PREPARING A RESUME

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					PREPARING A RÉSUMÉ
       What is a résumé?
A résumé is a summary of your
employment history, education, and
accomplishments.
The purpose of a résumé is to present
aspects of your life that are relevant to an
employer.
It is a marketing tool—what is being
marketed is YOU!
                                               2
   Functions of a résumé …
An inventory of your experiences
Helps you clarify your value as an
employee
Provides a summary for potential
employer so he/she can evaluate whether
you should be interviewed
Used as a reference for questions by an
interviewer
Filed for future reference by a potential
employer
                                            3
    Résumés at a glance …
A résumé has one specific function:
              to get an interview!

Employers need a quick way to reduce the
number of résumés they need to read

How? A 5-second glance can give an employer
reasons NOT to keep it.


                                              4
        Will your résumé make
             the short list …
Handwritten?                Definitely a NO!
Corners curled, paper       Into the basket!
wrinkled?
Smudges, coffee             Not a chance!
stains, etc.?
Design difficult to read?   Haven’t the time!
Oops, there’s a spelling    Pitch this one!
error?
No postal codes, no         It’s a loser.
telephone numbers?
                            Not wanted here.
Grammatical error?
                                                5
     Types of résumés …
There are three main ways to organize the
information on your résumé:
   Chronological
   Functional
   Combination
Each type serves a purpose
How do you know which one is best?

                                        6
    Chronological Résumé
Use this format if you can show steady
progress in your education and
employment
This is the best method to use when:
  The name of your last employer is important
  You want to find a job in the same area as
  your previous one
  Your job history or education shows growth
  and development

                                                7
     Chronological Résumé
Don’t use this format if:
  You want to emphasize skills you haven’t
  used in other jobs
  You’re looking for a job you’ve never done
  before
  You’ve changed jobs a lot




                                               8
    Chronological Résumé
     Advantage             Disadvantage
You can demonstrate,   You don’t have a
at a glance, a         place to indicate your
summary of your        skills and
education and          qualifications up front.
experience.




                                              9
Chronological Résumé Structure
Starts off with a job objective or a personal
profile
Groups education, work and volunteer
experiences and lists items in reverse
chronological order
May include a section on awards and
accomplishments
Provides information on interests
Provides references
                                            10
CHRONOLOGICAL
RÉSUMÉ




                11
        Functional Résumé
Use this format when you have little or no actual
work experience in the area in which you’re
looking for work
This is the best format to use when:
  You haven’t worked before
  You want to emphasize talents and skills you haven’t
  used in a particular job
  You’ve had a variety of jobs in the past which aren’t
  connected
  You’ve done mostly temporary work in the past
                                                      12
       Functional Résumé
Don’t use this format when:
  You have a steady pattern of jobs and
  education
  Your past employers are important in relation
  to your job objective




                                                  13
        Functional Résumé
    Advantage                Disadvantage
You can highlight         You have to back up
your special skills and   your list of skills and
any awards and            qualifications with
                          education, work or
achievements that         volunteer
come from work,           experiences. You
volunteer or school       can’t just list skills you
experiences.              believe you have
                          without demonstrating
                          how you got them.
                                                  14
Functional Résumé Structure
Starts off with a job objective
List of skills and/or achievements that
support the objective
Groups education, work and volunteer
experiences and lists items in reverse
chronological order (most recent first)
Provides information on interests
Provides references
                                          15
FUNCTIONAL
RÉSUMÉ




             16
     Combination Résumé
It is best to use this format when:
  Your education is an important part of your
  skills and your practical skills are limited
  Your background shows a wide range of
  unrelated skills
  Your work history isn’t reflective of you as a
  stable worker—you’ve held a lot of different
  jobs
  Your work history shows more time in other
  work areas
                                                   17
COMBINATION
RÉSUMÉ




              18
       Parts of a Résumé
NAME
 Do not use nicknames
 Highlight so it stands out: bold, larger   font

ADDRESS
 Use complete address
 Don’t use abbreviations except for the 2-letter
 abbreviations for provinces (i.e. NS, NB, PE)
 Put the postal code on a line by itself
                                               19
       Parts of a Résumé
TELEPHONE/FAX NUMBERS
 Include area code
   Two acceptable styles are:
   (902) 555-1234 or 902/555-1234


EMAIL ADDRESS
 Include it if you have one, giving the message
 you are computer literate
 Do not use an email address that is
 inappropriate (i.e. hotchick@hotmail.com)
                                              20
       Parts of a Résumé
OBJECTIVE OR PROFILE
 An objective gives focus, direction and
 support to the body of the résumé
 It is an attention grabber
 Use an objective only if it makes sense;
 otherwise use a cover letter
 If you are “shopping for work”, you might use
 a Career Profile focusing on skills,
 achievements and character attributes
                                                 21
       Parts of a Résumé
EDUCATION
 List your most recent education first
 Include the name of the school and dates of
 attendance
   Include courses studied, particularly if your résumé
   is short
 Additional training courses and certificates
 should be included
 It is not necessary to include your junior high
                                                     22
      Parts of a Résumé
WORK EXPERIENCE
 List your most recent work experience first
 and work backwards
 Include dates, job title, employer, job
 responsibilities
 Try to think like an employer—what would
 you want to see as the reader of your résumé
 Use action verbs to tell what you have done
 Include volunteer work experience
                                            23
       Parts of a Résumé
AWARDS AND ACTIVITIES
 List academic honours or certificates you
 received
 Stress extra-curricular activities and special
 achievements in sports, clubs, or other school
 activities
 These offer employers evidence of
 leadership, dedication and initiative


                                              24
       Parts of a Résumé
SPECIAL SKILLS AND ATTITUDES
 Highlight the skills you have that relate
 directly to the position for which you are
 applying
 These may include specific computer
 applications, fluency in a foreign language, or
 special abilities you possess that are not
 necessarily part of your formal education
 Highlight attributes such as honesty,
 enthusiasm, and maturity—qualities that
 make you indispensable in the work place
                                               25
       Parts of a Résumé
REFERENCES
 Think carefully about who can act as your
 references. Type the name, title, company,
 address, and phone/fax number of three to
 four references.
 Prior permission to use any individual’s name
 as a reference is a must and as a courtesy,
 inform your references that they may be
 contacted.

                                             26
Who can you ask to be a reference?
Someone from your school (teacher, guidance
counsellor, coach, administrator).
Someone you've worked for (summer, part-time
or full-time employer).
Someone you've worked for on a casual basis
(babysitting, shovelling snow, delivering papers).
Someone you've helped (as a volunteer or as a
friend).
Someone whose opinion is respected (elder,
minister, community leader).
You cannot use a relative!!
                                                 27
            References
There are different opinions on whether or
not to include the actual references on
your résumé. If you decide not to include
them on your résumé, follow these
suggestions:
  In the Reference section, type “References
  Attached” and prepare them on a separate
  sheet which matches your résumé.
  Type “References Available on Request” and
  do not submit them with your résumé.

                                               28
           References
Résumés that say “References available
on request” risk delay or rejection
Employers in a hurry will likely favour
people whose references are attached to
the résumé.
The employer may recognize one of your
references and be impressed—making
your résumé stand out from the others!
                                          29
     Résumé Dos and Don’ts
         DO                            DO
Use only one font size        Use power words (action
(12 pt) and one font style    verbs)
(Times New Roman,             Use a header including
Arial)                        your name and page
Be consistent when using      number on the second
bold, italics, underlining    page
Leave 2-3 blank lines         Staple the pages with one
between sections              staple in the top left
Use a good-quality paper      corner
Use white, off-white, ivory   PROOFREAD!!!
or cream-coloured paper
                                                     30
Résumé Dos and Don’ts
  DON’T INCLUDE YOUR …

 Age/birthdate
 Race
 Religion
 Marital status
 Sexual preference
 Social Insurance Number

                           31
  Employer’s Pet Peeves About
           Résumés
More than two pages     Attempts to inflate
long                    responsibilities
Coloured paper          Fancy graphics
Spelling errors         Poor quality paper
Handwritten             A photocopy of a
corrections             photocopy
Old jobs that are not
relevant
Repetition
                                              32
Employers Speak Out on Résumés
 “Any résumé that looks like it’s part of a mass
 mailing goes into the garbage. And if there’s
 one spelling mistake or bad punctuation, out it
 goes.” Mark Bowles, Komex International Ltd.
 “I want brief, to-the-point résumés that highlight
 work experience and education. Tailor your
 résumé to show me why you should work for my
 company.” Joanne Tully, Holiday Inn
 “When I see neatness in a résumé, I get the
 feeling that the job candidate will keep his or her
 work area and tools clean. That’s important in
 by business.” Clark Johnston, Clark’s Quality Woodwork
                                                      33
LET’S GET STARTED!!

				
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posted:10/18/2011
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