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DIPLOMAT IN NORWAY

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					                         DIPLOMAT IN NORWAY

        Table of contents

1.  FOREIGN GOVERNMENT PERSONNEL AND AGENCIES IN NORWAY........... 5
    1.1 Diplomatic agents.................................................................................................. 5
    1.2 Members of the administrative and technical staff of the mission................... 5
    1.3 Members of the service staff of the mission....................................................... 5
    1.4 Private servants ..................................................................................................... 6
    1.5 Diplomatic immunity............................................................................................. 6
    1.6 Inviolability............................................................................................................. 6
    1.7 Persons enjoying diplomatic immunity............................................................... 6
    1.8 Inviolability and immunity under the Vienna Convention on Consular
    Relations........................................................................................................................... 7
    1.9 Family members.................................................................................................... 7
2.  VISA REQUIREMENTS................................................................................................. 8
3.  ARRIVAL.......................................................................................................................... 8
    3.1 Heads of mission – resident and non-resident; chargés d'affaires en pied...... 8
    3.2 Chargés d'affaires ad interim ............................................................................... 8
    3.3 Military attachés .................................................................................................... 9
    3.4 Members of the staff of the mission .................................................................... 9
4.  IDENTITY CARDS ......................................................................................................... 9
5.  WORK PERMITS FOR FAMILY MEMBERS OF MEMBERS OF MISSIONS OR
CONSULAR POSTS ............................................................................................................... 10
    5.1 General information ............................................................................................ 10
    5.2 Nationals of EEA and/or EFTA member countries......................................... 11
    5.3 Nationals of non-EEA and/or non-EFTA countries ......................................... 11
6.  RESIDENCE AND WORK PERMITS FOR MEMBERS OF THE SERVICE STAFF
OF THE MISSION ................................................................................................................. 12
    6.1 Members of the service staff of the mission..................................................... 12
    6.2 Family members of members of the service staff of the mission................... 12
7.  PRIVATE SERVANTS .................................................................................................. 12
    7.1 Recruitment in Norway....................................................................................... 12
    7.2 Recruitment from outside Norway .................................................................... 13
    7.3 Employment contracts ........................................................................................ 13
    7.4 Visa and residence permit .................................................................................. 13
    7.5 Social security for private servants .................................................................... 14
    7.6 Family members.................................................................................................. 14
8.  HEALTH AND SOCIAL SECURITY........................................................................... 15
    8.1 General information ............................................................................................ 15
                                                                                                                                       2

      8.2 Who is covered by the provisions of the national insurance scheme? .......... 15
9.    TAXATION AND CUSTOMS DUTIES ...................................................................... 16
      9.1 Tax on capital and income .................................................................................. 16
      9.2 Real estate taxes .................................................................................................. 17
      9.3 Customs duties .................................................................................................... 18
10.   MOTOR VEHICLES – CUSTOMS DUTIES AND OTHER DUES ......................... 19
      10.1    Import and purchase of motor vehicles, including motorcycles................ 19
      10.2    Sale of motor vehicles..................................................................................... 19
      10.3    Taxes on motor vehicles ................................................................................ 20
11.   PETROL ......................................................................................................................... 21
12.   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES......................................................................................... 22
      12.1    General information........................................................................................ 22
      12.2    Import of alcoholic beverages........................................................................ 22
      12.3    Procedure for importing duty-free alcoholic beverages ............................. 22
      12.4    Serving alcoholic beverages outside diplomatic premises ......................... 23
13.   VALUE ADDED TAX ................................................................................................... 23
      13.1    Goods and services for state-owned properties ........................................... 23
      13.2    Goods and services for official use in the chanceries of diplomatic
      missions and career consular posts, irrespective of ownership............................... 24
      13.3    Goods and services for the personal use of diplomatic agents and career
      consular officers............................................................................................................ 25
      13.4    Application procedure .................................................................................... 25
      13.5    VAT relief in connection with new chancery buildings and new official
      residences...................................................................................................................... 26
14.   DRIVING LICENCES................................................................................................... 26
15.   CD LICENCE PLATES ................................................................................................ 26
      15.1    Documents required for applying for CD licence plates ............................ 26
      15.2    Disposal or return of CD licence plates when leaving Norway.................. 27
16.   TOLL CHARGES (“bomring”) .................................................................................... 27
17.   PARKING AND PARKING FEES ............................................................................... 27
18.   TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS............................................................................................... 28
19.   TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS................................................................................................ 28
20.   DRIVING AND ALCOHOL.......................................................................................... 29
21.   SMOKING IN INDOOR PUBLIC PLACES ............................................................... 29
22.   TELECOMMUNICATIONS ........................................................................................ 29
      22.1    The Norwegian broadcasting fee .................................................................. 29
      22.2    Satellite dishes................................................................................................. 30
      22.3    Official communication by radio transmitters.............................................. 30
23.   ACQUISITION OF REAL ESTATE ............................................................................ 31
24.   IMPORT/EXPORT OF ANIMALS, PLANTS, AND PETS....................................... 31
      24.1    General information........................................................................................ 31
      24.2    Pets ................................................................................................................... 32
      24.3    Restrictions ...................................................................................................... 32
25.   GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE RIGHT TO DEMONSTRATE.................... 32
26.   FIREARMS .................................................................................................................... 33
                                                                                                                                       3

27.   OSLO AIRPORT (GARDERMOEN)........................................................................... 34
      27.1     Admission cards for restricted areas ............................................................ 34
      27.2     How to get to the short-term CD parking spaces at Oslo Airport from the
      arrivals hall on foot ....................................................................................................... 34
      27.3     How to get to the VIP area and the drop-off parking space at Oslo Airport
      from Oslo ....................................................................................................................... 34
      27.4     VIP parking area for CD vehicles at Oslo Airport ....................................... 36
28.   EMBASSY SECURITY ................................................................................................. 36
29.   THE DIPLOMATIC BAG............................................................................................. 37
30.   FLAG AND EMBLEM OF THE SENDING STATE................................................. 37
31.   FLAG-FLYING DAYS IN NORWAY ........................................................................... 38
32.   SCHOOLS...................................................................................................................... 38
      32.1     Norwegian public schools .............................................................................. 38
      32.2     Schools where the main language of instruction is other than Norwegian39
33.   HUNTING AND FISHING .......................................................................................... 39
34.   SNOW REMOVAL IN WINTERTIME ....................................................................... 40
35.   THE A.T.A. CARNET ................................................................................................... 40
36.   EXPORT OF ANTIQUES AND OTHER CULTURAL GOODS FROM NORWAY 41
37.   DEPARTURE................................................................................................................. 41
                                                                                            4

FOREWORD

Welcome to Norway!

The purpose of this booklet is to provide information to diplomats and their families on
how the various privileges and immunities under the Vienna Conventions are
implemented in Norway, and to offer information and advice on related procedures and
regulations, as well as practical matters.

The Section for Diplomatic Relations will gladly assist you in any way it can in relation
to the various matters covered in this booklet.

Please note that this booklet is provided for information purposes only, and neither
constitutes an authoritative legal statement of any kind nor commits or binds the
Norwegian government in any way.

We hope you will find the information both helpful and useful.


Chief of Protocol
Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Oslo, June 2006
                                                                                            5


1.    FOREIGN GOVERNMENT PERSONNEL AND AGENCIES IN NORWAY


The status of foreign government agencies and personnel, consular officers and
representatives of international organisations in Norway is governed by the provisions
of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations (1961), the Vienna Convention on
Consular Relations (1963) and bilateral agreements.

1.1   Diplomatic agents
A diplomatic agent is the head of mission or a member of the diplomatic staff of the
mission. Diplomatic agents should in principle be of the nationality of the sending State,
in accordance with Article 8 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs also expects a diplomatic agent to be in possession of a
valid diplomatic passport, to hold a recognised diplomatic rank, and to perform
diplomatic functions on a full-time basis.

The holders of the following ranks are considered to be members of the diplomatic staff
as defined in Article 1(d) of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations:
Ambassador (Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary), Apostolic Nuncio, Minister
Plenipotentiary, Minister, Minister Counsellor, Counsellor, First Counsellor, Second
Counsellor, First Secretary, Second Secretary, Third Secretary, and Attaché. Variations
on these titles are accepted, for example “Defence Attaché” (or “Military”, “Naval”, or
“Air Attaché”), and “Commercial Counsellor”.

A member of the staff of the mission who does not hold one of the diplomatic ranks
listed above will be classified as a member of the administrative and technical staff of
the mission.

1.2   Members of the administrative and technical staff of the mission
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs expects members of the administrative and technical
staff of the mission to perform full-time duties with the diplomatic mission and to be in
possession of an official (service) passport issued by the sending State.

1.3   Members of the service staff of the mission
Article 1(g) of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations defines members of the
service staff as those who are in the domestic service of the mission. Immunity in
respect of acts performed in the course of their duties extends only to members of the
service staff of the mission who are not Norwegian nationals or permanently resident in
Norway.

Family members of members of the service staff of the mission are not covered by the
provisions of the Vienna Conventions.
                                                                                            6

1.4   Private servants
Members of the staff of the mission who employ private servants have employer
responsibility for them. Pursuant to Article 37, paragraph 4, of the Vienna Convention
on Diplomatic Relations, private servants do not in general enjoy privileges and
immunities.

Family members of private servants are not covered by the provisions of the Vienna
Conventions.

1.5   Diplomatic immunity
The term “diplomatic immunity” covers both inviolability and immunity from
jurisdiction. Inviolability means that the Norwegian government may not take any
coercive measures such as the arrest or remand in custody of individuals (Article 29 of
the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations), forced access to or seizure of
buildings (Article 30), or seizure of goods and property. Norwegian courts are not
competent to try cases where the defendant enjoys immunity under Article 31 of the
Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.

1.6   Inviolability
Under the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, the following are inviolable:
- A mission’s premises and its means of transport (Article 22).
- A mission’s archives and documents (Article 24).
- A mission’s official correspondence, the diplomatic bag and the diplomatic courier
(Article 27).
- Diplomatic agents (Article 29), members of the administrative and technical staff of
missions and members of their families forming part of their households (Article 37,
paragraph 1, and Article 37, paragraph 2).
- The private residences of diplomatic agents (Article 30) and members of the
administrative and technical staff of missions (Article 37, paragraph 2) as well as their
papers, correspondence and property (Article 30, paragraph 2). Property is only
inviolable when used by persons enjoying privileges and immunities.
- Diplomatic agents and members of his or her family who pass through Norway,
provided they are travelling to or returning from a post (Article 40).

1.7   Persons enjoying diplomatic immunity
According to the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, the following enjoy
diplomatic immunity:
- Diplomatic agents (Article 31) and members of their families forming part of their
households (Article 37, paragraph 1).
- Members of the administrative and technical staff of the mission and members of their
families forming part of their households (Article 37, paragraph 2).
- Members of the service staff of the mission, when performing acts in the course of
their duties (Article 37, paragraph 3).
                                                                                         7

1.8   Inviolability and immunity under the Vienna Convention on Consular
      Relations
Consular officers should, in principle, have the nationality of the sending State. The
holders of the following ranks are considered to be career consular officers: Consul
General, Consul, and Vice-Consul.

Under the provisions of the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations the following are
inviolable:
- The consular premises (Article 27, Article 31).
- The consular post’s archives and documents (Article 33).
- The consular post’s official correspondence (Article 35, paragraph 2).
- The consular courier (Article 35, paragraph 5).
- Consular officers, with certain limitations (Article 41).

1.9   Family members
Family members forming part of the household of a member of a mission or a consular
officer enjoy the same privileges and immunities as the member of the mission or the
consular officer. The privileges and immunities of family members forming part of the
household are in general considered to be derivative. However, the Vienna Conventions
do not provide any definition of the term “family”, and the definition of this term varies
from one country to another. It is generally agreed that receiving States may formulate
a reasonable definition in order to specify who may enjoy the privileges and immunities
of this category of persons.

As a general rule, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs defines the term “family”, for the
purposes of the Vienna Conventions, as including:
- a spouse; or
- a cohabitant/partner, on condition that this status is legally recognised by the sending
State, and
- unmarried children under 21 years of age who are not members of some other
household and who reside exclusively in the household of the parent in question.

Children between the ages of 21 and 23 will continue to enjoy privileges and immunities
on condition that they are attending an accredited institution of higher learning (e.g.
university) on a full-time basis in Norway. In such cases, proof of enrolment must be
presented to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs together with the request for the issuance or
renewal of the child’s ID card, cf. Chapter 4.
                                                                                          8

2.    VISA REQUIREMENTS


Members of the mission, consular officers and members of their families who are
nationals of countries whose nationals are required to present a visa to enter the
Schengen area must be in possession of a valid Schengen visa before entering Norway,
and should submit a visa application to a Norwegian Embassy/Consulate General well
in advance of their departure for Norway.

Please see Chapter 7 for specific information concerning private servants.


3.    ARRIVAL


The Ministry of Foreign Affairs should be notified of the arrival of all members of the
mission and family members forming part of their household. Notifications of arrival
should be sent to the Protocol Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs together
with a duly completed arrival form, passport(s), two passport photographs and a
specimen signature within one week of arrival in Norway. A specimen signature is not
required for children under 15 years of age.

3.1   Heads of mission – resident and non-resident; chargés d'affaires en pied
When the Ministry of Foreign Affairs has been notified in advance of the time of arrival
by air of a new head of mission, he/she will be met on arrival by a representative of the
Protocol Department, and accompanied to his or her residence or hotel in a car
provided by the Ministry.

If the new head of mission arrives by sea, by rail or by car on a weekend, or on a
national holiday or after 18:00 on a weekday, he/she will not be met on arrival. Instead,
a representative of the Protocol Department will visit the head of mission at his or her
residence, hotel or mission soon after arrival

VIP facilities will be reserved at Oslo Airport (Gardermoen) for the head of mission on
his or her first arrival in Norway by air.

Further information can be found in “Protocol Procedure for the Commencement and
Termination of a Diplomatic Mission to Norway”, published by the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs.

3.2   Chargés d'affaires ad interim
The Protocol Department will not be represented at the arrival in or departure from
Norway of a chargé d’affaires ad interim.
                                                                                             9

3.3   Military attachés
A “Guide for Military Attachés and Other Foreign Military Representatives in Norway”,
published by the Ministry of Defence, may be obtained from the Protocol Department
of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

3.4   Members of the staff of the mission
No practical arrangements are made by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs for the arrival
and departure of other diplomats or administrative and technical staff.



4.    IDENTITY CARDS


Red, blue, green and brown identity (ID) cards are issued by the Protocol Department
of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to the various categories of personnel listed below,
provided they are not Norwegian nationals or permanently resident in Norway.

RED – Diplomatic agents
Red cards are issued to diplomatic agents stationed in Norway and to their family
members. (ID cards are issued to their dependent children over 15 years of age.)

BLUE – Members of the administrative and technical staff
Blue cards are issued to members of the administrative and technical staff of missions
and to their family members. (ID cards are issued to their dependent children over 15
years of age).

GREEN – Consular officers
Green cards are issued to consular officers stationed in Norway and to their family
members. (ID cards are issued to their dependent children over 15 years of age).

BROWN – Service staff
Brown cards are issued to members of the service staff of a diplomatic mission or
consular post who are in possession of an official (service) passport, and to their family
members, provided that they too have official (service) passports. (ID cards are issued
to their dependent children over 15 years of age).

Please note:
When an ID card needs to be renewed, a request should be sent to the Protocol
Department in the form of a verbal note, enclosing the expired ID card and a copy of
the biographical data page of the applicant’s passport.

Loss of an ID card should be reported to Majorstua Police Station, which will provide a
written report on the loss. A copy of the report is required before a new ID card can be
issued. Majorstua Police Station can be contacted by telephone on 22 66 85 51, by e-mail
                                                                                           10

to post.oslo@politiet.no, or by post at PO Box 8101 Dep, N-0032 Oslo, or by personal
visit at Sørkedalsveien 27, NO-0369 Oslo.

ID cards issued by the Protocol Department cannot be used as identity or travel
documents outside Norway. ID cards must be returned to the Protocol Department on
departure from Norway at the end of the tour of duty, see Chapter 36 below.

Recommendations
It is recommended that all members of missions and consular officers carry their ID
cards at all times. If they come into contact with the police, they should immediately
clarify their status by showing their ID card, so that the police are able to treat them
accordingly.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs expects all members of missions and consular officers
to fully respect Norwegian laws and regulations during their stay in Norway, cf. Article
41 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. Members of missions are asked
to pay particular attention to speed limits and to Norwegian laws concerning alcohol
and driving. (Please see Chapters 17 and 21 for further details.)

Diplomatic and consular immunity does not relieve diplomatic and consular personnel
of the duty to discharge all private financial obligations incurred during their stay in
Norway.


5.    WORK PERMITS FOR FAMILY MEMBERS OF MEMBERS OF
      MISSIONS OR CONSULAR POSTS

5.1   General information
Neither the Vienna Conventions nor Norwegian legislation contain any specific
provisions prohibiting or limiting the employment of spouses or other family members
of the members of missions or consular officers. For work outside the missions they
are, however, bound by the general provisions relating to foreign nationals who wish to
work in Norway.

The applicant must have reached the age of 15 years to apply for a work permit. If the
applicant is between 15 and 18 years of age, written consent from a parent or other
person with parental responsibility must be presented (cf. section 2 of the Immigration
Regulations). Please note that there is a charge of NOK 600 for a work permit issued by
the Directorate of Immigration.

It should be noted that the general restrictions on practising certain professions in
Norway apply to holders of work permits in the same manner and to the same extent as
they apply to Norwegian nationals and permanent residents in Norway.
                                                                                          11

5.2   Nationals of EEA and/or EFTA member countries


Family members who are nationals of countries party to the Agreement on the
European Economic Area (EEA) and/or countries party to the European Free Trade
Association (EFTA) Convention can choose whether to apply for a Norwegian work
permit in accordance with EEA rules or in accordance with Norway’s rules for third-
country (i.e. non-EEA and/or non-EFTA) nationals.

Family members who are nationals of a country that was a member of the EEA prior to
1 May 2004 may work for three months without a work permit. If they wish to work for
more than three months, they must apply for a work permit (cf. section 172, first
paragraph, of the Immigration Regulations). The application should be submitted to the
applicant’s local police station or, if the applicant’s place of work is in Oslo, to:

Oslo Police District
Foreign Nationals Section
Storgata 33
PO Box 8010 Dep
N-0032 Oslo

Family members who are nationals of a country that became a member of the EEA on 1
May 2004 or later must have a work permit before they can begin working, cf. section
172, first paragraph, of the Immigration Regulations.


5.3   Nationals of non-EEA and/or non-EFTA countries
Family members who are nationals of countries that are not members of the EEA or
EFTA must apply for a work permit in Norway in accordance with the rules for third-
country nationals, cf. section 160, first and second paragraphs, of the Immigration
Regulations. They must have been granted a work permit before starting to work. The
application must include documentation from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs showing
that the person in question is a family member of a member of a mission, and should
include a copy of the applicant’s passport and form GP 7028 E, which can be obtained
from the police.

The application should be made to the police in the municipality where the applicant is
living or, if the applicant’s place of work is in Oslo, to the Foreign Nationals Section of
Oslo Police District at the address given in paragraph 5.2 above.

For further information, please call Oslo Police District, Foreign Nationals Section, on
22 34 21 00. (The initial recorded response is in Norwegian, but during working hours
you will be attended to personally if you hold the line.)

The Immigration Regulations can be found at:
                                                                                         12

http://www.lovdata.no/cgi-wift/ldles?doc=/sf/sf/sf-19901221-1028.html

The Directorate of Immigration is a further source of useful information. Its website
(which includes an English language option) can be found at http://www.udi.no.



6.    RESIDENCE AND WORK PERMITS FOR MEMBERS OF THE SERVICE
      STAFF OF THE MISSION

6.1   Members of the service staff of the mission
Members of the service staff of the mission are in the domestic service of a mission
(Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations Article 1g). Service staff must register with
the Protocol Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Each person who is to be
registered must submit a completed registration card and two passport photographs.
Service staff who hold official (service) passports should also submit a specimen of
their signature. The Ministry will issue renewable one-year residence permits to
persons taking up service as members of the service staff at foreign missions in
Norway.

In principle, there are no objections to the recruitment of Norwegian nationals or
permanent residents in Norway as service staff at foreign missions.

6.2   Family members of members of the service staff of the mission
Residence permits for family members of service staff who hold national passports and
are employed at foreign missions in Norway, are not issued by the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs. Applications should be sent to the Norwegian Embassy/Consulate General in
the family members’ place of residence, and must be accompanied by proof of means of
subsistence and social security coverage.

Please note that more time is required to deal with applications for family members of
service staff than for the member of the service staff in question.


7.    PRIVATE SERVANTS

7.1   Recruitment in Norway
A “private servant” is defined as a person who is in the domestic service of a member of
a mission (Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations Article 1h). Private servants
should be distinguished from members of the service staff who are in the domestic
service of a mission.

In principle, there are no objections to the local recruitment of private servants who are
Norwegian nationals or permanently resident in Norway. Please note, however, that
                                                                                        13

non-EEA nationals who are resident in Norway are required to have a work permit
issued by the Immigration Directorate (UDI) before taking up work as private servants.

7.2   Recruitment from outside Norway
When a private servant is recruited abroad, the mission concerned should, on behalf of
the employer (i.e. the member of the mission), send a verbal note to the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs for approval prior to the arrival of the private servant in Norway. The
verbal note should include a copy (in either English or Norwegian) of the employment
contract. Private servants who are approved by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs are
exempt from general immigration legislation. It should be noted that a residence
permit issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs does not constitute grounds
for granting a permit to settle in Norway.

7.3   Employment contracts
The employment of a private servant by a member of the mission must be based on a
full-time position. The contract of employment must meet certain minimum
conditions in relation to means of subsistence (i.e. a salary corresponding either to
grade 1 of the Government Pay Scale or the cost of room and board plus a minimum
salary of NOK 7000 per month) and social security (cf. section 8 of the Immigration
Act, sections 2, 19 (a) and 159-164 of the Immigration Regulations, and Article 33,
paragraph 2, of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations). The contract must also
stipulate that the private servant return to his/her country upon termination of the
employment.

According to Article 37, paragraph 4, of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations,
private servants who are not Norwegian nationals or permanently resident in Norway
are exempt from dues and taxes on the emoluments they receive by reason of their
employment.

If the employment is approved by the Ministry and no visa is required, the person
concerned may proceed to Norway.

7.4   Visa and residence permit
Private servants who are nationals of a country whose nationals need a visa to enter the
Schengen area should apply for a seven-day Schengen D-visa to the nearest Norwegian
Embassy/Consulate General. A copy of the Ministry of Foreign Affair’s verbal note of
approval should be enclosed. This procedure should be followed even if the private
servant is accompanying the member of the mission and has been employed by him or
her for some time.

Once a Schengen D-visa has been granted, the private servant may travel to Norway.
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs should be notified of the private servant’s arrival within
seven days by a verbal note enclosing the private servant’s passport. The Ministry will
endorse the passport with a residence permit before returning it to the mission.
                                                                                         14

Please note that a private servant will not receive a residence permit exceeding the
period of service with his or her employer at the mission. The employer (i.e. the
member of the mission) is responsible for ensuring that the employee (the private
servant) is in possession of a valid residence permit at all times during his or her stay in
Norway.

A private servant may change employer, as long as the new employer is a member of
the mission. In such cases, the new employment contract must be submitted to the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs and a new residence permit must be issued.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs must be notified when the employment is terminated
and the private servant has left the country.

If a private servant who holds a residence permit obtained through the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs leaves his or her employment before the end of the contract period, a
verbal note enclosing the servant’s passport must be submitted to the Protocol
Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs so that the residence permit can be
cancelled.

The same cancellation procedure applies if the member of the mission who has
employed the private servant leaves Norway permanently before the end of the
servant’s contract period. The cancellation will be effective from the date of departure of
the member of the mission.

Relatives and/or family members of members of missions and consular officers will not
be approved as private servants.

7.5   Social security for private servants
In accordance with Article 33, paragraphs 2 and 3 of the Vienna Convention on
Diplomatic Relations, private servants who are not Norwegian nationals or permanently
resident in Norway are exempt from Norwegian social security provisions. A member of
a mission who employs a person to whom this exemption does not apply must fulfil the
obligations imposed on employers by the Norwegian national insurance system,
including paying employer’s contributions to the Norwegian national insurance scheme.

An application for membership of the Norwegian national insurance scheme can be
made to the local national insurance office (“trygdekontoret”) in the municipality in
which the member of the mission resides.

7.6   Family members
Residence permits for family members of private servants are not issued by the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Applications should be sent to the Directorate of
Immigration via the Norwegian Embassy/Consulate General at the private servant’s
place of residence.
                                                                                       15

Please note that more time is required to process applications for family members of a
private servant than for the private servant him or herself.

8.    HEALTH AND SOCIAL SECURITY

8.1   General information
Members of the staff of foreign missions who enjoy privileges and immunities in Norway
are not covered by the provisions of the National Insurance Act.

A copy of the National Insurance Act can be found at http://www.lovdata.no/all/nl-
19970228-019.html (Norwegian only).

Members of the mission and consular officers who are taking up a posting in Norway and
are not covered in Norway by the public health insurance scheme of their home country
are advised to ensure that they have valid health insurance for the duration of their stay
in Norway.

 The Norwegian public health care system is based on the principle of cost-sharing
between individual patients and the municipality in which they live. However, costs will
only be shared if the patient is referred for treatment by a doctor who has an agreement
(“fastlegeavtale”) with the municipality. The municipality will not normally contribute to
the costs of medical treatment in private hospitals or clinics.

More information about the health care system in Norway is available from the National
Insurance Service (which offers information in English and can be reached by telephone
on 810 33 810 or via its website at www.trygdeetaten.no) and your local National
Insurance office.


8.2   Who is covered by the provisions of the national insurance scheme?
8.2.1 According to section 2-11 of the National Insurance Act, persons employed in this
country by a foreign State are exempt from membership in the national insurance
scheme, provided that they are not Norwegian nationals. Special rules apply to persons
permanently resident in Norway.

8.2.2 Spouses and children of such persons as described in paragraph 8.2.1 above are
exempt from membership in the national insurance scheme, provided that they are not
Norwegian nationals and do not support themselves by means of work.

8.2.3 Private servants of such persons as described in paragraph 8.2.1 above are exempt
from membership in the national insurance scheme, provided they are not Norwegian
nationals. (As stated, special rules apply to persons permanently resident in Norway.)
                                                                                      16

8.2.4 Persons who are already members of a foreign national insurance scheme may be
exempted from membership in the Norwegian national insurance scheme, even if they
do not fall into the categories mentioned in paragraphs 8.2.1 to 8.2.3 above.

8.2.5 Persons who are not exempt as described in paragraphs 8.2.1 to 8.2.4 above will
automatically become members of the Norwegian national insurance scheme when
taking up residence in this country. Under Norwegian law, a person takes up residence
when he/she stays in Norway legally for more than one year or settles in Norway with
the intention of staying longer than one year.

8.2.6 It should be noted that the Norwegian rules on exemption from compulsory
membership in the national insurance scheme are more liberal than those laid down in
Article 33 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations.

8.2.7 The Agreement on the European Economic Area (EEA) includes provisions that
entitle nationals of EEA states to sickness and maternity benefits when employed in an
EEA state other than the one to whose social security system they belong. The benefits
provided are the same as for nationals of the state in which they are employed.
Consequently, a person from another EEA country who is employed in Norway is
entitled to the same sickness or maternity benefits as Norwegian nationals. The
persons concerned do not have to make any contribution to the Norwegian national
insurance scheme, but will have to pay the individual patient’s charge (“egenandel”),
the level of which is set by the authorities, when they receive treatment. In order to
receive treatment, form E 106 should be sent to the national insurance office
(“trygdekontor”) in the municipality in which the individual resides. In addition to the
person employed in Norway, dependent family members should be included in the
form.

8.2.8 Information on exemption from membership (as described in paragraph 8.2.4
above) and on voluntary membership can be obtained from national insurance offices or
the National Insurance Administration, whose address is:

Rikstrygdeverket
PO Box 5200
Nydalen
NO-0426 Oslo


9.    TAXATION AND CUSTOMS DUTIES

9.1   Tax on capital and income
9.1.1 Exemption from national and municipal wealth and income tax is granted to:

      a)   Diplomatic agents and career consular officers stationed in Norway.
                                                                                        17

      b)   Members of the families of persons specified in a), provided they form part
           of the household of the person in question and are not Norwegian nationals.
      c)   Members of the administrative and technical staff of missions, provided they
           are not Norwegian nationals or permanently resident in Norway.
      d)   Members of the families of persons specified in c), provided they form part
           of the household of the person in question and are not Norwegian nationals
           or permanently resident in Norway.

9.1.2 The tax exemption does not apply to private income derived from sources in
      Norway, income derived from shares in joint stock companies and companies of
      similar status registered in Norway, or wages and other remuneration for work
      carried out in Norway.

9.1.3 Honorary consular officers are exempt from all dues and taxes on salary and other
remuneration received from the sending State for the performance of their functions,
provided they are not Norwegian nationals or permanently resident in Norway.

9.1.4 Persons belonging to the service staff of missions are exempt from taxation on
wages received from the sending State, provided they are not Norwegian nationals or
permanently resident in Norway.

9.1.5 Private servants of persons falling into the tax exemption categories set out in sub-
paragraphs 9.1.1a) and c) above are exempt from taxation on wages received for their
work as servants, provided they are not Norwegian nationals or permanently resident in
Norway.


9.2   Real estate taxes
All owners of real estate in Norway, including foreign governments, have to pay
municipal dues such as electricity, water, rubbish collection and chimney sweeping.

Exemption may be granted from the municipal property tax (which is a general tax, not
levied for specific purposes), as set out below.

a)    Premises owned by a sending State and used as a chancery or as a residence for
      the head of mission or other members of a mission are exempt from municipal
      property tax if the sending State exempts corresponding Norwegian premises
      from similar taxes in that State.
b)    Premises not owned by a sending State are not exempt from municipal property
      tax, even if owned by a member of a mission and used by that member for
      residential purposes.
c)    Rented premises are not exempt from municipal property tax. According to
      Norwegian tax laws, however, it is the landlord, and not the tenant, who is liable
      for municipal property tax.
                                                                                         18

9.3   Customs duties
9.3.1 Missions are exempt from customs duties on goods/products imported for official
use, including alcoholic beverages bought through bonded stores and motor vehicles.
Alcoholic beverages imported free of duty by diplomatic missions may not be used for
commercial purposes.

9.3.2 Diplomatic agents and consular officers are exempt from customs duties on:
      a) household effects and luggage; and
      b) other goods/products imported for their personal use only, including
           alcoholic beverages bought through bonded stores and motor vehicles.

9.3.3 Members of the family of a diplomatic agent or consular officer are also exempt
from customs duties as set out in paragraph 9.3.2, provided that they form part of the
household of the agent or officer and are not Norwegian nationals or permanently
resident in Norway.

9.3.4 Members of the administrative and technical staff of missions and members of
their families forming part of their households are exempt from customs duty on their
household effects and luggage when they first arrive in Norway, provided they are not
Norwegian nationals or permanently resident in Norway. Such effects should arrive no
later than three months after the arrival of the person in question.

9.3.5 Honorary consular officers do not enjoy any customs privileges in Norway.
However, office accessories (such as flags, coats of arms, printed matter, etc.) provided
by the sending State and intended for official use may be imported exempt from
customs duty.

9.3.6 Goods imported exempt from customs duty and other dues become subject to
them when they are sold or transferred to persons in Norway who do not enjoy
privileges under the Vienna Conventions. Applications for sale or transfer should be
made by verbal note to the Protocol Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. For
further details of the rules relating to motor vehicles, please see Chapter 10.

9.3.7 Commercial samples are not exempt from customs duties.

9.3.8 It should be noted that, in principle, goods for display at exhibitions are not
exempt from customs duties. Exemption may, however, be granted by Oslo and
Akershus Regional Customs Administration (“Tollregion Oslo og Akershus”), on the
express condition that all the items in the exhibition (except brochures) are re-
exported. The Customs Administration can be visited at Tollbugata 1a, NO-0152 Oslo,
or contacted by telephone on 22 86 03 00, by e-mail at oslo@toll.no, or by post at
following address:
                 Tollregion Oslo og Akershus
                 Postboks 8122 Dep
                 NO-0032 Oslo
                                                                                         19



You may also visit their home page at www.toll.no (click on Transport og vareførsel
on the left bar menu).


10.   MOTOR VEHICLES – CUSTOMS DUTIES AND OTHER DUES

10.1 Import and purchase of motor vehicles, including motorcycles
Motor vehicles may be imported free of tax by the mission or by members of the staff of
the mission on the condition that the vehicles are imported or purchased exclusively for
the official use of the mission or for the personal use of the importer or members of his
or her family forming part of his or her household. More information in English on the
import and registration tax on motor vehicles can be found at the home page of the
Customs Administration (cf. above).

Duty free import and purchase of motor vehicles is restricted as follows:

a) The mission may import or purchase free of duty such number of vehicles as is
reasonable in relation to its size, as determined by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

b) Diplomatic agents may import or purchase free of duty one vehicle at a time, or two
vehicles if the member in question is accompanied by a spouse, partner or cohabitant.

c) Members of the administrative and technical staff may import or purchase free of
duty a total of one vehicle during their tour of duty in Norway.

To import a motor vehicle free of duty, the person who wishes to do so must submit the
appropriate duty-free form (Form A II for diplomatic agents and consular officers; Form
A IV for non-diplomatic officials), stamped and signed by the Ministry of Foreign
Affairs, to the head of the relevant Regional Customs Administration. It should also be
attached to the customs declaration to show that duty-free clearance of the vehicle has
been granted.

Vehicles that may be imported free of duty are also exempt from Value Added Tax
(VAT), the recycling deposit and “engangsavgift” (initial registration tax), as well as the
taxes on hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs).

10.2 Sale of motor vehicles
The Norwegian text of the relevant Customs and Excise Regulations is available on
www.toll.no (click on Kjøretøy/Engangsavgift/Engangsavgift for motorvogner mm
for the current year).

a) Vehicles that have been imported free of duty by missions, members of the mission
or consular officers may be sold at any time. However, if the vehicle is sold to a person
who does not enjoy the privilege of duty-free import, the initial registration tax,
                                                                                         20

recycling deposit and taxes on HFCs and PFCs become payable by the seller (cf.
section 1-3 of the Customs and Excise Regulations). The buyer has to pay the
“omregistreringsavgift” (i.e. the re-registration tax charged when change of ownership
is registered in the Norwegian Central Motor Vehicles Register). For more detailed
information on these taxes, please contact Oslo and Akershus Regional Customs
Administration on the above-mentioned address, see paragraph 9.3.8.

b) The general discounts that are applied when a vehicle is to be sold by missions,
members of the mission or consular officers to a person who does not enjoy the
privilege of duty-free import can be found in Forskrift om engangsavgift på motorvogner,
section 3-3. (These regulations can be found on the Norwegian Customs
Administration’s website). However, for vehicles sold by missions, members of the
missions and consular officers, the Customs Administration applies the following
special deductions:

On vehicles over two years old:
     45 per cent deduction on the tax normally payable
On vehicles over three years old:
     65 per cent deduction on the tax normally payable

An application for the special discount on the tax normally payable should be made by
verbal note, together with a copy of the vehicle’s registration documents, to the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The registration and chassis numbers of the vehicle, the
owner’s name, and the level of deduction being applied for (i.e. the above-mentioned 45
per cent or 65 per cent reductions or other deduction, cf. Forskrift om engangsavgift på
motorvogner, section 3-3) should be stated in the verbal note.

If the Ministry of Foreign Affairs approves the application, the original note will be
endorsed accordingly and returned to the mission.

The mission or owner may then contact Oslo and Akershus Regional Customs
Administration for customs clearance. The original note bearing the Foreign Ministry’s
endorsement and all other relevant registration documents must be submitted to the
Customs Administration, which will decide whether to grant the deduction. The
original note will be filed at the Customs Administration.

10.3 Taxes on motor vehicles
a) Missions, diplomatic agents and consular officers are exempt from the annual tax on
motor vehicles.

b) Members of the families of diplomatic agents and consular officers are exempt from
the taxes specified in 10.3 a) above as long as they:
i) form part of the household of the agent or officer in question;
ii) are not nationals of or permanently resident in Norway; and
                                                                                          21

iii) are not engaged in any professional or commercial activity for personal profit in
Norway.

c) The exemption specified in 10.3 a) also applies to members of the administrative and
technical staff as long as they:
i) are not nationals of or permanently resident in Norway; and
ii) are not engaged in any professional or commercial activity for personal profit in
Norway.

d) Family members of the administrative and technical staff are equally exempted,
subject to the conditions listed in 10.3 b) i) - iii).

e) Cars registered to those who qualify as set out in paragraphs 10.3 a) - d) are
exempted from the charge normally levied on cars using studded tires in the Oslo area.


11.   PETROL
In this chapter, the term “petrol” refers to both petrol and diesel fuel.

a) Missions, diplomatic agents (and their family members who have a car at their
disposal) and consular officers (and their family members who have a car at their
disposal) have the right to purchase petrol exempt from all duties. Administrative and
technical staff are not covered by the exemption.

b) Duty free petrol can be purchased at Statoil filling stations throughout the country
using a special Statoil credit card.

Application forms may be obtained directly from Statoil. After completion, the forms
should be submitted for approval to the Protocol Department, which will forward them
to Statoil. Statoil will issue a credit card and personal identification number (PIN) to the
applicant. Credit card holders must assume full responsibility for the proper use of the
card. They will receive regular invoices for purchases from Statoil and are responsible
for full and prompt settlement of each invoice.

c) Petrol may also be purchased at any other filling station in Norway. Applications for
refunds of VAT should be made by verbal note to the Protocol Department of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which will forward them to Oslo and Akershus Regional
Customs Administration. Applications, which can be made on a quarterly basis, should
contain the original invoices and the applicant’s bank details. VAT refunds are paid
directly into the applicant’s bank account.

d) The exemption on petrol also applies to petrol for use in leisure boats

e) The exemption does not include motor oil.
                                                                                         22

f) At the end of their assignment in Norway, diplomatic agents (and their family
members who have a car at their disposal) and consular officers (and their family
members who have a car at their disposal), should return their Statoil credit cards to
the Protocol Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.


12.   ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES

12.1 General information
The import, retail sale and serving of alcoholic beverages are generally subject to strict
regulations. Most of the relevant rules are laid down in the Sale of Alcoholic Beverages
etc. Act and in municipal regulations pursuant to the Act.

Further general information on the import and sale of alcoholic beverages can be found
at the home page of the Directorate for Health and Social Affairs: www.shdir.no (click
on Rusmidler in the menu bar at the top).


12.2 Import of alcoholic beverages
a) Missions, as well as diplomatic agents and consular officers, may purchase alcoholic
beverages exempt of duty and all taxes through authorised companies or bonded
stores.

b) Likewise, members of the families of persons covered by subparagraph a) above may
purchase duty-free alcohol if they:
i) form part of the household of that person;
ii) are not Norwegian nationals or permanently resident in Norway; and
iii) are aged at least 18.

c) Alcoholic beverages imported free of duty by missions, diplomatic agents and career
consular officers may not be used for commercial purposes, exhibitions, fairs,
promotions or similar events.


12.3 Procedure for importing duty-free alcoholic beverages
Applications from missions for exemption from customs and other duties on goods
intended for official use in their chanceries and official residences, or for the personal
use of those members of their staff who are entitled to the exemption, must be made on
numbered forms supplied by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. They must be stamped
and signed by the head of mission or another member of the diplomatic staff duly
appointed by the head of mission, and must be verified by the Protocol Department of
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs before being submitted to the customs authorities. (See
also paragraph 13.4.)
                                                                                        23

The relief system applies only to imports into Norway, and it should therefore be noted
that VAT will not be refunded on alcoholic beverages purchased in Norway.


12.4 Serving alcoholic beverages outside diplomatic premises
The serving of alcoholic beverages in public places in Norway is generally subject to
licensing by the municipal authorities. In special cases, the Protocol Department of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs may temporarily grant mission premises status to an area
adjacent to the mission premises, to enable the mission to serve alcoholic beverages
outside its normal premises, e.g. at a National Day reception.

In such cases the following conditions apply:
a) The head of mission must be present at and hosting the event.
b) The event must be restricted to specially invited guests and closed to the general
public.
c) The owner of or authority responsible for the outside premises must agree to the
arrangements outlined above.
d) The event cannot be a trade fair or anything of a similar nature, and its purpose must
not be commercial.

Application by verbal note
Missions should apply for permission for such events by submitting a verbal note to the
Protocol Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The note should state the
intended location of the event and the measures taken to ensure that the event complies
with the conditions set out above.


13.   VALUE ADDED TAX
Value added tax (VAT) (called “merverdiavgift” or “mva.” in Norwegian) belongs to the
category of indirect taxes that do not fall under the general tax exemption rules for
sending States, diplomatic agents and career consular officers contained in Article 34 of
the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations. The Ministry of Finance has, however,
granted an exemption from VAT for certain kinds of goods and services intended for
the official use of a sending State or for the private use of diplomatic agents or career
consular officers stationed in Norway.

The exemption takes the form of a refund of VAT paid, and applies to the following:


13.1 Goods and services for state-owned properties
a)    Service charges, such as for water supply, sewerage, rubbish collection and
      chimney-sweeping.
b)    Charges for repair and maintenance of buildings and grounds, including cleaning
      and snow-removal services, gardening expenses (including purchase of trees,
      bushes, flowers, seeds, soil, lawn mowers and garden tractors), the costs of fitting
                                                                                         24

     or repairing cold-storage rooms, cleaning costs for wall-to-wall carpeting, air filters
     for ventilation systems, flagpoles, rental of sanders, purchase of rotary) snow-
     clearing machines, tennis court repair costs and storage rental in connection with
     renovations.
c)   Purchase and maintenance or service costs of air conditioning, heating and/or
     ventilation systems.
d)   Professional fees, e.g. of architects, consultants, surveyors and estate agents.


13.2 Goods and services for official use in the chanceries of diplomatic
     missions and career consular posts, irrespective of ownership
a)   Furniture, mirrors, lamps, china, glassware and porcelain, curtains, Venetian
     blinds, carpets, mattresses, upholstery, library ladders and trolleys, manuscript
     holders, curtains hooks and sewing equipment, cornices/curtain rods, plates to
     set under furniture and safes.
b)   Electric fans, humidifiers, air purifiers and hand dryers.
c)   Electric kitchen appliances, washing machines and clothes dryers, electric heaters
     and cleaning appliances, including vacuum- and carpet cleaners.
d)   Office machines, stamping and franking machines, postage scales, photocopying
     machines (including rental and repairs, including. repair or replacement of drums,
     time clocks and service or upgrade of such equipment’s operating software.
e)   Alarm, security, intercom and closed-circuit television systems and emergency
     generators.
f)   Firefighting equipment.
g)   Lawn mowers and rotary snow-clearing machines.
h)   Printing costs, e.g. of catalogues, programmes, brochures, circulars, invitation and
     business cards, writing paper with envelopes, sender labels, posters, tickets and
     giro payment forms.
i)   Electricity.
j)   Telephones, internet and mobile telephone subscriptions (including installation),
     telephone booths (pay phones) and telegraph, telex and telefax facilities, address
     plates, official seals and stamps.
k)   Cleaning and snow-removal services.
l)    Radios, record players, cassette, video, CD and DVD players and recorders, TV-
     sets, video monitors, stereo equipment, radio and TV antennas (including satellite
     dishes and decoders).
m)   Automobile tyres and rims.
n)   Commission when renting real estate.
o)   Parking space rental.

VAT will also be refunded for heating oil purchased for official use in the chanceries of
diplomatic missions and career consular posts, irrespective of ownership, or for the
personal use of diplomatic agents and career consular officers.
                                                                                     25

13.3 Goods and services for the personal use of diplomatic agents and career
     consular officers
a)   Radios, record players, cassette, video, CD and DVD players and recorders, TV-
     sets, video monitors, stereo equipment, radio and TV antennas (including satellite
     dishes and decoders), computers and a limited number of CDs, DVDs, cassettes
     and records bought in connection with the purchase of a CD, DVD, cassette or
     record player.
b)   Furniture, mirrors, lamps, china, glassware and porcelain, curtains, Venetian
     blinds, carpets, mattresses and upholstery, standing ashtrays, curtains hooks and
     sewing equipment, cornices/curtain rods, grandfather clocks, garden furniture,
     hammocks, mantle clocks, wall clocks (to be considered individually), coat racks,
     looms, wall and ceiling fittings (such as lamps), light bulbs (a limited number in
     connection with the purchase of lamps) and fluorescent tubes including brackets
     (for use as lamps).
c)   Organs, pianos and keyboards, including portable mini-organs.
d)   Electric kitchen appliances, washing machines, electric ironing machines and
     household irons, mangles, vacuum cleaners and sewing machines, trouser
     presses, gas stoves, knitting machines, carpet cleaning machines and clothes
     dryers.
e)   Business cards.
f)   Automobile tyres and rims.
g)   Electricity, telephone and alarm and security systems for the residence of the
     head of mission. VAT on the private telephone of an individual in interim charge of
     a mission may be refunded for the corresponding period, on the basis of a
     declaration from the permanent head of mission.

For the goods listed in sub-paragraphs a) to f), refunds are conditional upon the
aggregate amount of the invoice totalling not less that NOK 1 500 including VAT.

13.4 Application procedure
Application forms for VAT refunds can be obtained from the Protocol Department of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The form is divided into three sections, which cover,
respectively, goods and services intended for use in chanceries, use in official
residences and personal use of diplomatic agents (and consular officers). Please note
that separate applications must be made for the different categories.

Applications for refund should be stamped and signed by the head of mission or
another member of the diplomatic staff duly appointed by the head of mission.
Applications should be submitted on a quarterly basis to the Protocol Department of the
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which will forward them to Oslo County Tax Assessment
Office (“Oslo Fylkesskattekontor”). Reference is made to the Ministry’s verbal note of 6
January 2004 regarding the application procedure.
                                                                                            26

13.5 VAT relief in connection with new chancery buildings and new official
     residences
VAT relief can be granted for the construction of new chancery buildings and new
official residences. Further information can be obtained from Oslo County Tax
Assessment Office (“Oslo Fylkesskattekontor”) at http://www.skatteetaten.no.
(Contact details for the Tax Assessment Office can be found by clicking on Kontakt
oss at the top right of the page, and then on Fylkesskattekontoret and Oslo). Oslo
County Tax Assessment Office can also be contacted by telephone on 24 14 84 00.


14.   DRIVING LICENCES
Norway does not issue special CD driving licences. Provided that they are not nationals
of or permanently resident in Norway, the following individuals may use a valid foreign
driving licence during their tour of duty in Norway:

a) Members of missions and consular officers.
b) Consular officers serving at honorary consular posts.
c) Consular employees (administrative and technical staff) serving at honorary
consular posts.
d) Members of the service staff and private servants.
e) Members of the families of the persons mentioned above except family members
of private servants.
Drivers must on request be able to present a valid foreign national driving licence and
either a passport or an identity card issued by the Protocol Department of the
Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs (see Chapter 4).


15.   CD LICENCE PLATES
Norwegian CD licence plates can be obtained from Risløkka trafikkstasjon (Risløkka
Traffic Services Office) at the following address:

Østre Aker vei 50
PO Box 19 Risløkka
NO-5016 Oslo

Please note that a fee is payable for CD licence plates (from 1 April 2006: NOK 454 per
set). For more information please call Risløkka trafikkstasjon on 22 07 44 16.


15.1 Documents required for applying for CD licence plates
The following documents must be submitted with an application for CD licence plates:

a) A copy of a valid third party liability insurance policy or personal traffic insurance
card. It is compulsory under Norwegian law to have one of these forms of insurance.
                                                                                         27

b) A customs clearance certificate issued by the customs authorities and certified by
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs’ Protocol Department, or, if not applicable, written
confirmation from the Protocol Department that the applicant is entitled to CD
registration.
c) A certificate of inspection, issued by an official vehicle inspector.

15.2 Disposal or return of CD licence plates when leaving Norway
When the owner of a motor vehicle with Norwegian CD licence plates is transferred to
another posting, it is compulsory under Norwegian law to inform the authorities that
the car is being taken out of Norway permanently.

There are three option for the disposal or return of CD licence plates:

a) The CD licence plates can be returned to Risløkka trafikkstasjon at the address given
in paragraph 15.1.

b) The authorities of the sending State concerned must confirm directly (in writing) to
Risløkka trafikkstasjon, or to a Norwegian mission abroad, that the licence plates have
been destroyed.

c) The plates can be handed in to a Norwegian mission abroad.

Special customs plates will be provided when a car is being exported from Norway
permanently.


16.   TOLL CHARGES (“BOMRING”)
Members of the staff of diplomatic missions and career consular officers are not
exempted from paying toll charges. These are not considered to be penalties, dues or
taxes because they are levied for specific reasons, e.g. to fund and maintain roads or
bridges.


17.   PARKING AND PARKING FEES
While diplomatic vehicles are generally considered to be inviolable, they may not
obstruct traffic or endanger public safety. Diplomatic vehicles are subject to Norwegian
parking laws and regulations, and their owners are held responsible for parking
violations. This applies to all street parking, with the exception of the areas which have
been marked in front of or close to embassy buildings in Oslo.

Missions are expected to respect the local municipal parking regulations. The Ministry
of Foreign Affairs will, under normal circumstances, not involve itself in matters relating
to parking fees. Please note that many parking areas are private.
                                                                                         28

A special parking area on Victoria terrasse, close to the main entrance of the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs, is reserved for diplomatic vehicles.


18.   TRAFFIC VIOLATIONS
Under Article 41 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, it is the duty of all
persons who enjoy privileges and immunities under the Convention to respect the laws
and regulations of the receiving State.

When missions or their personnel incur fines for violations of traffic regulations, they
are expected to pay such fines. Any failure to pay a fine will be reported to the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs, either by the municipal parking authorities (for parking fees) or by
the police. The Ministry will then raise the question of unsettled fines directly with the
mission involved.

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs does not normally deal with complaints or appeals
relating to traffic violations. Such complaints or appeals should be directed to the body
or authority that issued the fine, in accordance with its complaints/appeals procedure.


19.   TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS
Anyone who becomes involved in a road accident, whether he or she is to blame or not,
must immediately stop and give all necessary assistance. Other persons in the vicinity
or who arrive at the accident scene are also obliged to give such assistance as may be
necessary.

Individuals who are involved in a traffic accident are obliged to exchange their names
and addresses. The drivers of the vehicles must also exchange the names and
addresses of the persons who own the vehicles and the cars’ licence plate numbers.

Where a traffic accident has caused death or serious injury, no traces of the accident
should be removed and nothing else which could be important in a subsequent
investigation into the accident should be altered unless strictly necessary (e.g. in the
interests of a victim’s health or safety) until the police arrive at the scene. Those who
were involved in the accident also have a duty to try to prevent any such trace removal
or alteration.

The Road Traffic Act can be found at
http://www.lovdata.no/all/hl-19650618-004.html#12 (Norwegian version) and
http://www.ub.uio.no/ujur/ulovdata/lov-19650618-004-eng.pdf (English translation).
                                                                                       29

20.   DRIVING AND ALCOHOL
Norwegian legislation related to driving and alcohol is strict.

If someone has a blood alcohol level of more than 20 milligrams of alcohol per 100
millilitres of blood, he/she is deemed to be under the influence of alcohol for the
purposes of the Road Traffic Act.

The regulations dealing with driving or attempting to drive while under the influence of
alcohol or any other intoxicating or narcotic substance can be found in section 22 of the
Road Traffic Act (cf. the links given in Chapter 19 above).


21.   SMOKING IN INDOOR PUBLIC PLACES
Norway has had a ban on smoking in indoor public places and on all means of public
transportation since 1988. If certain conditions are fulfilled, physically separated
smoking areas may be provided.

Since 1 June 2004 all smoking has been banned in all establishments that serve food or
drinks for consumption, such as restaurants, cafés, discos, bars and pubs. The above
mentioned possibility of providing physically separated smoking areas does not apply to
restaurants, bars, etc.

The legislation on smoke-free areas is enforced by the municipalities. Inspections of the
working environment are conducted by the Labour Inspection Authority.


22.   TELECOMMUNICATIONS

22.1 The Norwegian broadcasting fee
Under section 5.1, paragraph a) of the Television Receiver Regulations, members of
missions and career consular officers are exempt from the Norwegian broadcasting fee.
Diplomatic missions and consular posts are also exempt. Those who are exempt can
apply to the Norwegian Broadcasting Company (NRK) for free licences, which are valid
for one year at a time.

If a mission or consular post, member of the staff of a mission, or consular officer
receives a request for payment of the broadcasting fee, the diplomatic mission or
consular post should inform the NRK Licence Department (“lisenskontoret”) in writing
about the exempt status of the recipient so that a free licence can be granted.

The home page of the NRK’s Licence Department can be found at
http://www.nrk.no/lisens.
                                                                                            30

22.2 Satellite dishes
Please note that the installation of satellite dishes may be subject to special regulations.
Installation of a satellite dish with a diameter of over 1 metre requires special
permission. An application should be made to Oslo Municipality’s Planning Department
(“Plan- og bygningsetaten”). For further information please call 23 49 10 00 or check the
Department’s home page: www.plan-og-bygningsetaten.Oslo.kommune.no.


22.3 Official communication by radio transmitters
The use of radio transmitters for the official communication of a diplomatic mission
requires permission from the competent Norwegian authorities (cf. Article 27 of the
Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations).

Missions may – on the basis of reciprocity – be licensed by the Norwegian Post and
Telecommunications Authority to install, operate and use radio communications
equipment for:

-     official communication with the sending State;
-     security purposes within and around the mission premises; and
-     special visits of VIPs that require special security measures, including the use of
radio communications equipment, subject to a time limitation.

A licence application should be submitted with a verbal note to the Protocol
Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. The application should include
information on the location and type of equipment, frequencies, call signs, hours of
operation, transmitter output power, classes of emission, bandwidth and antenna
characteristics, and should be addressed to the Post and Telecommunications
Authority (“Post- og teletilsynet”).

Before any changes are made to the parameters of the licensed transmission
equipment, a request for permission to make such changes must be made to the Post
and Telecommunications Authority via the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

The Post and Telecommunications Authority will investigate any instances of
interference cause by a mission’s radio transmitters and may impose such modifications
or improvements to the installation as are necessary to resolve the problem.

The installation and operation of radio communications equipment/transmitters must
be in conformity with the International Telecommunication Union’s Constitution and
Convention, the International Radio Regulations, and any special conditions set by the
Norwegian Post and Telecommunications Authority.

The Post and Telecommunications Authority’s home page can be found at
http://www.npt.no.
                                                                                         31

Please note that installation of antennas may in addition require special permission from
the municipal authorities. (The contact details for Oslo Municipality Planning
Department can be found in paragraph 22.2 above).


23.   ACQUISITION OF REAL ESTATE
The real estate market in Norway is open, and regulated by offer and demand. Local
regulations may apply to the use of real estate by foreign nationals. As a general rule,
diplomatic missions and career consular officers are advised to seek legal advice when
planning to acquire real estate in Norway.

The ‘yellow pages’ (“Gule sider”) of the telephone directory contain a list of estate
agents (“eiendomsmeglere”), and can be found at www.gulesider.no.


24.   IMPORT/EXPORT OF ANIMALS, PLANTS, AND PETS

24.1 General information
The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora
(CITES) and Norwegian legislation prohibit the import of endangered animal or plant
species, or products made from them, into Norway. Examples of endangered species
include elephant, leopard, tiger, wolf, wolverine, certain crocodile and snake species,
certain birds of prey and eggs of certain bird species, as well as certain orchids and
cactuses.

Neither endangered animals and plant species nor products made from them may be
exported from Norway. Examples of endangered species which can be found in Norway
and are covered by this prohibition are wolf, arctic fox and wolverine, as well as some
birds of prey. Exporting the eggs of endangered bird species is also prohibited.

Norway’s animal import regulations are very strict. There have been no incidents of
rabies in Norway since 1814, and the import of animals which may carry this disease –
including dogs, cats, and ferrets – is especially restricted. No diplomatic privileges are
extended in connection with importing animals into Norway.

Further detailed information about importing pets and the new EU/EEA pet passport
can be obtained from Norwegian foreign service missions. Alternatively, you may wish
to consult the Norwegian Food Safety Authority’s website (in Norwegian):
www.mattilsynet.no (click on Import/Eksport in the menu bar at the top, then Sports-
og kjæledyr left menu bar).
                                                                                         32

24.2 Pets
Dogs, cats and ferrets imported to Norway must fulfil specific requirements regarding
rabies (i.e. they must be vaccinated and have a blood test). The rules are based on
Commission Regulation (EC) No. 998/2003 and concern only pets accompanied by
their owner or person responsible for them on behalf of the owner and not intended to
be sold or transferred (including as a gift). The EC Regulation introduced a pet passport
scheme, under which dogs, cats, and ferrets originating from EU/EEA countries are
issued with a passport and animals from outside the EU/EEA are required to have a
veterinary certificate issued by an official veterinarian.

Norwegian and Swedish dogs and cats may travel without restrictions between the two
countries. For animals imported into Norway or Sweden, import documentation must
be available on demand. Permission to import animals other than dogs, cats and ferrets
may be granted. Applications for import permission should be made to the Norwegian
Food Safety Authority or the Directorate for Nature Management. No application form
is required.

If import requirements are not fulfilled, the Norwegian Food Safety Authority can
decide to expel, quarantine or put down the animal(s) in question. The animal’s owner
is responsible for all expenses incurred in connection with importing it to Norway.


24.3 Restrictions
It is prohibited to import the following dog breeds (whether pure- or crossbred) to
Norway: Pit Bull Terrier, Fila Brasileiro, Tosa Inu, Dogo Argentino, and American
Staffordshire Terrier.

It is also prohibited to import reptiles (except certain tortoises, provided a special
permit has been granted), other exotic animals, animals presenting a danger to
Norwegian nature, or protected animals.

It should be noted that heavy penalties are imposed for violation of the rules regarding
the importation of animals into Norway.


25.   GENERAL INFORMATION ON THE RIGHT TO DEMONSTRATE
Norwegian nationals and persons who are permanently resident in Norway enjoy
freedom of speech and thought. The organisation of demonstrations is an expression of
these fundamental rights. However, certain requirements must be fulfilled when
demonstrations are to take place in public places.

A notification should be made to the police well in advance of the demonstration. The
police may prohibit a demonstration only when there is reason to fear that it may give
                                                                                           33

rise to a serious breach of public peace and order or disrupt traffic, or if the cause that it
is intended to promote or the manner in which it is promoted conflicts with the law.

The police may break up demonstrations in public places if they are held contrary to a
ban or fail to meet the conditions imposed on them, or if, for example, they provoke a
serious breach of public order or cause obstruction to traffic. The police may also break
up a demonstration if there is reason to fear violence, or in order to prevent anyone
suffering physical harassment.

When a lawful demonstration has been announced near a diplomatic mission or the
residence of a head of mission, the police will inform the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and
seek to inform the relevant mission.

For further information, please see section 11 of the Police Act. In Norwegian:
http://www.lovdata.no/all/hl-19950804-053.html#11

The English translation of the Act can be found at:
http://www.ub.uio.no/ujur/ulovdata/lov-19950804-053-eng.pdf.


26.   FIREARMS
A licence is required for all kinds of firearms, except for air guns, air pistols, spring
guns and spring pistols up to 4.5 mm calibre.
Individuals who wish to possess or buy firearms and ammunition for use in hunting or
sport in Norway must submit an application to the Norwegian police in the municipality
in which they reside. This requirement also applies to the members of a mission and
consular officers.

Applications from diplomatic missions and consular posts and their staff for permission
to possess, import or buy firearms for security purposes should be submitted to the
Protocol Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. A licence for this purpose is
generally restricted to the premises of the mission or consular premises. Any security
requirements outside this area are the responsibility of the Norwegian police.

Before exporting firearms acquired in Norway out of the country, the owner must
obtain an export licence, for which a fee must be paid. This also applies to diplomatic
missions and consular posts and their staff. The export licence can be obtained by
applying to the Police Arms Office (“Våpenkontoret”) in Oslo at the following address:

Våpenkontoret
Grønlandsleiret 44
NO-0190 Oslo

The export licence should be presented to the relevant authorities when the weapon is
taken out of the country.
                                                                                         34

27.   OSLO AIRPORT (GARDERMOEN)
In the interests of passenger safety, special regulations restrict access to certain areas
at Norwegian airports. The Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations does not give
diplomats any privileges in relation to access to restricted areas. However, the airport
authorities may, upon request and based on a real need, issue special admission cards
for restricted areas. Such special admission cards may, for example, be issued to
embassy personnel authorised to deal with or carrying the diplomatic bag.


27.1 Admission cards for restricted areas
Special admission cards are required to obtain access to the restricted areas at Oslo
Airport. The number of admission cards is kept to a minimum. Cards will be issued only
to those whose duties require them to have frequent access to restricted areas at the
airport. Other members of the mission may, when on official business, request
temporary admission cards. Admission cards are not required for official visits, when
VIP facilities are in use.

Applications for admission cards should be submitted with a verbal note to the Protocol
Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which will forward them to Oslo Airport.
In order to obtain an admission card the applicant must have completed training
courses on environment health and safety and fire safety.

The training courses are organised by Oslo Airport’s Environment Health and Safety
(EHS) Department. Embassy personnel are exempt from paying course fees. Applicants
who are Norwegian nationals or permanently resident in Norway need to present a
police certificate (“Utfyllende politiattest” (UPA))

Registration for courses can be arranged by contacting the EHS Department at Oslo
Airport, either by telephone on 64 81 91 20 or e-mail to kurs@osl.no.


27.2 How to get to the short-term CD parking spaces at Oslo Airport from the
     arrivals hall on foot
Take the escalator located opposite the domestic arrivals exit down one level. Walk
down the ramp and turn left. After approximately 40 metres you will find an elevator on
your left. Take the elevator to level four, “Car rental parking”. The CD parking spaces
are located outside the building.


27.3 How to get to the VIP area and the drop-off parking space at Oslo Airport
     from Oslo
Take the E6 northbound (direction Trondheim). Take the exit marked “Gardermoen”
and drive towards the long-term parking area. Take the exit marked “Stasjon, Hotell,
P Langtid, Sentralområde”.
                                                                                         35




Turn right at the first intersection where the sign reads: “Sentralområde Øst,
P Langtid/Long term, and OSL Flyporten”.




Then turn left at the first roundabout towards “P1, P2 Langtid”. Keep driving straight
ahead along “Henrik Ibsens veg” until you get to the main gate.
                                                                                         36




The main gate

Use the intercom system to get through the gate. After the gate, take the first turn on
the right to the VIP area. The drop-off parking space is located next to the entrance to
the VIP area, and is marked “Parkering for CD-biler”. The CD parking spaces are
located one level down from the departure level. The spaces are marked “CD” and have
the following numbers: 131, 132, 133, 135, 136 and 137.




      OSL VIP - av og   OSL Korttid.bmp
       pålessing.bmp




27.4 VIP parking area for CD vehicles at Oslo Airport
The VIP facilities at Oslo Airport include six parking spaces, which are located on the
left-hand side of the road leading towards the roundabout outside the VIP facilities.
These parking spaces are exclusively for the use of visitors to the VIP facilities. Others
should use the short-term CD parking spaces (see paragraphs 27.2 and 27.3 above).


28.      EMBASSY SECURITY


Embassy Security Office
The overall responsibility for embassy security lies with the police. The Embassy
Security Office (ESO) handles all inquiries from diplomatic missions.

Day-to-day matters should be raised directly with the ESO. Matters of principle may be
conveyed to the police via the Protocol Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
                                                                                         37

The ESO can be contacted as follows:

By telephone:    22 66 86 57
By fax:          22 66 87 83
By e-mail:       eso@politiet.no

Further useful telephone numbers are:

Police – Immediate help/emergency:                             112
Police – General inquiries:                                    02800
Oslo Police Command Centre/Duty Officer (24 hours):            22 66 46 60
Oslo Police District:                                          22 66 90 50


29.   THE DIPLOMATIC BAG
Official courier mail (the diplomatic bag) that is visibly marked or that can be identified
as such, must not be opened, detained or x-rayed. Airport security personnel must be
able to verify that the pouch is official courier mail to or from a diplomatic mission in
Norway.

The air carrier company personnel who receive the diplomatic pouch must be able to
verify that it has been sent by an official diplomatic or consular representative.
Diplomatic agents travelling as diplomatic couriers are required to complete normal
identity and security controls.

Airport security controls and Diplomatic agents’ hand luggage:
Please note that diplomatic agents and their personal hand luggage are subject to
normal airport security controls. Where diplomatic immunity is claimed as a reason for
refusing to complete security controls when leaving Norway, security staff will inform
the air carrier company or the captain of the aircraft. The air carrier company or the
captain of the aircraft will then decide whether the person in question may enter the
aircraft and proceed to his or her destination.



30.   FLAG AND EMBLEM OF THE SENDING STATE
Under Article 20 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, a diplomatic
mission and its head have the right to use the flag and emblem of the sending State on
the premises of the mission, including the residence of the head of mission, and on his
or her means of transportation.
                                                                                         38

31.   FLAG-FLYING DAYS IN NORWAY
Norwegians generally feel a strong personal attachment to their flag. Important days
(such as Constitution Day or private family anniversaries), are often celebrated by
flying the Norwegian flag. Local authorities also use a variety of county and town flags.
Government buildings are required to fly the state flag on official flag-flying days, of
which there are 16:

      1     January New Year’s Day
      21 January HRH Princess Ingrid Alexandra’s birthday
      6     February Sami People’s Day
      21 February HM the King’s birthday
      1     May       Labour Day
      8     May       Liberation Day 1945
      17 May          Constitution Day
      7     June      Union Dissolution 1905
      4     July      HM the Queen’s birthday
      20 July         HRH the Crown Prince’s birthday
      29 July         St. Olav’s Day
      19 August       HRH the Crown Princess’ birthday
      25 December Christmas Day
      Easter Sunday
      Whit Sunday
      Parliamentary election days (“Stortingsvalg”)

In addition, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs may instruct government institutions to fly
the flag on other occasions, e.g. special Royal Family events, state visits to Norway, etc.

The flag-flying regulations state that the flag should only be flown between 8 a.m. and 9
p.m. from March until the end of October. From November until the end of February,
the flag-flying hours are 9 a.m. until sunset (In the three northern counties, the flag may
be flown between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. from November until the end of February.)


32.   SCHOOLS

32.1 Norwegian public schools
Diplomats or embassy personnel who wish to register their children with a Norwegian
public school should contact the school of their choice.

Further information on primary education (and kindergartens) can be found on Oslo
Municipality’s website (in Norwegian only) at www.skoleetaten.oslo.kommune.no.

Information in English on secondary education can be found on Oslo and Akershus
County Council’s website, under Utdanning (Education), at www.akershus.no
                                                                                      39

32.2 Schools where the main language of instruction is other than Norwegian


English:
Oslo International School
Gamle Ringeriksvei 53
NO-1357 Bekkestua
Telephone: +47 67 53 23 03
Fax: +47 67 59 10 15
Website: www.oslointernationalschool.no

French:
Lycée français René Cassin d’Oslo
Den franske skolen
Skovveien 9
NO-0267 Oslo
Telephone: +47 22 92 51 20
Website: www.rcassin.no

German:
Deutsche Schule Oslo - Max Tau
Den tyske skolen
Sporveisgata 20
NO-0354 Oslo
Telephone: +47 22 93 12 20
Fax: +47 22 93 12 30
Website: www.deutsche-schule.no



33.   HUNTING AND FISHING


Hunting
There are good stocks of game in Norway. Land in Norway is either state-owned or
private, and landowners have the sole right to hunt and trap on their land. State-owned
land is classified either as common land or “other state-owned land”. All small-game and
wild reindeer hunting on state-owned common land is reserved for persons resident in
Norway for at least one year. However, anyone, including non-resident foreign
nationals, may apply for permits to hunt elk, red deer, roe deer and beaver. Applications
should be sent to the Directorate for State Forests and Land, which can provide detailed
information about the requirements for hunting in Norway and answer questions
relating to arms and ammunition (including importing firearms), hounds, etc.

The Directorate for State Forest and Land’s website can be found at www.statsskog.no.

For further information on firearms regulations, please see Chapter 26.
                                                                                          40



The Directorate for Nature Management also offers useful information about hunting
and fishing on its website at http://www.dirnat.no. (The English version can be found
at http://english.dirnat.no).

Fishing
Sports fishing is a popular activity in Norway. Fishing rights belong to the landowner,
and fishing therefore requires his or her permission. More information about fishing in
Norway can be found on the websites of the Directorate for Nature Management and
the Directorate for State Forest and Land. (The links are above).



34.   SNOW REMOVAL IN WINTERTIME
In order to minimise the nuisance to pedestrians, traffic and property owners, and to
ensure unimpeded access for the emergency services, owners of properties in “Inner
Oslo” are responsible for clearing snow from the pavement outside their properties and
for sanding or salting them. The Protocol Department of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs
can assist in obtaining information on who is responsible for the removal of snow in
particular areas.

In other parts of Oslo the responsibility for snow removal is shared by several bodies:

Oslo Municipality: streets and roads belonging to the city.
Norwegian Public Roads Administration (“Statens Vegvesen”): all main roads and
motorways (RV 4, E6, E18, Ring 1-3).
Recreation and Leisure Service (“Friluftsetaten”): parks and green areas.

Please note that the parking of cars (including those with CD-plates) may temporarily
be prohibited in the streets of Oslo in connection with snow removal. The temporary
prohibition will be indicated by official road signs (temporary plastic road signs)
informing that parking will be prohibited during a specified period. Any parked car that
violates the temporary prohibition will be removed.

More information on snow removal can be found (in wintertime) on Oslo Municipality’s
website, at www.samferdselsetaten.oslo.kommune.no (in Norwegian only).


35.   THE A.T.A. CARNET
The A.T.A. Carnet is an international customs document used worldwide to facilitate
customs clearance of goods that are temporarily imported into a member country. Its
legal basis is the Customs Convention on the A.T.A. Carnet for Temporary Admission
of Goods, which entered into force in Norway in 1965. Use of the Carnet eliminates the
need to make deposits at the time of importation, and simplifies customs procedures.
                                                                                          41

The Carnet may, for example, be used in connection with the import of commercial
samples and goods for exhibitions organised by a diplomatic mission or consular post.

The Carnet may be used for the transit of goods through more than one country, and
may be used multiple times for goods forming part of the same exhibition. It is valid for
up to one year. The A.T.A. Carnet system is administered by chambers of commerce in
the member countries.

Further information on the A.T.A. Carnet can be found on the website of the Oslo
Chamber of Commerce at www.chamber.no.

Diplomatic missions and consular posts of countries that are not party to the Customs
Convention on the A.T.A. Carnet, and which wish to import goods for display or use at
exhibitions, fairs, meetings or similar events, should contact the Oslo office of the
Directorate of Customs and Excise, whose website can be found at www.toll.no.


36.   EXPORT OF ANTIQUES AND OTHER CULTURAL GOODS FROM
      NORWAY
Antiques and objects of artistic, cultural or historical value may, as a general rule, not be
exported from Norway without special permission, unless they were legally imported by
a member of a mission taking up his or her post in Norway. (Please also note the
relevance of the A.T.A. Carnet to antiques imported temporarily for exhibitions, cf.
Chapter 35 above.)

Information on the export of antiques and other objects of cultural value from Norway,
together with the relevant application forms, can be found on the website of the
Norwegian Archive, Library and Museum Authority (“ABM-Utvikling”) at www.abm-
utvikling.no. The site provides information in Norwegian, English and German.


37.   DEPARTURE
The Ministry of Foreign Affairs should be notified by verbal note of the
departure/termination of duty of all members of the mission and consular officers.
The same applies to service staff and private servants.

The note should include the date of departure (for service staff and private servants: the
date of leaving his or her position) and confirmation from the Protocol Department of
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs that the ID card, Statoil credit card and Oslo Airport
admission card have been returned (if issued).

The note should include the same information for all family members forming part of
the household of the member of the mission or consular officer leaving Norway.

				
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