EDUC	390	or	EDUC	525	for	teacher	certification;	
completion	 of	 EDUC	 527,	 EDUC	 528,	 EDUC	 548	
and	 EDUC	 562	 for	 certification	 in	 mild/moderate	
cross-categorical	special	education.	

eDUc 614         practicum for Special              3 hrs
                 reading teachers
Application	 of	 the	 theory	 of	 Reading	 Diagnosis	
and	Prescription	in	authentic	classroom	situations;	
a supervised introduction to special reading pro-
grams.	Students	will	spend	120	clock	hours	in	the	
field	and	24	hours	in	seminar	to	meet	the	require-
ments	 of	 the	 course.	 	 May	 be	 repeated	 one	 time	
for	 a	 total	 of	 6	 hours	 of	 credit.	 	 Prerequisites:	
Graduate	 Standing;	 completion	 of	 one	 course	 in	
reading diagnosis and correction.

eDUc 615         practicum for the                  3 hrs
                 Gifted and talented
Application theory of gifted and talented education
in	 authentic	 classroom	 situations;	 a	 supervised	
introduction to gifted and talented programs.
Students	 will	 spend	 120	 clock	 hours	 in	 the	 field	
and	24	hours	in	seminar	to	meet	the	requirements	
of	 the	 course.	 	 May	 be	 repeated	 one	 time	 for	 a	
total	 of	 6	 hours	 of	 credit.	 Prerequisite:	 Graduate	
Standing;	EDUC	531.	
                                                                                                Academic	Programs						61


maSter of BUSineSS aDminiStration
coordinator: Diane Suhler, ph.D.
    drsuhler@ccis.edu, (573) 875-7640

proGram DeScription                                              appropriate professional experience or other prepa-
                                                                 ration.		Students	must	earn	a	grade	of	B	or	higher	in	
	    The	 Master	 of	 Business	 Administration	 (MBA)	           each	of	the	first	two	graduate	courses	for	which	they	
offers a balance of theory and practice. The mission             are	enrolled	in	order	to	be	reviewed	for	full	admission	
of	the	MBA	program	is	to	prepare	working	adults	in	              to	the	MBA	program.	
the	 early	 stages	 of	 their	 careers	 in	 small	 or	 middle-
sized	 organizations	 with	 the	 knowledge,	 skills,	 and	       admission criteria
personal	 characteristics	 that	 will	 enhance	 perfor-
                                                                 	    Serving	the	needs	of	working	adults	with	gradu-
mance in their present occupation, and prepare them
                                                                 ate studies in business is a guiding principle in the
for	 advancement	 to	 upper-level	 management	 in	 the	
                                                                 MBA	 program.	 To	 this	 end,	 admission	 to	 the	 MBA	
future.
                                                                 program	 rests	 heavily	 upon	 the	 extent	 to	 which	 the	
     A principal strategy for achievement of this over-
                                                                 applicant	 has	 had	 the	 opportunity	 for	 work-related	
all goal is to employ a balanced educational approach
                                                                 experience	 that	 would	 complement	 further	 study	 in	
that includes a rich mixture of business theory and
practice.	 The	 MBA	 program	 complements	 manage-               business	at	the	graduate	level.	Applicants	who	have	
ment	 development	 activities	 which,	 in	 combination,	         recently completed undergraduate studies are
prepare	 working	 adults	 for	 advancement	 within	 an	          encouraged	first	to	enter	the	world	of	work	and	then	
organization.	To	this	end,	the	MBA	program	enhanc-               later	 to	 seek	 admission	 to	 the	 MBA	 program	 after	
es career opportunities in the management of busi-               obtaining	a	larger	experiential	base	(minimum	of	two	
ness	 firms	 or	 other	 formally	 organized	 enterprises.	       years	 of	 full-time	 employment),	 unless	 there	 is	 a	
Therefore, the program centers on a professional                 compelling	reason	to	waive	this	fundamental	require-
approach	which	balances	business	theory	with	prac-               ment for admittance.
tice	in	the	search	for	knowledge,	skills,	and	method-                 Applicants	 who	 have	 successfully	 completed	
ologies that are useful in formulating strategies for            graduate	admission	procedures	required	by	Columbia	
the future in an uncertain and often turbulent busi-             College	 listed	 on	 page	 12	 will	 be	 evaluated	 by	 the	
ness environment.                                                Department	of	Business	Administration	for	admission	
                                                                 to	the	MBA	program.		The	MBA	program	is	open	to	
aDmiSSion                                                        all	who	are	qualified	and	show	promise	for	success	
                                                                 in graduate study.
admission categories                                                 Students	 who	 have	 not	 completed	 the	 following	
Full-Program:	 	 Students	 applying	 for	 Full-Program	          concept courses in their baccalaureate degree and
admission	 must	 complete	 steps	 1-5	 listed	 under	            cannot	show	evidence	of	professional	experience	or	
Application	Procedures	(page	12).                                other	 preparation	 must	 complete	 these	 courses	 (or	
                                                                 their	 equivalent)	 before	 being	 considered	 for	 full	
Non-Degree:		Those	applying	as	Non-Degree	Seeking	
students	 must	 complete	 steps	 1-5	 listed	 under	             admission	to	the	MBA	program:
Application	Procedures	(page	12),	complete	all	pre-              ACCT	280	 Accounting	I	(Financial)	                  3	hrs
requisite	 coursework,	 and	 present	 a	 minimum	 3.0	           ACCT	281	 Accounting	II	(Managerial)	                3	hrs
undergraduate cumulative grade point average.
                                                                 FINC	350	      Business	Finance	                     3	hrs
Post-Baccalaureate: Those	 applying	 as	 Post-
                                                                 MKTG	310	 Principles	of	Marketing	                   3	hrs
Baccalaureate	must	complete	steps	1-5	listed	under	
Application	 Procedures	 (page	 12).	 	 Students	 must	          MGMT	330	 Principles	of	Management	                  3	hrs
earn	a	grade	of	B	or	higher	in	undergraduate	prereq-
                                                                 acct 280, acct 281, and finc 350 must be
uisites in order to be considered for full admission to
                                                                 taken sequentially.
the	MBA	program.	
                                                                 	  The	 following	 factors	 are	 considered	 in	 the	
Conditional Admission: Students	 not	 meeting	 the	
                                                                 admission process:
department	admission	requirements	may	be	approved	
for	 “conditional	 admission”	 at	 the	 discretion	 of	 the	     1.	 A	 baccalaureate	 degree	 with	 a	 cumulative	 GPA	
MBA	 Graduate	 Program	 Coordinator,	 based	 on	                     of	3.0	or	above	from	a	regionally-accredited	insti-
62      Academic Programs

     tution, as represented by official transcripts from                     and more on the student’s ability to prepare for and
     the	degree-granting	institution.                                        master	various	“roles”	and	situations	that	competent	
                                                                             professionals	 encounter	 in	 their	 work.	 The	 goal	 in	
2. The potential of the student to achieve academic
                                                                             assessment is to use methods that replicate authen-
   and	 career	 goals	 by	 enrolling	 in	 the	 MBA	
                                                                             tic challenges and conditions rather than isolated
   program.	 	This	 factor	 requires	 evaluation	 of	 the	
                                                                             drills	or	tests.	Use	of	the	case	method	and	discussion	
   narrative component of the application and three
                                                                             learning is a primary component of courses in the
   graduate program recommendation forms attest-
                                                                             MBA	program.
   ing to the ability of the student to complete the
                                                                                     Skilled	 managers	 recognize	 that	 judgment	 in	
   MBA	program.
                                                                             adapting	 knowledge	 to	 the	 situation	 at	 hand	 is,	
                                                                             perhaps,	 more	 important	 than	 the	 acquisition	 of	
proGram reQUirementS
                                                                             knowledge	 alone.	 Therefore,	 students	 will	 be	 chal-
    Degree	 requirements	 include	 common	 core	                             lenged to perform or execute tasks or processes
courses and integrate foundation courses for a mini-                         using	 a	 knowledge	 base	 effectively	 and	 in	 a	 novel	
mum	of	36	semester	hours.	It	is	recommended	that	                            or	 creative	 way.	 	 The	 process	 adapts	 to	 changing	
the	foundation	courses	be	among	the	first	18	hours	                          environmental	 situations	 –	 much	 like	 those	 that	 are	
of	course	work	in	the	MBA		program.                                          dealt	 with	 on	 a	 day-to-day	 basis	 in	 the	 course	 of	
required Graduate foundation courses                                         managing	 a	 formal	 organization.	 	 The	 assessment	
                                                                             process not only provides the opportunity to evaluate
(12	semester	hours)
                                                                             the completion of performance tasks but also mea-
BUSI	508	       Decision	Science	for	Business	                    3	hrs      sures skills and personal characteristics that are
BUSI	510	       Managerial	Economics	                             3	hrs      essential for managers and to foster further learn-
BUSI	562	       Managerial	Accounting	                            3	hrs      ing.
BUSI	570	       Managerial	Finance	                               3	hrs              Projects	and	assignments	other	than	tests	will	
                                                                             be	 emphasized.	 	The	 process	 requires	 the	 student,	
required Graduate core courses
                                                                             under time constraints, to present his or her case
(24	semester	hours)                                                          clearly, concisely, and persuasively, a skill that is
BUSI	502	 Information	Systems	                                    3	hrs      invaluable to effective managers. The principal prod-
	  	      for	Management                                                     uct	of	the	MBA	program	will	be	a	graduate	who	has	
BUSI	504	 Business	Communication	                                 3	hrs      learned	how	to	think	strategically	and	critically	and	is	
          Theory and Practice                                                able	to	present	his	or	her	thoughts	orally	or	in	writing	
                                                                             in a competent manner. The relevant measure
BUSI	506	 Legal	and	Ethical	Environment	                          3	hrs      becomes the student’s capacity to apply critical think-
	  	      for	Business                                                       ing	 and	 analytical	 skills	 in	 whatever	 occupation	 is	
BUSI	522	 Organizational	Theory	                                  3	hrs      chosen.
          and Practice                                                               The most critical element of the assessment
BUSI/MSCJ	526		Human	Resource	                                    3	hrs      process occurs as part of the student’s culminating
	  	     Management	and	Theory                                               experience.		Both	product	and	process	components	
                                                                             that form key outcomes or performance tasks must
BUSI	528	 International	Business	                                 3	hrs      be completed satisfactorily as part of the culminating
BUSI	544	 Marketing	Strategy	                                     3	hrs      experience	(BUSI	595:	Strategic	Management).	
                                                                                     Case	 work	 from	 BUSI	 595	 affords	 the	 oppor-
BUSI	595	 Strategic	Management	                                   3 hrs
                                                                             tunity for students to demonstrate competency in
                (Capstone	Course*)
                                                                             each	 area	 of	 study	 covered	 in	 the	 MBA	 program.	
minimum total semester hours                                   36 hrs        With	the	approval	and	guidance	of	the	instructor,	the	
                                                                             student	 may	 also	 experience	 a	 real-world	 analysis	
*The	 capstone	 course	 is	 required	 of	 students	 as	 the	 culminating	
experience	 for	 the	 MBA	 Program,	 and	 students	 must	 have	 com-         and presentation of material specific to the student’s
pleted	 thirty	 hours	 in	 the	 MBA	 program	 before	 enrolling	 in	 this	   place	of	employment.		Each	component	of	the	case	
course.		Students	must	earn	a	B	or		higher	in	this	course	in	order	          work	is	measured	against	standards	and	these	stan-
to graduate.
                                                                             dards	 are	 included	 in	 the	 course	 syllabus	 for	 BUSI	
                                                                             595.	 	 Students	 refer	 to	 their	 study	 of	 Strategic	
aSSeSSment                                                                   Management	 and	 case	 analysis	 as	 the	 process	 for	   	
       Competent	performance	as	a	manager	requires	                          demonstrating	 critical	 thinking,	 judgment,	 analytical	
both	context	and		judgment.	As	a	result,	assessment	                         skill,	and	the	ability	to	communicate	in	writing	and/or	
will	rely	less	on	purely	knowledge-based	experiences	                        orally.
                                                                                           Academic	Programs						63

coUrSe DeScriptionS
BUSi 502     information Systems                  3 hrs     BUSi 526       human resource              3 hrs
             for management                                                management and theory
Examination	 of	 the	 value	 and	 uses	 of	 information	    Examination	of	the	organizational	human	resource	
systems for business operations, management                 function	and	contemporary	techniques	for	manag-
decision-making	 and	 strategic	 advantage.	           	    ing	human	resources.		Discussions	focus	on	EEO	
Discussions	and	applications	focus	on	spreadsheet	          law,	work	force	diversity,	managing	change,	staff-
software	and	its	usefulness	as	a	managerial	aid.	           ing, training and development, compensation and
                                                            benefits,	EEO/AA	and	other	human	resource	top-
BUSi 504      Business communication           3 hrs        ics.		Cross-listed	as	MSCJ	526.
              theory and practice
                                                            BUSi 528      international Business          3 hrs
This course is designed to strengthen students’
                                                            Examination	 and	 analysis	 of	 the	 importance	 of	
communications skills in the context of manage-
                                                            international trade as it applies to the business
rial	 communication.	 Topics	 include	 writing	 and	
                                                            sector. Analysis of import, export, trade deficit,
research skills, listening skills, nonverbal commu-
                                                            balance of trade and balance of payment is
nication, conflict resolution and negotiation strat-        explored. The course gives students an under-
egies,	 conducting	 interviews	 and	 meetings,	 and	        standing	of	how	the	cultural,	social,	political,	and	
giving formal presentations.                                economic environment in different countries can
                                                            affect the international competitive environment
BUSi 506       Legal and ethical              3 hrs         and the implications for business strategy.
               environment for Business
Examination	of	the	topics	in	the	area	of	law,	regu-         BUSi 544        marketing Strategy                3 hrs
latory controls, and ethical issues. Topics include         The	course	is	organized	around	the	marketing	plan-
contracts,	the	Uniform	Commercial	Code,	agency	             ning process to clearly delineate the relationship
agreements, partnerships, corporations, and                 among	 marketing	 decisions.	 Marketing	 functions	
product	liability.	Discussions	focus	on	the	implica-        are examined through case analysis to successfully
tions of these legal situations in management.              integrate all elements of the managerial process.
                                                            The course presents concepts from a decision mak-
BUSi 508       Decision Science for               3 hrs     ing perspective rather than from a descriptive point
               Business                                     of	view.	This	approach	reflects	an	emphasis	on	the	
Examination	 of	 quantitative	 skills	 useful	 to	 man-     marketing decisions that students are most likely to
agers.	 	 Discussions	 focus	 on	 selected	 algebra	        confront in their careers. Additionally, because mar-
topics, mathematics for finance and descriptive             keting managers are held accountable for profits as
statistics	and	probability.	Prerequisite:	Knowledge	        well	 as	 sales,	 budgetary	 considerations	 of	 market-
of	 College	 Algebra,	 Excel® or other computer             ing decisions are discussed.
spreadsheet applications is important.
                                                            BUSi 550      readings                       1-3 hrs
BUSi 510      managerial economics                 3 hrs    The	 course	 is	 designed	 to	 provide	 students	 with	
                                                            additional	 subject	 matter	 content.	 Students	 will	
Examination	 of	 the	 impact	 of	 the	 economic	 environ-
                                                            research	works	in	current	professional	journals	in	   	
ment	on	business	decision-making.	Discussions	focus	
                                                            the	appropriate	subject	area.	
on	macro-	and	microeconomics	topics	with	particular	
emphasis on marginal analysis and supply and                BUSi 562        managerial accounting               3 hrs
demand	considerations.	Prerequisite:	BUSI	508.	
                                                            Examination	 of	 the	 strengths	 and	 limitations	 of	 an	
BUSi 522      organizational theory       3 hrs             organization’s	 accounting	 system	 in	 many	 different	
              and practice                                  organizational	settings.		Discussions	focus	on	the	dif-
Examination	 of	 modern	 concepts	 of	 effective	           ferent	 roles	 of	 managers	 within	 organizations;	 the	
management.		Discussions	focus	on	foundations,	             importance	of	cross-functional	skills;	being	an	integral	
theories, models and literature for designing               part	 of	 the	 firm’s	 organizational	 infrastructure;	 and	
effective	organizational	relationships.		                   analysis of the information generated by the account-
                                                            ing system for both planning and control decisions.
64    Academic Programs

BUSi 570         managerial finance                3 hrs
Examination	 of	 the	 process	 of	 evaluating	 finan-
cial resources and planning and controlling activ-
ities	 within	 the	 firm.	 	 Discussions	 focus	 on	 ratio	
and	 cash	 flow	 analysis,	 financial	 forecasting,	
development and use of budgets for manage-
ment	 and	 planning	 and	 control.	 	 Prerequisite:	      	
BUSI	508.	 	

BUSi 595       Strategic management               3 hrs
Culminating	 experience/capstone	 course	 for	 the	
MBA	degree.	Requires	application	of	all	previous	
learned educational experiences in accounting,
economics, finance, management and marketing.
Extensive	 use	 of	 case	 analysis	 and	 strategic	
report	 writing	 is	 used	 to	 integrate	 all	 previous	
course materials in the analysis and resolution of
complex business strategic planning problems. A
final	grade	of	B	or	better	must	be	achieved	to	sat-
isfy	 graduation	 requirements. Prerequisite:	
Completion	 of	 at	 least	 30	 semester	 hours	 in	 the	
MBA	program.		
                                                                                              Academic	Programs						65


maSter of Science in criminaL
JUStice
coordinator: michael Lyman, ph.D.
  mlyman@ccis.edu, (573) 875-7472

proGram DeScription                                           higher	in	undergraduate	prerequisites	in		order	to	be	
                                                              considered	for	full	admission	to	the	MSCJ	program.		
     The	Master	of	Science	in	Criminal	Justice	(MSCJ)	
is designed primarily for practitioners in the field of       Pre-Graduate: Students	 applying	 for	 Pre-Graduate	
criminal	 justice	 interested	 in	 developing	 and/or	        status must submit a completed and signed applica-
enhancing administrative skills. The program is also          tion	for	graduate	admission	accompanied	by	a	non-
designed to meet the analytical and theoretical needs         refundable	 $55	 application	 fee	 and	 transcripts	 from	
of	 students	 who	 will	 continue	 with	 doctoral	 or	 law	   all colleges and universities attended. Applicants
studies.	 	 The	 degree	 emphasizes	 four	 foundational	      must have earned over ninety undergraduate semes-
areas:	trends	in	criminal	justice,	policy	development	        ter	 hours	 toward	 the	 baccalaureate	 degree	 at	 a	
and analysis, research design and ethics in criminal          regionally accredited college or university and have
justice.	 	 Understanding	 derived	 from	 these	 courses	     an	overall	GPA	of	3.0.		Eligible	degree	programs	are	
provides graduate students a solid foundation for             those	 closely	 related	 to	 the	 criminal	 justice	 area	 at	
dealing	with	the	many	critical	issues	confronting	the	        regionally accredited colleges or universities. Those
contemporary	criminal	justice	administrator.		Courses	        accepted	as	Pre-Graduate	status	students	may	take	
are	 structured	 in	 a	 hands-on	 format	 encouraging	        up	 to	 nine	 (9)	 semester	 hours	 of	 graduate	 course-
maximum	student	interaction	while	at	the	same	time	           work	in	the	MSCJ	program	while	observing	all	exist-
encouraging the development of useful action skills.          ing	MSCJ	program	requirements.
                                                                   After completion of the baccalaureate degree
aDmiSSion                                                     and	 up	 to	 nine	 graduate	 semester	 hours,	 Pre-
                                                              Graduate students must submit complete application
admission categories                                          materials to be considered for full admission to the
Full	 Program:	 Students	 applying	 for	 Full	 Program	       MSCJ	program.
admission	 must	 complete	 steps	 1-5	 listed	 under	         Conditional Admission: Students	 not	 meeting	 the	
Application	Procedures	(page	12).                             department	admission	requirements	may	be	approv-
Student-at-Large:		Students	applying	as	Student-at-           ed	for	“conditional	admission”	at	the	discretion	of	the	
Large	must	submit	a	completed	and	signed	applica-             MSCJ	 Graduate	 Program	 Coordinator,	 based	 on	
tion for graduate admission, accompanied by a                 appropriate professional experience or other prepa-
non-refundable $55	 application	 fee,	 and	 transcripts	      ration.	 	 Students	 may	 enroll	 in	 a	 maximum	 of	 nine	
from	 all	 degree-granting	 institutions.	 	 Students-at-     hours under the category and must earn a grade of
large are not eligible for financial aid.                     B	or	higher	in	all	courses	in	order	to	be	considered	
                                                              for	Full	Admission.
Non-Degree:		Those	applying	as	Non-Degree	Seeking	
students must submit a completed and signed appli-            admission criteria
cation for graduate admission, accompanied by a               	    Applicants	 who	 have	 completed	 admission	 pro-
non-refundable	 $55	 application	 fee,	 and	 transcripts	     cedures	 will	 be	 evaluated	 by	 the	 faculty	 of	 the	
from	 all	 degree-granting	 institutions.	 	 Non-Degree	      Criminal	Justice	Administration	and	Human	Services	
Seeking	students	are	not	eligible	for	financial	aid.          Department	for	acceptance	into	the	Master	of	Science	
                                                              in	 Criminal	 Justice	 degree	 program.	 	 To	 be	 consid-
Post-Baccalaureate: Students	 accepted	 as	 Post-
                                                              ered,	applicants	must	meet	the	following	criteria:
Baccalaureate	must	meet	two	undergraduate	prereq-
uisites:	 CJAD	 101	 Introduction	 to	 Criminal	 Justice	     1.	 A	 baccalaureate	 degree	 in	 criminal	 justice	 or	
Administration	 and	 CJAD	 415	 Criminal	 Procedures.	  	         closely related cognate area.
Those	 applying	 as	 Post-Baccalaureate	 students	
                                                              2.	 A	cumulative	grade	point	average	of	3.0	or	higher	
                               A
must	complete	steps	1-5	under	 pplication	Procedures	
                                                                  on	 a	 4.0	 scale	 from	 a	 regionally	 accredited	
(page	 12).	 	 Students	 must	 earn	 a	 grade	 of	 B	 or	
66       Academic Programs

     degree-granting	institution.                              certificate in criminal
      Students	possessing	a	baccalaureate	degree	in	           Justice management
a	 field	 other	 than	 criminal	 justice	 and	 who	 do	 not	
meet	the	minimum	two-year	experience	requirement	                    Students	 majoring	 in	 the	 Master	 of	 Science	 in	
may	enroll	as	a	Post-Baccalaureate.		Students	in	this	         Criminal	Justice	degree	program	desiring	a	concen-
category	 must	 complete	 CJAD	 101	 Introduction	 to	         tration in management skills may choose a Certificate
Criminal	 Justice	 Administration	 and	 CJAD	 415	             in	 Criminal	 Justice	 Management	 (CJM)	 as	 part	 of	
Criminal	Procedures,	earning	a	grade	of	B	or	higher	           their	 degree	 completion	 plan.	 The	 CJM	 Certificate	
in	both	courses.		Subsequent	to	successful	comple-             will	appear	on	the	student’s	academic	transcript	and	
tion of these courses students may be considered for           provide evidence that the student has satisfied aca-
admission	 to	 the	 MSCJ	 program.	 	 Post	 Baccalaur-         demic	 requirements	 for	 departmentally	 recognized	
eate	 students	 may	 take	 graduate	 courses	 with	            courses	in	the	area.	The	CJM	Certificate	consists	of	
permission	 from	 the	 MSCJ	 Graduate	 Program	                successful completion of four of the five designated
Coordinator.                                                   graduate	 courses	 (12	 semester	 hours	 total).	 To	
                                                               qualify	for	the	awarding	of	the	certificate,	each	course	
                                                               comprising	the	certificate	must	be	completed	with	a	
DeGree reQUirementS                                            minimum	grade	of	“B.”		Required	courses	include:
    The	 degree	 requirements	 include	 12	 hours	 of	
foundation	courses	and	24	hours	of	core	courses	for	           Certificate	 in	 Criminal	 Justice	 Management	 desig-
a	minimum	of	36	semester	hours.                                nated	courses	(students	choose	four	of	the	five)

required mScJ foundation                     12 sem. hrs            MSCJ	524	 Criminal	Justice	Policy		               3	hrs
courses                                                             	         Development	and	Evaluation
MSCJ	500		      Research	Design	                     3	hrs	         MSCJ/BUSI	526	Human	Resource	                     3	hrs
MSCJ	501		      Current	Issues	and	Future	           3	hrs          	         Management	and	Theory
	 	             Directions	in	Criminal	Justice                      MSCJ	532	 Organizational	Behavior	                3	hrs
MSCJ	510		      Legal	and	Ethical	Issues	in	         3	hrs	         MSCJ	533	 Topics	in	Criminal	Justice	             3	hrs
	 	             Criminal	Justice                                    	         (topics	will	vary)
MSCJ	524	       Criminal	Justice	Policy	             3	hrs	         MSCJ	561	 Crisis	Intervention	                    3 hrs
	 	             Development	and	Evaluation                          total required:                          12 sem. hrs
required mScJ core courses                   24 sem. hrs
                                                               non-transcripted certificate:	Persons	who	desire	a	
MSCJ	525	 Comparative	Criminal		                     3	hrs     Certificate	in	Criminal	Justice	Management	and	who	
	 	        Justice	Systems
                                                               do	not	meet	college	admissions	requirements	to	the	
MSCJ/BUSI	526	Human	Resource	                        3	hrs
                                                               MSCJ	Program	may	qualify	for	admission	to	the	CJM	
           Management and Theory
                                                               certificate	 (non-transcripted)	 program	 provided	 the	
MSCJ	532	 Organizational	Behavior	                   3	hrs
                                                               following	conditions	are	met.
MSCJ	550	       Readings	in	Criminal		               3	hrs
                                                               •	   The	applicant	must	have	a	minimum	of	five	years	
	 	             Justice	Administration
                                                                    practical	 experience	 in	 the	 criminal	 justice	 field	
MSCJ	561		      Crisis	Intervention	                 3	hrs
                                                                    as	 recognized	 by	 the	 graduate	 faculty	 of	 the	
MSCJ	567		      Seminar	in	Juvenile	Justice	                        Criminal	Justice	Department.
MSCJ	580		      Capstone/lntensive	
	 	             Writing	Seminar	                   	 3 hrs     •	   The	applicant	must	understand	that	they	will	be	
                                                                    attending	 classes	 with	 others	 who	 have	 been	
one course     selected from the following:                         fully	admitted	into	the	MSCJ	program.	It	is	incum-
MSCJ	530	       Legal	Aspects	of	Criminal	           3	hrs          bent upon them, therefore, to successfully meet
	  	            Justice	Management	                                 all	course	requirements	and	complete	all	course-
MSCJ	533	       Topics	in	Criminal	Justice		         3	hrs          work	with	a	minimum	grade	of	“B”	in	each	of	the	
                                                                    certificate courses.
MSCJ	535	       Budgeting	and	Planning	              3	hrs
                                                               •	   The	applicant	must	pay	regular	MSCJ	tuition	fees	
	  	            for	Criminal	Justice	Managers	        	
                                                                    for their courses.

total:                                             36 hrs      	   If	 within	 a	 period	 of	 10	 years	 following	 the	 suc-
                                                               cessful	 completion	 of	 the	 non-transcripted	 CJM	
                                                               Certificate.	 If	 a	 non-transcripted	 certificate	 recipient	
                                                               is	admitted	to	the	MSCJ	Program,	courses	success-
                                                                                                 Academic	Programs						67

fully	completed	in	their	CJM	Certificate	Program	will	         the	MSCJ	580	intensive	writing	course	are	asked	to	
apply	toward	the	completion	of	their	MSCJ	degree.	             complete a program assessment instrument.
                                                                    All assessment activities are designed to mea-
                                                               sure	 the	 degree	 to	 which	 MSCJ	 students	 have	 met	
focused academic Sequence: Bacca-                              the seven learning goals:
laureate or Graduate
        A Focused Academic Sequence	(FAS)	can	be	              1.	 To	 acquire	 and	 increase	 skills	 in	 writing	 in	 a	
developed	 and	 implemented	 to	 quickly	 and	 effec-              criminal	justice	context.
tively respond to a student’s specific needs. Any              2.	 To	acquire,	increase	and	improve	skills	in	public	
student	may	request	an	FAS	to	meet	any	baccalaure-                 speaking.
ate	or	graduate	academic	need	for	which	there	is	no	
present	 academic	 degree,	 major,	 minor,	 concentra-         3. To enhance managerial decision making, com-
tion, emphasis or endorsement.                                    munication	and	organizational	skills.
        In a formal business memorandum, addressed             4.	 To	attain	real	world	critical	thinking/problem	solv-
to	 the	 academic	 department	 chair(s),	 and	 jointly	            ing	 skills	 as	 they	 relate	 to	 criminal	 justice	 and	
signed	by	the	student	and	the	faculty	member	work-                 public policy.
ing	with	the	student,	an	FAS	must	be	requested.		An	
                                                               5.	 To	gain	knowledge	about	recent	developments	in	
FAS	 request,	 taking	 the	 form	 of	 a	 specific	 educa-
                                                                   criminal	justice.
tional	objective,	or	objectives,	and	specification	of	the	
completed	 coursework	 necessary	 for	 meeting	 the	           6.	 To	 learn	 how	 to	 apply	 experience	 and	 research	
objective,	 or	 objectives,	 must	 be	 approved	 by	 the	          to the development of public policy and accepted
department	chair(s)	of	the	department(s)	in	which	the	             criminal	justice	procedure.
coursework	is	to	be	completed.		The	chair	of	the	aca-          7.	 To	 gain	 knowledge	 of	 comparative	 criminal	 jus-
demic	department	in	which	the	student	is	pursuing	an	              tice policy and procedures and the possible
academic	 major	 is	 responsible	 for	 monitoring	 the	            application	 in	 an	 American	 criminal	 justice	 set-
student’s	 FAS	 progress,	 and	 for	 notifying	 the	               ting.
Executive	 Vice	 President	 and	 Dean	 for	 Academic	
Affairs	when	the	FAS	has	been	completed	and	a	let-
ter	 of	 completion	 is	 justified.	 	 The	 Executive	 Vice	
President	and	Dean	for	Academic	Affairs	issues	the	
                                                                 coUrSe DeScriptionS
“Letter	 of	 Completion”	 and	 authorizes	 the	 Student	       mScJ 500        research Design                       3 hrs
Records	Office	to	enter	notice	of	the	letter	in	the	stu-       The	study	of	applied	research	designs.		Data	collec-
dent’s academic transcript                                     tion	 methods	 emphasized	 are	 observation	 and	 psy-
                                                               chometry.	 	 Both	 qualitative	 and	 quantitative	 data	
aSSeSSment                                                     analysis	methods	are	studied,	with	strong	emphasis	
      The	Master	of	Science	in	Criminal	Justice	is	writ-       on	results	interpretation.		Must	be	taken	as	a	founda-
ing	intensive	with	scholarly	research	required	in	each	        tional	 course	 for	 the	 Master	 of	 Science	 in	 Criminal	
of the graduate classes. The program is assessed in            Justice.		Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.	
several	 ways.	 	 Student	 course	 evaluations	 provide	
                                                               mScJ 501        current issues and future             3 hrs
guidance to instructors regarding the pedagogy,
                                                                               Directions in criminal Justice
course	organization	and	related	concerns.		The	most	
critical element of the assessment process occurs              An examination of the salient, current critical issues
as	 part	 of	 the	 student's	 culminating	 experience.	   	    in	 the	 justice	 system	 affecting	 law	 enforcement,	
A	 faculty-approved	 assessment	 instrument	 is	 given	        criminal	 justice	 personnel,	 public	 policy	 and	 recent	
to	students	in	the	capstone	course	MSCJ	580.		Both	            social	 developments.	 	 Must	 be	 taken	 as	 a	 founda-
product and process components that form key out-              tional	 course	 for	 the	 Master	 of	 Science	 in	 Criminal	
comes or performance tasks must be completed                   Justice.	
satisfactorily as part of the culminating experience
(MSCJ	 580).	 	 An	 eleven	 member	 criminal	 justice	         mScJ 510         Legal and ethical                      3 hrs
advisory	board	comprised	of	criminal	justice	profes-                            issues in criminal Justice
sionals in the field meets periodically to provide             Examination	of	topics	in	the	areas	of	law,	legal	con-
advice,	 suggestions	 and	 recommendations.	 	 Each	                                                                           	
                                                               trols,	 and	 ethical	 issues	 in	 the	 criminal	 justice	 field.	
currently	 enrolled	 student	 is	 requested	 to	 complete	     Areas such as corruption, misconduct and related
and	 return	 a	 graduate	 student	 survey.	 	 Students	 in	    issues are discussed.
68    Academic Programs

mScJ 524      criminal Justice policy             3 hrs   mScJ 535      Budgeting and planning for 3 hrs
              Development and evaluation                                criminal Justice managers
Examination	 of	 the	 development,	 implementation	       Examination	 of	 public	 sector	 budgeting	 from	 the	
and	analysis	of	public	policy.		Students	identify	and	    perspective of agency and departmental manag-
evaluate public policies as they relate to the criminal   ers. Analysis of the issues involved in planning,
justice	system.		Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.	        developing, tracking and implementing an agency
                                                          or	 departmental	 budget.	 	 Prerequisite:	 Graduate	
mScJ 525      comparative criminal            3 hrs       standing.
              Justice Systems
Examination	 of	 criminal	 justice	 systems	 world-       mScJ 550      readings in criminal               3 hrs
wide.		Includes	exploration	of		means	of	establish-                     Justice administration
ing	 cooperation	 toward	 mutual	 goals	 despite	         Selected	 readings	 that	 allow	 the	 student	 to	 pur-
structural, historical and ideological differences.       sue areas of particular interest or need not cov-
Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.                          ered in established courses or programs.
                                                          Prerequisite:	12	semester	hours	of	required	grad-
mScJ 526       human resource               3 hrs         uate foundation courses.
               management and theory
Examination	of	the	organizational	human	resource	         mScJ 551 readings                            1-2 hrs
function	and	contemporary	techniques	for	manag-           This course is designed to provide transfer stu-
ing	human	resources.		Discussions	focus	on	EEO	           dents	 with	 additional	 subject	 matter.	 	 Course	
law,	work	force	diversity,	managing	change,	staff-        involves	research	in	current	professional	journals	
ing, training and development, compensation and           in	 the	 appropriate	 subject	 area.	 	 Prerequisite:	
benefits,	EEO/AA	and	other	human	resource	top-            Transfer student.
ics.		Cross-listed	as	BUSI	526.
                                                          mScJ 561        crisis intervention            3 hrs
mScJ 530      Legal aspects of criminal         3 hrs     Study	of	the	theory	and	practice	of	crisis	interven-
              Justice management                          tion	 with	 an	 emphasis	 on	 outreach	 intervention	
Examination	 of	 the	 legal	 issues	 within	 criminal	    models.	 Demonstration	 of	 skills	 is	 required.	  	
justice	management,	and	of	the	effects	of	consti-         Prerequisite:	12	semester	hours	of	required	grad-
tutional	provisions,	statutes,	ordinances	and	judi-       uate foundation courses.
cial	decisions	on	justice	administration.		Analysis	
of the legal aspects of selection, compensation,          mScJ 567       Seminar in Juvenile                 3 hrs
promotion,	 assignment	 and	 termination	 of	 justice	                   Justice
employees and consideration of operational                Analysis	of	all	aspects	of	the	juvenile	justice	sys-
issues not addressed in other courses.                    tem and process. Topics include history, move-
Prerequisite:	Graduate	standing.		                        ments	toward	diversion	and	deinstitutionalization,	
                                                          police	 interaction,	 court	 co-process,	 due	 process	
mScJ 532      organizational Behavior         3 hrs       and community intervention.           Included is an
The study of individual and group behavior in             examination	 of	 the	 law	 as	 it	 relates	 to	 juvenile	
organizational	settings.		Included	are	issues	relat-      justice	and	future	trends	in	the	field.		Prerequisites:	
ing	to	how	we	live	our	lives	at	work	and	in	organi-       MSCJ	500,	MSCJ	501,	MSCJ	510,	MSCJ	524.		
zations	 and	 are	 approached	 from	 a	 motivation,	      mScJ 580         capstone/lntensive                 3 hrs
teamwork	and	leadership	standpoint.		Prerequisites:	                       Writing Seminar
Students	are	encouraged	to	take	the	four	founda-
                                                          This culminating experience	requires	students	to	
tional courses set forth in the college catalog
                                                          refine	 their	 writing	 skills.	 	 Numerous	 assignments	
(MSCJ	 500,	 MSCJ	 501,	 MSCJ	 510,	 and	 MSCJ	
                                                          are	 given	 students	 with	 special	 attention	 to	 paper	
524)	before	enrolling	for	any	other	MSCJ	course.	   	
                                                          preparation in APA format, critical thinking content,
                                                          identification of salient topics in the field and pre-
mScJ 533       topics in criminal Justice    3 hrs
                                                          sentation	 of	 findings.	 	 Prerequisites:	 12	 semester	
Intensive study of specially chosen topical areas         hours	of	required	graduate	foundation	courses	and	
with	 special	 emphasis	 on	 the	 systems	 concept	       an	additional	18	semester	hours	of	required	gradu-
as it applies to problem solving in the manage-           ate core courses.
ment	of	criminal	justice.	
                                                                                                         Personnel	Directory						69




                               BoarD of trUSteeS

                                                officerS
                    Chair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Daisy Grossnickle ’66
                    Vice Chairman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .richard montgomery
                    Secretary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Janet Wright ’58




        term expireS in 2010                  term expireS in 2011                      term expireS in 2012


        Judith cunningham ’64                 mark Baisley ’93                          Daisy Grossnickle ’66
        Columbia,	Missouri                    Aurora, Colorado                          Columbia,	Missouri

        Jerry Daugherty                       Walter e. Bixby iii, ’82                  George hulett
        Columbia,	Missouri                    Kansas	City,	Missouri                     Columbia,	Missouri

        Don Landers                           Gary Drewing                              nollie moore*
        Columbia,	Missouri                    Columbia,	Missouri                        Columbia,	Missouri

        robert W. maupin                      richard montgomery                        Sandra nichols ’80
        Columbia,	Missouri                    Columbia,	Missouri                        North	Potomac,	Maryland

        Jolene Schulz ’61                     ron nielsen                               carol Winkler ’93
        Columbia,	Missouri                    Columbia,	Missouri                        Columbia,	Missouri

        anita timmons ’58                     Daniel L. Scotten
        Sea	Island,	Georgia                   Columbia,	Missouri

        Janet Wright ‘58                      patrick Smith
        Columbia,	Missouri                    Columbia,	Missouri

        rev. John J. Yonker                   Diane Suhler*
        Columbia,	Missouri                    Columbia,	Missouri

	   	                                     	                                 												*Faculty	Representative
70	    Personnel	Directory

aDminiStration                                                  aDmiSSionS
                                                                Samantha White,	Director	of	Admissions
Senior aDminiStration                                             B.A.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia;	M.Ed.,	
Gerald t. Brouder, President                                      Stephens	College	
  A.A.,	Mayfair	College;	B.S.,	University	of	Illinois;	M.S.,	   aaron coffey,	Assistant	Director	of	Graduate	and	Adult	
  Northern	Illinois	University;	Ph.D.,	University	of	Texas-        Admissions
  Austin                                                           B.S,	MBA,	Missouri	State	University,	Stephens	College
terry B. Smith,	Executive	Vice	President	and	Dean	for	          Laura Denker, Admissions Counselor
   Academic	Affairs,	Professor	of	Political	Science	               B.S.,	M.S.,	University	of	Missouri
   B.A.,	Central	Methodist	College;	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	Michigan	      Kyle Dyer,	Evening	and	Graduate	Admissions	Counselor
   State	University                                             	 B.A.,	University	of	MIssouri-Columbia
mike randerson,	Vice	President	for	Adult	Higher	Education
                                                                matthew haltom, Admissions Counselor
   B.A.,	Southern	Illinois	University-Carbondale;	M.A.,	
                                                                  B.M.E.,	Ouachita	Baptist	University;	M.M.,	University	
   The	George	Washington	University
                                                                  of	Missouri
faye Burchard, Dean	for	Campus	Life
                                                                annie hubbell, Admissions Counselor
   B.S.E.,	Arkansas	State	University;	M.A.,	East	
                                                                  B.A.,	Westminster	College
   Carolina	University
                                                                penny o’connor,	Evening	and	Graduate	Admissions	
Bruce e. Boyer,	C.P.A.,	Controller/Chief	Financial	Officer	
                                                                  Counselor
   B.S.,	Bowling	Green	State	University
                                                                  A.A.,	B.A.,	Columbia	College
robert p. Burchard,	Director	of	Athletics	and	Physical	
                                                                tim tesar, Coordinator of International and Graduate
  Recreation;	Head	Men’s	Basketball	Coach
                                                                   Admissions
  B.A.,	Catawba	College;	M.A.,	East	Carolina	University
                                                                   B.A.,	Drake	University	
tery Donelson,	Assistant	Vice	President	for	Enrollment	
   Management
                                                                aDULt hiGher eDUcation DiViSion
   B.S.,	California	State	Polytechnic	University;	M.S.,	
                                                                mike randerson, Vice President for Adult Higher
   Air	Force	Institute	of	Technology	
                                                                   Education	
Bob hutton,	Executive	Director	of	Administrative	Services          B.A.,	Southern	Illinois	University-Carbondale;	M.A.,	
  B.S.,	Culver-Stockton	College,	M.Ed.,	Memphis	                   The	George	Washington	University
  State	University;	APPA	Institute	for	Facilities	
                                                                eric cunningham,	Associate	Dean	for	Adult	Higher	
  Management	
                                                                   Education
mike Kateman, Executive	Director	of	Development,		                 B.S.,	U.S.	Military	Academy;	M.S.,	Troy	State;	M.S.,	
   Alumni	and	Public	Relations                                     University	of	Missouri-Columbia
   B.S.,	M.A.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
                                                                Gary massey,	Dean	for	Adult	Higher	Education
Kevin palmer, Chief Information Officer                           B.A.,	Columbia	College;	M.A.,	D.M.,	Webster	University
  A.A.S.,	St.	Louis	Community	College;	B.S.,	Maryville	
                                                                rené massey,	Associate	Dean
  University;	M.B.A.,	Fontbonne	University	
                                                                  A.A.,	B.A.,	M.B.A.,	Columbia	College
Lana poole, Executive	Director	of	Marketing
   B.S.,	Missouri	State	University;	M.P.A.,	University	of	      ramona mcafee, Assistant	Dean	for	Military	and	Federal	
   Missouri-Columbia                                              Programs
                                                                  A.A.,	B.A.,	University	of	Alaska	Fairbanks;	M.P.A.,	
acaDemic affairS                                                  University	of	Alaska	Southeast

terry B. Smith,	Executive	Vice	President	and	Dean	for	          Gary oedewaldt,	Associate	Dean
   Academic	Affairs,	Professor	of	Political	Science               B.S.,	University	of	Wisconsin;	M.A.,	Central	Michigan	
   B.A.,	Central	Methodist	College;	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	Michigan	        University
   State	University                                             Sonda ridgway,	Director	of	Budget	and	Personnel
misty haskamp, Director	of	Institutional	Research                 B.S.,	M.B.A.,	Columbia	College
   B.S.,	Southwest	Missouri	State	University;	M.A.,	            ernie Wren,	Assistant	Dean
   University	of	Missouri-Columbia                                 B.A.,	M.P.A.,	University	of	Missouri	-	Columbia
terry obermoeller,	Executive	Assistant                          ronald aikens,	Director,	Hunter	Army	Airfield,	Georgia
   B.S.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia                          B.A.,	Saint	Leo	University;	M.A.,	Webster	University;	
                                                                  Ed.Sp.,	Lincoln	Memorial	University
aDminiStratiVe SerViceS                                         Karen Beckstrom, Director,	Elgin,	Illinois			
Bob hutton,	Executive	Director	of	Administrative	Services          B.S.,	Penn	State	University;	M.A.,	Michigan	State	
  B.S.,	Culver-Stockton	College;	M.Ed.,	Memphis	State	             University
  University;	APPA,	Institute	for	Facilities	Management	        Kim Bonine,	Director,	Jefferson	City,	Missouri	
  and Housekeeping                                                 B.S.,	Lincoln	University;	M.B.A.,	Columbia	College
                                                                                               Personnel	Directory						71

richard conroy,	Director,	Ft.	Stewart,	Georgia                Keith mciver,	Director,	NWS	Charleston,	South	Carolina
   B.A.,	University	of	Richmond,	M.S.,	Rollins	College           B.A.,	Williams	College;	M.S.,	Milano	The	New	School	
carl David,	Director,	Los	Alamitos,	California                   for	Management	and	Urban	Policy
   B.A.,	Central	Methodist	University;	B.S.,	McNeese	         thomas meehan,	Director,	Coast	Guard	Island,	California
   State	University;	M.Ed.,	University	of	Missouri-             A.A.Delta	College;	B.A.,	Saginaw	Valley	State	
   Columbia;	M.M.A.S.,	Command	and	General	Staff	               University;	M.A.,	Central	Michigan	University
   College                                                    cindy miller, Director,	Kansas	City,	Missouri
theresa Genova, Director,	San	Luis	Obispo,	California            B.A.,	University	of	Wisconsin;	M.A.,	University	of	
   A.A.,	Cuesta	College;	B.A.,	Mount	Saint	Mary’s	               Missouri-Kansas	City
   College;	M.B.A.,	California	Polytech	State	University	–	   mary f. morgan,	Director,	Redstone	Arsenal,	Alabama
   San	Luis	Obispo                                              B.S.,	University	of	Texas;	M.Ed.,	University	of	Texas
Kathy Gress,	Director,	Christian	County,	Missouri             Jeffrey c. musgrove,	Director,	Southeast	Region,	Patrick	
   B.A.,	M.Ed.,	Drury	University                                 Air	Force	Base	and	Jacksonville,	Florida
Gary hall,	Director,	Jacksonville,	Florida                       A.S.,	Community	College	of	the	Air	Force;	B.S.,	
  A.A.,	Florida	Community	College;	B.A.,	University	of	          University	of	Maryland;	M.A.,	Webster	University
  Central	Florida;	B.T.,	University	of	North	Florida;	        robert K. pine Sr.,	Director,	Ft.	Sill,	Oklahoma
  M.S.M.,	Troy	University                                       B.S.,	Toccoa	Falls	College;	M.A.	Webster	University
John hammill, Director,	Hancock	Field,	New	York               Betsy Quade,	Director,	Lemoore,	NAS,	California
   B.S.,	Syracuse	University;	M.A.,	University	of	               B.A.,	California	State	University;	M.A.,	Chapman	
   Maryland                                                      University		
John hardy,	Director,	Ft.	Worth,	Texas                        Diana Schriefer,	Director,	San	Diego,	California
   B.A.,	University	of	Texas;	M.S.,	Frostburg	State	             A.A.,	Grossmont	College;	B.A.,	Columbia	College;	M.A.	
   University                                                    National	University
Jewly harris,	Director,	Salt	Lake	City,	Utah                  Debra Shrout,	Director,	St.	Louis,	Missouri
  B.A.,	University	of	Phoenix;	M.A.,	Webster	University         BS.E.,	M.A.,	Ed.S.,	Truman	State	University
Debra hartman, Director,	Crystal	Lake,	Illinois               patti Skinner,	Director,	Evening	Campus,	Missouri
  A.A.	College	of	DuPage;	B.A.,	M.A.,	Eastern	Illinois	          B.A.,	Central	Methodist	College;	M.A.,	Kansas	State	
  University                                                     College-Pittsburg	
alan hilliard, Director,	Orlando,	Florida                     Stephen Stephany,	Director,	Illinois	Region	and	Lake	
   B.S.,	Heidelberg	College;	M.S.,	State	University	of	          County, Illinois
   New	York;	Ph.D.,	Rutgers	University                           B.S.,	Regis	University;	M.B.A.,	Gonzaga	University
Bruce Jackson,	Director,	Moberly,	Missouri                    Gregory Stratman,	Director,	Rolla,	Missouri
   B.A.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia;	B.M.,	New	             B.A.,	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri
   England	Conservatory	of	Music;	M.Mus,	University	of	       andrea Wolff-Yakuborich,	Director,	Aurora,	Colorado
   Arkansas;	Ph.D.,	Ball	State	University                       B.A.	California	State	University	Northridge;	M.A.,	
John Keeney,	Director,	Lake	Ozark,	Missouri                     University	of	Northern	Colorado
   B.S.,	M.A.,	Southeast	Missouri	State	University;	Ph.D.,	
   University	of	Mississippi                                  athLeticS
David King,	Director,	Ft.	Leonard	Wood,	Missouri              robert p. Burchard,	Director	of	Athletics	and	Physical	
  B.S.,	Southwest	Missouri	State	University;	M.Ed.,	            Recreation;	Head	Men’s	Basketball	Coach
  Ed.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia                        B.A.,	Catawba	College;	M.A.,	East	Carolina	University
marJean Knokey,	Director,	Whidbey	Island,	Washington          Jon Barfknecht, Certified Athletic Trainer and Athletic
  B.A.,	Oregon	State	University;	M.A.,	Columbia	University       Training Coordinator
elizabeth Koeller, Director,	Freeport,	Illinois                  B.S.,	University	of	Iowa;	M.A.,	Tennessee	
    B.A.,	University	of	Evansville;	M.S.,	Eastern	Illinois	      Technological	University
    University                                                michael B. Davis, Head	Women’s	Basketball	Coach
Wanda Lancaster,	Director,	Ft.	Drum,	New	York                    B.S.,	Central	Methodist	College	
  B.S.,	Mississippi	State	University;	M.A.,	Syracuse	         John D. Klein,	Head	Soccer	Coach
  University	                                                    B.S.,	St.	Louis	University;	M.B.A.,	University	of	
thomas Larsen, Director,	Marysville,	Washington                  Missouri-Columbia
  B.S.,	Humboldt	State	University;	Master	of	Strategic	       Wendy Spratt,	Head	Softball	Coach
  Planning,	Naval	War	College	(equivalent);	M.B.A.,	            B.S.,	Columbia	College;	M.B.A.,	Central	Missouri	
  National	University                                           State	University
Lakeshia Lightner,	Director,	NAS	Jacksonville,	Florida        melinda Wrye-Washington, Head Volleyball Coach
   B.A.,	Albany	State	University;	M.Ed.,	M.S.,	Troy	State	      B.A.,	Columbia	College;	M.Ed.,	William	Woods	University
   University
72	    Personnel	Directory

BUSineSS SerViceS                                               myles hinkel,	Director	of	Development,	Major	and	Planned	
                                                                  Gifts
Bruce e. Boyer, C.P.A., Controller/Chief	Financial	Officer	
                                                                  B.S.,	Universtiy	of	Louisville
   B.S.,	Bowling	Green	State	University
                                                                Lindsay Lopez, Senior	Director	of	Development
phyllis Grant,	Payroll	Manager
                                                                   B.A.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
  A.	A.,	B.S.,	Columbia	College
                                                                missy montgomery,	Development	Officer,	Major	and	
randal Schenewerk, Associate Controller
                                                                   Planned Gifts
  A.A.S.,	Linn	State	Technical	College;	B.S.,	Columbia	
                                                                   B.A.,	William	Woods	University;	M.B.A.,	Columbia	College
  College;	M.B.A.,	William	Woods	University	
                                                                John randolph,	Manager	of	Development	Research	and	
campUS Life                                                        Grants
                                                                   B.A.,	Columbia	College
faye Burchard, Dean	for	Campus	Life
   B.S.E.,	Arkansas	State	University;	M.A.,	East	Carolina	      Brendon Steenbergen, Director	of	Development,	Annual	
   University                                                      and Planned Gifts
                                                                   B.A.	University	of	Missouri
cindy allen,	Coordinator	of	Health	Services
   B.S.N.,	M.S.N.,	Post	Masters	Certificate	FNP,	               Joanne tedesco,	Senior	Director	of	Public	Relations
   University	of	Missouri                                          B.S.,	University	of	Wisconsin
cynthia Baker, Counselor                                        therese Wheatley,	Manager	of	Advancement	Services
  B.S.,	Southeast	Missouri	State	University;	M.S.W.,	             B.S.,	Columbia	College
  University	of	Missouri-Columbia
                                                                enroLLment manaGement
elizabeth Ball, Director	of	Student	Activities	and	
                                                                tery Donelson,	Assistant	Vice	President	for	Enrollment	
    Leadership	Development
                                                                   Management
    B.S.,	M.Ed.,	University	of	MIssouri-Columbia
                                                                   B.S.,	California	State	Polytechnic	University;	M.S.,	Air	
Kim coke, Director	of	Student	Development                          Force	Institute	of	Technology
   B.S.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia	
Jimmy french, Area Coordinator                                  eVaLUationS
   B.A.,	Western	Washington	University                          Gary cain,	Director
Don malson,	Director	of	Career	Services	                          B.S.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
  B.S.	Central	Methodist	College;	M.Ed.,	Northeast	
  Missouri	State	University                                     eVeninG campUS
Bryan Sappington,	Assistant	Director	of	Residential	Life        eric cunningham,	Associate	Dean	for	Adult	Higher	Education
   B.A.,	Truman	State	University;	M.B.A.,	Columbia	College          B.S.,	U.S.	Military	Academy;	M.S.,	Troy	State;	M.S.,	
                                                                    University	of	Missouri-Columbia
Julie p. Starkey,	Assistant	Dean	for	Campus	Life
   B.B.A.,	Texas	A&M	University;	M.Ed.,	Southwest	              John Kenerley, Assistant	Director
   Texas	State	University                                          B.A.,	Guilford	College;	M.A.,	Illinois	State	University	

ruth tichenor, Coordinator	of	Disability	Services               patti r. Skinner,	Director	of	Evening	Campus
   B.A.,	Southwest	Baptist	College;	M.A.,	Lincoln	University       B.A.,	Central	Methodist	College;	M.A.,	Kansas	State	
                                                                   College-Pittsburg
Britta Wright,	Director	of	International	Programs
   A.A.,	B.S.,	Columbia	College
                                                                financiaL aiD
terri Zeilenga,	MA,	LPC	Coord.	of	Counseling	Services           Sharon abernathy, Director
   B.A.,	Hope	College;	M.A.,	University	of	Arizona                B.S.,	Southeast	Missouri	State	University;	M.B.A.,	
                                                                  Columbia College
DeVeLopment, aLUmni SerViceS &
pUBLic reLationS                                                GraDUate StUDieS
mike Kateman, Executive	Director	of	Development	and	            Steve Wiegenstein,	Associate	Dean	for	Graduate	Studies
   Alumni	Services                                                 B.J.,	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
   B.S.,	M.A.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
Susan Y. Davis,	Senior	Director	of	Alumni	Services              hUman reSoUrceS
  B.A.,	William	Woods	University                                patty fischer,	Director	of	Human	Resources
neal fandek, Chief editor                                          B.S.,	M.B.A.,	William	Woods	University
  B.A.,	University	of	California	Berkeley
                                                                inStitUtionaL reSearch
Brandi herman, Associate	Director	of	Public	Relations
                                                                misty haskamp,	Director,	Institutional	Research
   B.A.,	 Wichita	 State	 University;	 M.P.,	 University	 of	
                                                                   B.S.,	Southwest	Missouri	State	University;	M.A.,	
   Missouri
                                                                   University	of	Missouri-Columbia
                                                                                                Personnel	Directory						73

LiBrarY                                                         WritinG center
Janet caruthers,	Director	                                      Lynda Dunham,	Writing	Center	Coordinator		
   B.A.,	Central	Missouri	State	University;	M.A.L.S.,	             B.A.,	Central	Missouri	State	University;	M.A.,	
   University	of	Missouri-Columbia                                 University	of	Missouri-Columbia

maiL anD print SerViceS
                                                                emeriti facULtY
mark tindell,	Director
                                                                paulina a. Batterson,	Professor	Emerita	of	Government
  B.S.,	M.S.,	Pittsburgh	State	University
                                                                  A.B.,	Marietta	College;	M.A.,	University	of	Missouri-
                                                                  Columbia
marKetinG
                                                                carolyn f. Dickinson,	Associate	Professor	Emerita	of	
Lana poole, Executive	Director	of	Marketing
                                                                   English
   B.S.,	Missouri	State	University;	M.P.A.,	University	of	
                                                                   B.A.,	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
   Missouri-Columbia
                                                                L. novelle Dunathan,	Professor	Emerita	of	Education
math center                                                        B.A.,	Northwestern	University;	M.S.,	University	of	
Susan hughes, Coordinator                                          Utah;	Ed.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
  B.S.,	M.A.,	M.S.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia             Dennis m. Grev,	Professor	Emeritus	of	Chemistry
                                                                  A.B.,	Mankato	State	University;	M.S.,	University	of	
mUSic actiVitieS                                                  Missouri-Columbia
nollie moore, Jr.,	Instructor	of	Music,	and	Director	of	        elaine t. Grev,	Professor	Emerita	of	Music
   Jane	Froman	Singers                                             B.S.,	M.M.Ed.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
   B.S.,	M.Ed.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
                                                                helga huang,	Professor	Emerita	of	Sociology
onLine campUS                                                      A.B.,	National	Taiwan	University;	M.C.L.,	Southern	
                                                                   Methodist	University;	Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-
michael Grissom,	Assistant	Dean	for	Adult	Higher	
                                                                   Columbia
   Education	and	the	Online	Campus
   B.S.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia;	M.A.,	Webster		       anthony S. marshall, Professor	Emeritus	of	Business
   University                                                      B.A.,	M.A.,	Central	Missouri	State	University;	Ph.D.,	
                                                                   University	of	Missouri-Columbia
William carney, Director,	Academic	Programs
   B.S.,	M.A.,	Truman	State	University                          David o’hagan,	Professor	Emeritus	of	Music
marilyn Whitehead, Director,	Administration	for	Online            A.B.,	Furman	University;	M.Mus.,	Indiana	University	
  Campus                                                        Lawrence W. West,	Professor	Emeritus	of	Computer	
  B.S.,	University	of	Missouri;	M.B.A.,	William	Woods	            Science
  University                                                      B.S.,	Southwest	Missouri	State	University;	Ph.D.,	
                                                                  University	of	Kansas
preSiDent                                                       Becky J. Widener,	Associate	Professor	Emerita	of	
Gerald t. Brouder, President                                      Education
  A.A.,	Mayfair	College;	B.S.,	University	of	Illinois;	M.S.,	     B.S.,	Southeast	Missouri	State	University;	M.A.,	Webster	
  Northern	Illinois	University;	Ph.D.,	University	of	Texas-       University;	Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
  Austin
Lori ewing,	Executive	Assistant                                 facULtY
   B.S.E.,	Northeast	Missouri	State	University
                                                                fULL-time facULtY at coLUmBia
StUDent recorDS & tranScriptS                                   campUS
Susan m. Koopmans,	Registrar                                    anthony m. alioto, Professor of History
  B.A.,	University	of	Minnesota                                   B.S.,	University	of	Wisconsin,	Oshkosh;	M.A.,	PhD.,	
                                                                  Ohio	University
StUDent SUpport SerViceS                                        christopher Babayco, Instructor of Chemistry
nancy Lombardi,	Student	Support	Services	Director                 B.A.,	Willamette	University;	Ph.D.,	University	of	
  B.S.,	Central	Missouri	State	University;	M.Ed.,	                California-Davis
  University	of	Missouri-Columbia
                                                                Bo Bedillion, Assistant Professor of Art
                                                                   BFA,	Edinboro	University	of	Pennsylvania,	B.A.,	
technoLoGY SerViceS                                                California	University	of	Pennsylvania
Kevin palmer, Chief Information Officer
                                                                Linda Bradley, Visiting	Instructor	of	Education
  A.A.S.,	St.	Louis	Community	College;	B.S.,	Maryville	
                                                                   B.A.,	University	of	Kentucky;	M.A.,	Eastern	
  University;	M.B.A.,	Fontbonne	University	                        Kentucky	University
74	    Personnel	Directory

Ben D. cameron, Professor of Art                              paul hanna, Assistant	Professor	of	Education
  B.S.,	St.	Louis	University;	M.A.,	University	of	Iowa;	        B.S.,	Alfred	University;	M.A.,	Lincoln	University;	Ed.D.,	
  M.F.A.			University	of	Cincinnati                             North	Central	University

Danny c. campbell, Associate	Professor	of	English		           cheryl hardy, Professor of Psychology
  B.A.,	William	Jewell	College;	M.A.,	University	of	            B.S.,	Bowling	Green	State	University;	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	
  Missouri-Kansas	City;	Ph.D.,	University	of	Oklahoma           State	University	of	New	York	at	Binghamton

Joseph J. carrier, Associate	Professor	of	Criminal	Justice	   hoyt hayes,	Associate	Professor	of	Business
   B.A.,	Southeastern	Louisiana	University;	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	       B.S.,	M.B.A.,	Western	Illinois	University;	M.A.,	Eastern	
   University	of	Missouri-Columbia;	Certification	in	Law	       Illinois	University;	Ph.D.,	Mississippi	State	University
   Enforcement
                                                              Gretchen hendrickson, Instructor of Psychology
Linda S. claycomb, Instructor	of	Nursing,	Nursing	               B.A.,	Earlham	College;	M.A.,	Ball	State	University;	
   Program	Director                                              M.A.,	University	of	Missouri	-	Columbia
   B.S.,	M.S.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
                                                              Kristina henry,	Instructor	of	Nursing
edward c. collings, Professor of Art                             B.S.,	University	of	Central	Missouri;	M.S.N.,	University	
  A.B.,	M.A.,	M.F.A.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia            of	Kansas	Medical	Center

tonia compton, Assistant Professor of History                 Graham e. higgs,	Professor	of	Education	and	Psychology
   B.A.,	Columbia	College;	M.A.,	Texas	A&M	University;	          B.A.,	Vanderbilt	University;	M.S.,	Ph.D.,	University	of	
   Ph.D.,	University	of	Nebraska                                 Tennessee

elizabeth critser,	Associate	Professor	of	Biology	            timothy ireland,	Associate	Professor	of	Business
    A.B.,	Mount	Holyoke	College;	M.S.,	University	of	            B.A.,	Kansas	State	University;	B.B.A.,	Washburn	
    Wisconsin;	M.B.A.,	Indiana	University;	Ph.D.,	               University;	M.A.,	University	of	Iowa;	M.B.A.,	University	
    University	of	Wisconsin                                      of	Kansas;	Ph.D.,	Emory	University	

amy Darnell,	Assistant	Professor	of	Speech	Communication	     alan J. James, Associate Professor of Chemistry
  B.A.,	Morehead	State	University;	M.A.,	University	of	          B.S.,	Truman	State	University;	Ph.D.,	University	of	
  Texas	at	Austin;	Ph.D.,	Southern	Illinois	University           Missouri-Columbia

Johanna Denzin, Assistant	Professor	of	English                David S. Karr, Assistant Professor of History
   B.A.,	M.Ed.,	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	University	of	Illinois             B.A.,	M.A.,	University	of	Alabama;	Ph.D.,	Vanderbilt	
                                                                University
Yngve Digernes,	Assistant	Professor	of	Sociology		
  A.A.,	Bergen	University,	Norway;	B.A.,	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	        Brian L. Kessel,	Associate	Professor	of	Political	Science
  University	of	Missouri-Columbia                                B.A.,	University	of	Northern	Iowa;	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	
                                                                 University	of	Iowa
Linda “Kay” Dingler, Instructor	of	Nursing
   B.S.N.,	M.S.N.,	University	of	Central	Arkansas             angela Kinworthy,	Instructor	of	Business	Administration
                                                                B.S.,	M.B.A.,	Lincoln	University	
arlin epperson,	Associate	Professor	of	Business	
   Administration                                             Barry r. Langford, Assistant	Professor	of	Criminal	Justice
   B.S.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia;	M.A.,	Re.D.,	          B.A.,	M.S.,	J.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
   Indiana	University-Bloomington
                                                              nataliya Latushkina, Associate Professor of
Julie estabrooks,	Assistant	Professor	of	Biology	                Mathematics	
   B.S.,	University	of	Nebraska;	Ph.D.,	New	Mexico	State	        M.S.,	Ph.D.,	Odessa	University
   University
                                                              naomi Lear, Associate Professor of Art
faye fairchild, Instructor	of	Nursing                           B.MUS,	B.A.,	Eastern	Illinois	University;	M.F.A.,	
   B.S.N.,	M.S.N.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia              Wichita	State	University

Kenneth r. felts, ii, Assistant	Professor	of	Mathematics      Yihsiang Liow,	Associate	Professor	of	Computer	Science	 	
  B.S.,	M.S.,	Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia             B.S.,	National	University	of	Singapore;	M.S.,	M.S.,	
                                                                 Ph.D.,	University	of	Illinois	at	Urbana-Champaign
Lisa ford-Brown,	Associate	Professor	of	Speech	
   Communication                                              Brad D. Lookingbill, Professor of History
   B.S.,	M.A.,	Indiana	State	University;	Ph.D.,	Southern	        B.A.,	Southwestern	Oklahoma	State	University;	M.A.,	
   Illinois	University                                           Ph.D.,	University	of	Toledo

Joyce Gentry, Assistant	Professor	of	Nursing                  michael Lyman,	Professor	of	Criminal	Justice
   B.S.N.,	Truman	State	University;	M.S.N.,	Ph.D.,	              B.S.,	M.S.,	Wichita	State	University;	Ph.D.,	University	
   University	of	Missouri-Columbia                               of	Missouri-Columbia
                                                                                              Personnel	Directory						75
christopher J. mazurek, Associate Professor of                michael Sleadd, Associate Professor of Art
  Psychology                                                     B.A.,	Georgetown	College;	M.F.A.,	University	of	
  B.S.,	University	of	Illinois;	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	University	of	      Missouri-Columbia
  North	Carolina
                                                              frank L. Somer, Jr., Associate Professor of Physical
James a. mcallister, Associate	Professor	of	Biology              Chemistry
  B.S.,	University	of	Massachusetts;	M.A.,	M.Phil.,	Ph.D.,	      B.S.,	Oglethorpe	University;	Ph.D.,	University	of	
  University	of	Kansas                                           Tennessee

pamela a. mcclure, Associate	Professor	of	English	            thomas J. Stauder,	Instructor	of	Business	
  B.A.,	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia	           Administration
                                                                B.S.,	M.A.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
nathan means, Associate	Professor	of	Biology		
   B.S.,	Southwest	Missouri	State	University;		M.S.,	         Diane r. Suhler,	Associate	Professor	of	Business	
   Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia                        Administration
                                                                 A.A.,	Otero	Junior	College;	B.S.,	University	of	
Lizbeth Brydges metscher,	Instructor	of	English                  Colorado;	M.I.A.,	Columbia	University;	Ph.D.,	
   B.S.,	Oklahoma	State	University;	M.A.,	University	of	         University	of	Maryland
   Oklahoma
                                                              Suzanne e. tourville, Associate Professor of
carla mettling,	Assistant	Professor	of	English                  Mathematics	
   B.A.,	Lawrence	University;	M.A.,	University	of	              B.A.,	Agnes	Scott	College;	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	Washington	
   Chicago;	Ph.D.,	Stanford	University                          University
Kenneth a. middleton,	Associate	Professor	of	Business	        J. thomas Watson, Professor of Art
  Administration                                                  B.A.,	Harding	College,	M.A.,	M.F.A.,	University	of	
  B.A.,	M.A.,	Ph.D.,	Arizona	State	University	                    Missouri-Columbia
Kristina L. miller,	Assistant	Professor	of	Education	         B. Joann Wayman,	Professor	of	Business	
   B.	A.,	University	of	California;	M.A.,	Bowling	Green	         Administration
   State	University;	Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia      B.S.,	Northeast	Missouri	State	University;	M.S.,	Ph.D.,	
nollie moore, Jr.,	Instructor	of	Music,	Director	of	Jane	        University	of	Missouri-Columbia
   Froman	Singers                                             Sarah S. Wells,	Assistant	Professor	of	Business	
   B.S.,	M.Ed.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia                  Administration
michael r. perkins,	Instructor	of	Human	Services                 B.A.,	M.B.A.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
   B.A.,	Columbia	College;	M.S.W.,	University	of	             Karen Weston, Assistant	Professor	of	Education
   Missouri-Columbia;	L.C.S.W.                                  B.A.,	Stephens	College;	M.Ed,	Ph.D.,	University	of	
michael J. polley, Associate Professor of History               Missouri-Columbia
   B.A.,	St.	Joseph’s	College;	M.A.,	Washington	State	        Lia Willis,	Assistant	Professor	of	Human	Services
   University;	M.A.,	Temple	University;	Ph.D.,	Washington	       B.A.,	M.S.W.,	Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
   State	University
                                                              peggy J. Wright,	Assistant	Professor	of	Biology
mark L. price, Associate Professor of Philosophy                B.S.,	M.S.,	Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
  A.A.,	Dalton	College;	B.A.,	University	of	Georgia;	M.S.,	
  Ph.D.,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia                      Youlong Zhuang, Assistant	Professor	of	Business	
                                                                Administration/Management	Information	Systems
Sharilyn reedy, Instructor	of	Nursing
                                                                B.S.,	Shanghai	University	of	Science	and	Technology;	
  B.S.,	M.S.N,	University	of	Missouri-Columbia
                                                                M.B.A.,	Indiana	State	University;	Ph.D.,	University	of	
Sara riley, Instructor	of	Nursing                               Kentucky
   B.S.,	University	of	Missouri	-	Columbia;	M.S.N.,	St.	
   Louis	University

David roebuck, Professor	of	Political	Science
  B.A.,	M.S.S.,	Mississippi	State	University;	Ph.D.,	
  University	of	Mississippi	

Sean Siebert, Assistant	Professor	of	Business	
  Administration
  A.A.,	St.	Louis	Community	College;	B.A.,	University	of	
  Missouri-Columbia;	M.B.A.,	William	Woods	University;	
  D.M.,	Webster	University
76	     Personnel	Directory




                              aLUmni
                              aSSociation

	                             BOARD	OF	DIRECTORS

                              President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kerri mcBee Black '93
	                             	     	                                                Columbia,	MO
	                             President	Elect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . helen “Dale” coe Simons ’65
	                             	     	                                                Harrisburg,	MO
	                             Secretary/Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lollie Zander reed ’68
	                             	     	                                                Lee’s	Summit,	MO
                              Immediate Past President. . . . . . . . . .William “Bill” J. Johnston ’82
	                             	     	                                                Columbia,	MO
	                             Alumni-Trustee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .carol Winkler ’93
	                             	     	                                                Columbia,	MO
	                             Directors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Lynne Stuver Baker ’64
	                             	     	                                                Independence,	MO
                                                                                     Brandon Beza ’96
	                             	     	                                                Columbia,	MO
                                                                                     Deneise caruthers ’96
	                             	     	                                                Columbia,	MO
                                                                                     tanya clatterbuck ’00
	                             	     	                                                Ashland,	MO
                                                                                     Steve combs ’95
	                             	     	                                                Harrisburg,	MO
                                                                                     martha eberhard ’00
	                             	     	                                                Columbia,	MO
                                                                                     Beverly Stemmons Green ’94
	                             	     	                                                Florissant,	MO
                                                                                     marjorie thomas Gutelius ’69
	                             	     	                                                Kansas	City,	MO
                                                                                     Laura hutton ’03
	                             	     	                                                Columbia,	MO
                                                                                     rachael Kaelin ’05
	                             	     	                                                Columbia,	MO
                                                                                     Joe reardon ’93
	                             	     	                                                Columbia,	MO	




     All	graduates	and	former	students	requesting	membership	belong	to	the	Columbia	College	National	Alumni	
Association,	which	includes	more	than	30,000	members.	Its	purposes	are	to	promote	in	alumni	and	alumni	groups	
an	active	interest	in	the	College;	to	establish	mutually	beneficial	relations	among	the	College,	its	alumni,	and	its	
friends;	and	to	support	the	College	through	financial	assistance,	individual	expertise,	and	voluntary	service.

      There	are	more	than	61,000	Christian	College	alumnae	and	Columbia	College	alumni.
                                                                                                                                                             Index					77


                               index
Academic Integrity..........................................................37           BEACON Program ................................................... 15, 45
Academic Policies...........................................................31           Board of Trustees ............................................................69
Academic Progress..........................................................20            Bookstore ........................................................................29
Academic Support Services ............................................40
Accreditation .....................................................................8     Campus Buildings ...........................................................11
Active Service .................................................................18       Campus Life ....................................................................27
ADA .............................................................................30      Candidacy for Degree .....................................................34
Adding a Course .............................................................31          Career Services ...............................................................29
ADMINISTRATION                                                                           Carnegie Classification .....................................................8
 Academic Affairs .........................................................70            Certificate in Criminal Justice Management ...................66
 Administrative Services ...............................................70               Certification Requirements ....................................... 47–56
 Admissions ...................................................................70        Changing Degree Program.........................................34-35
 Adult Higher Education ...............................................70                College Profile ..................................................................8
 Athletics .......................................................................71     Commencement Ceremonies ..........................................34
 Business Services .........................................................72           Computer Use Policy ......................................................41
 Campus Life .................................................................72         Conditional Admission........................................46, 61, 65
 Development, Alumni and Public Relations ................72                             Conduct ..................................................................... 37, 38
 Emeriti Faculty .............................................................73         CougarMail ............................................................... 41, 42
 Enrollment Management ..............................................72                  Counseling Services ........................................................29
 Evaluations ...................................................................72       Course Descriptions
 Evening Campus ..........................................................72              Business...................................................................63-64
 Faculty ..........................................................................73     Criminal Justice.......................................................67-68
 Financial Aid ................................................................72         Education.................................................................56-60
 Graduate Studies ..........................................................72           Course Load ....................................................................31
 Human Resources.........................................................72
 Institutional Research ...................................................72            DAYSTAR Program..................................................15, 45
 Library ..........................................................................73    Deferred Payment Plan ...................................................17
 Mail and Print Services ................................................73              DESE Alternative Route to Certification ........................48
 Marketing .....................................................................73       Directory Information .....................................................35
 Math Center..................................................................73         Dismissal .........................................................................36
 Music Activities ...........................................................73          Dropping a Class ....................................................... 18, 32
 Online Campus .............................................................73
 President .......................................................................73     E-mail ................................................................ 19, 40-43
 Student Records and Transcripts ..................................73                    Emeriti Faculty............................................................... 73
 Student Support Services .............................................73                Emphasis Areas .............................................................. 44
 Technology Services ....................................................73              Employer Tuition Assistance ......................................... 18
 Writing Center ..............................................................73         Endorsements ................................................................. 44
Administrative Offices ......................................................2           EServices........................................................................ 15
Admission Policy ............................................................13
Advising ..........................................................................31    Faculty.............................................................................73
Affirmative Action Policy .................................................1             Fees .............................................................................17
Alternative Certification Program .......................14, 45, 48                      FERPA.............................................................................35
Alumni Association (see also Warranted Degree Program)........76                         Financial Aid ............................................................. 19-26
Application for Admission ..............................................14               Financial Aid Appeal.......................................................21
Assessment..........................................................47, 62, 67           Financial Aid Probation ............................................ 20, 21
Attendance ...................................................................... 22     Financial Aid Suspension.......................................... 20, 21
Audit ............................................................................. 33   Focused Academic Sequence ....................................44, 67
78       Index
Food Services ................................................................. 27      TOEFL Score .................................................................. 15
Full Program Admission .............................. 13, 45, 61, 65                    Transcripts .......................................................................36
Grading System.............................................................. 32         Transfer Credit ..........................................................20, 33
Grievance and Appeals .................................................. 36             Tuition and Fees ..............................................................17
                                                                                        Tuition Reimbursement.............................................18, 44
Health Services .............................................................. 27
                                                                                        Veterans Educational Assistance .....................................18
Incomplete Grade ........................................................... 32
International Programs ................................................... 27           Withdrawal Policy and Procedure.............................18, 32
International Students .............................................. 15, 27            Withdraw with Extraordinary Circumstances .................32

Laptop Availability......................................................... 40
Library...................................................................... 12, 40

Map, Campus ....................................................................3
Master of Arts in Teaching ............................................. 44
Master of Business Administration ................................ 61
Master of Science in Criminal Justice ........................... 65
Military Tuition Assistance ............................................ 18
Mission Statement................................ Inside Front Cover

Non-Degree Seeking .................................... 14, 45, 61, 65

Online Registration ........................................................ 31

Parking Permits .............................................................. 30
Payment Policy .............................................................. 17
Personnel Directory ....................................................... 69
Post-Baccalaureate ........................................14, 49, 61, 65
Post Baccalaureate Certification Program .................47-48
Pre-Graduate .......................................................14, 45, 65
Prerequisites ....................................................................16
Probation ........................................................................ 36

Readmission ................................................................... 16
Recreation ...................................................................... 28
Refund Policy................................................................. 17
Registration .................................................................... 31
Repeating a Course ........................................................ 33
Right to Privacy ............................................................. 35

Satisfactory Progress................................................20, 36
Second Degrees ..............................................................34
Standards of Progress..................................................... 20
Students-at-Large ............................................... 13, 45, 65
Students with Disabilities .............................................. 30

Teacher Certification .................................................47-55
Technology Solutions Center ......................................... 40
Title IV Funds ................................................................ 22
78       Index
Food Services ................................................................. 27      TOEFL Score .................................................................. 15
Full Program Admission .............................. 13, 45, 61, 65                    Transcripts .......................................................................36
Grading System.............................................................. 32         Transfer Credit ..........................................................20, 33
Grievance and Appeals .................................................. 36             Tuition and Fees ..............................................................17
                                                                                        Tuition Reimbursement.............................................18, 44
Health Services .............................................................. 27
                                                                                        Veterans Educational Assistance .....................................18
Incomplete Grade ........................................................... 32
International Programs ................................................... 27           Withdrawal Policy and Procedure.............................18, 32
International Students .............................................. 15, 27            Withdraw with Extraordinary Circumstances .................32

Laptop Availability......................................................... 40
Library...................................................................... 12, 40

Map, Campus ....................................................................3
Master of Arts in Teaching ............................................. 44
Master of Business Administration ................................ 61
Master of Science in Criminal Justice ........................... 65
Military Tuition Assistance ............................................ 18
Mission Statement................................ Inside Front Cover

Non-Degree Seeking .................................... 14, 45, 61, 65

Online Registration ........................................................ 31

Parking Permits .............................................................. 30
Payment Policy .............................................................. 17
Personnel Directory ....................................................... 69
Post-Baccalaureate ........................................14, 49, 61, 65
Post Baccalaureate Certification Program .................47-48
Pre-Graduate .......................................................14, 45, 65
Prerequisites ....................................................................16
Probation ........................................................................ 36

Readmission ................................................................... 16
Recreation ...................................................................... 28
Refund Policy................................................................. 17
Registration .................................................................... 31
Repeating a Course ........................................................ 33
Right to Privacy ............................................................. 35

Satisfactory Progress................................................20, 36
Second Degrees ..............................................................34
Standards of Progress..................................................... 20
Students-at-Large ............................................... 13, 45, 65
Students with Disabilities .............................................. 30

Teacher Certification .................................................47-55
Technology Solutions Center ......................................... 40
Title IV Funds ................................................................ 22

				
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