COOKING by pengxiang

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									                        COOKING

                                THE

                   MAINE WAY

          A PRESENTATION BY CHERYL WIXSON
                       AT THE
         MAINE SCHOOLSITE HEALTH PROMOTION
                  CONFERENCE XXI


                              June 27, 2007
                             Sugarloaf, USA



Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching
people the joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional
products while supporting a sustainable environment. For more
information, visit our website at: www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
The holy trinity of bad taste is fat, sugar, and salt. A combination of these
ingredients can make anything taste good while contributing to poor health.


Techniques I use in my kitchen to eliminate the holy trinity of bad taste:

       FAT: First of all, fat is good. Fat carries important fat-soluble
nutrients to our brain, cushions our vital organs, and protects our bodies
from temperature extremes. Fat is a flavor enhancer, and it produces a
feeling of fullness and satisfaction. The problem is when you have too much
fat. The fats I use in my kitchen are olive oil, canola oil, and butter. To
minimize fat when sautéing, use chicken or vegetable stock. When baking, I
replace some fat with substances like applesauce or prune puree. Utilize all
parts of your citrus fruits: juice and zest. Replace mayonnaise with a blend
of ½ fat free yogurt and ½ mayo. For other dairy products, I use skim milk,
low-fat sour cream and cream cheese, and heavy cream.

       SUGAR: It’s no secret that high fructose corn syrup has slowly and
steadily crept into our diets. It’s cheap and the ingredient of choice for food
manufacturers. Don’t purchase processed foods. Reduce sugar in baked
goods. Decrease the amount of sugar and offer bursts of sweetness like
chocolate chips or raisins. Love your friends and family: offer them fruit
instead of cake.

       SALT: Second only to sugar, salt is one of the cheapest additives in
processed foods. Become label conscious. Look for labels that say “low
sodium.” In cooking, don’t add salt until the very end, and then only to
taste. Use freshly ground black pepper, chopped herbs like parsley, citrus
and sea salt. The Italians make a seasoning called gremolata; minced garlic,
parsley and lemon zest that I like to use.
Other ways to put better health in our lives:

1. Sneak in fiber whenever you can. Oat bran, wheat germ, grind your own
grain, whole meal flours.

2. Serve salad for dessert.

3. Replace the crunch of potato chips with the crunch of vegetables.

4. Cook once – eat twice.

5. Exercise, exercise, exercise.

6. Don’t keep junk around…don’t buy it and don’t bring it to the office. Be
kind to your friends and don’t offer them rat poison.

7. Eat nine fruits and vegetables a day.



System to provide nutritious and delicious eating:

1. Weekly inventory

2. Plan a weekly menu and post on door of refrigerator.

3. Shopping list based on specials and seasonal items.

4. Organize refrigerator.

5. Back-up meals.
Researchers have identified four food color groups, red, orange-yellow,
green and blue-purple. For optimum health, we should eat something from
each color group every day.

       RED: Of the top 20 antioxidant foods, 7 are red: strawberries,
cranberries, raspberries, cherries, red grapes, beets, and red peppers. Also in
this group are tomatoes, apples, pomegranates and red onion. One glass of
red wine.

      ORANGE-YELLOW: This group includes carrots, sweet potatoes,
yellow potatoes like Yukon Gold, oranges, tangerines, grapefruit, mango,
cantaloupe, pumpkin, squash, apricots, corn and bananas.

     GREEN: Avocado, spinach, asparagus, artichokes, broccoli, kale,
cabbage, watercress, brussel sprouts, green tea, kiwi.

      BLUE-PURPLE: blueberries, blackberries, concord grapes, raisins,
plums, prunes, eggplant, purple cabbage.


To get your nine – a – day: Think in terms of three: strive for 3 at every
meal.

Breakfast: tomato juice or orange juice, blueberries on cereal or with
yogurt. Mid-morning snack: green tea with orange or banana.

Lunch: Salad with 2 cups of vegetables or encore plate with 2 vegetables.
Apple or applesauce for dessert.

Cocktails: hummus dip with carrot chips and cranberry lime spritzer

Dinner: 2 colored vegetables, protein, salad for dessert. Optional: glass of
red wine.

Total for the day: 13!!!
                       INDEX OF RECIPES


RED COLOR GROUP

    Cranberry Nut Muffins
    Apple and Oat Crisp
    Cranberry Lime Spritzer Punch

ORANGE YELLOW GROUP

    Corn, Black Bean, Avocado and Tomato Salad
    Maple Pumpkin Pudding
    Pumpkin Snack Cakes

GREEN COLOR GROUP

    Vegetable Quiche Cups
    Braised Greens
    Hummus for a Crowd served with sugar snap peas and broccoli

BLUE- PURPLE GROUP

    Wilted Red Cabbage Slaw
    Wild Blueberry Cobbler
    Blueberry Mousse
                           CRANBERRY NUT MUFFINS
    These not-too-sweet muffins can be made with either fresh or frozen cranberries.
      They are a good source of the trace minerals manganese and selenium and
                           provide 3 grams of dietary fiber.



1 ½ cups whole wheat flour
¾ cup rolled oats
¼ cup non-fat dry milk powder
1/3 cup sugar
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 cup cranberries, chopped
½ cup walnuts, chopped
2 tablespoons finely chopped orange rind and orange
2 eggs
¾ cup skim milk
1/3 cup canola oil

In a large bowl, whisk together the flour, rolled oats, dry milk powder, sugar and baking
powder. In a small bowl, whisk together the skim milk, eggs and canola oil. Stir into the
dry mixture, just combining. Fold in the cranberries, walnuts and orange rind. Spoon
batter into greased muffin tins. Bake in preheated 350 degree oven about 15 – 20
minutes. While muffins are baking, prepare glaze by combining orange juice and sugar
in a small bowl and gently heating in the microwave. When muffins are done, remove
from the pan and dip each muffin top in the glaze. Makes 12 muffins.

Nutritional analysis per muffin: 201 calories, 6 grams protein, 23 grams carbohydrates, `0
grams fat, 67 mg. sodium, 3 grams fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy cooking and eating utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable environment. For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
                                APPLE AND OAT CRISP
         Oats are high in soluble fiber, low in sodium and low in fat. By toasting
      them in the oven, they lend a nutty flavor to this healthy Apple and Oat Crisp.



6 cups peeled and sliced apples (about 8 medium apples)
1/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon cinnamon
Stir together in bowl. Spray a 9” x 13” baking pan and line with the apples.

Topping:

1 cup rolled oats toasted *
1/3 cup brown sugar
½ cup chopped walnuts
½ cup all purpose flour
1 teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons butter at room temperature
¼ cup apple juice concentrate
Combine in a bowl and sprinkle over the top of the apples
Bake in 350 degree oven until the apples are soft, about 35 – 40 minutes.Makes 8
servings.

* Rolled oats are old-fashioned oatmeal, not the quick cooking variety. To toast oats,
sprinkle them on a cookie sheet and bake in a 350 oven, shaking the pan every few
minutes, until fragrant, about 10 minutes.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 278 calories, 4 grams protein, 8.5 grams fat, 50 grams
carbohydrates, 26 mg. sodium, 3 grams fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable environment. Visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
                      CRANBERRY LIME SPRITZER PUNCH
       When this beverage is served in a wine glass, it becomes even more festive!
       Cranberry Lime Spritzer Punch is a delicious and healthy alternative to the
                                  traditional cocktail.




2 – 64 ounce containers of no-sugar cranberry juice
3 – 1 liter bottles of lime flavored sparkling water like Poland Spring
1 lime, sliced thinly
Ice


Mix in a punch bowl and serve in wine glasses. Makes 46 five ounce servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 48 calories, 12 grams carbohydrates, 0 grams protein, 0
grams fat, 10 mg. sodium, 0 grams fiber. Bonus: 60% RDA of Vitamin C.




Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable environment. For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
                CORN, BLACK BEAN, AVOCADO & TOMATO SALAD
          I like to make this salad in the height of the summer when the corn and
       tomatoes are ripe and plentiful. But in winter, it may also be prepared with
         frozen and canned vegetables. Just be sure to marinate the avocado in
            lime or lemon juice and add at the last minute to prevent browning.




2 cups cooked black beans, drained
2 cups chopped tomatoes (may use canned, drain them)
2 cups corn kernels (frozen will work)
½ cup minced fresh cilantro
¾ cup chopped scallions
 ¼ cup hot green salsa or spicy salsa (may need to add more to get flavor)
2 cups avocado, cut into ½ inch dice (about 2 avocadoes) soaked in ¼ cup (more or less)
of lime or lemon juice


In a large bowl, combine the black beans, chopped tomatoes, corn kernels, fresh cilantro,
chopped scallions and hot green salsa. Taste for spiciness. There should be enough salsa
to you can “taste the hot”, but not enough to burn the tongue. Just before serving, gently
fold in the avocado and spoon into serving bowl.

Makes about 10 – 1 cup servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 141 calories, 5 grams protein, 20 grams carbohydrates,
6 grams fat, ( 0 grams trans fat), 47 mg. sodium, 7 grams fiber. Added benefits: 24%
RDA folate, 27% RDA Vitamin C, good source of manganese and Vitamin K.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable environment. For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
                              MAPLE PUMPKIN PUDDING
           This low-fat pudding is loaded with Vitamins A and C, and makes a
    delicious alternative to pumpkin pie. Don’t have maple sugar? Substitute brown
       sugar and ½ teaspoon maple extract. This recipe was adapted from one by
                     Barbara Kafka in her book, “Vegetable Love.”




1 ½ cups pumpkin puree
2 eggs
¼ cup cornstarch
½ cup maple sugar (available at Health food stores)
½ teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon ginger
¼ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
¼ teaspoon ground cloves
2 cups skim milk
2/3 cup orange juice

Beat the eggs with the pumpkin puree in a heavy saucepan. In a medium bowl, whisk
together the cornstarch, maple sugar, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg and cloves. Whisk into
the pumpkin mixture. Set the sauce pan over medium heat, and whisk in the milk and
orange juice. Bring the mixture to a simmer and cook, whisking continually, until it is
quite thick and the taste of the cornstarch has cooked out, at least 10 minutes. Be sure to
whisk thoroughly to remove any lumps. Spoon the pudding into 8 ramekins or pudding
dishes. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 2 hours before eating. Makes 8
servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 116 calories, 4 grams protein, 22 grams carbohydrates,
1.5 grams fat, 47 mg. sodium, 1.5 grams fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable environment. For photographs and directions how to cook and
make your own pumpkin puree, visit our website at: www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
                              PUMPKIN SNACK CAKES

   My teenagers are always rummaging through the cupboards for a snack. I make
 Pumpkin Snack Cakes and store them in the freezer. Better than cookies, one little cake
 has over a gram of fiber and provides 20% of the RDA of Vitamin A. Dry milk powder
      and chopped apricots replace the sugar to add extra calcium and Vitamin C.


Beat with electric mixer in large bowl:

1 – 15 ounce can pumpkin (1 ¾ cup cooked pumpkin)
½ cup sugar
3 eggs
1 cup canola oil
1 ½ cup skim milk
½ cup fat-free dry milk powder

Mix together in medium bowl:
2 cups all purpose flour
½ cup wheat germ
2 cups whole wheat flour
1 tablespoon cinnamon
1 ½ teaspoon grated nutmeg
2 tablespoons baking powder

Stir into pumpkin mixture. Stir in 1 cup chocolate chips and ½ cup finely chopped dried
apricots.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray mini-muffin pans with cooking spray. Spoon batter
into pans and bake until a toothpick comes out clean, about 15 minutes. Let cool on rack.
Store in tins, plastic bags or plastic containers. Makes 72 cakes.

Nutritional analysis per cake: 83 calories, 2 grams protein, 10 grams carbohydrates, 4
grams fat, 1 gram fiber, 29 mg sodium.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable environment. For photographs and more cooking tips visit our
website at: www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
                             VEGETABLE QUICHE CUPS



Unlike traditional quiches, these mini vegetable ones have no crust. They are an
excellent source of Vitamins C, K and A. I like to keep Vegetable Quiche Cups in the
freezer and microwave them for a quick and nutritious snack.


3 eggs
5 ounces frozen spinach (1/2 of a 10 ounce package)
1 cup sweet peppers, finely chopped *
½ cup onion, minced
1 cup grated Parmesan cheese


Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray 2 mini muffin pans with cooking spray.

Microwave the frozen spinach for 2 ½ minutes on high. Drain the excess liquid. Blend
the eggs and spinach together in a blender. Scrape into a bowl. Stir in the peppers,
onions and cheese and mix well. Spoon into the muffin tins. Bake at 350 degrees for
about 20 minutes, until a knife inserted in the center comes out clean. Makes 24 mini
quiches. Serving size is 3 quiches.

* Try substituting broccoli and / or grated carrots for a taste change. Any vegetable
combination, along with chopped fresh herbs will work….I often make these quiches
with chopped cooked vegetables leftover from supper. Be creative!


Nutritional analysis (per 3 quiches): 83 calories, 7 grams protein, 4.8 grams fat, 3 grams
carbohydrates, 1 gram fiber




Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable environment. For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
                                  BRAISED GREENS
   Braising, a cooking process in which the food is first cooked in a small amount of
      fat and then simmered in a liquid, is an excellent way to cook a wide variety
 of greens like kale, chard, spinach, and collard greens. Cooks will often add chopped
garlic and/or onion and use different fats like olive oil, sesame oil or bacon. Liquid can
   be water, stock or wine. Braised greens retain many of their phytochemicals, and
   provide the body with a wealth of health benefits, including maintaining a healthy
            liver, boosting the immune system and repairing damaged DNA.




Wash the greens thoroughly and roughly cut them. In greens with large stems, chop the
stems separately. Heat the oil in a large skillet. Add the toughest pieces first, stirring and
cooking. If necessary, add some liquid or stock. When the stems have started to become
tender, add the garlic and onion and the chopped leaves. Stir and cook until wilted and
tender. It may be necessary to add stock and cover and cook until they are tender
enough. Season to taste with sea salt and fresh pepper. If desired, chopped fresh herbs
like parsley, basil, or cilantro may be added. Generally speaking, one pound of greens
feeds 2 to 3 as a side dish.

KALE: A green-leafed member of the brassica family. The stems are often thick and
may be discarded. A vegetable loved by Italians that Americans are starting to develop a
taste for. Becomes much sweeter after the first frost.

KOHLRABI: Another member of the brassica family with a bulb on the end. The bulb
is often peeled and eaten like turnip and the greens cooked.

BOK CHOY: A Chinese cabbage whose flavor is that of a mild cabbage crossed with
spinach. Try it braised with fresh ginger and garlic.

SPINACH: The most versatile of greens, spinach needs to be thoroughly washed to
remove sand and grit. Braised Spinach usually does not need the addition of liquid as
there is enough water in the leaves. My favorite is braised with sesame oil and sesame
seeds.

SWISS CHARD: Although not related to spinach, chard has similar characteristics.
Separate the leaves from the stalks. Chard comes in a variety of bright colors and grows
well in our Maine climate.

BEET GREENS: The leaves of beet plants, the best having tiny beets attached to them.
Be sure to wash thoroughly. Delicious when sautéed with bacon fat!

A seed catalog, like Johnny’s Selected Seeds will list many other types of greens that are
enjoyed by adventuresome cooks!
                              HUMMUS FOR A CROWD
    There are several variations on Hummus, the Middle Eastern puree of chick peas
     flavored with garlic and lemon juice. This recipe is one I use to make hummus
                                     for a crowd..




6 cups cooked chick peas (drain and reserve juice)
4 heaping tablespoons garlic finely chopped
2/3 cup fresh lemon juice
3 tablespoons reduced sodium soy sauce
½ cup sesame tahini
1/3 cup olive oil
½ cup finely chopped fresh parsley
¾ cup bean juice (or water)
1 teaspoon garlic salt


Using a food processor fitted with a stainless steel blade, mince the garlic cloves until
fine. Add the chick peas, lemon juice, soy sauce, sesame tahini, and olive oil and bean
juice or water. Pulse until pureed, adding more water or bean juice as needed. Pulse in
the fresh parsley. Store tightly covered in the refrigerator for up to 1 week. Serve with
pita bread wedges or fresh pieces of vegetables. Makes about 9 cups, or 72 – 1 ounce
servings.


Nutritional analysis per tablespoon: 42 calories, 2 gram protein, 5 grams carbohydrates,
2 gram fat, (0 grams transfat), 40 mg. sodium, 1 gram fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable environment. Visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
                   WILTED RED CABBAGE & BELL PEPPER SLAW
           This salad is a snap to prepare using the food processor, and keeps in
          the refrigerator for several days. Red or purple cabbage has twice the
             Vitamin C and cancer-fighting phytochemicals of green cabbage.
                           Recipe adapted from Best of Gourmet.




½ cups distilled white vinegar
½ cups water
¼ cup sugar
½ teaspoon salt
1 teaspoons Dijon mustard
3 tablespoons olive oil
1 tablespoons mustard seed
½ head shredded red cabbage (about 3 cups)
2 – red, yellow and / or orange bell peppers, cut into ½ inch dice

In a saucepan bring vinegar and water to a boil with sugar, salt and mustard. Simmer,
stirring, for about 3 minutes.
In a heavy skillet, heat the oil until hot then add the mustard seeds and sauté until they
start to pop. Stir in the cabbage and sauté for a minute, then stir in the bell peppers and
sauté for a minute. Add the vinegar mixture and cook. Drain the vegetables, reserving
the liquid. Boil the liquid until it is reduced by one half, then mix with the vegetables.
Refrigerate at least one hour before serving.

Makes 8 servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 90 calories, 1 gram protein, 10 grams carbohydrates, 5.5
grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 168 mg. sodium, 1.3 grams fiber. Additional benefits:
119% RDA Vitamin C, 25% RDA Vitamin A, 18% RDA Vitamin K.




Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable lifestyle. For more recipes, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
                           WILD BLUEBERRY COBBLER
       This delicious, low-sugar cobbler can also be prepared with blackberries.
         Both fruits are excellent sources of phytochemicals and antioxidants.
       Recipe was adapted from The New Vegetarian Epicure by Anna Thomas.




6 cups frozen or fresh Maine wild blueberries
¾ cup sugar
4 teaspoons cornstarch
2/3 cup water
3 tablespoons lemon juice
1 1/3 cup whole meal flour (or 1 cup all purpose and 1/3 cup wheat germ)
3 tablespoons sugar
Generous ½ teaspoon baking soda
Generous 1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon cinnamon
½ teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg
4 tablespoons butter, melted
2/3 cup buttermilk

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a large, non-reactive pot, combine the water, ¾ cup
sugar, cornstarch and lemon juice. Stir to dissolve, then add the fruit. Bring the mixture
to a simmer over medium heat and cook for a few minutes to cook the cornstarch. Taste
and correct the sugar or lemon juice if necessary. Pour the mixture into a greased 9 inch
by 13 inch glass baking pan.
In a medium bowl, mix together the dry ingredients (flour, baking soda and baking
powder, sugar, and spices) Melt the butter and whisk into the buttermilk. Pour into the
dry ingredients and stir until just combined. The batter will be sticky. Drop by spoonfuls
onto the fruit. Bake until the topping is golden, about 25 minutes. Serve with Tofu
Vanilla Ice Cream. Makes 12 servings.

Nutritional analysis per serving: 192 calories, 3 grams protein, 37 grams carbohydrates, 5
grams fat (0 grams trans fat), 116 mg. sodium, 4 grams fiber.


Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable environment. For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org
                               BLUEBERRY MOUSSE
        Blueberries are the number one antioxidant fruit. This delicious mousse
            has a tofu base and is a snap to prepare in your food processor.




3 – 12.3 ounce packages firm silken tofu
2 cups powdered sugar
1 cup blueberry juice
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice
3 cups canned blueberries in light syrup, drained


In the bowl of your food processor, puree the tofu until very smooth, scraping down the
sides frequently. Puree and add the lemon juice, blueberry juice and powdered sugar. Be
sure the mixture is very smooth. Portion out into 50 – 2ounce soufflé cups. Cover and
let refrigerate over night. Just before serving, top each mousse with a tablespoon of
blueberries. Makes 50 servings.

To prepare for 200:

15 packages tofu
1 – 46 ounce bottle blueberry juice
9 cans blueberries
1 quart lemon juice
2 pounds powdered sugar

Nutritional analysis per serving: 1 gram protein, 9 grams carbohydrates, less than 1 gram
fat, 18 mg. sodium, less than 1 gram fiber.



Cheryl Wixson’s Kitchen is a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching people the
joys and benefits of healthy eating and cooking utilizing regional products while
supporting a sustainable environment. For more information, visit our website at:
www.cherylwixsonskitchen.org

								
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