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MENTORING

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					     CLINICAL FACULTY LEAD TEACHER
               PREPARATION
         Professional Development
                Workshop I


Southwest Virginia Professional Education
              Consortium
           November 1, 2006
Icebreaker…
Can you recall:
• The worst experience you had as a student
  teacher?
• The best experience you had as a student
  teacher?
What would you say would be
• One characteristic of an effective mentor for
  student teachers?
  What is the Southwest Virginia
Professional Education Consortium?

• Over 100 schools
• 11 school divisions
• Four institutions of higher education
• 80 Lead Clinical Faculty (and with you
  all…?)
• Over 800 Clinical Faculty
          SWVA PEC GOALS

• Promote exemplary mentors for pre-service
  teachers
• Nurture leadership abilities and exemplary
  practices of clinical faculty
• Promote culture of inquiry in which all members
  of the professional learning community engage in
  life-long learning
• Support activities involving clinical faculty and
  interns that impact student learning and well-being
 SWVA PEC          ACTIVITIES
• Enhance communication among central office, schools and
  universities
   – Meetings with central office, with principals, and with
     teachers and university faculty
   – Advisory Board
   – Common system for placements

• Prepare Clinical Faculty Lead Teachers who prepare
  Clinical Faculty (mentoring)

• Mini-Grants to improve student learning and well-being
  and promote teacher development

• Planning, implementing, and evaluating clinical programs
  for pre-service teachers and beginning teachers.
Southwest Virginia Professional
    Education Consortium


 http://www.soe.vt.edu/clinical_fac/ne
            w/home.html
 Mentor Training
Level I Professional Development Workshop
1. Structure, operation, and goals of SWVA
    PEC
2. Mentoring Interns and Beginning Teachers
3. Minimum Expectations of Student Teacher
    Interns
http://www.soe.vt.edu/clinical_fac/new/worksh
    ops/workshop%20level-1.html
Mentor Training
Level II Professional Development Workshop
  1. Pre-conferencing and post-conferencing
  2. Evaluating early field experience interns and
      student teaching interns
  3. Working with marginally performing interns
  http://www.soe.vt.edu/clinical_fac/new/workshops/wor
      kshop%20level-2.html
           Effective Mentors
Based on “High Performance Mentoring” by James B. Rowley and Patricia
                            Hart (2000)
                Qualities of the
           Effective Mentor Teacher

Commits to the Roles and            Serves as an
Responsibilities of Mentoring       Instructional Coach

Accepts the Beginning                Models a Commitment to
Teacher as a Developing              Personal and Professional
Person and Professional              Growth

Reflects on Interpersonal            Communicates Hope and
Communications and                   Optimism for the Future
Decisions


                        Rowley and Hart (2000)
Interns and Beginning
      Teachers:
 Three Perspectives
Four Perspectives of Beginning Teachers
We are going to explore the lives of beginning teachers from
four diverse perspectives. We will seek to better understand
entry-year teachers . . .

  As developing adults at different places in
   the life-cycle
  As adult learners
  As beginning professionals experiencing
   common problems
  As novice practitioners with developmental
   levels of concern
                        Rowley and Hart (2000)
Perspective Number 1:

Life-Cycle Theories of Adult Development

 …seek to better understand adult behavior in
 light of what is known about the types of needs
 people tend to have at various age periods in the
 human life cycle. The next slide by Gordon (1990)
 synthesizes the work of many life-cycle theorists.



                               - Gordon, 1990, p. 45
        Age-Based Stages of Adult Development
Age                      Stage

16-22             Leaving the Family
22-29             Getting Into the World
29-32             Age 30 Transition
32-35             Rooting
35-40             Becoming One’s Own Person
40-43             Midlife Transition
43-50             Restabilization
50-65             Preretirement
Leaving the Family & Getting Into the World




                Maria, 23, drives from Hillsville to
                attend the teacher preparation
                program and is in the midst of
                planning her wedding next June (her
                fiancé is in medical school in another
                part of the state).
                John, 22, has been a soccer coach for 4
                years, enjoys computers, and intends
                to return to Northern Virginia to
                teach.
Midlife Transition




     Mildred, 41, has decided after
     working for 13 years as a social
     worker to enter teaching. She has
     lived in her community for 30 years
     and is married to a teacher and has
     2 adult children. She feels her life
     experiences will help shape her
     contributions as a teacher.
Four Perspectives of Beginning Teachers
We are going to explore the lives of beginning teachers from
four diverse perspectives. We will seek to better understand
entry-year teachers . . .

  As developing adults at different places in
   the life-cycle
  As adult learners
  As beginning professionals experiencing
   common problems
  As novice practitioners with developmental
   levels of concern
                          Rowley and Hart
Perspective Number 2:

Adult Learning Theory



 What do we know about adult learning that can
 help us plan and manage internships?

 A leading researcher in the field of adult
 learning, Malcolm Knowles, identified five basic
 principles of adult learning.


                    Rowley and Hart (2000)
 Principles of Adult Learning


 1. Adults’ orientation to learning is life-centered
      •   Awareness of personal and social contexts
      •   Linked to values, life experiences, life goals
 2. Experience: rich resource for learning
      •   Shared experiences
      •   Critical reflection
      •   Individual and group ownership
 3.   Adults have a deep need to be self-directing.
 4.   Tension in transforming: building “new”
      knowledge based on existing knowledge and beliefs

- Knowles (1978), Mezirow (2001), Taylor (2000)
            Instructions


Reflect on the principles of adult learning
and their implications for mentoring by
working in your groups to complete the
“Beginning Teachers as Adult Learners”
worksheet.


                  Rowley and Hart (2000)
Processing . . .
Reflections on the principles
of adult learning and their
implications for mentoring




              Rowley and Hart (2000)
Beginning Teachers:
Four Perspectives


    As developing adults at different places in
     the life cycle
    As adult learners
    As beginning professionals experiencing
     common problems
    As novice practitioners with
     developmental levels of concern
                   Rowley and Hart (2000)
Perceived Problems of Beginning
           Teachers




 A study by Veenman synthesized the
 research on beginning teachers and
 identified the problems they most
 commonly report during their first year of
 teaching.
              Rowley and Hart (2000)
      SURVEY QUESTION:

What are the most commonly
reported problems of beginning
teachers as reported by
beginning teachers?



         Rowley and Hart (2000)
Working groups, take 2 minutes to list the
eight most commonly reported problems
of beginning teachers. After you have
your list of eight, prioritize the top three
problems.




              Rowley and Hart (2000)
Survey Says . . .


 Rowley and Hart (2000)
  Number 1:

CLASSROOM
DISCIPLINE


   Rowley and Hart (2000)
Survey Says . . .




 Rowley and Hart (2000)
  Number 2:

MOTIVATING
 STUDENTS


   Rowley and Hart (2000)
Survey Says . . .




 Rowley and Hart (2000)
   Number 3:

DEALING WITH
 INDIVIDUAL
DIFFERENCES


    Rowley and Hart (2000)
Nine Most Commonly Reported
Problems of Beginning Teachers
How might these relate to problems student teachers
have?

1. Classroom Discipline
2. Motivating Students
3. Dealing With Individual Differences
4. Parent Relations
5. Planning Class Work
6. Evaluating Student Work
7. Insufficient Materials and Supplies
8. Students’ Personal Problems
9. Relations With Colleagues
                       Rowley and Hart (2000)
Beginning Teachers:
Four Perspectives
   As developing adults at different places in
    the life cycle
   As adult learners
   As beginning professionals experiencing
    common problems
   As novice practitioners with
    developmental levels of concern


                     Rowley and Hart (2000)
               Developmental Levels
                of Teacher Concern


A study by Fuller asked teachers to
describe their chief concerns about
teaching. The study resulted in the
identification of three developmental
levels of teacher concern.


                 Rowley and Hart (2000)
Take a minute now to quietly reflect on
how you would answer the following
question.


What is your chief concern as a
classroom teacher?




                    Rowley and Hart (2000)
Teachers’ Developmental
Levels of Concern Theory
                    - Fuller, 1969




           Rowley and Hart (2000)
Stage 1
The Survival Stage




Stage One
                                  Survival Stage

Teachers in this stage are primarily
focused on . . .Rowley and Hart (2000)
      Self



Rowley and Hart (2000)
Some key Survival Stage
questions are . . .

 - How am I doing?
 - Will I make it?
 - Do others approve of
   my performance?


             Rowley and Hart (2000)
      People from whom many beginning
               teachers seek approval . . .

   School Administrators
   Other Teachers
   Parents
   Students
   Mentors


                  Rowley and Hart (2000)
Stage 2
The Task Stage



Stage Two                         Task Stage

Stage One
                                  Survival Stage

Teachers in this stage are primarily
focused on . . .Rowley and Hart (2000)
Time
          and



                   Task
   Rowley and Hart (2000)
Some key Task Stage questions
are . . .

- Is there a better way?
- How can I do all that is
  expected of me?
- How can I improve this?

              Rowley and Hart (2000)
        Time Crunchers Frequently Reported
                       by Student Teachers

• Lesson Planning
• Family obligations
• Adapting to new schedule
• Class work and field experience in same
  semester
• Travel
• Getting personal tasks done

                  Rowley and Hart (2000)
Stage 3
The Impact Stage

Stage Three                        Impact Stage

Stage Two                          Task Stage

Stage One
                                   Survival Stage

 Teachers in this stage are primarily
 focused on . . .Rowley and Hart (2000)
Student Learning



    Rowley and Hart (2000)
Some key Impact Stage
questions are . . .

- Are students learning?
- How can I raise achievement
   levels?
- Is this meaningful to students?

             Rowley and Hart (2000)
Processing your . . .
Ideas on what mentors can do to
support beginning teachers in
different stages of concern




                Rowley and Hart (2000)
Stage 1: The Survival Stage
Appropriate Mentoring Behaviors

Look for opportunities to provide specific praise.
Express interest in the intern’s ideas.
Empathize by sharing your own experiences.
Encourage the intern to reflect on things that are
going well, on successes as well as on setbacks.
Share your coping skills.
Encourage the intern to lead a balanced life that
includes time for self, family, and friends.
“Scaffold:” support successive skill development
                        Rowley and Hart (2000)
Stage 2: The Task Stage
Appropriate Mentoring Behaviors


Help the intern prioritize tasks.
Open your lesson plan files and invite the intern to
adopt or adapt them.
Share your methods of more efficiently accomplishing
common teaching and management tasks.
Encourage the intern to speak with or observe
colleagues who demonstrate exemplary practice.




                      Rowley and Hart (2000)
Stage 3: The Impact Stage
Appropriate Mentoring Behaviors

Commend the intern for being student centered.
Engage the intern in collegial dialogue that focuses
on meeting the needs of individual learners.
Expose the intern to more complex teaching and
learning strategies.
Encourage the intern to collaborate with or
observe outstanding teachers who can model best
practices the intern has not mastered.
Focus conversations on the intern’s efforts to make
progress with challenging students.
                      Rowley and Hart (2000)
Mentor Training
• Level I CF Professional Development
  Workshop
  –   Effective mentoring overview
  –   Beginning teacher development
  –   Basic expectations of interns
  –   Roles of clinical faculty members and teams
       MINIMUM EXPECTATIONS
•   Assessment
•   Classroom management
•   Professionalism
•   Theory/principles of teaching, learning
•   Cultural differences
•   Work habits
•   Instruction
•   Parent/community outreach and communication

				
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