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					               IMPORTANT INFO
Here is the website address:


Copy down this URL
http://peninsula.swiftclassroom.com/phs/vweldy/index.php

You will find your homework assignments and web links to ASL sites
  here.

You can also get to the link from the PHS website.
  It is located under tab: -STUDENTS
                                  -CLASSROOM WEBSITES
                                       - WELDY
                   Cell Phone
                   Reminder
We are living in the digital age.
Almost everyone has a cell phone or some other mobile tech
   device.
There is a time and place for cell phone use.
Texting during class time is NEVER okay.
You are interrupting your own learning and the learning of
   the friend you are texting (if they are in class)
Last week I observed 4 students blatantly texting during
   class.
I will take phones and turn them into the office..
               So
PLEASE don‟t text in my classroom.
                   Syllabus
• Pass out – syllabus and expectations
• Read together with parent
• Both signatures required
• Required best email and cell contact info
  required.
• No big grades will be entered until this is
  returned – completed.
• There will be a syllabus test.
• If you lose it you may print out a new one from
  the ASL class website.
Entry Procedures
               Backpacks
    In the middle of the room




 ASL binder and pen/pencil with you at your seat.
Entry Procedures
             NAME CARD
 1. Please pick up your name card at the
    start of class.

   BE SURE TO GIVE BACK THE CARD
         BEFORE YOU LEAVE.

       This card needs to stay in the room.
    Entry Procedures



Thank you for spitting
   out your gum.
FIRST WORK                                  Voice Off
                                             Please
Practice these signs

•   1                          •   Red
                               •   Green
•   8                          •   Blue
•   3                          •   Orange
•   5                          •   White
                               •   Purple
•   9                          •   Black
•   6                          •   Pink
•   10                         •   Gray
                               •   Yellow
•   2                          •   Brown
•   4
•   7            THANK YOU FOR TOSSING OUT YOUR GUM
                    Syllabus
•   Only turn in the bottom strip.
•   Only turn in if it is completed.
•   Cut with scissors.
•   DO NOT RIP IT
  Asl 1
Monday, Sept.12, 2011
DAY 7
                          Agenda
 • Roll call
 • MASL Lesson 1
     – Greetings: formal and informal
     – Eye contact
 • MASL Lesson 2
     – Names
     – Fingerspelling
 • Review
 • New book
 • Homework
L.T. Learn formal or informal greetings; importance of eye-contact in
ASL settings; fingerspelling standards; what is Deixis
            QUIET TIME
•    Watch every name that is fingerspelled.
     Keep watching even after your name has
     been called.
    This is how you will learn to READ
               fingerspelling.

•    Respond with HERE(nod) when your name
     is spelled.
•    Respond with HERE(negative) when a
     name is spelled for an absent student.
               Seating Chart
                Clarification
•   Please sit in your assigned seats.
•   (ABC order by first name)
•   Pay attention as I do roll call.
•   This is the order you should be seated.
•   If you are in the wrong seat,
•   Please get up and move to correct seat.
•   Please sit this way every day
       Entry Routine Clarification
•   Voice off BEFORE entry to the room. (4th per.)
•   I-pod, cell phone etc. off and put away before entry.
•   Spit out gum – gum board at door or trash can.
•   Go to bathroom before class – do not come up here and
    then ask to go.

• Backpacks in center of room.
• Pick up name card. (return at end of class)
• Your ASL binder and pen/pencil at your seat.
• This is a daily routine.
• That means I should not be reminding you of what you
  already know.
• Failure to follow the entry routine will result in a poor
  „work habits‟ grade.
        Classroom Expectations
              Clarification
• No food, drink or gum
• No cell phone, texting, I-pod w/out permission.
• No profanity (4th per)
• Dress code
• Pay attention & Participation
• Good Behavior
• Middle School is over
• And we certainly are not in elementary.
(If I have to tell you simple things you should or
   should not be doing then something is wrong.)
 Master ASL


Intro to our book
               Master ASL
•   Pass out books to class.
•   We do not have enough to go around
•   So we will have to share.
•   Look at page 3.

• Take a moment to read about the Deaf
  students that you will be seeing in the
  companion DVD.
                Master ASL
• These books will need to stay here at school.
  (Lucky you because they are really heavy!)
• But I have worked hard to type Units 1-6 into
  PowerPoint.
• Unit 1 is already uploaded onto the ASL Class
  Website.
• So it will be easy for you to view it from home.
• If you do not have PowerPoint on your home
  computer, there is a link on the ASL class
  website for a FREE PowerPoint reader that you
  can download.
                Master ASL
• Eyes back up here to today‟s lesson
  please.
• Today we will be going through Lesson 1
  and part of Lesson 2 of Unit One.
• It is a little jumpy in my opinion, but that is
  how this book is set up.
• I will have slides of my own mixed in with
  those from the book to give more detail or
  extended explanations.
“American Sign Language
    is of great value to the
    deaf,
 but could also be of great
    benefit to the hearing
    as well…
 It is superior to spoken
    language in its beauty
    and emotional
    expressiveness.
 It brings kindred souls
    into a much more close
    and conscious
    communion
 than mere speech can
    possibly do.”

    –Thomas H. Gallaudet 1848
                           For more info on Gallaudet go to this site:
                        http://www.deafis.org/history/who/gallaudet.php
Master ASL

  UNIT ONE
Lesson 1pp 4-8
                 Lesson One pp4-8
Outcomes:
  Can exchange and respond to formal and informal greetings
  Demonstrate a variety of responses about one‟s state of being
  Uses deixis with eye gaze                  Postpone to
                                           Introductions lesson 3
• Greetings
• Formal vs informal
• Eyes on ASL #1
   *Eye contact
• Deixis w eye gaze

Homework       Ex 1 pg 8
Objective: Can explain how to introduce oneself in the culturally
  appropriate manner.
             Greetings

Words you need to know
• HELLO
• HI
• WHAT‟S-UP?
• HOW-ARE-YOU?
• FINE



                         p4
            Formal or Informal

• When signing to friends sign Hi!
• When signing with adults or people you don‟t
  know well, use the more formal Hello.
• What‟s-up? is an informal way to ask How-are-
  you?
• How-are-you? Is formal in both English and in
  ASL.
Note: you can sign What‟s-up? one-handed, but both signs must
  include raising your chin.



                                                                p4
           Formal or Informal
FORMAL                      INFORMAL
Signing to adults, people   Signing to friends and peers
  you don‟t know well.
                            Use:
Use:
                            HI
HELLO                       WHAT‟S-UP?
HOW-ARE-YOU?
          Formal or Informal
FORMAL                     INFORMAL
                           Now sign this to your
Try signing this to your
                             partner
  partner.

Use:                       Use:
                           HI
HELLO
                           WHAT‟S-UP?
HOW-ARE-YOU?
Classroom Exercise

3. Greetings                  •   an acquaintance
Look at the list of people.   •   parents
Would you use What’s-up       •   an ASL student
or How-are-you to greet       •   your partner
    them?                     •   an ASL teacher
                              •   grandmother
                              •   buddy
                              •   younger brother
                              •   teacher
                              •   school administrator

                                                   MASL p 5
                  Times of Day

• Morning
• Afternoon
• Night/evening
Classroom Exercise
3. What time of day is it? Is it afternoon,
   evening, or morning in each illustration?
Pics from MASL p 7




                                         MASL p 7
Vocabulary   More Greetings

• Good+afternoon
• Good+evening/night
• Good+morning
          Let‟s Practice
GOOD-MORNING, GOOD-AFTERNOON,
         GOOD-NIGHT

Which would you use?
             Eyes on ASL #1
                                            Eye contact DVD
Eye contact is very important in ASL.
What is the purpose of eye contact?
  It shows respect.
Not having eye contact shows:
  boredom or disinterest.
Keeping eye contact shows –
  that you are participating.
Eye contact shows that you are listening.

                                                 MASL p 8
            Eyes on ASL #1
                                          Eye contact DVD

Eye contact shows that you are listening.
Breaking eye-contact can be compared to -
   Covering your ears to block out what someone is
   saying to you.
If you break eye contact you disrupt the
   communication.
Maintaining eye contact does not mean staring. If
   you must look away, make the hold on sign first.


                                               MASL p 8
       Eyes on ASL #1

 VOCABULARY
• EYE CONTACT
• HOLD ON
• LOOK AT ME
• PAY ATTENTION
• NO EYE CONTACT



                        MASL p 7
           Eyes on ASL #1
                                       Eye contact DVD
Watch the DVD clip about eye contact
What was the error in the example…?
• For Marc (blue shirt)
• For Sean
• For Kelly

• Why was Kris frustrated?
• What did she do to fix the situation?
                                            MASL p 7
Master ASL

   UNIT ONE
Lesson 2 pp 9-10
                         Lesson Two
Outcomes:
   Asks for and provides first and last name in a culturally appropriate manner.
   Can fingerspell first and last name clearly
   Uses the closing signal at the end of sentences
   Responds to questions in a complete sentence
   Can fingerspell the ASL alphabet


•   Names
•   Fingerspelling
•   Closing signals

•   Eyes on ASL 2
    *Closing Signals

•   Eyes on ASL3
    *One word answers.



                                                                        MASL pp 9-10
   Fingerspelling Your Name
1. To fingerspell your name correctly, you
   need to hold your dominate hand steady
   about shoulder height.
2. And you need to have your palm facing
   outward for all letters except for G and H.
3. Also the letters P and Q the palm drops
   down slightly.
   (you can also drop the palm down for the
   letter Y if it is the last letter of the name)
     Adding Your Last Name
• In Deaf culture it is expected to always give your
  first and last name.
• It is important to show that you are moving on to
  the next name so that it doesn‟t look like one
  very long name.
• To do this you simply need to PAUSE for a
  second between the first and last name.

It is not necessary to move your hand over or to
    sign ‘final’ before your start your last name.
       Fingerspelling Hints
• If you find that you are „bouncy‟ with your
  fingerspelling, try holding your arm steady
  with your non-dominate hand.
• This will also help you to keep your palm
  out for all letters (except for G and H)
Practice Fingerspelling your first and last
  name with a slight pause between the 2
  names.
  I NAME V-I-R-G-I-N-I-A W-E-L-D-Y I
      Fingerspelling Names –
           Let‟s practice
1. Pick three friends
2. Fingerspell both their first and last name.

Remember to pause between the 1st and
   last name.
Hold your hand steady and at shoulder
   height.
What is the sign for NAME?
    More Practice with Names
NAME
Practice signing the following.
(HINT: just pick someone in the room to point
  to for HE and SHE)
SHE NAME N-I-N-A…P-A-T-E-L SHE nod
ME NAME C-H-E-R-Y-L….M-A-D-D-O-X
 ME nod
HE NAME T-Y-L-E-R...B-R-O-P-H-Y HE nod
                    ASL Up Close
Deixis
Pointing is a logical feature of a signed, non spoken language.
It is not considered rude or impolite.
If a person or object is not visible, point to an empty space and
     continue signing.
Using the index finger to point is called deixis.

Conjugating Verbs: To Be
I, I am, me,
You, you are,
He, she, it is,
We, we are, us
You, you are (plural)
They, they are,



                                                                    MASL p 6
                 Deixis
Let‟s practice together…
I, I am, me,
You, you are,
He, she, it is,
We, we are, us
You, you are (plural)
They, they are,
                 Deixis
What‟s the difference?
You, you are,
He, she, it is,

You, you are (plural)
They, they are,
                         Deixis
What‟s the difference?....Eye-Gaze
You, you are,
I point to you and keep my eye-gaze directed to you (the
   person I‟m speaking to) for the entire comment.
I look at you and point to you.




He, she, it is,
I look over briefly to he/she to be sure I‟m pointing to the
    right person, but then I keep my eye-gaze on you (the
    person I‟m speaking to) for the entire comment.
I look to you but point to him.
      Using Deixis with Names
In English we say I am…. or My name is….
BUT
In ASL we use Deixis.
Point to person, sign NAME, fingerspell the name, then
   point back to the person.
SHE NAME N-I-N-A…P-A-T-E-L SHE nod
ME NAME C-H-E-R-Y-L….M-A-D-D-O-X ME nod
HE NAME T-Y-L-E-R...B-R-O-P-H-Y HE nod
This are examples of using Deixis.
Homework Exercise 1

A. Teach a friend or family member how to
   greet you in sign language

B. Practice fingerspelling your first and last
   name until you feel comfortable spelling
   quickly and clearly.

              DVD – Fingerspelling Names


                                            MASL p 8
                Review
• What is the difference between formal and
  informal greetings?
• Why is maintaining eye contact so
  important?
• Where and how do you hold your hand
  when fingerspelling?
• How do indicate that you are adding your
  last name?
• What is Deixis?
              3rd period
• Something unique
                  HOME WORK
1. Do Homework Exercise 1-A at bottom of p8.
    (2 slides back from here; also in MASL Unit 1 upload on website)
2. Have parent write a note stating you have
   done Exercise 1-A. (the note needs to tell what you did,
    a paper with only a signature will not suffice)
            We will watch DVD part in class


For this class you will need:
   1.   a new 1½” (or larger) in view cover binder,
   2.   dividers (at least 7)
   3.   page protector sheets (one package to start with and you
        can add through the year)
                Clean up
• Please return your name cards to the
  center table.
• Please put the books back on the cart.
   Asl 1
Tuesday, Sept.13, 2011
Entry Procedures
               Backpacks
    In the middle of the room




 ASL binder and pen/pencil with you at your seat.
Entry Procedures
             NAME CARD
 1. Please pick up your name card at the
    start of class.

   BE SURE TO GIVE BACK THE CARD
         BEFORE YOU LEAVE.

       This card needs to stay in the room.
    Entry Procedures



Thank you for spitting
   out your gum.
First Work                     quiet time
• Backpacks in center of room.
• Turn homework note into basket for your class.
  – Make sure YOUR NAME is on it too.
• Greet your neighbor and ask how he/she is
  doing? (don‟t know well)           (friend)
          HOW ARE YOU?, or WHAT‟S UP?
• Now greet your neighbor on the other side and
  ask how he/she is doing?
• Finished?
• Practice Fingerspelling your first and last name
  3 times.
  DAY 8
                            Agenda
   •   First work
   •   Roll call
   •   MASL Lesson 1 quick review
   •   NMS for positive statements
   •   MASL Lesson 2 cont.
       – Giving Names
       – Closing signals
   •   NMS for Wh-word questions
   •   Review
   •   ASL Pre-test
   •   ASL Class website - review
L.T. Develop sight recognition of first name FSP;
        Learn simple greeting; learn colors;
Good Morning

 Today Tuesday
  Sept 13, 2011
               QUIET TIME
•   Watch every name that is fingerspelled.
•   Keep watching even after your name has been
    called.
    This is how you will learn to READ
               fingerspelling.

•   Respond with HERE when your name is spelled.
•   Respond with HERE (negative) when a name is
    spelled for an absent student.

            Keeping eye contact shows –
                that you are participating.
      Review from yesterday
 (quietly answer these to yourself)
• What is the difference between formal and
  informal greetings?
• Why is maintaining eye contact so
  important?
• Where and how do you hold your hand
  when fingerspelling?
• How do indicate that you are adding your
  last name?
• What is Deixis?
           Formal or Informal
FORMAL                      INFORMAL
Signing to adults, people   Signing to friends and peers
  you don‟t know well.

                            Use:
Use:
                            HI
HELLO
                            WHAT‟S-UP?
HOW-ARE-YOU?
                    ASL Up Close
Deixis
Pointing is a logical feature of a signed, non spoken language.
It is not considered rude or impolite.
If a person or object is not visible, point to an empty space and
   continue signing.

Using the index finger to point is called deixis.

                                                  Conjugating Verbs: To Be
                                                  I, I am, me,
                                                  You, you are,
                                                  He, she, it is,
                                                  We, we are, us
                                                  You, you are (plural)
                                                  They, they are,
                                                                    MASL p 6
             Eyes on ASL #1
                                        Eye contact DVD
Eye contact is very important in ASL.


What is the purpose of eye contact?
  It shows respect.
Not having eye contact shows:
  boredom or disinterest.
Keeping eye contact shows –
  that you are participating.
Eye contact shows that you are listening.
Master ASL

   UNIT ONE
Lesson 2 pp 9-10
                      Lesson Two                      cont.

Outcomes:
   Asks for and provides first and last name in a culturally appropriate manner.
   Can fingerspell first and last name clearly
   Uses the closing signal at the end of sentences
   Responds to questions in a complete sentence
   Can fingerspell the ASL alphabet


•   Names
•   Fingerspelling
•   Closing signals

•   Eyes on ASL 2
    *Closing Signals

•   Eyes on ASL3
    *One word answers.



                                                                        MASL pp 9-10
           Non-Manual Signals
                  (facial grammar)
• In English, vocal intonation helps to clarify if you
  are asking a question or saying a statement.
• In ASL, these grammatical clues are given on
  the face.
• We will be learning special „facial grammar‟ for
  ASL.
• This facial grammar or special facial expressions
  is referred to as
     Non-Manual Signals (NMS)
 NMS for Positive Statements
• Positive statements are the most common in any
  language.
• They simply mean basic sentences that are not negative
  and are not questions.
• In ASL positive statements have a neutral position for
  the eyebrows and are ended with a slight nod.
• This nod along with Deixis at the end of the sentence is
  the closing signal.
• It is like the period at the end of a written sentence.
• Using a closing signal allows somebody else to begin
  signing without interrupting you.

Deixis means pointing.
   It can be used to refer back to the subject at the
           end of the sentence for a closing signal.
                    NAMES
Practice signing this positive statement.

   I NAME K-E-L-L-Y B-O-Y-D I (nod)
                 My name is Kelly Boyd.
Pay special attention to “nod” at the end of the sentence.



Now repeat the same sentence using your own
 name.



                                                        MASL p 9
Classroom Exercise

Practice signing each positive statement in ASL.
Example: SHE NAME N-I-N-A (pause) P-A-T-E-L SHE

1.    She is Nina Patel.                6. My name is………
2.    My name is Cheryl                 7. She is Erin White .
      Maddox .
                                        8. His name is Jeff Peck.
3.    He’s Tyler Brophy.
                                        9. Her name is Lisa Taylor.
4.    I’m Nikki Smith, he’s
      Aaron Jones.                      10. Her name is……
5.    He’s Luis Cortez.

     Don‟t forget to use your closing signal.



                                                               MASL p 10
         How did you do?
SHE NAME N-I-N-A…P-A-T-E-L SHE nod
ME NAME C-H-E-R-Y-L….M-A-D-D-O-X
 ME nod
HE NAME T-Y-L-E-R...B-R-O-P-H-Y HE nod
                          Why was deixis   not used here?


ME NAME N-I-K-K-I…S-M-I-T-H, HE NAME
 A-A-R-O-N…J-O-N-E-S HE nod
HE NAME L-U-I-S…C-O-R-T-E-Z HE nod
           Because deixis with a nod makes a closing signal.
           The sentence was not finished- no closing signal needed
 Deaf Culture Minute
Introductions in the Deaf community tend to
  include both first and last names.
Often, new acquaintances know relatives or
  have friends in common.
Many Deaf people have stories about
  meeting a friend of a friend in other cities,
  states, and even countries!
How is this similar or different from our own
  community?

                                            MASL p10
                WH Face
• The WH Face is used when asking a Wh-word
  question.
• Common Wh-words are: Who, What, Where,
  When & Why.
• Look at your teacher to see how to make the
  WH Face.
               Now you try it.
              Eyebrows down
                    NAMES
Practice with me signing this Wh-word question.


            YOU NAME WHAT YOU?
                   What is your name?
Pay special attention to make the “What” face that your
  teacher has shown you.


Partners:
Practice asking this question to your partner. Take turns.




                                                             MASL p 9
    NMS for WH Questions
                            NMS stands for Non-Manual Signals

1. Eyebrows down
2. Slight head tilt forward
3. Hold last sign and eye-contact




          To non-signers it may look like an angry face.
  Classroom Exercise
partners

   1.      Introduce yourself to your classmate,
           fingerspelling your complete name carefully.
   Example:

   HI, I NAME (first name pause last name) I (nod)
       YOU NAME WHAT YOU? (eyebrows down)

   2. Now switch and the other person start off
      the conversation.


                                                      MASL p 10
            I Want to Know…

Why do I have to point twice?
• Pointing back to yourself or the person you‟re talking
  about shows completion of a train of thought
• This allows somebody else to begin signing without
  interrupting you.
• Using deixis at the end of a sentence is called closing
  signal.

Remember to use closing signals when:
• Making a statement or comment about yourself or
  somebody else.
• Asking a question.

                                                     MASL p 9
                   Review
• What to the letters NMS stand for?

• What does it mean?

• What is the culturally appropriate manner to give
  your name in ASL?

• Why do Deaf people tend to give both first and
  last name when meeting others?

• What are “closing signals” and why do you have
  to use them at the end of a sentence?
Fingerspelling Hints
                  Review points from Bravo #6
Fingerspelling is used for:
• A person‟s _______
• The _______ of a place
• Things without an _________

Rules for fingerspelling
• Fingerspell ________ - avoid extra movement
• Keep the movement going – don‟t _______after each
  letter
• Keep hand steady – no ________
• When you are reading the word, ___________ the
  word as you do when reading a book
• When fingerspelling, look __________ to whom you
  are signing rather than looking at your hand.
Fingerspelling Hints
                   Review points from Bravo #6
Fingerspelling is used for:
• A person‟s name
• The name of a place
• Things without an established sign

Rules for fingerspelling
• Fingerspell smoothly - avoid extra movement
• Keep the movement going – don‟t stop after each
  letter
• Keep hand steady – no bouncing
• When you are reading the word, sound out the word
  as you do when reading a book
• When fingerspelling, look at the person to whom you
  are signing rather than looking at your hand.
Transition
              ASL Pre-test
Purpose: School-wide start of course assessment.

This test is only to show me, the teacher, what
  students in my class know and don‟t know about
  the cultural information we will be covering in
  this course.
There will be no grade attached to this test or
  entered into the grade book.
This is solely for the purpose of assessing prior
  knwledge.
            ASL Pre-test
Directions:
NO NAME on your paper.
Answer the questions to the best of your
 ability with either TRUE or FALSE
Turn in when completed.
        ASL Class website
Quick review:
• How many of you have already been to
  the ASL Class Website?
Demo for class again
• Easy way to get there the first time:
• PHS web-site, students, classroom
  websites, teacher name.
• Then just bookmark the page for quick
  access.
           ASL Class website
Absent:
If you are absent I expect you to go to the ASL
   Class website BEFORE returning to class and
   review the day‟s PowerPoint lesson. It is located
   in the Documents section.
Please do not come up to me during class and say
   “What did I miss?”
My answer will always be “Everything you read on
   the lesson when you looked it up.”
                Clean up
• Please return your name cards to the
  center table.
• Please put the books back on the cart.
    Asl 1
Wednesday, Sept.14, 2011
                          Agenda
DAY 9
                       Cultural Lesson


 • Deaf Culture Note: Interacting with Deaf
   People
 • Formal Assignment
 • Sub expectations
 • Plans for Friday and Monday
 • Questions?

L.T. Understands behavioral expectations within the Deaf community
regarding attention-getting strategies and use of voice.
Master ASL

  UNIT ONE
 Lesson 4 p 14
             Lesson Four
Outcomes:
 Understands behavioral expectations within
 the Deaf community regarding attention-
 getting strategies and use of voice.


  • Interacting with Deaf people




                                       MASL pp14
                 Deaf Culture
 MASL DVD      Interacting with Deaf People

 As a student of American Sign Language, learn how to
   interact with the Deaf Community by becoming familiar
   with Deaf culture behaviors that differ from the way you
   are used to doing things as a hearing person.
 One cultural behavior you‟ve already learned is that it is
   considered rude to break eye contact when signing with
   Deaf people, which for most hearing people is often
   difficult.
 Think of how often you turn your head in the direction of
   sound and you can realize it will be a challenge to break
   this habit!


Lesson 4                                               MASL p14
            Deaf Culture
1.It is important to become familiar with Deaf
  community norms that differ from
  ____________as a hearing person.
2.It is considered rude to
  _____________when signing with Deaf
  people.
3.What have we learned earlier this week to
  do if you need to break eye contact?
                 Deaf Culture
 GETTING ATTENTION
 Getting attention of a Deaf person is different from the way
   you interact with hearing people.
 Many hearing people tend to work harder than necessary
   to gain a Deaf individual‟s attention by wildly swinging
   their hands in the air, stomping on the floor, or flashing
   overhead lights in a strobe pattern.
 None of this is necessary!
 Gently tapping the Deaf person‟s shoulder or slightly
   waving a hand in his or her direction until you are noticed
   is the most effective and considerate way to get
   attention.

Lesson 4                                                MASL p14
            Deaf Culture
4.Some wrong ways to try to get a Deaf
  person‟s attention are:
  a.
  b.
  c.
5.Two culturally appropriate ways to get a
  Deaf person‟s attention are:
  a.
  b.
                     Deaf Culture
 VOICES
 Using your voice to talk to another hearing individual instead of signing
     when a Deaf person is near is considered rude.
 Develop the habit of always signing when you know a Deaf person is in
     the same room with you.
 This way everybody has equal access to what is being communicated.
 If you must speak to a hearing person who doesn‟t know ASL, then tell
     your Deaf friend or teacher that first, before speaking.
 You may be surprised to learn that most Deaf people know when
     hearing people talking, even if someone is whispering. How so?
 Remember, Deaf people rely on their vision far more than hearing
     people do!
 Your teacher may remind you to turn off voice if you‟re being rude in
     class.



Lesson 4                                                            MASL p14
              Deaf Culture
6.If you know sign and then only use your voice
  even though a Deaf person is present, you will
  thought of as being _____.
7.Signing when a Deaf person is in the room
  allows for _________ to what is being
  communicated.
8.How is it that Deaf people often know if you are
  talking even if you are whispering?
9.ASL class is the best place to practice Deaf
  culture, so if your teacher has to continually
  remind you to turn off your voice during quiet
  times then you are being ______ .
            Culture Assignment
•   Title “Interacting with Deaf People”
•   Name date and period on paper.
•   Questions and answers must be typed.
•   Questions must be separate from answers.
•   Answers must be in your own words.
•   Questions 1-9 from the previous slides.
We have already discussed the answers in class so
 this should be easy for you.
     Incomplete or substandard work will not be accepted.

                                          Estimated time = 20 min
   Sub on Friday and Monday
• I will be absent this Friday and next
  Monday.
• Behavior expectations with sub
• Lesson plan for Friday and Monday
                Clean up
• Please return your name cards to the
  center table.
• Please put the books back on the cart.
   Asl 1
Thursday, Sept. 15, 2011
Entry Procedures
               Backpacks
    In the middle of the room




 ASL binder and pen/pencil with you at your seat.
Entry Procedures
             NAME CARD
 1. Please pick up your name card at the
    start of class.

   BE SURE TO GIVE BACK THE CARD
         BEFORE YOU LEAVE.

       This card needs to stay in the room.
    Entry Procedures



Thank you for spitting
   out your gum.
DAY 10                            Agenda
   • FW
   • Roll call
   • MASL Lessons 3
       – Asking names
       – Making Introductions to others
   • MASL Lesson 2 finish
       – No one word answers
   • Fingerspelling practice web site
   • Culture assignment reminder
   • Homework
            L.T. Can introduce oneself and mention hearing status
     Can introduce two individuals by name and mention hearing status
Demonstrate a variety of responses about one‟s state of being (from lesson one)
    Good Morning

Today Thursday, Sept. 15, 2011
                       Review
• What to the letters NMS stand for?

• What does it mean?

• What is the culturally appropriate manner to give your
  name in ASL?

• Why do Deaf people tend to give both first and last name
  when meeting others?

• What are “closing signals” and why do you have to use
  them at the end of a sentence?
• What are the NMS for a Wh word question?
           Non-Manual Signals
                  (facial grammar)
• In English, vocal intonation helps to clarify if you
  are asking a question or saying a statement.
• In ASL, these grammatical clues are given on
  the face.
• We will be learning special „facial grammar‟ for
  ASL.
• This facial grammar or special facial expressions
  is referred to as
     Non-Manual Signals (NMS)
 Deaf Culture Minute
Introductions in the Deaf community tend to
  include both first and last names.
Often, new acquaintances know relatives or
  have friends in common.
Many Deaf people have stories about
  meeting a friend of a friend in other cities,
  states, and even countries!
How is this similar or different from our own
  community?

                                            MASL p10
 NMS for Positive Statements
• Positive statements are the most common in any
  language.
• They simply mean basic sentences that are not negative
  and are not questions.
• In ASL positive statements have a neutral position for
  the eyebrows and are ended with a slight nod.
• This nod along with Deixis at the end of the sentence is
  the closing signal.
• It is like the period at the end of a written sentence.
• Using a closing signal allows somebody else to begin
  signing without interrupting you.

Deixis means pointing.
   It can be used to refer back to the subject at the
           end of the sentence for a closing signal.
    NMS for WH Questions
                            NMS stands for Non-Manual Signals

1. Eyebrows down
2. Slight head tilt forward
3. Hold last sign and eye-contact




          To non-signers it may look like an angry face.
Master ASL

   UNIT ONE
Lesson 3 pp 9-10
               Lesson Three
Outcomes:
  Can introduce oneself and mention hearing status
  Can introduce two individuals by name and mention
  hearing status
Demonstrate a variety of responses about one‟s state
  of being (from lesson one)

   • Introducing oneself
   • Hearing status
   • Making introductions


                                             MASL pp11-13
VOCABULARY                 Introductions

•   Deaf              •   To meet
•   Friend            •   My
•   Hard of hearing   •   Nice
•   Hearing           •   Nice to meet you
•   To introduce      •   To want
    Practice Sentences
I want to introduce my friend.
I WANT INTRODUCE MY FRIEND SHE (nod)
It‟s nice to meet you.
NICE-TO-MEET YOU (handshake)
He‟s Deaf
HE DEAF HE (nod)
She’s hearing.
SHE HEARING SHE (nod)
He‟s Hard of Hearing
HE H.H. HE (nod)
              Accent Steps

When fingerspelling your complete name,
 you don‟t need to sign “last name”
 between the first and last name.
Just pause briefly and continue on!


           FYI         Use deixis
           instead of the sign my when
           signing “My name is…”



                                         MASL p12
Classroom Exercise
1.Classroom introductions. Introduce two classmates to each other.
                                Groups of 3
EXAMPLE:
      I WANT INTRODUCE MY FRIEND.
      SHE NAME L-I-S-A…J-O-N-E-S (nod)
      SHE HEARING SHE (nod)
Turn to the other person
          HE NAME J-O-H-N…S-M-I-T-H (nod)
          HE HEARING HE (nod)
Rotate so that each person in your group gets to introduce the other two.
        Use the REAL NAMES and hearing status of your
                         classmates.


                                                                    MASL p 11
                   Introductions
I WANT INTRODUCE MY FRIEND                SHE NAME L-I-S-A SHE
I want to introduce my friend.            Her name is Lisa.

 Introductions in the Deaf community vary depending on whether
     one is hearing or Deaf.
 If you are Deaf, background information like where one goes or
     went to school is exchanged.
 If you are hearing, then you will be introduced as a hearing person
     who knows or is learning American Sign Language.
 This information allows everybody to understand where he or she
     is coming from and reduces cultural misunderstandings.
 It is culturally appropriate to shake hands when meeting new
     people or greeting friends.
 Like many hearing people, Deaf friends often hug each other when
     saying hello and good-bye.




                                                             MASL p 11
Introducing a Deaf person to meet others…
To a Hearing person                 To another Deaf person
State: Hearing                      State Deaf or Hard of Hearing
  This information allows everybody to understand where he or she is
  coming from and reduces cultural misunderstandings.


Share how know ASL                  Share background info
   Learning Sign                      H.S. school or state school
(or Deaf parents, Interpreter,        attended & year grad.
   teacher, etc)
            This shows your connection to the community.


Greet with Handshake                Greet with Handshakes or Hugs
           Handshakes are always expected and
           hugs are common among friends or friends of friends.
Classroom Exercise
Introductions
Sign the following dialogues in pairs.


Dialogue 1

•    Student A Hi! How are               Be sure to sign this ‘deaf style’
     you?                                    •closing signals
                                             •head nod
•    Student B I’m fine. How
     are you?
                                                 Don‟t forget to shake hands
•    Student A I’m good. I’m
     Eric Morse. I’m Deaf

•    Student B Hi, my name is
     Chris Sarn. I’m hearing

                                                                      MASL p 11
“American Sign Language
    is of great value to the
    deaf,
 but could also be of great
    benefit to the hearing
    as well…
 It is superior to spoken
    language in its beauty
    and emotional
    expressiveness.
 It brings kindred souls
    into a much more close
    and conscious
    communion
 than mere speech can
    possibly do.”

    –Thomas H. Gallaudet 1848
                           For more info on Gallaudet go to this site:
                        http://www.deafis.org/history/who/gallaudet.php
          Eyes on ASL #2
                                   MASL DVD


There is no such thing as a one-word
 answer or reply in American Sign
 Language.

When responding to a question or
 statement, one-word replies are
 incomplete.
                 Lesson One pp4-8
                         finish up red part

Outcomes:
  Can exchange and respond to formal and informal greetings
  Demonstrate a variety of responses about one‟s state of being
  Uses deixis with eye gaze                  Postpone to
                                              Introductions lesson 3
• Greetings
• Formal vs informal
• Eyes on ASL #1
   *Eye contact
• Deixis w eye gaze

Homework       Ex 1 pg 8
Objective: Can explain how to introduce oneself in the culturally
  appropriate manner.
Vocabulary How are you? & What’s up?
•   BUSY
•   CONFUSED
•   FINE
•   GOOD/WELL
•   HAPPY
•   NOTHING/NOTMUCH
•   SAME OLD/THE USUAL
•   SLEEPY
•   SO-SO
•   TIRED

                                MASL p 5
    Complete Sentence Answers
There is no such thing as a one-word answer or reply in American Sign
  Language.
When responding to “how are you?” you need to sign a complete
  sentence.

Let‟s practice together:
•   I FINE I
•   I BUSY I
•   I TIRED I
•   I CONFUSED I


When responding to a question or statement, one-word replies are incomplete.
Classroom Exercise

How is everybody. Sign each sentence in ASL
  following the example.
    example:   I SO-SO I (I‟m not too bad.)
•   They are busy.
•   She is happy.
•   I am confused
•   We are happy.
•   She‟s good.           FYI   Don‟t forget to point back to the person

•   I‟m sleepy.
•   It‟s so-so
•   He‟s fine


                                                                MASL p 6
Vocabulary How are you? & What’s up?
•   BUSY
•   CONFUSED
•   FINE
•   GOOD/WELL
•   HAPPY
•   NOTHING/NOTMUCH
•   SAME OLD/THE USUAL
•   SLEEPY
•   SO-SO
•   TIRED

                                MASL p 5
Classroom Exercise
1.   Hello! Exchange greetings with a classmate and
     ask how he or she is doing.

     Vocabulary:
     HELLO, HI, WHAT‟S UP? HOW-ARE-YOU?
     BUSY, CONFUSED, FINE, GOOD/WELL, HAPPY,
     NOTHING/NOT MUCH, SAME OLD/THE USUAL, SLEEPY,
            SO-SO, TIRED


2. How are you? Ask a partner to tell you how
   another classmate is doing?
HINT: you may have to stop and ask the other
   classmate how they are to be able to answer the
   your partner‟s question.


                                                     MASL p 5
Classroom Exercise
Introductions
Sign the following dialogues in pairs or groups of three as needed.
Using Deixis to sign “this.”
                                      Dialogue 2

                                      • Student A What’s up? How
                                        are you?

                                      • Student B I’m busy. How are
                                        you?

                                      • Student A Same old. I want
                                        you to meet my friend Cara.

                                      • Student B Hi Cara. How are
                                        you?

                                      • Student C I’m fine. Nice to
                                        meet you.
                                                                      MASL p 11
                        Review
What is Deixis?

Why are there no „one-word‟ answers in ASL?

When making introductions, why is it important to state
 Hearing or Deaf early on?

Why do Deaf meeting Deaf often ask about what school
 they are from?

Is it culturally appropriate to shake hands, give a hug, or no
   physical touching when meeting a Deaf person?
               HOMEWORK reminder
“Interacting with Deaf people” Culture assignment

Due next Tuesday
Must be typed
Needs to have complete heading and Title on front page.
Must have both questions and answers (separate).
Be sure to check your spelling and punctuation.
                             Sub-standard work will be rejected.

This assignment will be included in your Portfolio.
            FSP Website
I want to show you a cool way to develop
  your fingerspelling reading skills.

         http://asl.ms/()/names.htm
    Sub tomorrow and Monday
• Your sub tomorrow will be Ms. Hooks.
• Ms. Hooks works here full time and I see her daily.
• Many of you know her and she knows many of you too.
• Sub expectations
•     Sit in you assigned seats
•     Follow all ASL class rules (Ms. Hooks has covered
  my classes before and is aware of my expectations)
•     Follow all her directions.

     • And I hope you ENJOY the movie! – I liked it.
                Clean up
• Please return your name cards to the
  center table.
• Please put the books back on the cart.
 Asl 1
Friday, Sept 16, 2011
DAY 11                      Agenda




L.T. Cont. Develop sight recognition of first name FSP;
        Camera exposure;

				
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