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					                                                                                                                                      African American Studies / 103

                                                                   AAS 100, Introduction to African American Studies        study of the international and national divisions of
African American                                                   AAS 101, Interdisciplinary Research Methods
                                                                                                                            race as they pertain to persons of African descent,
                                                                                                                            wherever they may find themselves. Such an ap-
Studies                                                            AAS 116, Colonialism, Slavery, and African Amer-
                                                                   ican Life Before 1865
                                                                                                                            proach is to be employed for the study and un-
                                                                                                                            derstanding of development and underdevelopment,
(College of Letters and Science)                                   AAS 117, African Americans in the Industrial Age,
                                                                                                                            domination and power, self-determination, mutual
                                                                                                                            cooperation, and aesthetic and creative expression.
Department Office: 660 Barrows Hall, (510) 642-7084
                                                                   1865-1970, and
                                                                                                                            Issues of identity construction, marginality, terri-
socrates.berkeley.edu/~africam                                     AAS H195A-H195B, Senior Honors Thesis                    toriality, and the universal role of race in the or-
Chair: Stephen Small, Ph.D.
                                                                                                                            ganization of political economy and in class for-
Professors                                                         To complete the major, students must take a clus-
                                                                                                                            mation are critical to the program’s intellectual
Charles Henry, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Black politics,        ter of eight-ten courses (depending on thesis sta-
                                                                                                                            agenda.
  public policy                                                    tus) courses focused on a specific area of con-
Percy Hintzen, Ph.D. Yale University. Political sociology,         centration. Such a concentration is expected to          Applicants must have completed an undergraduate
  social change
Michel S. Laguerre, Ph.D. University of Illinois. Caribbean        form the basis for a senior thesis. Five of the eight    degree and should demonstrate a general knowl-
  anthropology                                                     courses must be selected from African American           edge of African American history and an under-
William M. Banks (Emeritus) Ed.D.                                  Studies departmental course offerings. The re-           standing of the disciplinary bases for the study of
Margaret B. Wilkerson (Emeritus) Ph.D.
                                                                   maining three courses may be taken from other de-        the African diaspora. Demonstrated knowledge in
Associate Professors                                               partments. The list of areas of concentration and        the field should include understanding relations
VèVè Clark, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.              sample programs is available in the department           among social, economic, and political structures
  Francophone and Anglophone literature of Africa and the
  Caribbean                                                        office.                                                   and culture in African American life.
Stephen Small, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
  Sociology                                                        Honors Program. To be eligible for admission to          Fields of Emphasis
Ula Taylor, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara.         the honors program, a student must have com-
  American history                                                                                                          The fields of emphasis are focused in two gen-
                                                                   pleted at least two semesters at Berkeley and have
Assistant Professors
                                                                                                                            eral areas representing current faculty fields of
                                                                   attained senior standing with a GPA of 3.3 or
                                                                                                                            expertise:
Brandi Wilkins Catanese, Ph.D. Stanford University. Drama          higher in all University work, as well as a 3.5 GPA
  and humanities (Theatre, Dance, and Performance                  or higher in the African American studies major.         Issues of Development. History of the African Di-
  Studies)
G. Ugo Nwokeji, Ph.D. University of Toronto. African and           Students in the program must complete two con-           aspora; Social and Cultural Institutions; Urban So-
  African diaspora history, the Atlantic slave trade               secutive semesters of African American Studies           ciology; Politics of Culture; Political Economy of the
Leigh Raiford, Ph.D. Yale University. African American             H195A-H195B under the supervision of a faculty           Diaspora.
  studies and American studies
                                                                   member, culminating in the completion of a senior
                                                                                                                            Cultural Studies. Comparative Literatures and
                                                                   honors thesis or equivalent project.
                                                                                                                            Cultures; Critical Theory, Popular Culture, Perfor-
                                                                                                                            mance and Film; and Women’s Studies.
Adjunct Professor
Robert Allen (Graduate Adviser) Ph.D. University of
                                                                   Minor Requirements                                       The University requires a minimum of two years or
  California, San Francisco. Sociology                                                                                      four semesters of academic residence for all Ph.D.
                                                                   Students in the College of Letters and Science may       programs. Academic residence is defined as en-
Affiliated Professors
                                                                   complete one or more minors of their choice, nor-        rollment in at least 4 units in the 100 or 200 series
Jocelyne Guilbault, Ph.D. University of Michigan. Caribbean
  music studies, popular music, cultural studies (Music)           mally in a field both academically and administra-        of courses. Thus every graduate student must en-
Waldo E. Martin Jr., Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.     tively distinct from their major.                        roll in and complete a minimum of 4 units of upper
  Recent U.S., black, cultural, intellectual (History)
Mary Lovelace O’Neal, M.F.A. Columbia University. (Art             For the minor in African American studies, students      division or graduate coursework or both per re-
  Practice)                                                        must complete at least one lower division course         quired semester of academic residency. The pro-
Tyler E. Stovall, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison.                                                                   gram will require at least 48 semester units. At
  French history (History)                                         selected from AAS 4A, AAS 4B, AAS 5A, or AAS
Minh-ha T. Trinh, Ph.D. University of Illinois. Feminist theory,   5B and five upper division courses in the Depart-         least 24 of the 48 units completed must be grad-
  film theory and production, comparative literary and art          ment of African American Studies.                        uate courses in the Department of African Ameri-
  theory, cultural politics, Third World arts and politics                                                                  can Studies. After successful completion of course-
                                                                   Consistent with Letters and Science requirements,        work with a minimum GPA of 3.3, the department
                                                                   a GPA of 2.0 is required in all courses applied to       will administer a pre-qualifying examination based
Overview of Curriculum                                             the minor program. All courses in the minor must         upon general knowledge in the field of African
                                                                   be taken for a letter grade. Students may petition       American studies.
The Department of African American Studies offers                  to have transfer credits accepted, but transfer stu-
students a bachelor of arts degree as well as a mi-                dents must take a minimum of three upper division        Students who have been accepted to this program
nor in African American studies. The curriculum fo-                courses from the Department of African American          and have earned a master’s degree in another pro-
cuses on Africa and the African diaspora, with par-                Studies.                                                 gram will be evaluated based on requirements for
ticular attention paid to the life and culture of the                                                                       the pre-qualifying examinations.
populations of African descent in North America
and the Caribbean. There is also some focus on                     Old Major Requirements                                   Lower Division Courses
populations of African descent in Latin America and                                                                         R1A. Freshman Composition. (4) Three hours of lec-
Europe. The program is interdisciplinary and pre-                  Program changes were effective beginning fall            ture and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequi-
pares students to use and develop analytical ap-                   1995. Students who declared the major before fall        sites: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement. Formerly
proaches to critical issues associated with the                    1995 are not required to meet the new require-           1A. Training in expository, argumentative, and other
African diaspora.                                                  ments. Their programs of study will be based on          styles of writing. The assignments will focus on themes
                                                                   existing requirements.Students completing College        and issues in African American life and culture.
In preparation for declaring a major in African                    of Letters and Science breadth requirements under
American studies, students should complete the                                                                              Satisfies the first half of the Reading and Composition
                                                                   the six-course rule should consult with the de-          requirement. (F,SP) Staff
Reading and Composition requirement and fresh-                     partment regarding the breadth requirement. Refer
man/sophomore seminars. African American Stud-                     to requirements listed in the College of Letters and     R1B. Freshman Composition. (4) Three hours of lec-
ies offers lower division courses that satisfy the                 Science announcement, “Earning Your Degree.”             ture and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequi-
American Cultures and College of Letters and Sci-                                                                           sites: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement and 1A.
ence breadth requirements. For a list of current                                                                            Formerly 1B. Continued training in expository and ar-
semester freshman/sophomore seminars and other                     Graduate Program                                         gumentative writing, with more emphasis on literary in-
courses with selected topics, consult the descrip-                                                                          terpretation. Satisfies the second half of the Reading
tion of courses for the current semester available                 Students are admitted to graduate studies in the         and Composition requirement. (F,SP) Staff
at the department office.                                           fall semester only. Applicants must file a University
                                                                   of California, Berkeley graduate application; two        4A. Africa: History and Culture. (4) Three hours of
                                                                   official transcripts from all colleges and universities   lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Em-
Major Requirements                                                 attended; three letters of recommendation; writing       phasis on pre-colonial social, cultural, political, and
                                                                   sample (no more than 14 pages) that best reflects         economic structures; introduction to art, literature, oral
Completion of or enrollment in the following four                  their program/research interests. TOEFL (required        traditions, and belief systems. (F) Nwokeji
courses is required in order to declare the major:                 for all international students). Applications are ac-    4B. Africa: History and Culture. (4) Three hours of
AAS 4A-4B, Africa: History and Culture; and AAS                    cepted for the Ph.D. only.                               lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Em-
5A-5B, Black Life and Culture. Students are strongly
                                                                   The African American Studies graduate program            phasis on social, political, and economic change in
encouraged to complete the lower division require-
                                                                   focuses on life, culture, and social organization        20th century Africa; with further emphasis upon the
ments early in their academic program.
                                                                   (broadly defined) of persons of African descent.          roles of modernization, urbanization, and the emer-
Upon declaring the major, students are required to                 Africa, North America, and the Caribbean are cen-        gence of contemporary African states. (F,SP) Nwokeji
complete the following upper division core re-                     tral components of the program. Students are ex-         5A. African American Life and Culture in the
quirements:                                                        pected to apply a multidisciplinary approach to the      United States. (4) Three hours of lecture and one

        B prefix=language course for business majors                     R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                *Professor of the Graduate School
        C prefix=cross-listed course                                     AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures             †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
        H prefix=honors course                                           requirement
104 / African American Studies
hour of discussion per week. A study of the genesis,         lectual topic with a faculty member and a group of           examination of the structural and actual manifestations
development, and scope of African American culture,          peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are         of Third World underdevelopment and the broad spec-
approached through an examination of selected art            offered in all campus departments; topics vary from          trum of theoretical positions put forward to explain it.
forms, historical themes, and intellectual currents.         department to department and from semester to                Underdevelopment will be viewed from both the in-
(F,SP) Allen                                                 semester. (F,SP) Staff                                       ternational and intranational perspective. (F) Hintzen
5B. African American Life and Culture in the                 84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-               112B. Political and Economic Development in the
United States. (4) Three hours of lecture and one            peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar       Third World. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour
hour of discussion per week. Emphasis on the social          per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half         of discussion per week. A critical appraisal of the the-
experience of African Americans. An interdisciplinary        hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two         oretically based policies employed by Third World na-
approach designed to help students understand the            hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.          tions in their attempts at transition to modernized de-
forces and ideas that are influencing the individual and      Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five             veloped socio-political and economic systems and an
collective African American experience. (F,SP) Staff         weeks. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not             examination of the international and intranational im-
                                                             passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-         pediments to Third World development. The focus will
C15. Geographies of Race and Gender. (4) Three               grade basis. Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.     be on actual examples that represent the diversity of
hours of lecture and one hour of mandatory discussion        Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses of-         developing countries. (SP) Hintzen
per week. What can geography contribute to our un-           fered by faculty members in departments all across the
derstanding of gender inequality and racial discrimi-                                                                     116. Slavery and African American Life Before
                                                             campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for
nation in a globalizing world? The course examines (a)                                                                    1865. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of dis-
                                                             close, regular intellectual contact between faculty
how supposedly “natural” differences are actually pro-                                                                    cussion per week. This course will examine the origins
                                                             members and students in the crucial second year. The
duced through everyday practices in particular spatial                                                                    of the African slave trade, and explore political, eco-
                                                             topics vary from department to department and
contexts; (b) historical and cultural geographies of race                                                                 nomic, demographic and cultural factors shaping
                                                             semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sopho-
and gender in the U.S. in relation to those in other                                                                      African American life and culture prior to 1865. (F,SP)
                                                             mores. (F,SP)
parts of the world, including South Africa; and (c) how                                                                   Taylor
these concepts and comparative historical geographies        98. Directed Group Studies for Freshmen and
                                                                                                                          117. African Americans in the Industrial Age, 1865-
can help us think critically and constructively about        Sophomores. (1-4) Course may be repeated for
                                                                                                                          1970. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of dis-
questions of social change in the face of globalization.     credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to
                                                                                                                          cussion per week. With emphasis given to the orga-
Also listed as Geography C15 and Gender and                  Courses and Curricula section of this catalog. Super-
                                                                                                                          nization of labor after slavery, this course will explore
Women’s Studies C15.                                         vised research. Must be taken on a passed/not passed
                                                                                                                          the history of African American cultural, institutions and
                                                             basis. Supervised research on specific topics related
24. Freshman Seminars. (1) Course may be repeated                                                                         protest traditions from the Civil War to the Civil Rights
                                                             to African American Studies. (F,SP)
for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per                                                                       Movement. (SP) Taylor
week. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade ba-        99. Supervised Independent Studies for Freshmen
                                                                                                                          119. Selected Topics in the Sociohistorical De-
sis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed        and Sophomores. (1-4) Course may be repeated for
                                                                                                                          velopment of the Black World. (1-4) Course may be
basis. The Berkeley Seminar Program has been de-             credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to
                                                                                                                          repeated for credit. One to four hours of lecture per
signed to provide new students with the opportunity to       Courses and Curricula section of this catalog. Super-
                                                                                                                          week per unit. Prerequisites: Determined by offering.
explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a     vised research. Must be taken on a passed/not passed
                                                                                                                          Topics will vary each semester. (F,SP)
small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered         basis. Supervised research on specific topics related
in all campus departments, and topics vary from de-          to African American Studies. (F,SP)                          121. Black Political Life in the United States. (4)
partment to department and semester to semester.                                                                          Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per
                                                             Upper Division Courses
(F,SP)                                                                                                                    week. Prerequisites: 5B or 116 and 117 or History
                                                             100. Introduction to African American Studies. (4)           125A-125B. Analysis of the theoretical and historical
25AC. Male and Ethnic in American Culture. (3)
                                                             Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per        development of African Americans’ political forms and
Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per
                                                             week. Prerequisites: Reading and composition re-             expression. Examination of local, state, and federal po-
week. The course examines the interplay of ethnicity
                                                             quirement. This course, lets students explore the sta-       litical processes and activities, and the development of
and male gender in three groups, Italians, Puerto Ri-
                                                             tus of African American studies as a discipline. The         black political ideologies, organizations, and move-
cans, and African Americans. Interdisciplinary in ap-
                                                             class will discuss the social relevance of African Amer-     ments. Henry
proach, the course will reveal the complexities of gen-
                                                             ican studies, the political origins of the discipline, and
der, class, and race in the social quilt of American life.                                                                122. African American Families in American So-
                                                             the debate over Afrocentricity. Special attention will be
This course satisfies the American Cultures require-                                                                       ciety. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequi-
                                                             devoted to the contributions of black feminist theory
ment. (SP) Staff                                                                                                          sites: 5B or introductory course in sociology. Examines
                                                             and community scholars/organic intellectuals to the de-
                                                                                                                          the historical roles and functions of families in the de-
26. Black Music and Musicians in American Cul-               velopment of the discipline. Raiford
                                                                                                                          velopment of black people in America from slavery to
ture. (2) One and one-half hours of lecture per week.
                                                             101. Research Methods for African American Stud-             the present.
Examines the impact of African American music, and
                                                             ies. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of labo-
the artists who produce it, on American culture in the                                                                    123. Social and Political Thought in the Diaspora.
                                                             ratory per week. Prerequisites: Introductory statistics.
20th century. (F,SP) Staff                                                                                                (3) Three hours of lecture per week. An examination of
                                                             As an introduction to interdisciplinary research meth-
                                                                                                                          social and political thought of Africans traveling across
27AC. Lives of Struggle: Minorities in a Majority            ods as they are applied to the study of African Amer-
                                                                                                                          the Diaspora, with particular focus on the 19th and
Culture. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. The pur-       ican communities, the course will examine theoretical
                                                                                                                          20th centuries. (F,SP) Small
pose of this course is to examine the many forms that        and conceptual issues; techniques for identifying ex-
the struggle of minorities can assume. The focus is on       isting research; and sources and methods of social re-       124. Political Philosophy of Martin Luther King Jr.
individual struggle and its outcome as reported and          search and data collection. The main focus will be on        (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Using the thought
perceived by the individuals themselves. Members of          qualitative methods.                                         and actions of Martin Luther King, this course exam-
three minority aggregates are considered: African                                                                         ines the major events of the Civil Rights Movement.
                                                             107. Race and Public Policy. (3) Three hours of lec-
Americans, Asian Americans (so called), and Chi-                                                                          Reading includes original works by King as well as
                                                             ture per week. This course examines the formation
cano/Latino Americans. The choice of these three                                                                          secondary sources with a special emphasis on African
                                                             and implementation of public policies directly relevant
has to do with the different histories of members of                                                                      American religion, nonviolence, and integration. (F,SP)
                                                             to the black community. While the policies analyzed
these aggregrates. Such differences have produced                                                                         Staff
                                                             differ from year to year, basic public policy methodol-
somewhat different approaches to struggle. This
                                                             ogy will be introduced each year. Henry                      125. History of the Civil Rights Movement. (4) Three
course satisfies the American Cultures requirement.
                                                                                                                          hours of lecture per week. The objective of this course
(F) Hintzen                                                  109. Black and Male in American Life. (3) Three
                                                                                                                          is to examine the modern civil rights movement. As un-
                                                             hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Upper divi-
28AC. Globalization and Minority American Com-                                                                            derstood traditionally, this period began with the United
                                                             sion status. The course examines ways gender and
munities. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. An ex-                                                                     States Supreme Court decision of May 17, 1954,
                                                             race constructions shape the lives of African American
amination of the movement of individuals, ideas, ide-                                                                     Brown vs. Board of Education, until the passage of the
                                                             males. Developmental in design, we examine black
ologies, and institutions between minority American                                                                       Voting Rights Act of 1965. This course will seek to
                                                             males in the context of childhood, adolescence, gen-
communities in the U.S. (African Americans, Asians,                                                                       place this movement in the context of global devel-
                                                             der relations and family, and the world of work. (SP)
Chicanos) and their cultures of origin, in the 19th and                                                                   opments and in the context of the broad sweep of
                                                             Staff
20th centuries. The course will utilize the concepts of                                                                   United States history. Assigned readings consist of his-
“migration,” “diaspora,” “otherness,” “multiculturalism,”    111. Race, Class, and Gender in the United States.           torical texts and autobiographies. Lectures will place
and “global village” and will draw largely on social sci-    (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:          the readings in context, discussing the material and its
ence perspectives. This course satisfies the American         Reading and composition requirement. Emphasis on             significance in the overall history and culture of African
Cultures requirement. (SP) Small                             social history and comparative analysis of race, class,      Americans. Visual and musical media will augment the
                                                             and gender relations in American society. Examines           class lectures. (F,SP) Taylor
39. Freshman/Sophomore Seminar. Course may be
                                                             both similarities and differences, and highlights gender
repeated for credit as topic varies. Seminar format.                                                                      126. African American Women’s History. (4) Three
                                                             politics.
Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sopho-                                                                      hours of lecture per week. The objective of this course
mores. Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower           112A. Political and Economic Development in the              is to examine substantive issues in the African Amer-
division students the opportunity to explore an intel-       Third World. (4) Four hours of lecture per week. An          ican female experience from colonial times to the pre-
                                                                                                                                       African American Studies / 105

sent. The dominant themes of this course include fam-         Examines through lectures and a selection of films, the         structor. Study and production of a play by an African
ily, work, community, sexuality, and individual and col-      development and achievements of Third World motion             American writer. The play will be studied within its so-
lective activism. Particular attention will be paid to the    picture artistry. Social, political, and cultural themes are   cial and historical context. Students will be introduced
interplay between race, class, and gender in American         discussed, with particular emphasis given to major             to the various aspects of theatre production. Also listed
society. Assigned readings consist of an introduction         works from Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Other              as Theater, Dance, and Performance St C183C.
to the scholarly secondary literature on African Amer-        newly developed film sources from abroad are pre-
ican women’s history. Lectures and discussions will ex-       sented for critical assessment. (F)                            144. Introduction to Cultural Studies: Black Visual
amine the readings in context. Videos will augment the                                                                       Culture. (4) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-
lectures and discussions. (F) Taylor                          142AC. Race and American Film. (4) Three hours of              requisites: Reading and composition requirement. This
                                                              lecture and two hours of viewing/discussion per week.          course examines theories of culture and contemporary
131. Caribbean Societies and Cultures. (3) Three              Prerequisites: Reading and composition requirement             issues in popular culture. The course focuses on the
hours of lecture per week. Comparative study of Span-         satisfied. This course uses film to investigate the cen-         instrumentality of culture as a vehicle of domination
ish, Dutch, English, and French-speaking Caribbean            tral role of race in American culture and history. Using       and resistance. The goal of the course is to provide the
societies. Analysis of Caribbean social structure in-         films as the primary texts, the course will explore the         student with a critical vocabulary for cultural analysis.
cluding the development of the plantation system, ur-         relationship between these films and the social and po-         Key issues to be examined are ideology, hegemony,
ban dynamics, ethnic politics, family structures, and         litical contexts from which they emerged. Looking at           articulation, race and gender formation. Students must
ecology of African Caribbean religions. (SP) Laguerre         both mainstream and independent cinema, the course             have a willingness to engage new and difficult ideas.
                                                              will chart the continuities and varieties of representa-       (F,SP) Raiford
C132. Psychology of African American People:                  tions and negotiations of “race.” The course spans the
Current Issues. (3) Three hours of lecture per week.          20th century, covering (among other topics) Jim Crow           C145. Gospel Chorus. (2) Course may be repeated
Prerequisites: Africam 5B or 101A, or upper division          in silent film, Hollywood westerns and melodramas,              for credit. Three hours of large ensemble and one hour
course in psychology. Examines psychological re-              borderland crime dramas, documentary film, and ex-              of sectionals per week. A course that will focus on the
search and theory pertaining to African American peo-         perimental cinema. This class will concentrate on the          performance of choral music of the African American
ple. Emphasis on understanding the concerns, meth-            history of African Americans in film, but we will also          gospel music tradition with a particular emphasis on
ods and conclusions regarding African Americans               watch movies that consider how the overlapping his-            contemporary performance techniques. The Gospel
offered by American psychology from its origins to the        tories of whiteness and ethnicity, American Indians,           Chorus, as is the case with other formal University mu-
present. Also listed as Psychology C105.                      Asian Americans, Mexican Americans, the “Third                 sic performance ensembles, will prepare music to be
                                                              World” and “multiculturalism” have been represented            presented to the public in at least two concerts each
134. Information Technology and Society. (4) Three                                                                           semester. Students will be selected for the chorus on
hours of lecture per week. This course assesses the           in film. Themes covered include representing race and
                                                              nation; the borderlands; passing and miscegenation;            the basis of individual auditions. Also listed as Music
role of information technology in the digitalization of so-                                                                  C143. (F,SP) Henderson
ciety by focusing on the deployment of e-government,          the intersections of race, gender, and sexuality. This
e-commerce, e-learning, the digital city, telecommut-         course satisfies the American Cultures requirement.             C146. History of the African American Music The-
ing, virtual communities, Internet time, the virtual office,   (F,SP) Raiford                                                 atre. (3) Course may be repeated for credit subject to
and the geography of cyberspace. Course will also dis-        142B. The Cross-Cultural Images of American Mi-                acceptance of petition. Three hours of lecture per
cuss the role of information technology in the gover-         norities in Film. (4) Three hours of lecture and two           week. Prerequisites: Dramatic Art 120, senior standing,
nance and economic development of society. (F,SP)             hours of viewing/discussion per week. Prerequisites:           or consent of instructor. This course will cover the ori-
Laguerre                                                      Reading and composition requirement. A critical, his-          gins and development of musical theatre productions,
                                                              torical course describing the cross-cultural images of         created, and performed by African Americans, with a
C134. Information Technology and Society. (4) Stu-                                                                           view towards elucidating the dynamic role that African
dents will receive no credit for C134 after taking 134.       black Americans, aligned with other ethnic minorities,
                                                              with attention to comparative changes in their cine-           American musical theatre has played in the develop-
Three hours of lecture per week. This course assesses                                                                        ment of the mainstream American musical theatre
the role of information technology in the digitaliza-         matic depictions, from the silent era to the present. Im-
                                                              portant works that formed specific images of the di-            drama. Also listed as Theater, Dance, and Perfor-
tion of society by focusing on the deployment of e-                                                                          mance St C133.
government, e-commerce, e-learning, the digital city,         verse American population (including Native American,
telecommuting, virtual communities, internet time, the        Asian, Hispanic, and other immigrant groups, recently          150B. African American Literature 1920 to Present.
virtual office, and the geography of cyber space. The          integrated into American culture) are viewed and dis-          (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Survey of African
course will also discuss the role of information tech-        cussed in order to expose deformations of censorship           American literature from the Harlem Renaissance
nology in the governance and economic development             and history, and to recognize the struggles against            to the present. A close analysis of major writers,
of society. Also listed as American Studies C134.             prejudices and taboos. This course satisfies the Amer-          premises. (F,SP)
(F,SP) Laguerre                                               ican Cultures requirement. (SP)
                                                                                                                             C151A. African American Plays from 1858 to 1959.
135. Caribbean Cultural History. (3) Three hours of           142D. Race and American Film. (4) Two hours of lec-            (4) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:
lecture per week. An examination of the history and           ture and two hours of discussion/viewing. Prerequi-            Reading and composition requirement. Historical
cultural evolution of the French, Dutch, Spanish, and         sites: Reading and composition requirement. This               survey of plays by African American writers and the
English-speaking Caribbean societies from the slav-           course uses film to investigate the central role of race        portrayal of the black experience in theatre. Emphasis
ery era to the Second World War. Particular attention         in American culture and history. Using films as the pri-        on predominant themes, structural tendencies, socio-
will be paid to African-Caribbean cultural institutions       mary texts, the course will explore the relationship be-       historical context. Also listed as Theater, Dance, and
and practices; immigration of Chinese, East Indians,          tween these films and the social and political contexts         Performance St C131A.
Lebanese, Canary Islanders, and Jews during the               from which they emerged. Looking at both mainstream
post-emancipation period; political history; and the his-     and independent cinema, the course will chart the con-         151B. Contemporary African American Drama. (4)
torical and structural evolution of Caribbean cities. (F)     tinuities and varieties of representations and negotia-        Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 151A
Laguerre                                                      tions of race. (F,SP) Raiford                                  or consent of instructor. Survey of contemporary
                                                                                                                             plays by African American writers and the portrayal
137. Multicultural Communities. (3) Three hours of            C143A. Performance:An African American Per-                    of the black experience in American theatre. Emphasis
seminar per week. Examination of theoretical issues in        spective. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-            on predominant themes, structural tendencies, socio-
urban anthropology and sociology pertaining to the            requisites: 1A or consent of instructor. Introduction to       historical context. (F,SP)
United States as a multicultural society. Comparative         the Research-to Performance Method, African Amer-
analysis of the ecology and social structure of African       ican aesthetics and dramatic performance techniques.           C151B. Contemporary African American Drama. (4)
American, Native American, Asian American, Mexican            Course will survey wide range of writings on perfor-           Four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 151A or
American and Afro-Caribbean urban communities with            mance and investigate applications through exercises           consent of instructor. Survey of contemporary plays by
special emphasis on social class, ethnicity, and culture.     and improvisations. Students will also assist in infor-        African American writers and the portrayal of the black
(SP) Laguerre                                                 mation gathering for works in progress. Also listed as         experience in American theatre. Emphasis on pre-
                                                              Theater, Dance, and Performance St C183A.                      dominant themes, structural tendencies, socio-histor-
138. Black Nationalism. (4) Four hours of lecture per                                                                        ical context. Also listed as Theater, Dance, and Per-
week. Prerequisites: 5B. Examines the concept of              C143B. Research-to-Performance Laboratory. (3)                 formance St C131B. (SP)
black nationalism and its historical and intellectual de-     Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 143A
velopment. Special attention will be given to the role of     or consent of instructor. Development of scholarly ma-         C152C. African American Dramatic Literature:
African American religion and the attempt to develop          terial for theatrical presentation and enhancement of          Forms and Styles. (3) Three hours of lecture/labo-
“black socialism.” (F,SP) Henry                               dramatic performance techniques through discussions,           ratory per week. Introduction to play analysis with em-
                                                              improvisations and readings of work conceived by the           phasis on the primary theatrical form of styles chosen
139. Selected Topics of African American Social               class and/or writers in other African American Studies         by African American playwrights and the thematic con-
Organization and Institutions. (1-4) Course may be            courses. All source material will be based on the re-          sequences of those choices. Plays will be analyzed
repeated for credit. One to four hours of lecture per         search of scholars in the field of African American             both as literature and as theatrical production; e.g., lab-
week per unit. Prerequisites: Determined by offering.         Studies. Also listed as Theater, Dance, and Perfor-            oratory will include attendance at plays and perfor-
Topics will vary each semester. (F,SP) Staff                  mance St C183B.                                                mance of plays. Also listed as Theater, Dance, and
                                                                                                                             Performance St C132.
142A. Third World Cinema. (4) Three hours of lec-             C143C. Black Theatre Workshop. (3) Course may be
ture, plus two hours of viewing/discussion per week.          repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week.          C153A. Images of African American Women in Lit-
Prerequisites: Reading and composition requirement.           Prerequisites: 143A or equivalent or consent of in-            erature: Slavery to the 20th Century. (3) Three


       B prefix=language course for business majors                  R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                     *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                  AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                  †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                        requirement
106 / African American Studies
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.        hours of lecture per week per unit. Prerequisites:            ganizations. Regular individual meetings with faculty
Prerequisites: Reading and Composition requirement.          Reading and composition requirement, plus those set           sponsor and written reports required. Independent
Analysis of the cultural, literary, and social assumptions   by instructor. Special topics in African American liter-      study form available in department office. (F,SP) Staff
that contribute to the various images of African Amer-       ature. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                           198. Directed Group Studies for Undergraduates.
ican women in Western literature and African American
                                                             160. African Literatures. (4) Three hours of lecture          (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is
writing. The course explores the literature of 19th-cen-
                                                             per week. An introduction to writings by African authors      restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-
tury African American women, an exploding field in
                                                             from the Anglophone, Francophone, and Lusophone               ricula section of this catalog. Must be taken on a
American literary discourse. Also listed as Gender and
                                                             regions of colonized Africa. The course sets the read-        passed/not passed basis. Supervised research on a
Women’s Studies C153A. (F)
                                                             ings within the contexts of their articulation from the       specific topic. (F,SP) Staff
C153B. Contemporary Images of African American               1930s through 1980s, from dependence through in-
                                                                                                                           199. Supervised Independent Study and Research.
Women in Literature. (3) Three hours of lecture and          dependence and neo-colonialism or post-colonial writ-
                                                                                                                           (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is
one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Read-        ing. Clark
                                                                                                                           restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-
ing and Composition requirement. Analysis of the cul-
                                                             161. African Theater. (4) Three hours of lecture per          ricula section of this catalog. Must be taken on a
tural and social assumptions and dynamics that shape
                                                             week. Prerequisites: 160 or consent of instructor. The        passed/not passed basis. Forms for independent study
the image of the African American woman in con-                                                                            are available in the department office. (F,SP) Staff
                                                             course introduces readers to dramatic texts produced
temporary Western African American writing. Also
                                                             in France, Africa, and the Caribbean from 1958 to the
listed as Gender and Women’s Studies C153B. (SP)                                                                           Graduate Courses
                                                             present. From Genet’s The Blacks through Aidoo’s
154. Negritude: French African Literature. (4) Three         Anowa, the perspective of analysis engages theory             201A. Interdisciplinary Research Methods. (4)
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Reading and        with practice. Based on a research-to-performance             Three hours of seminar per week. This seminar will
composition requirement. An introduction to Negritude        method, the course requires students to produce a             provide a detailed introduction and working knowledge
and racial consciousness in the creative and political       one-act play derived from former or current research          of the various methodological techniques appropriate
writings of French-speaking Africans and Antilleans. In-     efforts. Clark                                                for interdisciplinary research on the African Diaspora.
cludes close readings of works by Aime Cesaire, Leon         162. Caribbean Literature by Women Authors:                   201B. Qualitative Research Methods for African
Damas, Frantz Fanon, Cheikh Hamidou Kane, Ferdi-             Marasa. (4) Three hours of lecture per week. This             American Studies. (4) Four hours of seminar per
nand Oyono, and Joseph Zobel. Students learn to revise       course in literary theory uses concepts of twinning           week. A review of competing epistemologies in qual-
the literary history of Negritude (1931-1966) through        in African Diasapora discourse as a means of over-            itative research of African Americans. (SP) Small
examinations of primary sources. Clark                       coming binary oppositions in contemporary writing
                                                                                                                           240. Special Topics in Cultural Studies of the Di-
155. Literature of the Caribbean: Significant                 by women authors from the Caribbean. Includes
                                                                                                                           aspora. (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. One
Themes. (4) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-            novels and testimonial literature by authors from the
                                                                                                                           to four hours of lecture per week. One hour of lecture
requisites: Reading and composition requirement. An          Creole, English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish
                                                                                                                           per week per unit. Topics will vary from term to term
introduction to representative works, themes, and dis-       Caribbeans—namely, contemporary works by Merle
                                                                                                                           depending on student demand and faculty availability.
courses in Caribbean literatures—produced by authors         Hodge, Jean Rhys, Simone Schwartz-Bart, Carolina
                                                                                                                           (F,SP) Staff
from the Anglophone, Creolophone, Francophone, and           deJesus, and Rosario Ferre. (F,SP) Clark
Hispanophone areas within Plantation America. In-                                                                          241. Special Topics in Development Studies of the
                                                             163. African Literature by Women. (4) Three hours
cludes examinations of indigenous folkways and nation                                                                      Diaspora. (1-4) One to four hours of lecture per week.
                                                             of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Reading and com-
languages as sources for a re-examination of Caribbean                                                                     One hour of lecture per week per unit. Topics will vary
                                                             position requirement. An introduction to writing by
culture and literary history. (F) Clark                                                                                    from term to term depending on student demand and
                                                             women authors from East, Southern, West Africa, and
                                                                                                                           faculty availability. (F,SP) Staff
156AC. Poetry for the People: Introduction to the            the Maghreb. Course explores 19th-century orature,
Art of Poetry. (4) Course may be repeated for credit.        early settler narratives, and 20th-century significant         251. African American Women’s History. (4) Three
Two to three hours of lecture and one to two hours of        themes and discourses, such as polyggny, bride price,         hours of seminar per week. The objective of this
discussion per week. A large lecture/discussion class        motherhood, the veil, apartheid, novels of formation,         course is to examine substantive issues in the African
which introduces students to poetry as culture, history,     and narratives. (SP) Clark                                    American female experience from colonial times to the
criticism, politics, and practice. Focusing comparatively                                                                  present. The dominant themes of this course include
                                                             C170. Fanon and the Network Society. (4) Three
on poetry from three American racial/ethnic groups,                                                                        family, work, community, sexuality, and individual and
                                                             hours of seminar per week. Fanon is one of the fore-
this course requires students to learn both the tech-                                                                      collective activism. (F) Taylor
                                                             most theorists of race and decolonization in the 20th
nical structure of various forms of poetry as well as the    century. Today, we are no longer under the Cold War,          253A. Public Policy Analysis: Race and Culture in
world views which inform specific poetic traditions. The      racism is taking a new turn, and the technification of         Domestic Policy. (4) Three hours of seminar per
groups and traditions vary from semester to semester.        society may make us believe that reading Fanon may            week. This course will use the issues of full employ-
This course satisfies the Arts and Literature breadth re-     have historical interest but be irrelevant to deal with is-   ment and multiculturalism as an approach to examin-
quirement. This course satisfies the American Cultures        sues brought about by globalization and the network           ing the impact of race and culture on domestic policy.
requirement. (F,SP)                                          society. This seminar combines readings in the hu-            Our focus will be on the process of political innovation
158A. Poetry for the People: The Writing and                 manities and social sciences, along with Frantz               and agenda setting rather than the more traditional ar-
Teaching of Poetry. (4) Four hours of seminar per            Fanon’s texts on decolonization, society, and subjec-         eas of institutional decision-making and implementa-
week, plus community workshop teaching. Prerequi-            tivity, in order to imagine a more just, democratic, and      tion because it is usually at the formative stage that
sites: 156AC plus consent of instructor. The focus of        “human” society. Also listed as Ethnic Studies C170.          crucial decisions are made. (SP) Henry
this course is on the writing of poetry, and students un-    (F) Maldonado-Torres
                                                                                                                           254. Globalization and Caribbean Modernity. (4)
dertake an intensive study of both the techniques of         190AC. Advanced Seminar in African Diaspora                   Three hours of seminar per week. This seminar exam-
poetry and the social and cultural context of specific        Studies. (3-4) Course may be repeated for credit as           ines the social construction of the modern Caribbean
poetic traditions. Students must “imitate” the poems         topic varies. Three hours of lecture per week. For a          subject, the transnationality of the Caribbean state, the
they study, write critical papers comparing poetic tra-      four-unit course, an extra assignment/research com-           localization of the globalization process. Laguerre
ditions, and complete an original manuscript of new          ponent will be added to the course to increase contact
poems. In addition, they must produce an on-campus           hours with students. Possible components include ad-          256A. Multiculturalisms. (4) Three hours of seminar
poetry reading and are required to teach for five to          ditional readings, outside of class reserach projects         per week. This seminar uses an epistemological and
seven weeks at one of the assigned Poetry for the            and other projects which the instructor feels will add to     hermeneutic approach to locate and study the ethnic
People venues. This course satisfies the Arts and Lit-        the value of course. Topics to be announced at the be-        question in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. It examines
erature breadth requirement. This course satisfies the        ginning of each semester. This course satisfies the            the social construction of ethnicity and deconstructs it
American Cultures requirement. (F)                           American Cultures requirement. (F,SP) Staff                   in relation to the gender and class positions of the sub-
                                                                                                                           ject. Modernist and postmodernist theories dealing with
158B. Poetry for the People: Practicum. (4) Four             H195A-H195B. Senior Honors Thesis. (3;3) Regular              state formation and inter-ethnic relations will be scru-
hours of seminar, plus peer teaching and performance.        individual meetings with faculty sponsor. Credit and          tinized. National, transnational, and global aspects of
Prerequisites: 158A. A teaching practicum, with the          grade to be awarded on completion of sequence. Pre-           ethnicity will be discussed. The technology of the in-
regular and active supervision of the instructor, for stu-   requisites: Senior standing and 3.5 GPA overall and in        frapolitics of minority groups in both colonial and post-
dents who completed 156AC during the previous year           major. The student will complete a primary research           colonial settings will be assessed. (F) Laguerre
and 158A in the previous fall. They serve as student         and writing project based on study of an advanced
teacher poets for 156AC. The focus of 158B is on the                                                                       256B. Diaspora, Citizenship, and Transnationality.
                                                             topic with faculty sponsor. Fulfills department thesis re-
teaching of poetry. Each student poet is responsible for                                                                   (4) Three hours of seminar per week. This seminar an-
                                                             quirement. Application and details at departmental ad-
a group of seven to ten students, and, under the direct                                                                    alyzes the social construction and reproduction of di-
                                                             viser’s office. Students must enroll for both semesters
supervision of the instructor, helps the students in                                                                       asporic communities in the U.S., Canada, and Europe.
                                                             of the sequence. (F,SP) Staff
his/her group learn to read, criticize, and produce po-                                                                    It examines the relations of the diaspora to the home-
etry. This course satisfies the American Cultures re-         197. Field Study in African American Life. (1-4)              land in the context of the globalization process. The
quirement. (SP)                                              Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is re-          role of transnational migration and deterritorialization
                                                             stricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula       in the production of bipolar, fragmented, and multiple
159. Special Topics in African American Literature.          section of this catalog. Must be taken on a passed/not        identities will be analyzed. Postnational models of cit-
(1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. One to four         passed basis. Supervised field work in off-campus or-          izenship—differentiated, transnational, and multicul-
                                                                                                                     Agriculture and Resource Economics / 107

tural—will be assessed in light of poststructuralist the-   week. The seminar provides a systemic approach to            instructor. Research in agricultural and environmental
ories. (SP) Laguerre                                        theories and practices of critical pedagogy at the uni-      chemistry. (F,SP) Staff
                                                            versity level. Examines the arts of teaching and learning
257A. Identity Politics in the Caribbean and Africa.        and current disciplinary and cross-disciplinary issues in
(4) Three hours of seminar per week. An exhaustive
examination of the conditions under which identity con-
                                                            African/diaspora and Ethnic Studies. Participation two
                                                            hours per week as practicum in 39, “Introduction to the
                                                                                                                         Agricultural and
structs (race, ethnicity, nation, religion, language, re-
gion, etc.) come to occupy the symbolic center in the
                                                            University: African American Perspectives” is manda-
                                                            tory. The course is required for students expecting to
                                                                                                                         Resource Economics
organization of mass political movements in non-in-         serve as graduate student instructors in the depart-         (College of Natural Resources)
dustrialized Third World societies. The course will be      ment. Also listed as Ethnic Studies Graduate Group
comparative in scope using case histories from Africa       C301. (F,SP)                                                 Department Office: 207 Giannini Hall, (510) 642-3345
and the Caribbean. It will focus on the relationship be-                                                                 are.berkeley.edu
tween the “politics of identity,” national economic de-                                                                  Chair: Larry Karp, Ph.D.
cision making, and the distribution of economic, social,
cultural, and symbolic capital. (SP) Hintzen                Agricultural and                                             Professors
                                                                                                                         Peter Berck, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
257B. Power, Domination, and Ideology. (4) Three
hours of seminar per week. This course will focus on
                                                            Environmental                                                   Natural resources, applied microeconomics
                                                                                                                         Severin Borenstein (Professor of Business Administration
                                                                                                                            and Agricultural and Resource Economics) Ph.D.
theories and realities of power, domination, and ide-
ology as they pertain to issues of identity in the post-
                                                            Chemistry                                                       Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Industrial
                                                                                                                            organization and government regulation, law and
                                                                                                                            economics, applied macroeconomic theory
World War II political economies of Africa and the          (College of Natural Resources)                               Alain de Janvry, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
African diaspora. Hintzen                                                                                                   International rural economic development
                                                                                                                         Anthony C. Fisher, Ph.D. Columbia University. Natural
                                                            Office: 111E Koshland Hall, (510) 642-5167                       resources and environmental public economics, micro-
262. Black Feminist Criticism. (4) Three hours of           plantbio.berkeley.edu/newpmb/academic/                          economic theory
seminar per week. This course will focus on the de-         graduate-agchem.shtml                                        †J. Keith Gilless, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin, Madison.
                                                            Chair: Bob Buccanan, Ph.D.                                      Forest economics and management
velopment of a black feminist criticism(s). We will be      Graduate Adviser: Anastasios Melis, Ph.D.                    W. Michael Hanemann, Ph.D. Harvard University. Resource
specifically concerned with the writings of significant                                                                       economics, applied microeconomics
                                                            Professors
black women critics of the 19th and 20th centuries who                                                                   Ann E. Harrison, Ph.D. Princeton University. International
                                                            Leonard F. Bjeldanes, Ph.D. (Nutritional Science)               trade policy
have used intersections of class, race, and gender to       Bob B. Buchanan, Ph.D. (Plant and Microbial Biology)         Larry S. Karp, Ph.D. University of California, Davis.
analyze major issues of their time. (SP)                    John E. Casida, Ph.D. (Environmental Science, Policy, and       International trade
                                                               Management)                                               Jeffrey LaFrance, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
263. Comparative Diaspora Discourses. (4) Four              Benito O. de Lumen, Ph.D. (Nutritional Science)                 Agricultural policy, econometrics
hours of seminar per week. The seminar investigates         Harvey E. Doner, Ph.D. (Environmental Science, Policy, and   Richard B. Norgaard, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Resource
                                                               Management)                                                  and environmental economics
imitation, protest, and reformation of form in narratives   Robert Fischer, Ph.D. (Plant and Microbial Biology)          Jeffrey Perloff, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
produced by authors from East/West Africa and the           Sharon E. Fleming, Ph.D. (Nutritional Science)                  Labor, industrial organization
Caribbean. Includes prose and drama written in African      Isao Kubo, Ph.D. (Environmental Science, Policy, and         Gordon C. Rausser (The Robert Gordon Sproul Chair in
                                                               Management)                                                  Agricultural and Resource Economics), Ph.D. University
and European languages, Creoles, and pidgins from           Sheng Luan, Ph.D. (Plant and Microbial Biology)                 of California, Davis. Agriculture and resource policy
the 18th to 20th centuries. (SP) Clark                      John G. McColl, Ph.D. (Environmental Science, Policy, and    Jeffrey M. Romm, Ph.D. Cornell University. Forest, land and
                                                               Management)                                                  water policy
264. Migrations of the Word. (4) Three hours of dis-        Anastasios Melis, Ph.D. (Plant and Microbial Biology)        Elisabeth Sadoulet, Ph.D. University of Geneva.
cussion per week. An interdisciplinary approach to bor-     Norman Terry, Ph.D. (Plant and Microbial Biology)               International economic development
                                                            Eugene Zavarin (Emeritus), Ph.D. (Environmental Science,     David L. Sunding, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
der crossing theories and to the self migrating beyond         Policy, and Management)                                      Agricultural and natural resource policy, law and
homeplace in literary works and migration studies de-                                                                       economics, welfare analysis
                                                            Associate Professors
voted to the African diaspora. Particular attention is                                                                   Brian D. Wright, Ph.D. Harvard University. Agriculture and
                                                            George W. Chang, Ph.D. (Nutritional Science)                    resource policy
given to writings produced in exile or through no-          Krishna K. Niyogi, Ph.D. (Plant and Microbial Biology)       David Zilberman, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
madism and errance. (SP) Clark                                                                                              Resource and quantitative policy
                                                                                                                         *Irma Adelman, Ph.D. (Emeritus) University of California,
296. Directed Dissertation Research. (1-8) Course
may be repeated for credit. One to eight hours of in-
                                                            Program Overview                                                Berkeley. International rural economic development
                                                                                                                         *George Judge, Ph.D. (Emeritus) Iowa State University.
dependent study per week. Must be taken on a satis-                                                                         Econometrics
                                                            This graduate program is administered by an inter-
factory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Advance-                                                                    Associate Professors
                                                            departmental group and is open to students who are
ment to Ph.D. candidacy. Open to qualified students          interested in the application of chemistry to agri-          Ethan Ligon, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Rural
who have been advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D.                                                                          development, information and uncertainty
                                                            cultural and environmental problems. A prerequisite          Edward Miguel (Associate Professor of Economics and
degree and are directly engaged in doctoral disserta-       for admission is completion of courses in biology,             Agricultural and Resource Economics) Ph.D. Harvard
tion research. (F,SP) Staff                                 chemistry, physics, and mathematics equivalent                 University. Economic development
                                                                                                                         Catherine Wolfram (Associate Professor of Business
299. Individual Study or Research. (1-4) One to four        to a bachelor’s degree in chemistry or a biological            Administration and Agricultural and Resource Economics)
                                                            science.                                                       Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Regulation
hours of independent study per week. Prerequisites:                                                                        of business, energy economics, electricity industry
Consent of instructor. Individual study or research pro-    Studies leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are              restructuring
gram to be worked out with sponsoring faculty before        offered by a group of agricultural and environ-              Assistant Professors
approval by department chair. Regular meetings ar-          mental chemists, biochemists, and molecular bi-              Michael L. Anderson, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of
ranged with faculty sponsor. (F,SP) Staff                   ologists who are engaged in research. Graduate                 Technology. Environmental economics, health economics,
                                                                                                                           applied econometrics
602. Individual Study for Doctoral Students. (2-8)          research is directed by a member of the group                Maximilian Auffhammer, Ph.D. University of California, San
Course may be repeated for credit. Individual confer-       whose activities most closely coincide with the stu-           Diego. Environmental and resource economics,
                                                            dent’s interests. Courses may be taken in various              econometrics
ences. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory                                                                    Sofia B. Villas-Boas, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
basis. Prerequisites: 201A-201B. Individual study, in       departments of the College of Natural Resources,               Industrial organization, applied econometrics
consultation with group faculty, to prepare students for    the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology in
                                                                                                                         Adjunct Professors
the doctoral oral examinations. A student will be per-      the College of Letters and Science, and the Col-
                                                                                                                         David Roland-Holst, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
mitted to accumulate a maximum of 8 units toward ex-        lege of Chemistry. The following are examples of               International economic development, environmental
amination preparation. Units earned in this course may      the fields represented: insecticide and natural prod-           economics, applied general equilibrium modeling
                                                            ucts chemistry, soil chemistry, and forest products          Leo K. Simon, Ph.D. Princeton University. Econometrics,
not be used to meet academic residence or unit re-                                                                         policy
quirements for the master’s or doctoral degree. (F,SP)      chemistry in the Department of Environmental Sci-            Arnold Zellner, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
                                                            ence, Policy, and Management; molecular biology                Econometrics
Professional Courses                                        of food legumes, food chemistry and toxicology,
                                                            phytoremediation and environmental plant biology,            Adviser: Gail Vawter, 203 Giannini Hall, (510) 642-
301. Critical Pedagogy: Instructor Training. (4) Two                                                                     3347.
hours of seminar and two hours of practicum per week.       and animal nutrition in the Department of Nutritional
The seminar provides a systemic approach to theories        Science; and plant nutrition in the Department of
                                                            Plant and MicrobialBiology. In addition to the ma-
and practices of critical pedagogy at the university
                                                            jor field of specialization, predoctoral students must        Undergraduate Program
level. Examines the arts of teaching and learning and
                                                            take courses in chemistry, biochemistry, and allied
current disciplinary and cross-disciplinary issues in                                                                    Choice of College
African and diaspora studies. Participation two hours       sciences as needed to enable them to pass the
per week as practicum in 39, “Introduction to the Uni-      qualifying examination in agricultural and envi-             Students can complete a major in environmental
versity: African American Perspectives” is mandatory.
                                                            ronmental chemistry.                                         economics and policy in either the College of Let-
The course is required for students expecting to serve                                                                   ters and Science for a Bachelor of Arts(B.A.) de-
                                                            Graduate Courses
as graduate student instructors in the department. (F)                                                                   gree or the College of Natural Resources for a
Clark                                                       299. Research in Agricultural and Environmental              Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree. Major and
                                                            Chemistry. (1-12) Course may be repeated for credit.         breadth requirements are identical for all students,
C301. Critical Pedagogy: Instructor Training. (4)           Approximately four hours of research per week per            regardless of college. Please refer to the web site
Two hours of seminar and two hours of practicum per         unit. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of        of the appropriate college for details. All students

       B prefix=language course for business majors                R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                    *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                 †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                      requirement
108 / Agriculture and Resource Economics

must complete the L&S seven-course breadth re-           partmental preliminary examinations in each of               tion, theory of the firm, industrial organization, general
quirements and essential skills before graduation.       these areas. The level of sophistication expected            equilibrium, public goods and externalities. Applications
Junior transfer students may satisfy these re-           in these preliminary examinations is defined with             to agriculture and natural resources. (F)
quirements by completing IGETC.                          reference to a specific set of courses, and most
                                                         students are advised to take these courses.                  C101. Environmental Economics. (4) Three hours of
Major in Environmental Economics and Policy                                                                           lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prereq-
The undergraduate major in environmental eco-            Outstanding facilities are available within the de-          uisites: 100, Mathematics 16A-16B, or Economics
nomics and policy (ENVECON) offers an oppor-             partment, including the Giannini Foundation Agri-            100A or 101A. Theories of externalities and public
tunity to explore those aspects of economic and          cultural Economics Library, one of the world’s fore-         goods applied to pollution and environmental policy.
political institutions which affect the development      most research libraries of its type.                         Trade-off between production and environmental
                                                                                                                      amenities. Assessing nonmarket value of environ-
and management of natural resources and the en-
                                                                                                                      mental amenities. Remediation and clean-up policies.
vironment. The focus of concern includes both re-
                                                                                                                      Environment and development. Biodiversity manage-
newable resources such as food, forests and wa-
ter, and resources in fixed supply such as land and       Environmental Economics                                      ment. Also listed as Economics C125. (SP) Staff
minerals. The distinctive feature of the major is that   and Policy                                                   C102. Natural Resource Economics. (4) Three hours
it adopts a problem-solving approach to these is-                                                                     of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Pre-
sues. The core requirement for the major is micro-       Lower Division Courses                                       requisites: 100, or Economics 100A or 100B. Intro-
economic theory, and the economics of resources                                                                       duction to the economics of natural resources. Land
and the environment. These core courses are sup-         C1. Introduction to Environmental Economics and              and the concept of economic rent. Models of optimal
plemented by other courses that apply the methods        Policy. (4) Students will receive 2 units of credit for C1   depletion of nonrenewable resources and optimal use
of social science to resource problems.                  after taking Economics 1. Three hours of lecture and         of renewable resources. Application to energy, forests,
                                                         one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Math-        fisheries, water, and climate change. Resources,
The major is structured to ensure that students ob-      ematics 32. Introduction to microeconomics with em-
tain a sufficient background in the natural and                                                                        growth, and sustainability. Also listed as Economics
                                                         phasis on resource, agricultural, and environmental          C102. (F) Staff
physical sciences and sufficient training in basic        issues. Also listed as Economics C3. (F,SP) Staff
mathematics, statistics, and communication skills                                                                     C115. Modeling and Management of Biological Re-
in order to approach resource-related issues in an       24. Freshman Seminar. (1) Course may be repeated             sources. (4) Three hours of lecture and three hours of
effective and practical manner. It can also be ex-       for credit with different topic. One hour of seminar per     computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Two
cellent preparation for business school. Students        week. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade ba-        semesters of calculus and consent of instructor. Mod-
who graduate from the major are prepared to un-          sis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed        els of population growth, chaos, life tables, and Leslie
dertake a career in public or private agencies and       basis. The Freshman Seminar Program has been de-             matrix theory. Harvesting and exploitation theory.
firms engaged in the planning or management of            signed to provide new students with the opportunity to       Methods for analyzing population interactions, pre-
natural resources, or to enter a graduate school for     explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a     dation, competition. Fisheries, forest stands, and in-
further study in programs such as economics, law,        small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered         sect pest management. Genetic aspects of population
public policy, business, or resources administration.    in all campus departments, and topics vary from de-          management. Mathematical theory based on simple
                                                         partment to department and semester to semester.             difference and ordinary differential equations. Use of
Lower division major requirements include a              Enrollment limited to 15 freshmen. (F,SP)
course in microeconomics and courses in calculus                                                                      simulation packages on microcomputers (previous ex-
(equivalent to Mathematics 16A-16B or 1A-1B) and         39. Freshman/Sophomore Seminar. Course may be                perience with computers not required). Also listed as
statistics.                                              repeated for credit as topic varies. Sections 1-2 to be      Environ Sci, Policy, and Management C104. (SP) Getz
                                                         graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be
Upper division work includes courses in methods,                                                                      C118. Introductory Applied Econometrics. (4) Three
                                                         graded on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites:
core courses in environmental economics and pol-                                                                      hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
                                                         Priority given to freshmen and sophomores. Freshman
icy, and courses in an area of concentration cho-                                                                     Prerequisites: Statistics 2 or equivalent. Formulation of
                                                         and sophomore seminars offer lower division stu-
sen by the student. For specific major require-                                                                        a research hypothesis and definition of an empirical
                                                         dents the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic
ments, contact the Student Services Office, 203                                                                        strategy. Regression analysis with cross-sectional and
                                                         with a faculty member and a group of peers in a
Giannini Hall, (510) 642-3347 or go to are.berkeley.                                                                  time-series data; econometric methods for the analy-
                                                         small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered in
edu/UnderGradStudy.html.                                                                                              sis of qualitative information; hypothesis testing. The
                                                         all campus departments; topics vary from department
                                                                                                                      techniques of statistical and econometric analysis are
Minor Program                                            to department and from semester to semester. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                      developed through applications to a set of case stud-
Students may declare a minor in environmental            84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-               ies and real data in the fields of environmental, re-
economics and policy. A minimum of six courses           peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar       source, and international development economics. Stu-
from the ENVECON curriculum is required. Stu-            per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half         dents learn the use of a statistical software for
dents must declare in advance their intention to mi-     hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two         economic data analysis. Also listed as International
nor with the undergraduate adviser. Students who         hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.          and Area Studies C118. (F) Sadoulet
believe they have already completed the require-         Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five
                                                                                                                      131. Globalization and the Natural Environment. (3)
ments for a minor should apply for departmental          weeks. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not
                                                                                                                      Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Inter-
certification. For more information, contact Gail         passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-
                                                                                                                      mediate micro-economic theory or consent of in-
Vawter, Student Affairs Officer, 203 Giannini Hall        grade basis. Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.
                                                                                                                      structor. An examination of the environmental effects
(510) 642-3347.                                          Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses of-
                                                                                                                      of globalization. How has increased international trade,
                                                         fered by faculty members in departments all across the
                                                                                                                      the integration of factor markets, and the adoption of
                                                         campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for
Graduate Programs                                        close, regular intellectual contact between faculty
                                                                                                                      international agreements affected the environment?
                                                                                                                      Case studies include the environmental impact of
                                                         members and students in the crucial second year. The
The Department of Agricultural and Resource Eco-                                                                      GATT/WTO and NAFTA. Multi-disciplinary approach
                                                         topics vary from department to department and
nomics offers programs leading to the M.S. and                                                                        examines the actual laws and institutions and the
                                                         semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sopho-
Ph.D. degrees. Because of quota limitations, stu-                                                                     economic theories of globalization, in addition to
                                                         mores. (F,SP)
dents are rarely admitted for the master’s degree,                                                                    the empirical evidence of globalization’s environ-
although it may be awarded to students who are           98. Directed Group Studies (for Lower Division Stu-          mental effects. (F) Karp
pursuing work toward the Ph.D. in our program (or        dents). (1-3) Course may be repeated for credit. En-
                                                                                                                      140AC. Economics of Race, Agriculture, and the
in another field at Berkeley) after fulfillment of the     rollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses
                                                                                                                      Environment. (3) Two hours of lecture and one hour
appropriate M.S. requirements. Applicants should         and Curricula section of this catalog. One and one-half
                                                                                                                      of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 1, or one lower
hold a degree (not necessarily in agricultural eco-      hour of meeting per unit per week. To be arranged.
                                                                                                                      division course in a social science, or consent of in-
nomics) comparable to a bachelor’s degree at the         Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Prereq-
                                                                                                                      structor. This course examines whether and how eco-
University of California and must have demon-            uisites: Consent of Instructor. Group study (or seminar)
                                                                                                                      nomic processes explain shifting formations of race
strated strong scholarship potential.                    of a selected topic or topics in Environmental Economics
                                                                                                                      and differential experiences among racial groups in
                                                         and Policy. (F,SP)
The agricultural and resource economics program                                                                       U.S. agricultural and environmental systems. It ap-
is relatively flexible; however, each program             Upper Division Courses                                       proaches economic processes as organizing dynam-
stresses economic theory, quantitative methods,                                                                       ics of racial differentiation and integration, and uses
                                                         100. Microeconomic Theory with Application to                comparative experience among different racial and eth-
and two elective fields defined in consultation with
                                                         Natural Resources. (4) Students who have taken               nic groups as sources of evidence against which eco-
the graduate adviser. Some common elective fields
                                                         Econ 100A, Econ 101A or Bus Adm 110 will receive             nomic theories of differentiation and integration can be
include agriculture in economic development, agri-
                                                         only 2 units of credit for 100. Three hours of lecture       tested. This course satisfies the Amercan Cultures re-
cultural policy, natural resource economics, mar-
                                                         and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites:          quirement. (SP) Romm
kets and international trade.
                                                         Environmental Economics and Policy 1 or Economics
The first year of coursework in the Ph.D. program         1 and Math 16A or consent of instructor. Covers the          141. Agricultural and Environmental Policy. (4)
is normally devoted to economic theory and quan-         basic microeconomic tools for further study of natural       Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per
titative methods, after which the student writes de-     resource problems. Theory of consumption, produc-            week. Prerequisites: 100 or Economics 100A or 101A.
                                                                                                                  Agriculture and Resource Economics / 109

This course considers the formation, implementation,        tools. Specific topics studied are impacts on water re-      202. Issues and Concepts in Agricultural Eco-
and impact of public policies affecting agriculture and     sources and agriculture, economic evaluation of im-         nomics. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of
the environment. Economic approaches to public law-         pacts, optimal control of greenhouse gases, benefit          discussion per week. Prerequisites: Economics 201A-
making, including theories of legislation, interest group   cost analysis, international treaty formation, dis-         201B or consent of instructor. History, institutions, and
activity, and congressional control of bureaucracies.       counting, uncertainty, irreversibility, and extreme         policies affecting agriculture markets and environ-
Case studies include water allocation, endangered           events. Also listed as International and Area Studies       mental quality. Producer behavior over time and under
species protection, water quality, food safety, drainage,   C175. (F,SP) Aufhammer, Fisher                              uncertainty. Asset fixity and agricultural supply models.
wetlands, pesticides, and farmworker safety. Empha-                                                                     (SP)
                                                            C180. Ecological Economics in Historical Context.
sis on examples from California. (F)
                                                            (3) Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion       210. Probability and Statistics. (3) Three hours of
142. Industrial Organization with Applications to           per week. Prerequisites: Economics 100A or equiva-          lecture per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing or
Agriculture and Natural Resources. (3) Three hours          lent. Economists through history have explored eco-         consent of instructor. This is an introduction to prob-
of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 100 or Economics        nomic and environmental interactions, physical limits       ability theory and statistical inference. It is primarily in-
100A or 101A. Organization and performance of agri-         to growth, what constitutes the good life, and how eco-     tended to prepare students for the graduate econo-
cultural and resource markets. Conduct of firms within       nomic justice can be assured. Yet economists continue       metrics courses 212 and 213. The emphasis of the
those markets, such as price competition, product dif-      to use measures and models that simplify these issues       course is on the principles of statistical reasoning.
ferentiation, predatory pricing, vertical integration,      and promote bad outcomes. Ecological economics re-          Probability theory will be discussed mainly as a back-
dealer networks and advertising. The role of public pol-    sponds to this tension between the desire for simplicity    ground for statistical theory and specific models will, for
icy in the markets. Case studies include oil cartel         and the multiple perspectives needed to understand          the most part, be considered only to illustrate the gen-
OPEC, agricultural cooperatives, vertical integration of    complexity in order to move toward sustainable,             eral statistical theory as it is developed. (F) LaFrance
food processors and franchising of fast-food chains.        fulfilling, just economies. Also listed as Energy and Re-
                                                                                                                        211. Mathematical Methods for Agricultural and
(SP) Villas-Boas                                            sources Group C180. (SP) Norgaard
                                                                                                                        Resource Economists. (4) Four hours of lecture and
C151. Economic Development. (4) Three hours of              195. Senior Thesis. (4) Course may be repeated for          one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Con-
lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prereq-        credit. Individual meetings with faculty sponsor. Pre-      sent of instructor. The goal of this course is to provide
uisites: 100 or Economics 100A or 101A. Problems of         requisites: Senior standing in Environmental Eco-           entering graduate students with the basic skills re-
underdevelopment and poverty, policy issues, and de-        nomics and Policy and consent of instructor. Writing of     quired to perform effectively in the graduate program
velopment strategy. Also listed as Economics C171.          a thesis under the direction of member(s) of the faculty.   and as professional economists. The lectures place
(F) Staff                                                   Subject must be approved by faculty sponsor. (F,SP)         heavy emphasis on intuition, graphical representations,
                                                                                                                        and conceptual understanding. Weekly problem sets
152. Advanced Topics in Development and Inter-              H196. Honors Research. (4) Course may be repeated
                                                                                                                        provide the opportunity to master mechanical skills and
national Trade. (3) Two hours of lecture and one hour       for credit. Individual research or meetings with faculty
                                                                                                                        computational techniques. Topics covered include real
of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 100 or Eco-          sponsor(s). Prerequisites: Upper division standing and
                                                                                                                        analysis, linear algebra, multivariable calculus, theory
nomics 100A. This course discusses recent efforts to        a minimum 3.2 GPA. Eligibility restrictions related to
                                                                                                                        of static constrained optimization, and comparative
understand behavior and institutions in village             GPA and unit accumulation. Open only to Environ-
                                                                                                                        statics. (F) Simon
economies, with particular attention paid to the im-        mental Economics and Policy majors. Supervised in-
portance of risk. Economic analysis of savings, con-        dependent honors research specific to aspects of en-         212. Econometrics: Multiple Equation Estimation.
sumption, insurance, production, trade, welfare dis-        vironmental economics and policy, followed by a             (4) Four hours of lecture and one hour of discussion
tribution and institutions of villages in developing        written report to the department. (F,SP)                    per week. Prerequisites: 211 or consent of instructor.
countries. Roughly equal parts of theory, evidence, and                                                                 Introduction to the estimation and testing of economic
                                                            197. Field Study in Environmental Economics and
policy. (SP)                                                                                                            models. Includes analysis of the general linear model,
                                                            Policy. (1-3) Course may be repeated for credit. En-
                                                                                                                        asymptotic theory, instrumental variable, and the gen-
153. Population, Environment, and Development.              rollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses
                                                                                                                        eralized method of moments. In addition, a survey of
(3) Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion         and Curricula section of this catalog. Independent
                                                                                                                        time series, analysis, limited dependent variables. (SP)
per week. Prerequisites: Intermediate microeconomic         study. Minimum of three hours of work per week per
theory or consent of instructor. This course takes an in-   unit of credit. Must be taken on a passed/not passed        213. Applied Econometrics. (4) Three hours of lec-
terdisciplinary approach to the complex interactions be-    basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Supervised     ture and three hours of computer laboratory per week.
tween population, environmental change, and eco-            experience in off-campus organizations relevant to          Prerequisites: 211 and 212 or equivalent or consent of
nomic development, including the leading theories for       specific aspects of environmental economics and pol-         instructor. Standard and advanced econometric tech-
understanding these interactions. The origins and his-      icy. Regular individual meetings with faculty sponsor       niques are applied to topics in agriculture and resource
tory of current debates are discussed as well as some       and written reports required. (F,SP)                        economics. Techniques include limited dependent vari-
of the major issues stemming from these debates,                                                                        ables, time series analysis, and nonparametric anal-
                                                            198. Directed Group Studies for Advanced Un-
such as immigration, international trade, family plan-                                                                  ysis. Students will use computers to conduct statistical
                                                            dergraduates. (1-3) Course may be repeated for
ning policies and concerns over the global commons.                                                                     analyses. (F)
                                                            credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to
Specific natural resources and services like fresh wa-       Courses and Curricula section of this catalog. Meetings     214. New Econometric and Statistical Techniques.
ter, food supply, and forest cover are analyzed as case     to be arranged. Must be taken on a passed/not passed        (4) Three hours of lecture and three hours of computer
studies. Policy options for sustainable development are     basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Group study    lab per week. Prerequisites: 211, 213 or equivalent or
discussed. (SP) Zilberman                                   of selected topic or topics in Environmental Economics      consent of instructor. Theory and application of new
161. Advanced Topics in Environmental and Re-               and Policy. (F,SP)                                          and emerging approaches to estimation and inference.
source Economics. (4) Three hours of lecture and                                                                        Bayesian, maximum entropy,and other new applica-
                                                            199. Supervised Independent Study and Research.
one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 100 or                                                                  tions to economic problems will be emphasized. Stu-
                                                            (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is
Economics 100A or Economics 101A; 101 recom-                                                                            dents will use computers to conduct statistical analy-
                                                            restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-
mended. The roots of environmental and resource                                                                         ses. (SP)
                                                            ricula section of this catalog. Independent meetings.
economics. Theories of land and resource rent. Mod-         Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Pre-            219A-219B. Econometric Project Workshop. (2;2)
els of optimal use of renewable and nonrenewable re-        requisites: Upper division standing and consent of in-      Two hours of seminar per week. 219A must be taken
sources with applications to energy and timber. Balancing   structor. Enrollment restrictions apply. Open to qualified   on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis; 219B must be
environmental and extractive values. Resources, growth,     upper division students wishing to pursue special study     taken for a letter grade. Prerequisites: 210, 211, and
and sustainability. Special topic: the problem of global    and directed research under the direction of a member       212 or consent of instructor. Techniques for preparing
climate change. (F)                                         of the staff. (F,SP)                                        econometric studies, including finding data sources,
                                                                                                                        the reporting of results, and standards for placing re-
162. Economics of Water Resources. (3) Two hours
                                                                                                                        search questions with existent literature. With faculty
of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Pre-
                                                                                                                        guidance, students prepare approved econometric pro-
requisites: 100 or Economics 100A or 101A; 101 rec-
ommended. Urban demand for water; water supply
                                                            Agricultural and                                            jects, present projects to the class, provide comments
and economic growth; water utility economics; irriga-       Resource Economics                                          on other student projects, and revise projects in re-
                                                                                                                        sponse to faculty and student comments. (F,SP)
tion demand; large water projects; economic impacts
                                                                                                                        Auffhammer, Sadoulet
of surface water law and institutions; economics of         Graduate Courses
salinity and drainage; economics of groundwater man-                                                                    231. International Markets and Trade. (3) Three
agement. (SP)                                               201. Production, Industrial Organization, and Reg-
                                                                                                                        hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 212 and
                                                            ulation in Agriculture. (4) Three hours of lecture and
                                                                                                                        Economics 201B. Review of theories of comparative
C175. The Economics of Climate Change. (4) Three            one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Eco-
                                                                                                                        advantage. Theory and practice of international com-
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.       nomics 201A or equivalent or consent of instructor. Ba-
                                                                                                                        mercial policy. Customs unions trade under uncer-
Prerequisites: Economics 1, International and Area          sic concepts of micro and welfare economics: partial
                                                                                                                        tainty. Empirical models of trade. Market structure
Studies 106, 107, or equivalent. The course will start      and general equilibrium. Industrial organization: mo-
                                                                                                                        considerations in international trade. (F)
with a brief introduction and evaluation of the scientific   nopolistic competition, vertical integration, price dis-
aspects behind climate change. Economic models will         crimination, and economics of information with appli-       232. Empirical International Trade and Investment.
be developed to analyze the impacts of climate change       cations to food retailing, cooperatives, fishing, and        (2) Two hours of lecture per week for eight weeks. Pre-
and provide and critique existing and proposed policy       energy. (F)                                                 requisites: Consent of instructor. Empirical aspects on


       B prefix=language course for business majors                R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                   *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                      requirement
110 / Agriculture and Resource Economics
international trade, foreign investment, and the envi-      of renewable and nonrenewable natural resource use,
ronment. Issues related to testing various trade mod-
els. Topics include: testing trade models (HO, Ricardo,
                                                            with applications to forests, fisheries, energy, and cli-
                                                            mate change. Resources, growth, and sustainability.
                                                                                                                       American Studies
Specific Sector); gravity models; linkages between           Economic theory of environmental policy. Externality;      (College of Letters and Science)
openness and growth; trade orientation and firm per-         the Coasian critique; tax incidence and anomalies; in-
formance; pattern of trade; trade and the environment;      direct taxes; the double dividend; environmental stan-     Group Major Office: Division of Undergraduate and
labor markets and trade. New topics in international        dards; environmental regulation; impact of uncertainty     Interdisciplinary Studies, 301 Campbell, (510) 642-9320
                                                                                                                       ls.berkeley.edu/ugis/as
trade with empirical applications, such as trade mod-       on taxes and standards; mechanism design; moni-            Director: Christine Rosen, Ph.D.
els with heterogeneous firms, outsourcing and foreign        toring, penalties, and regulatory strategy; emissions      Faculty Advisers: A list of faculty advisers is available in
investment. (SP) Harrison                                   markets. (F) Fisher                                        the major office or on the web site.
                                                                                                                       Affiliated Faculty
239. Markets and Trade Workshop. (1) Course may             262. Non-market Valuation. (3) Three hours of lecture
                                                                                                                       Charles Altieri (English)
be repeated for credit. Two hours of seminar per week.      per week. Prerequisites: Ph.D.-level economic theory       Dorothy Beam (English)
Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.       or consent of instructor. The economic concept of          Karen Biestman (American Studies)
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Presentation and      value; historical evolution of market and non-market       Mark Brilliant (American Studies/History)
                                                                                                                       Richard Candida Smith (History)
criticism of ongoing research by faculty, staff, and stu-   valuation; revealed preference methods: single site de-    Robin L. Einhorn (History)
dents. Not necessarily offered every semester. (F,SP)       mand, multi-site demand, corner solution models, and       Sally Fairfax (Environmental Science, Policy, and
                                                            valuation of quality changes; averting behavior; the he-      Management)
241. Economics and Policy of Production, Tech-              donic method; contingent valuation; other stated pref-     Claude S. Fischer (Sociology)
nology and Risk in Agricultural and Natural Re-                                                                        Marshall Foletta (History)
                                                            erence methods: ranking, choice, conjoint analysis; the    Victor Geraci (Regional Oral History Office, Bancroft Library)
sources. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-          value of life and safety; sampling and questionnaire de-   Jon Gjerde (History)
requisites: 201 and 202, or Economics 201A-201B, or         sign for valuation surveys. (SP) Hanemann                  Peter Glazer (Theater Studies)
consent of instructor. This course covers alternative                                                                  Marcial Gonzalez (English)
                                                                                                                       Paul Groth (Architecture)
models of production, resource and environmental risk       263. Dynamic Methods in Environmental and                  Dorothy Hale (English)
management; family production function; adoption and        Resource Economics. (3) Three hours of lecture per         Bob Hass (English)
diffusion; innovation and intellectual property rights;     week. Prerequisites: Ph.D.-level economic theory or        David Henkin (History)
                                                            consent of instructor. This course studies methods of      David Hollinger (History)
agricultural and environmental policies and their impact                                                               Richard Hutson (English)
on production and the environment; water resources;         analysis and optimal control of dynamic systems, em-       †David Kirp (Public Policy)
pest control; biotechnology; and optimal control over       phasizing applications in environmental and natural        Kerwin Klein (History)
                                                            resource economics. Continuous-time deterministic          Michel S. Laguerre (African American Studies)
space and time. (F) Zilberman                                                                                          Thomas C. Leonard (Journalism)
                                                            models are studied using phase plane analysis, the         Margaretta Lovell (Art History)
242. Quantitative Policy Analysis. (3) Three hours of       calculus of variations, the Maximum Principle, and dy-     Colleen Lye (English)
lecture per week. Prerequisites: 211 or consent of in-      namic programming. Numerical methods are applied           Waldo Martin (History)
structor. Production versus predatory government be-                                                                   Mary Ann Mason (Social Welfare)
                                                            to discrete time stochastic and deterministic dynamic      †Joe McBride (Environmental Science, Policy, and
havior, rent seeking, social waste, and their trade-offs    models. (F) Karp                                              Management)
with the provision of growth-promoting public goods.                                                                   Rebecca McLennon (History)
Three failure types are distinguished: market, gov-         269. Natural Resource Economics Workshop. (1)              Donald McQuade (English)
                                                            Course may be repeated for credit. Two hours of sem-       Martin Meeker, Regional Oral History Office, Bancroft Library
ernment, and organizational. The roles of public versus                                                                Carolyn Merchant (Environmental Science, Policy, and
special interests are modeled to determine degree and       inar per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsat-         Management)
extent of organizational failures in collective group be-   isfactory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.     †Kathleen Moran (American Studies)
havior. Alternative frameworks are used to evaluate         Presentation and criticism of ongoing research by fac-     Louise Mozingo (Landscape Architecture)
                                                                                                                       Christopher Nealon (English)
various types of policy reform. (SP)                        ulty, staff, and students. Not necessarily offered every   Samuel Otter (English)
                                                            semester. (F,SP)                                           Genaro Padilla (English)
249. Agricultural, Food, and Resource Policy Work-                                                                     Christine Palmer (American Studies)
shop. (1) Course may be repeated for credit. Two            298. Special Study for Graduate Students. (1-6)            Carolyn Porter (English)
hours of seminar per week. Must be taken on a sat-          Course may be repeated for credit. Individual study.       Leigh Raiford (African American Studies)
                                                            Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. All properly         Christine Rosen (Business)
isfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Consent                                                                 Jose Saldívar (Ethnic Studies)
of instructor. Presentation and criticism of ongoing re-    qualified graduate students who wish to pursue a spe-       Alex Saragoza (Chicano Studies)
search by faculty, staff and students. Not necessarily      cial field of study may do so if their proposed program     Scott Saul (English)
                                                            of study is acceptable to the member here of the staff     †Susan M. Schweik (English)
offered every semester. (F,SP)                                                                                         Andrew Shanken (Architecture)
                                                            with whom they work. (F,SP)                                Katherine Snyder (English)
C251. Microeconomics of Development. (3) Three                                                                         Jennifer Spear (History)
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Consent of in-    299. Individual Research. (1-12) Course may be re-         Shannon Steen (Theater Studies)
structor. Theoretical and empirical analyses of poverty     peated for credit. Approximately four hours of research    Ann Swidler (Sociology)
                                                            per week per unit. Must be taken on a satisfactory/un-     Kim Voss (Sociology)
and inequality, household and community behavior,                                                                      Bryan Wagner (English)
and contract and institutions in the context of devel-      satisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Graduate standing       Richard Walker (Geography)
oping countries. Also listed as Economics C270A. (F)        and consent of instructor. (F,SP)                          Hertha Wong (English)
Sadoulet                                                    602. Individual Study for Doctoral Students. (1-12)
252. Sectoral and Regional Planning in Economic             Course may be repeated for credit. Individual study.       Group Major in American Studies
Development. (3) Three hours of lecture per week.           Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Analysis of policy    Individual study in consultation with the major field ad-   Established in fall 1993, the American studies ma-
issues in agricultural development using sectoral and       viser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified     jor offers students the opportunity to study Amer-
regional models of growth and development. (SP)             students to prepare themselves for the various ex-         ican society using a broad range of methods drawn
                                                            aminations required for candidates of the Ph.D. May        from a variety of disciplines in the College of Let-
C253. International Economic Development Policy.            not be used for unit or residence requirements for the     ters and Science and the professional schools and
(3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:         doctoral degree. (F,SP)                                    colleges. “American society” refers primarily to the
Minimum one semester graduate-level microeco-                                                                          geographical regions of the United States, from
nomics and statistics or consent of instructor. This        Professional Courses
                                                                                                                       pre-colonial times to the contemporary period, but
course emphasizes the development and application           300. Professional Preparation: Teaching of Envi-           recognizes that political, cultural, and economic
of policy solutions to developing-world problems re-        ronmental Economics and Policy. (1-6) Course may           patterns do not stop at national borders. Therefore,
lated to poverty, macroeconomic policy, and environ-        be repeated for credit. Four hours of work per week        American studies courses will attempt to see this
mental sustainability. Methods of statistical, economic,    per unit. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory   region within larger world systems, taking into ac-
and policy analysis are applied to a series of case         basis. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, appointment       count how the cultures of America have been con-
studies. The course is designed to develop practical        as a graduate student instructor, or consent of in-        tinually reshaped by movements of people, com-
professional skills for application in the international    structor. Discussion, problem review and development,      merce, and ideas which cross borders. As an
arena. Also listed as Public Policy C253. (F) De Jan-       guidance of discussion classes, course development,        interdisciplinary program, American studies draws
vry, Sadoulet, Zilberman                                    supervised practice teaching. (F,SP)                       on faculty resources and research in literature, his-
259. Rural Economic Development Workshop. (1)
                                                                                                                       tory, economics, architecture, material culture, me-
                                                            400. Professional Training in Research Methodol-
Course may be repeated for credit. Two hours of sem-
                                                                                                                       dia studies, ethnic studies, and urban and regional
                                                            ogy. (1-6) Course may be repeated for credit. Indi-
inar per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsat-
                                                                                                                       studies.
                                                            vidual research. Must be taken on a satisfactory/un-
isfactory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.      satisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Graduate student        Prerequisites to the Major. In order to declare the
Presentation and criticism of ongoing research by fac-      researcher appointment. Individual training for grad-      major, students must complete two of the four
ulty, staff and students. Not necessarily offered every     uate students in planning and performing research un-      lower division requirements before their Petition to
semester. (F,SP)                                            der the supervision of a faculty adviser, intended to      Declare can be accepted.
                                                            provide academic credit for the experience obtained
261. Environmental and Resource Economics. (3)                                                                         Lower Division Requirements. A minimum grade
                                                            while holding a research assistantship. (F,SP)
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Ph.D.-                                                                 of “C” is required in all lower division courses taken
level economic theory or consent of instructor. Theory                                                                 for the major. Lower division requirements consist
                                                                                                                                                American Studies / 111

of American Studies 10, Introduction to American             art, religion, music, engineering, environmental stud-       tures act simultaneously at a given time. To help stu-
Studies (4 units), plus three courses from the fol-          ies, anthropology, politics, economics, law, and medicine.   dents develop skills in cultural analysis, lectures will
lowing list of courses, with no more than two                This course may include discussion sections depending        contrast various methods and perspectives as they ap-
courses from any one department.                             on available funding. Some versions of this course need      ply to the study of a particular year or decade. Topics
                                                             four in-class contact hours because of the extensive use     will vary from semester to semester. This course may
Note: This list is subject to annual review and re-          of media. (F,SP) Staff                                       include discussion sections depending on available
vision. New courses, particularly those that fulfill the                                                                   funding. Some versions of this course need four in-
American Cultures requirement, can be substituted            10AC. Introduction to American Studies. (4) Stu-
                                                                                                                          class contact hours because of the extensive use of
for those on the list with adviser approval. Transfer        dents will receive no credit for 10AC after taking 10 or
                                                                                                                          media. (F,SP) Staff
students should check with an AS adviser to have             Undergraduate and Interdisciplinary Studies 10. Three
their lower division courses approved to fulfill this         hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.        101AC. Examining U.S. Cultures in Time. (4)
requirement.                                                 American culture and cultural change, with attention to      Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
                                                             the multicultural basis of American society and em-          Three hours of lecture per week. This course exam-
Lower Division Course List:                                  phasis on the need for multiple methods of analysis.         ines how U.S. cultures are constructed, reinforced, and
African Am Studies 5A, 5B, 17AC, 27AC; Agricul-              The course will consistently draw on the arts, material      changed, and how those cultures act simultaneously
tural and Resource Economics 1; American Stud-               culture, and various fields affecting cultural production     at a given time. To help students develop skills in cul-
ies 39; Anthropology 2, 10AC, 11AC; Art 8; Asian             and meaning. Those areas include literature, film, his-       tural analysis, lectures will contrast various methods
Am Studies 2A, 2B, 20A, 20B, 20C; UGBA 10; Chi-              tory, architecture, history of art, religion, music, engi-   and perspectives as they apply to the study of a par-
cano Studies 20, 30, 40, 50, 70, 80; Comparative             neering, environmental studies, anthropology, politics,      ticular year or decade. Topics will vary from semester
Lit 60AC; Education 40AC; English 31AC, 33, 37;              economics, law, and medicine. This course satisfies           to semester. This course satisfies the American Cul-
Environ Design 4; ESPM 10, 11, 50AC; Environ-                the American Cultures requirement. (F,SP) Staff              tures requirement. Staff
mental Sciences 10; Ethnic Studies 21AC, 41AC;               24. Freshman Seminar. (1) Course may be repeated
Film 25A, 25B, 40AC; Gender and Women’s Stud-                                                                             102. Examining U.S. Cultures in Place. (4) Course
                                                             for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per          may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Three to
ies 14, 20, 20W; Geography 20, 50AC, 70AC; His-              week. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade ba-
tory 7A, 7B, 16AC, 17A, 30B; IDS 1; ISF 60, 61;                                                                           four hours of lecture and zero to one hours of discus-
                                                             sis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed        sion per week. This course examines how U.S. cul-
Linguistics 55AC; Mass Comm 10; Military Affairs             basis. The Freshman Seminar Program has been de-
2; Music 26AC; Native Am Studies 20A, 71, 72, 90;                                                                         tures are constructed, reinforced, and changed—par-
                                                             signed to provide new students with the opportunity to       ticularly in reference to place and material culture.
Poli Sci 1, 33AC; Psych 14; Public Health 14;                explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a
Rhetoric 40AC, 41AC; Sociology 1, 3, 3AC, 5; The-                                                                         Qualitative and quantitative methods of analysis drawn
                                                             small seminar setting. Freshman seminars are offered         from several disciplines will help students develop skills
ater, Dance, and Performance Studies 25AC.                   in all campus departments, and topics vary from de-          in cultural interpretation. Case studies may focus on a
Upper Division Requirements. 30-36 units dis-                partment to department and semester to semester. En-         neighborhood, a city, or a region. Topics will vary from
tributed among the following:                                rollment limited to 15 freshmen. (F,SP)                      semester to semester. This course may include dis-
1. Core Methods Courses. (8 units) Students are              39. Freshman/Sophomore Seminar. Course may be                cussion sections depending on available funding.
required to take one course each from the two                repeated for credit as topic varies. Two to four hours of    Some versions of this course need four in-class con-
methods series, “Examining U.S. Cultures in Time”            seminar per week. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a let-        tact hours because of the extensive use of media.
and “Examining U.S. Cultures in Place.” See de-              ter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a              (F,SP) Staff
partment listings for available courses every                passed/not passed basis. Freshman and sophomore              102AC. Examining U.S. Cultures in Place. (4)
semester.                                                    seminars offer lower division students the opportunity       Course may be repeated for credit with different topic.
                                                             to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member       Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per
2. Area of Concentration. At least 20 units of up-           and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These
per division coursework drawn from the College of                                                                         week. This course examines how U.S. cultures are
                                                             seminars are offered in all campus departments; top-         constructed, reinforced, and changed—particularly in
Letters and Science and the professional schools             ics vary from department to department and from
and colleges, in the student’s individually articu-                                                                       reference to place and material culture. Qualitative and
                                                             semester to semester. Enrollment limits are set by the       quantitative methods of analysis drawn from several
lated area of concentration. Areas of concentration          faculty, but the suggested limit is 25. (F,SP)
may be highly individualized, depending on the stu-                                                                       disciplines will help students develop skills in cultural
dent’s intellectual focus, prior preparation, and the        84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-               interpretation. Case studies may focus on a neigh-
availability of courses. Therefore, students planning        peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar       borhood, a city, or a region. Topics will vary from
to declare the major should meet with a faculty ad-          per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half         semester to semester. This course satisfies the Amer-
viser early in their junior year, at the latest, to plan     hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two         ican Cultures requirement. (F,SP) Staff
their upper division program. Subsequently, this             hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.          110. Special Topics in American Studies. (3,4)
program can be revised only with the approval of             Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five             Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
the faculty adviser.                                         weeks. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not             Three to four hours of lecture per week. This course is
                                                             passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-         designed primarily to allow faculty to develop focused
3. Thesis Requirement. All majors are required to            grade basis. Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.
satisfy a senior thesis requirement in American                                                                           interdisciplinary courses which address specific issues,
                                                             Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses of-         themes, or problems in American society. Topics vary
Studies in which they write a substantial research           fered by faculty members in departments all across the
paper.                                                                                                                    from semester to semester. Students should consult
                                                             campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for             the department’s web page for current offerings before
4. Historical Requirement. One of the courses                close, regular intellectual contact between faculty          the start of the semester. (F,SP) Staff
taken to complete the American studies major (ei-            members and students in the crucial second year. The
ther upper or lower division) must focus on U.S.             topics vary from department to department and                H110. Honors Seminar: Special Topics in American
history, culture, and/or politics before 1900. Stu-          semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sopho-        Studies. (3) Course may be repeated for credit as
dents should check with an American studies stu-             mores. (F,SP)                                                topic varies. Three hours of seminar per week. Pre-
dent affairs officer to ensure that the course they                                                                        requisites: Consent of instructor may be required. This
                                                             98. Directed Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-            course is designed to introduce honors students (those
take meets this requirement.                                 peated for credit as topic varies. Group meetings to be      who have achieved a minimum overall GPA of 3.3) to
Honors Program. Students who wish to be eligi-               arranged. Must be taken on a passed/not passed ba-           the history and theory of American studies as an in-
ble to graduate with honors must enroll in Ameri-            sis. Prerequisites: Open only to freshmen and sopho-         terdisciplinary field and to explore current themes, de-
can Studies H195. For admission to H195, stu-                mores. Consent of instructor. Written proposal must be       bates, and research problems in American studies.
dents must have senior standing, an overall                  approved by sponsoring faculty. Seminars for the             (F,SP) Staff
grade-point average of 3.51, and a grade-point av-           group study of selected topics, which will vary from
erage of 3.65 in the major.                                  year to year. Topics may be initiated by students. Staff     110AC. Special Topics in American Studies—
                                                                                                                          American Cultures. (3,4) Course may be repeated for
For further information, please contact the student          99. Supervised Independent Study and Research.
                                                                                                                          credit as topic varies. Three or four hours of lecture per
affairs officer at 301 Campbell Hall, (510) 642-              (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is
                                                                                                                          week. This course is designed primarily to allow faculty
9320.                                                        restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-
                                                                                                                          to develop focused interdisciplinary courses that ad-
                                                             ricula section of this catalog. Must be taken on a
Lower Division Courses                                                                                                    dress specific issues, themes, or problems in American
                                                             passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Restricted to
                                                                                                                          society and American cultures. Topics vary from
10. Introduction to American Studies. (4) Three to           freshmen and sophomores; consent of instructor. In-
                                                                                                                          semester to semester. This course satisfies the Amer-
four hours of lecture and zero to one hour of discus-        dependent study and research by arrangement with
                                                                                                                          ican Cultures requirement. (F,SP) Staff
sion per week. Formerly Undergraduate Interdisci-            faculty. Staff
plinary Studies 10. American culture and cultural                                                                         C111E. Topics in American Studies. (4) Course may
                                                             Upper Division Courses
change, with attention to the multicultural basis of                                                                      be repeated for credit with different topic and consent
American society and emphasis on the need for mul-           101. Examining U.S. Cultures in Time. (4) Course             of instructor. Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly
tiple methods of analysis. The course will consistently      may be repeated for credit. Three to four hours of lec-      C136. A course on the intellectual, cultural, historical,
draw on the arts, material culture, and various fields af-    ture and zero to one hours of discussion per week.           and social backgrounds to American literature. Topics
fecting cultural production and meaning. Those areas         This course examines how U.S. cultures are con-              will vary from semester to semester. Students should
include literature, film, history, architecture, history of   structed, reinforced, and changed, and how those cul-        consult the department’s “Announcement of Classes”


       B prefix=language course for business majors                 R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                   *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                 AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                       requirement
112 / American Studies
for current offerings well before the start of the           the cultural and social contexts which have shaped           duction to Courses and Curricula section of this cata-
semester. Also listed as English C136.                       and informed landscape architecture in the United            log. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Pre-
                                                             States since the advent of the public parks movement,        requisites: Regulations set by College of Letters and
C111F. Cultures of U.S. Imperialism: Spanish-
                                                             as well as, the aesthetic precepts, environmental con-       Science. Seminars for the group study of selected top-
American War of 1898. (4) Three hours of lecture and
                                                             cerns, horticultural practices, and technological inno-      ics not covered by regularly scheduled courses. Top-
one hour of discussion per week. Formerly C173. This
                                                             vations of American landscapes. Students will com-           ics will vary from semester to semester. Students must
survey course explores the histories and narratives of
                                                             plete a midterm, final, and a research assignment. Also       have completed 60 units in order to be eligible to en-
the Spanish-American War of 1898. Did the war initi-
                                                             listed as Landscape Architecture C171. (SP) Mozingo          roll. (F,SP) Staff
ate new kinds of affiliations when the U.S. invaded
Cuba, Puerto Rico, and the Philippines? Readings by          C172. Business in Its Historical Environment. (3)            199. Supervised Independent Study and Research
Turner, Anzaldua, Roosevelt, Marti, Rizal, Retamar,          Three hours of lecture per week. This course will ex-        for Upper Division Majors. (1-4) Course may be re-
Montejo, and Perez, among others. Also listed as Eth-        amine selected aspects of the history of American            peated for credit as texts vary. Must be taken on a
nic Studies C173. (F) Staff                                  business. Included will be discussions of the evolution      passed/not passed basis. Directed individual study on
                                                             of the large corporation, the development of modern          special topics approved by an American studies faculty
C112A. American Cultural Landscapes, 1600 to                                                                              member. Enrollment restrictions apply; see the Intro-
                                                             managerial techniques, and the changing relationship
1900. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of dis-                                                                     duction to Courses and Curricula section of this cata-
                                                             of business, government, and labor. Also listed as Un-
cussion per week. Formerly Formerly C169A. Intro-                                                                         log. (F,SP) Staff
                                                             dergrad. Business Administration C172. (F,SP) Rosen
duces ways of seeing and interpreting American his-
tories and cultures, as revealed in everyday built           C174. Visual Autobiography. (4) Six hours of lecture         Graduate Courses
surroundings—houses, highways, farms, factories,             per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Since        250. Research Seminar: Selected Topics. (4)
stores, recreation areas, small towns, city districts, and   visual and literary studies have historically been viewed    Course may be repeated for credit. Four hours of sem-
regions. Encourages students to read landscapes as           as separate disciplines, we will use theories from both      inar per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. A
records of past and present social relations and to          to study those forms of self-representation that defy        seminar course designed to involve graduate students
speculate for themselves about cultural meaning. Also        disciplinary boundaries, or what we call “visual auto-       directly in the interdisciplinary research process. Em-
listed as Environmental Design C169A and Geography           biography.” The course aims to help students become          phasis on examination and analysis of primary
C160A. (F) Groth                                             conversant with the elements of alphabetic literacy          sources, methodology, and the development of theo-
C112B. American Cultural Landscapes, 1900 to                 (reading and writing) and visual literacy (observing and     retical constructs. A major paper is required. (F,SP)
Present. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of          making) in order to develop a third distinctive textual/
discussion per week. Formerly c169B. Introduces ways         visual literacy. Also listed as Visual Studies C185A,
of seeing and interpreting American histories and cul-
tures, as revealed in everyday built surroundings—
                                                             Undergrad Interdisciplinary Studies C135, and English
                                                             C143V. This course satisfies the Amercan Cultures re-         Ancient History and
homes, highways, farms, factories, stores, recreation
areas, small towns, city districts, and regions. En-
                                                             quirement.
                                                                                                                          Mediterranean
                                                                                                                          Archaeology
                                                             189. Research and Writing in American Studies. (3)
courages students to read landscapes as records of           Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: In-
past and present social relations, and to speculate for      tended for American studies majors. This course is de-
themselves about cultural meaning. Also listed as En-        signed to encourage research skills, critical thinking,      (College of Letters and Science)
vironmental Design C169B and Geography C160B.                and effective writing. An intensive reading and re-
(SP) Groth                                                   search seminar, the course will assist students in the       Group Major Office: 7233 Dwinelle Hall, (510) 643-8741
                                                                                                                          ls.berkeley.edu/dept/ahma
C112F. The American Forest: Its Ecology, History,            development of skills fundamental to advanced re-
                                                             search in the humanities, social sciences, and cultural      Professors
and Representation. (4) Three hours of lecture and                                                                        Daniel Boyarin, Ph.D. Jewish Theological Seminary.
one hour of discussion per week. Formerly C176. The          studies. In addition to examining some topics in current        Rabbinic literature, Talmudic culture
American forest will be examined in terms of its ecol-       American studies scholarship, students will conduct          Stanley H. Brandes, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
                                                             semester-long research projects. The effort entails             Mediterranean ethnology and folklore
ogy, history, and representations in paintings, pho-                                                                      David J. Cohen, Ph.D. Cambridge University, J.D. University
tographs, and literary essays. This examination seeks        identification of research topics, cultivation of inter-         of California, Los Angeles. Ancient rhetoric, classical
to understand the American forest in its scientific and       disciplinary methodologies, compilation of annotated            Greek law, political and legal theory
economic parameters, as well as the historic, social,        bibliographies, and completion of a literature review,       Susanna Elm, D.Phil. Oxford University. History of late
                                                             which may serve as the first portion of the American             antiquity, early Christianity
and ideological dimensions which have contributed to                                                                      Crawford H. Greenewalt Jr., Ph.D. University of
the evolution of our present attitudes toward the forest.    studies senior thesis. The course is strongly recom-            Pennsylvania. Classical Archaeology
Also listed as Undergrad Interdisciplinary Studies           mended for those who have been out of touch with the         Erich S. Gruen, Ph.D. Harvard University. Roman and
                                                             conventions of academic research and writing or who             Hellenistic history
C136, History of Art C189, and Environ Sci, Policy, and                                                                   Ronald Hendel, Ph.D. Harvard University. Hebrew Bible
Management C191. (F,SP) Lovell, McBride                      might wish to pursue a graduate degree in the future.        Leslie V. Kurke, Ph.D. Princeton University. Greek literature
                                                             (F,SP) Moran, Palmer                                         Laurent Mayali, Ph.D. Montpellier. Classical rhetoric,
C132B. Intellectual History of the United States. (4)                                                                        Roman law
                                                             190. Senior Thesis. (4) Individual meeting with thesis       Stephen G. Miller (Emeritus), Ph.D. Princeton University.
Students will receive no credit for C132B after taking                                                                       Classical archaeology
History 132B. Three hours of lecture and one hour of         adviser. All American Studies majors must satisfy the        Martin Schwartz, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
discussion per week. History C132B.                          senior thesis requirement. Three options are available:         Iranian studies
                                                             AS 190—Senior Thesis, AS 191—Senior Seminar, or              Andrew F. Stewart, Ph.D. Cambridge University. Greek and
C134. Information Technology and Society. (4) Stu-                                                                           Roman art history and archaeology
                                                             students may (with prior Faculty Advisor approval) en-       David B. Stronach (Emeritus), M.A. Cambridge University.
dents will receive no credit for C134 after taking Africam   roll in an upper division seminar appropriate to their          Near Eastern Archaeology
American Studies 134. Three hours of lecture per week.       concentration for which they write a substantial re-         Ruth E. Tringham, Ph.D. University of Edinburgh. Old World
This course assesses the role of information technology                                                                      anthropology, prehistoric archaeology
                                                             search paper. Students planning to enroll in AS 190          John K. Anderson (Emeritus), M.A., F.S.A. Oxford
in the digitalization of society by focusing on the de-      must complete the “Thesis Proposal/Adviser Agree-               University. Greek and Roman archaeology
ployment of e-government, e-commerce, e-learning,            ment” (available in the departmental office) prior to the     Guitty Azarpay (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,
the digital city, telecommuting, virtual communities, in-                                                                    Berkeley. Near Eastern art history
                                                             semester in which the thesis is written. (F,SP) Staff        Wolfgang J. Heimpel (Emeritus), Ph.D. Heidelberg
ternet time, the virtual office, and the geography of cyber                                                                   University. Sumerian studies, Mesopotamian history
space. The course will also discuss the role of informa-     191. Senior Seminar. (4) Four hours of seminar per           J. E. Huesman (Emeritus), Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University,
tion technology in the governance and economic de-           week. Prerequisites: Declared majors with senior                Licentiate Sacred Scripture, Pontical Biblical Institute,
                                                             standing. Students will meet in seminar and will be re-         Rome. Hebrew, Old Testament, Syro-Palestinian
velopment of society. Also listed as African American                                                                        archaeology
Studies C134. (F,SP) Laguerre                                quired to write individual research papers based on the      Anne D. Kilmer (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania.
                                                             general themes or issues of the seminar. The partic-            Assyriology, ancient Near Eastern history
C160. International Media. (3) Course may be re-             ular themes/issues will be outlined on the American          Robert C. Knapp (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of
peated for credit as topic varies. Three hours of lecture                                                                    Pennsylvania. Roman history, Latin historical authors and
                                                             Studies Course List provided each semester by the               epigraphy
per week. Prerequisites: Mass Communications 10 or           American Studies office. (F,SP) Staff                         Jacob Milgrom (Emeritus), D.H.L. Jewish Theological
consent of instructor. Case studies of the foreign mass                                                                      Seminary. Biblical religion, history of ancient Israel
media. Focus may be on the press and publishing,             H195. Honors Thesis. (4) Three hours of seminar per          W. Kendrick Pritchet (Emeritus), Ph.D. Johns Hopkins
                                                                                                                             University. Greek epigraphy, topography and history
broadcasting, documentaries, or new media. Possible          week. Prerequisites: Senior-standing major in Ameri-         Raphael Sealey (Emeritus), M.A. Oxford University. Greek
topics: Pacific Rim press; mass media in China; Israeli       can studies; completion of 101 and 102, 3.51 overall            history, Greek law
and Palestinian media. Also listed as Interdisciplinary      GPA, and 3.65 GPA for classes in the major. This is a        John M. Smith Jr. (Emeritus), Ph.D. Columbia University.
                                                             required course for students wishing to graduate with           Inner Asian history, numismatics, military history
Studies Field Maj C126 and Mass Communications                                                                            Ronald S. Stroud (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,
C160.                                                        honors in American studies. Entails writing a bachelor’s        Berkeley. Greek history and epigraphy
                                                             thesis pertaining to the student’s individual area of con-   Leslie L. Threatte (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University.
C171. The American Designed Landscape Since                  centration within the American studies major. The com-          Greek and Latin linguistics, Greek epigraphy
1850. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. This course       pleted thesis will be read by the thesis supervisor and      Associate Professors
surveys the history of American landscape architecture       one other faculty member. (F,SP) Staff                       Christopher Hallett, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
since 1850 in four realms: 1) urban open spaces—that                                                                        Roman art and material culture
is squares, plazas, parks, and recreation systems; 2)        198. Directed Group Study for Advanced Under-                Cathleen Keller, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
                                                                                                                            Egyptian language, history and art history
urban and suburban design; 3) regional and environ-          graduates. (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit as        Carol A. Redmount, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Egyptian
mental planning; 4) gardens. The course will review          topic varies. Enrollment is restricted; see the Intro-         archaeology and archaeology of the Southern Levant
                                                                                                                                                                  Anthropology / 113
Nicolaas Veldhuis, Ph.D. Assyriology, ancient                   the committee and be in a final form before the stu-                Eugene A. Hammel (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of
  Mesopotamian literature and languages, reconstruction                                                                               California, Berkeley. Demography, quantitative analysis,
  and interpretation ofthe religious, literary, and scholarly   dent is recommended for the Ph.D. degree.                             Europe
  traditions of ancient Mesopotamia, Sumerian language                                                                             F. Clark Howell (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of Chicago.
  and writing                                                   For further information, inquiries should be ad-                      Primate and human evolution, paleo-anthropology
                                                                dressed to the Graduate Group in Ancient History                   Herbert P. Phillips (Emeritus), Ph.D. Cornell University.
Assistant Professors                                                                                                                  Psychological anthropology, literature, art, S.E. Asia
                                                                and Mediterranean Archaeology.
Marian Feldman, Ph.D. Harvard University. Bronze Age                                                                               Jack M. Potter (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,
  Aegean and Near Eastern art and archaeology                   Graduate Courses                                                      Berkeley. U.S., China, S.E. Asia, peasants, theory
Todd Hickey, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Greek and                                                                                Vincent M. Sarich (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,
  Egyptian papyrology, social and economic history, Late        210. Ancient History and Mediterranean Archae-                        Berkeley. Evolution, biochemistry, behavior, variation
  Antiquity                                                                                                                        William S. Simmons (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University.
Emily Mackil, Ph.D. Princeton University. Ancient Greek         ology Interdisciplinary Seminar. (2,4) Course may                     Social anthropology, North America
  history, Greek political thought, epigraphy, numismatics      be repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per
                                                                                                                                   Associate Professors
Carlos F. Norena, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania. Roman       week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Team-taught
  history, topography of Rome, Roman numismatics, Latin                                                                            Lawrence Cohen, Ph.D. Harvard University. Medical
  epigraphy
                                                                by faculty from two different departments. The purpose               anthropology, sexuality, gerontology, religion, South Asia
Kim Shelton, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania. Classical        is not only to expose students to a discipline other than          Mariane Ferme, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Social/cultural
  archaeology, Bronze Age Aegean, ancient Greek                 their own, but to engage them directly in the applica-               and gender theory, symbolic anthropology, colonialism,
  domesticarchitecture, ancient religion and mythology                                                                               West Africa, contemporary Western Europe
                                                                tion of that discipline to their own research interests.           Junko Habu, Ph.D. McGill University. Hunter-gatherer
                                                                The topic and instructors will vary from year to year.               subsistence and settlement, ceramic analysis, East Asian
                                                                Staff                                                                archaeology, Jomon, Japan
                                                                                                                                   Xin Liu, Ph.D. University of London. Practice/critical theory,
Lecturer                                                        299. Special Study. (1-4) Course may be repeated for                 transformation of rural society, social change and
                                                                                                                                     resistance, China and East Asia
David Larkin, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Egyptology           credit. Four hours of independent study per week per               Saba Mahmood, Ph.D. Stanford University. Anthropology of
Affiliated Professors
                                                                unit, including consultation. Prerequisites: Graduate                subject formation, liberalism, and secular modernity;
                                                                standing or consent of instructor. Topics and instruc-               feminist and poststructuralist theory; religion and politics;
Aaron Brody, Ph.D. Pacific School of Religion                                                                                         Islam, the Middle East, South Africa
Victor R. Gold, Ph.D. Semitic languages, Syro-Palestinian       tors will vary from year to year. Special individual study         Stefania Pandolfo, Ph.D. Princeton University. Symbolic and
   history and archaeology                                      for qualified graduate students. Individual study and re-             semiotic anthropology, psychoanalysis, gender, political
Rebecca Lyman, Ph.D. Church Divinity School of the Pacific       search, including archaeological fieldwork or laboratory              economy, philosophical, North Africa, Islam
                                                                                                                                   Laurie A. Wilkie, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles.
Senior Staff                                                    projects, in consultation with instructor on subject mat-            Historical archaeology, African-American ethnicity,
Frank Asaro (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,         ter not covered in scheduled course offerings. (F,SP)                gender, community, Louisiana, California, West Indies
  Berkeley. Provenance determination of archaeological          Staff                                                              Alexei Yurchak, Ph.D. Duke University. Linguistic
  artifacts                                                                                                                          anthropology, cultural and social theory, Soviet and post-
                                                                                                                                     Soviet, popular culture

The Major                                                       Anthropology                                                       Assistant Professors
                                                                                                                                   Sabrina Agarwal, Ph.D. University of Toronto.
                                                                                                                                     Bioarchaeology, biological and evolutionary anthropology,
There is no undergraduate major.                                (College of Letters and Science)                                     osteology and osteoporosis, health and disease,
                                                                                                                                     paleopathology
                                                                                                                                   Cori Hayden, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz.
                                                                Department Office: 232 Kroeber Hall, (510) 642-3391                   Anthropology of science, technology, and medicine; Latin
The Graduate Program                                            www.ls.berkeley.edu/dept/anth/dept.html                              America (particularly Mexico); postcolonial science
                                                                                                                                     studies; kinship, gender, queer studies
                                                                Professors                                                         Charles Hirschkind, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University.
The Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology               Stanley H. Brandes, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.        Religion, anthropology of the senses, media theory,
program is interdisciplinary and is administered by                Psychological, religion, Spain, Mexico                            language and performance, Islam and the Middle East
faculty group drawn from different departments.                 Charles L. Briggs (The Alan Dundes Distinguished Professor         Donald S. Moore, Ph.D. Stanford University. Environmental
                                                                   in Folklore), Ph.D. University of Chicago. Linguistic and         politics; development; space, place, and identity; cultural
Both M.A. and Ph.D. degrees are offered. Fields of                 medical anthropology, social theory, modernity,                   politics; Africa
emphasis include Classical, Near Eastern, ancient                  citizenship and the state, race, and violence.
Egyptian, and Late Antique history, religion, art and           Margaret W. Conkey (The Class of 1960 Chair for
archaeology; epigraphy; numismatics; and ancient                   Distinguished Teaching), Ph.D. University of Chicago.
                                                                   Archaeology, prehistoric art, hunter-gatherers, gender
law. Candidates for degrees will offer a combina-               Terrence Deacon, Ph.D. Harvard University. Biological              Affiliated Faculty
tion of three of these fields or similar fields, one as              anthropology, neuroanatomy, human communication,                Genevieve Ames, Ph.D. Medical anthropology, occupational
a major subject, two as minor subjects. The pro-                   behaviorial evolution                                             culture and health, substance abuse prevention (Public
                                                                Nelson H. H. Graburn (The Thomas Garden Barnes Chair of              Health)
gram is open to students with the B.A. in a relevant               Canadian Studies), Ph.D. University of Chicago. Kinship,        Phillipe Bourgois, Ph.D. Inner-city social suffering, substance
area who have completed at least one year of un-                   art, tourism, circumpolar, Japan                                  abuse, HIV prevention (Anthropology, History, and Social
dergraduate study in ancient history, art, or ar-               William F. Hanks (The Distinguished Chair in Linguistic              Medicine, UCSF)
                                                                   Anthropology), Ph.D. University of Chicago. Maya culture,       Susan Ervin-Tripp, Ph.D. Sociolinguisitcs, child language
chaeology. Applicants should have had sufficient                    language in culture, discourse, cognition and                     (Psychology)
training to undertake advanced work in at least one                communication, shamanism, the logic of anthropological          Mia Fuller, Ph.D. Anthropology of colonialism, fascism
ancient language.                                                  inquiry, anthropology of literature                               (Italian Studies)
                                                                Christine Hastorf, Ph.D. University of California, Los             Denise Herd, Ph.D. Medical anthropology, social
M.A. Requirements. The M.A. by thesis requires                     Angeles. Archaeology, food and agriculture, political             movements, alcohol and drug use (Public Health)
                                                                   complexity, gender, paleoethnobotany, Andes                     Jennifer Johnson-Hanks, Ph.D. Social organization,
20 semester units of coursework and a thesis. The               Rosemary Joyce, Ph.D. University of Illinois, Urbana.                reproduction, Africa (Demography)
M.A. by examination requires 24 semester units of                  Settlement patterns, symbolism, complex societies,              Michel Laguerre, Ph.D. Contemporary social theory,
coursework and a comprehensive examination in                      ceramics, Central America                                         transnational citizenship (African American Studies)
the area of principal specialization. All M.A. can-             Patrick V. Kirch (The Class of 1954 Chair for Distinguished        Jean Lave, Ph.D. Anthropology of science and the sociology
                                                                   Teaching), Ph.D. Yale University. Environmental                   of culture (Education)
didates must pass an examination in at least one                   archaeology, prehistory, Pacific Islands                         Carol Stack, Ph.D. Social anthropology, comparative family
(normally modern) language before the degree is                 Kent G. Lightfoot, Ph.D. Arizona State University. N.                organization (Education)
awarded. Each student’s progress is monitored by                   American archaeology, coastal hunter-gatherers                  Timothy White, Ph.D. Physical anthropology, evolutionary
                                                                Laura Nader, Ph.D. Radcliffe/Harvard University. Mexico,             studies (Integrative Biology)
a three-person advisory committee. Students are                    Middle East, law, controlling processes, conflict theory
expected to complete requirements for the M.A.                  Aihwa Ong, Ph.D. Columbia University. Cultural politics,           Affiliated Researchers
within two years after admission. Successful com-                  gender and sexuality, transnationalism, SE Asia, U.S.           Ira Jackins, Ph.D. Musicology, visual anthroplogy (Phoebe
                                                                Paul M. Rabinow, Ph.D. University of Chicago. France,                 A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology)
pletion of the M.A. does not carry with it automatic               history of social thought, genomics                             Barbara Voytek, Ph.D. European prehistory, lithic analysis
admission into the Ph.D. program. Students must                 Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Ph.D. University of California,                 (Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies)
petition the faculty and obtain its approval before                Berkeley. Medical, psychological, Europe, Brazil
continuing for the Ph.D.                                        M. Steven Shackley, Ph.D. Arizona State University. Hunter-
                                                                   gatherers, archaeometry, lithic technology                      Medical Anthropology Ph.D. Program Office:
                                                                Ruth Tringham, Ph.D. University of Edinburgh. European             232 Kroeber Hall, (510) 642-3391
Ph.D. Requirements. There are no specific course
                                                                   archaeology, early agriculturalists, prehistoric architecture   Professors
requirements. It is expected that all students will             James N. Anderson (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of
take at least one AHMA interdisciplinary seminar                   California at Los Angeles. Ecology, development, medical,       Stanley Brandes, Ph.D.
                                                                   S.E. Asia                                                       Charles L. Briggs, Ph.D.
during their graduate years. Students should also                                                                                  Paul Rabinow, Ph.D.
take considerable seminar work in at least two of               Burton Benedict (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of London.
                                                                   Social structure, exhibitions                                   Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Ph.D.
the departments represented in the program and                  Brent Berlin (Emeritus), Ph.D. Stanford University.                Associate Professors
obtain some practical experience in archaeology.                   Ethnobiology, cognitive anthropology, Amazonia,                 Lawrence Cohen, Ph.D.
Candidates must pass examinations in two modern                    Mesoamerica                                                     Stefania Pandolfo, Ph.D.
                                                                Gerald D. Berreman (Emeritus), Ph.D. Cornell University.
languages and two ancient languages appropriate                    Inequality, interaction, India, Himalayas                       Assistant Professor
to the fields of study. They are then eligible for the           Elizabeth Colson (Emerita), Ph.D. Radcliffe College. Social        Corinne Hayden, Ph.D.
Ph.D. qualifying examinations, both written and                    anthropology, social migration, politics, religion, Africa
                                                                George A. DeVos (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of Chicago.
oral, which test competence in the major and minor                 Japan, psychological anthropology, ethnicity
subjects. Upon successful completion of these re-               Phyllis Dolhinow (Emerita), Ph.D. University of Chicago.           Department Overview
quirements and when advanced to candidacy, the                     Physical anthropology, primatology, development
student proceeds to research and writing of a dis-              John A. Graham (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University.               The Department of Anthropology offers students
                                                                   Mesoamerican art, archaeology, epigraphy
sertation under the guidance of a three-person                  John J. Gumperz (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of Michigan.          the opportunity to study humankind from the broad-
committee. The dissertation must be approved by                    Discourse, sociolinguistics, intercultural communication        est historical and geographical perspective.

        B prefix=language course for business majors                    R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                         *Professor of the Graduate School
        C prefix=cross-listed course                                    AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                      †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
        H prefix=honors course                                          requirement
114 / Anthropology

Courses in the department offer knowledge of so-        the mentorship of a faculty thesis adviser. A grade-      results of this research. On completion of the re-
cial and cultural aspects of behavior, as well as the   point average of 3.3 overall, and 3.5 in the major in     search and approval of the dissertation by the com-
physical nature of humans. Lower division courses       courses completed at Berkeley is required to qual-        mittee, the students are awarded the doctorate.
are intended to give a general understanding of hu-     ify for the program. It is a year-long senior program
man evolution, prehistory, and the nature of human      which may begin in either the fall or spring semester.    For further information, please address corre-
cultures, while upper division courses elaborate        The program requires the sponsorship of an an-            spondence to the Graduate Adviser, Department of
particular themes.                                      thropology professor as thesis adviser and a second       Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley;
                                                        reader. The honors courses, H195A and H195B,              Berkeley, CA 94720.
The anthropology major is designed to serve two
                                                        may also count as elective requirements for the ma-       Medical Anthropology Ph.D. Program
purposes: to provide a general education in an-
                                                        jor. Applications and more information are available
thropology for students who are pursuing a liberal                                                                General Information. The Department of An-
                                                        at 209 Kroeber Hall.
arts education, and to provide preparation for grad-                                                              thropology of the University of California, Berkeley,
uate work for students who wish to become pro-                                                                    and the Graduate Group in Anthropology at the
fessional anthropologists. Students who do not in-      The Minor                                                 University of California at San Francisco, currently
tend to do graduate work in anthropology may plan                                                                 offer a joint Ph.D. in medical anthropology. Stu-
their program with considerable freedom, so long        Lower Division. Choose two from Anthropology 1,           dents may apply to enter the program through ei-
as they fulfill the requirements of the major listed     2/2AC, or 3/3AC.                                          ther the Berkeley or the San Francisco campus but
below. Students who plan to go on to graduate                                                                     not to both. The point of entry determines the stu-
study, either at Berkeley or at another institution,    Upper Division. Any five anthropology courses. All         dent’s home base during the program. Financial
should select a combination of courses to form a        courses must be taken for a letter grade, and the         aid, primary advising, and other routine services
unified plan of study that meets special intellectual    student must achieve a C average in all anthro-           are provided by the campus through which the stu-
interests.                                              pology coursework. At least four of the five courses       dent enters the program. All students, however,
                                                        must be completed at Berkeley. For more infor-            benefit by taking required coursework on both cam-
The collections and research facilities of the          mation about the minor, please contact the un-
Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology are                                                                       puses and by the participation of the faculty on
                                                        dergraduate adviser in 209 Kroeber.                       both sides of the program on all qualifying exami-
available for study in archaeology, ethnography,
physical anthropology, and related subjects by                                                                    nations and on the doctoral dissertation commit-
                                                                                                                  tees. The degree is the same and bears the name
graduate and undergraduate students, and by vis-        Preparation for Graduate Study                            of both campuses.
iting scholars; the museum’s exhibition hall is used
for instructional and educational purposes, partic-     Admission to graduate studies at Berkeley does            Medical Anthropology. Medical anthropology en-
ularly in connection with class work. Those inter-      not presuppose a B.A. in anthropology. The grad-          tails the exploration of humans as simultaneously
ested may address the Director, 103 Kroeber Hall.       uate program is oriented toward the doctorate, and        physical and symbolic beings in both contemporary
For further information on the Hearst Museum, see       only candidates for the Ph.D. will be accepted. The       and evolutionary contexts. As such, medical an-
the Index.                                              M.A. degree is awarded in the course of study             thropology participates in anthropology as a whole,
The Anthropology Library, 230 Kroeber Hall, is part     leading to the doctorate.                                 encompassing theory and practice from sociocul-
of the campus library system. It contains nearly                                                                  tural, psychological, biological, biocultural, sym-
                                                        Because of the number of students who wish
70,000 bound volumes and receives 965 current                                                                     bolic, and linguistic anthropology. It is concerned
                                                        advanced training, only a small percentage of
serial titles. The Anthropology Library houses a                                                                  with questions of both theoretical and applied
                                                        applicants can be accepted. Applications are
large reading room and facilities for reading mi-                                                                 significance, and with research that is of relevance
                                                        considered only once a year for the following fall
crofilm. It is open to all members of the University                                                               to the social sciences as well as to medicine and
                                                        semester. The deadline for application is Decem-
but serves primarily the faculty and students of the                                                              the biological sciences. Courses in bioevolutionary
                                                        ber 15.
Anthropology Department.                                                                                          dimensions of disease are accompanied by sem-
                                                                                                                  inars that explore pain, suffering, madness, and
Students seeking information on the Undergradu-         Graduate Programs                                         other human afflictions as a social language speak-
ate Program may inquire at 209 Kroeber Hall. Stu-                                                                 ing to the critically sensitive or contradictory as-
dents seeking information on the Graduate Pro-          Anthropology Ph.D. Program                                pects of culture and social relations. Anthropolog-
gram may inquire at 205 Kroeber Hall.                                                                             ical epidemiology asks the questions, “Who gets
                                                        The Department of Anthropology offers a Ph.D. in          sick with what ailments?” (differential risks, forms
                                                        anthropology, with the subdisciplines of social-cul-      of medical knowledge, and medical systems) and
The Major                                               tural anthropology or archaeology. The Ph.D. in an-       “Why?” (what social arrangements, cultural fea-
                                                        thropology is concerned with diverse analytic and         tures, and biotechno-environmental forces account
Lower Division Prerequisites: Anthropology 1, 2         substantive problems in the contemporary world            for these risks). Medical anthropology interprets in-
or 2AC, and 3 or 3AC.                                   and includes research sites across the United             dividuals as actively constructing their medical re-
Upper Division Requirements: A total of nine up-        States and around the world. For example, the             alities and not simply adjusting to or coping with
per division courses is required.                       Ph.D. in anthropology might focus on globalization        them.
                                                        and political economy; gender and feminist anal-
Anthropology 114                                        ysis in archaeology and social-cultural anthropol-        Given the broad definition of medical anthropology,
                                                        ogy; genomics and the anthropology of science             the joint graduate program at Berkeley-UCSF is ex-
One course in biological anthropology (courses                                                                    tremely flexible, allowing for the individual needs
100-112, 127)                                           and reason; folklore theory; ethno-archaeology; lin-
                                                        guistic anthropology; paleo-ethnobotany; the an-          and interests of each student. During the first year
One course in archaeology (courses 121-136,             thropologies of tourism, food, energy, space, and         of training, students are required to take core
174AC)                                                  the body; sexuality and difference; aging and the         courses in both sociocultural and biological aspects
                                                        life course; cultural politics of identity, space, and    of medical anthropology, taught at both campuses.
One course in social/cultural anthropology (courses                                                               After the first year and successful completion of the
115-119, 138-189)                                       the body; political ecology and agrarian micropol-
                                                        itics; coastal archaeology; urban anthropology and        preliminary qualifying examination, medical an-
Five other elective anthropology courses.               psychoanalytic anthropology.                              thropology students develop a more specialized
                                                                                                                  and individually tailored program under the su-
The above nine courses must include at least one        The program for the Ph.D. degree normally takes           pervision and guidance of their adviser.
“area” course (121-124, 128A, 170-188, 189A),           six years and is divided into three steps, as follows:
and one “method” course (127, 128M, 131-136,                                                                      For students entering Berkeley with a B.A., the
138B, 169A, 169B, 189M). For example, Anthro-           Step I. The students begin to narrow down their in-       doctoral program is estimated to take between five
pology 123D, Archaeology of East Asia, is an area       terests to particular topical and geographical fields      and six years, as follows: three years of course-
course that is also upper division archaeology.         of specialization, a process that normally takes one      work, one to two years of dissertation research,
Method courses must be taken for a minimum of 4         year.                                                     and one to two years of writing the dissertation.
units. Summer field courses, when sponsored or           Step II. Students attend seminars, prepare three          For a complete list of faculty, consult the Medical
endorsed by a Berkeley professor of anthropology,       field statements in their specializations, satisfy their   Anthropology brochure available from the Pro-
satisfy the method requirement.                         language requirement, and prepare for their Ph.D.         gram Office, 232 Kroeber Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-
All courses must be taken on a letter-graded basis      oral qualifying examination. This step lasts one to       3710, or the General Catalog of UCB and UCSF
with the exception of Anthropology 199, Indepen-        two years. With the successful passing of the orals,      campuses.
dent Study, if sponsored and evaluated by a pro-        students are advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D.
                                                        degree.                                                   Applications to all graduate programs are consid-
fessor of anthropology. Transfer students should
                                                                                                                  ered once each year for admission the following fall
attempt to satisfy prerequisites before transferring
                                                        Step III. Students undertake research for the Ph.D.       semester. The application period opens in early
to Berkeley. They may declare when they have
                                                        dissertation under a three-person committee in            September, and the deadline for receipt of both de-
completed two of the prerequisites.
                                                        charge of their research and dissertation. Students       partment and Graduate Division applications is De-
Honors Program. The Honors Program in an-               do original field, laboratory, or library research,        cember 15. Applications are screened by the an-
thropology is an independently pursued course of        which generally takes a minimum of one year. The          thropology faculty, and selections are made on the
research undertaken by qualified students under          students then write the dissertation based on the         basis of academic excellence, letters of recom-
                                                                                                                                                            Anthropology / 115

mendation, GRE scores, relevant experience, and                  passed/not passed basis. Freshman and sophomore               and cultural dimensions can be understood using the
a strong statement of intellectual and professional              seminars offer lower division students the opportunity        relatively small number of basic principles provided by
purpose.                                                         to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member        evolutionary biological considerations.
                                                                 and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These
The minimum requirement for admission to the                                                                                   112. Special Topics in Biological Anthropology. (4)
                                                                 seminars are offered in all campus departments; top-
Berkeley doctoral program in anthropology and in                                                                               Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lec-
                                                                 ics vary from department to department and from
medical anthropology is a B.A. The UCSF program                                                                                ture per week and one or more hours of laboratory
                                                                 semester to semester.
in medical anthropology requires a master’s degree                                                                             may be required based on topic. Prerequisites: An-
in anthropology or a related discipline, or a post-              84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-                thropology 1 recommended. Varying topics covering
baccalaureate professional degree.                               peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar        current discoveries, research, theories, fieldwork, etc.,
                                                                 per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half          in biological anthropology. Topics vary with instructor.
The Master of Arts in Folklore                                   hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two          (F,SP)
The folklore program is designed to provide grad-                hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.
uate students with a competent knowledge of both                 Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five              History of Anthropology
the materials of folklore and the various methods of             weeks. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not              114. History of Anthropological Thought. (4) Three
studying these materials.                                        passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-          hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
                                                                 grade basis. Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.      Formerly 114A. This course will present a history of
For information, see the Folklore section of this                Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses of-
catalog.                                                                                                                       anthropological thought from the mid-19th century to
                                                                 fered by faculty members in departments all across the        the present, and will draw upon the major subdisci-
Lower Division Courses                                           campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for              plines of anthropology. It will focus both upon the in-
                                                                 close, regular intellectual contact between faculty           tegration of the anthropological subdisciplines and
1. Introduction to Biological Anthropology. (4)                  members and students in the crucial second year. The          upon the relationships between these and other dis-
Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per            topics vary from department to department and                 ciplines outside anthropology. (F)
week. An introduction to human evolution. Physical               semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sopho-
and behavioral adaptations of humans and their pre-              mores. (F,SP)
historic and living relatives. Issues in evolutionary the-
                                                                                                                               Medical Anthropology
ory, molecular evolution, primate behavior, interpre-            98. Directed Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-             115. Introduction to Medical Anthropology. (4)
tation of fossils. Prehistoric activities, racial differences,   peated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-      Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per
genetic components of behavior are defined and eval-              troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-      week. Cultural, psychological, and biological aspects
uated. (F,SP) Staff                                              alog. Three to twelve hours of group study (or tutorial       of the definitions, causes, symptoms, and treatment of
                                                                 or fieldwork) per week. Must be taken on a passed/not          illness. Comparative study of medical systems, prac-
2. Introduction to Archaeology. (4) Students will re-            passed basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor;           titioners, and patients. (F,SP)
ceive no credit for 2 after taking 2AC but may remove            freshmen or sophomore status. Organized group study
a deficient grade. Three hours of lecture and one hour            on topics selected by lower division students under the       119. Special Topics in Medical Anthropology. (4)
of discussion per week. Prehistory and cultural growth.          sponsorship and direction of a member of the An-              Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lec-
(F,SP)                                                           thropology Department’s faculty.                              ture per week. Prerequisites: Upper division status and
                                                                                                                               consent of instructor. Special topics in cultural, biomed-
2AC. Introduction to Archaeology. (4) Students will              99. Supervised Independent Study and Research.                ical and applied approaches to medical anthropology.
receive no credit for 2AC after taking 2 but may re-             (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is        (F,SP)
move a deficient grade. Three hours of lecture and one            restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-
hour of discussion per week. Prehistory and cultural             ricula section of this catalog. Three to twelve hours of      Archaeology
growth. Introduction to the methods, goals, and theo-            tutorial (or fieldwork) per week. Must be taken on a
retical concepts of archaeology with attention to the            passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Consent of in-        121. Historical Archaeology. Archaeology of the pe-
empact archaeology has had on the construction of the            structor; freshmen and sophmores only. Individual re-         riod from the first European settlement in America,
histories of diverse communities—Native Americans,               search by lower division students. (F,SP)                     Australasia, South Africa, etc. The following series of
Hispanics, and Euro-Americans. It fulfills the require-                                                                         121, Historical Archaeology sequence courses may be
ments for 2. This course satisfies the American Cul-              Upper Division Courses                                        taken in any order.
tures requirement. (F,SP)                                                                                                      121A. American Material Culture. (4) Three hours of
                                                                 Physical Anthropology
2L. Introduction to Archaeology through Multimedia Au-                                                                         lecture per week. Prerequisites: 2 or consent of in-
                                                                 C100. Human Paleontology. (5) Three hours of lec-             structor. Formerly 121. Patterns in material culture
thoring. (2) One hour of seminar/lecture and two hours
                                                                 ture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prereq-          as it reflects behavioral and psychological aspects
of workshop/lababoratory per week. Prerequisites:
                                                                 uisites: 1, Biology 1A-1B. Origin and relationships of        of American culture since the 17th century. Topics
Concurrent enrollment in 2. A supplemental course to
                                                                 the extinct forms of mankind. Also listed as Integrative      include architecture, domestic artifacts, mortuary
the regular 2 in which students are introduced to mul-
                                                                 Biology C185. (SP) White                                      art, foodways, and trash disposal. Euro-American,
timedia authoring for archaeology and the multimedia
presentation of archaeology through commercial and               101. Genetic Anthropology. (4) Three hours of lec-            African American, and Native-American examples
educational web sites and CD ROMs.                               ture and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequi-           are considered.
                                                                 sites: 1. Human variation in both a racial and non-racial     121AC. American Material Culture. (4) Students will
3. Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropol-
                                                                 context; basic genetics (both molecular and popula-           receive no credit for 121AC after taking 121A. Three
ogy. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of dis-
                                                                 tional); theories of racial origins, selective bases of hu-   hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 2 or consent
cussion per week. The structure and dynamics of hu-
                                                                 man variation. (F,SP) Staff                                   of instructor. Patterns in material culture as it reflects
man culture and social institutions. (F,SP)
                                                                 C103. Introduction to Human Osteology. (6) Six                behavioral and psychological aspects of American cul-
3AC. Introduction to Social/Cultural Anthropology                                                                              ture since the 17th century. Topics include architecture,
                                                                 hours of lecture and fourteen hours of laboratory per
(American Cultures). (4) Three hours of lecture and                                                                            domestic artifacts, mortuary art, foodways, and trash
                                                                 week. Prerequisites: 1, Biology 1B. An intensive study
one hour of discussion per week. The structure and                                                                             disposal. This course satisfies the American Cultures
                                                                 of the human skeleton, reconstruction of individual and
dynamics of human cultures and social institutions                                                                             requirement. (F,SP)
                                                                 population characteristics, emphasizing methodology
from a comparative perspective with special attention
                                                                 and analysis of human populations from archaeolog-            121B. Theoretical Approaches in American Historical
to American Cultures and their roots. Case studies will
                                                                 ical and paleontological contexts, taphonomy, and pa-         Archaeology. (4) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-
illustrate the principles presented in the course. It fulfills
                                                                 leopathology. Also listed as Integrative Biology C142.        requisites: 2 or consent of instructor. This course will
the requirements for 3. This course satisfies the Amer-
ican Cultures requirement. (F,SP)                                105. Primate Evolution. (4) Three hours of lecture per        provide a background in the theoretical and method-
                                                                 week. Prerequisites: 1 recommended. A consideration           ological development of American historical archae-
24. Freshman Seminar. (1) Course may be repeated                                                                               ology, with particular emphasis on the ways in which
                                                                 of the major groups of primates with an emphasis on
for credit with different topic and different instructor. Fif-                                                                 archaeologists have approached the integration of ar-
                                                                 the evolution of behavior. (F,SP)
teen hours of seminar per semester. Sections 1-10 to                                                                           chaeological, documentary, oral historical and ethno-
be graded on a passed/not passed basis. Sections 11-             106. Primate Behavior. (4) Three hours of lecture and         historic data. Emphasis on continuing theoretical de-
20 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. The Freshman            one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 1 or          velopments in the discipline. Politics of historical
Seminar Program has been designed to provide new                 Integrative Biology 32 recommended. Humans, apes,             archaeology, and ways in which historical archaeolo-
students with the opportunity to explore an intellectual         and selected monkeys are the primates of concern,             gists and other public historians make the past relevant
topic with a faculty member in a small seminar setting.          and among this array patterns and degrees of social           to the present.
Freshman seminars are offered in all campus de-                  behavior vary greatly. Lectures present a general in-
partments, and topics may vary from department to de-                                                                          121C. Historical Artifact Identification and Analysis. (4)
                                                                 troduction to behavior and its ecological context, the in-
partment and semester to semester. Enrollment limited                                                                          Two hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per
                                                                 teraction of biology and behavior from an evolutionary
to 15 freshmen.                                                                                                                week. Prerequisites: 121A or 121B recommended and
                                                                 perspective, and an examination of the roots of mod-
                                                                                                                               consent of instructor. Learn to work with historical ar-
                                                                 ern human behavior. (F,SP) Staff
39. Freshman/Sophomore Seminar. (2-4) Course                                                                                   tifacts from the stage of recovery through the stages of
may be repeated for credit when topic changes. One               111. Evolution of Human Behavior. (4) Three hours             analysis and interpretation. The focus is on the anal-
hour of lecture per unit. Sections 1-2 to be graded on           of lecture per week. This course will ask to what extent      ysis of materials (i.e., ceramic, glass, metal, bone, shell
a letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a             human behavior in its various individual, group, social,      artifacts) recovered from historic sites. Skills acquired


        B prefix=language course for business majors                    R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                    *Professor of the Graduate School
        C prefix=cross-listed course                                    AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                 †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
        H prefix=honors course                                          requirement
116 / Anthropology
include how to identify, date, record, illustrate, photo-     123D. Archaeology of East Asia. (4) Prerequisites: 2         art; Ice Age Arts; prehistoric ceramics. Uses illustrative
graph, catalog, and interpret historical archaeological       recommended. Prehistoric and protohistoric archae-           materials from the Hearst Museum. (F,SP)
materials through a combination of lectures, lab ex-          ology in China, Japan, and Korea.
                                                                                                                           129C. Archaeology of Hunter-Gatherers. (4) Course
ercises, and a research paper.
                                                              124. Pacific Cultures. Three hours of lecture per             will provide an overview of hunter-gatherer archaeol-
122. Archaeology of the Americas. Three hours of              week. Prerequisites: 2. A variety of courses that con-       ogy, focusing on the history of hunter-gatherer ar-
lecture per week. Prerequisites: 2. A group of courses        sider the peoples and past cultures and societies of         chaeology in North America and Britian; long-term
that examine the native societies and cultures of the         Oceania and the Pacific, through the study of ar-             changes in hunter-gatherer subsistence, settlement,
Americas in the past, as known from a variety of              chaeology, ethnography, ethnohistory and other rele-         mortuary/ceremonial practices and crafts/trade; social
sources used by archaeologists, including study of ma-        vant fields. No specific sequence of courses; students         archaeology of hunter-gatherers including studies of
terial culture, documents, visual culture, and the use of     may take any or all of the following in any sequence.        gender, cognition, and cultural landscapes; and dis-
ethnographic accounts. (F,SP)                                                                                              cussions of the relevance of hunter-gatherer studies in
                                                              124A. Archaeology of the South Pacific. (4) Selected          the context of world archaeology. (F,SP)
122A. Archaeology of North America. (4) Prerequisites:        topics and research problems in the archaeology of the
2. Formerly 122. Prehistory of North American Indians;        southern Pacific from prehistory through to the es-           129D. The Archaeology of Global Change. (4) This
prehistoric culture areas; relations with historic Indians.   tablishment of complex chiefdoms in many locales.            course explores the interface between archaeology,
                                                              Stress on current issues and interpretations.                ecology, geography, environmental studies, and ge-
122B. Culture Contact in North America. (4) Three                                                                          omorphology to understand global change. The geo-
hours of lecture per week. This culture examines the          124AC. Hawaiian Ethnohistory. (4) Three hours of             graphic scope is global and will cover time periods
implications of early encounters between Native Amer-         lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 or equivalent or con-     ranging over the Holocene and at time to the Pleis-
icans and Europeans, including how indigenous peo-            sent of instructor. Developmental foundations of the         tocene. (F,SP)
ples responded to European contact and colonialism,           20th-century multicultural society of Hawaii, during the
and how the outcomes of these encounters influenced            period 1778-1900, explored through an explicitly an-         129E. Household Archeology. (4) This class explores
cultural developments in postcolonial contexts. The           thropological perspective. The following ethnic groups       the questions: why study the archaeology of house-
study employs a holistic approach that integrates ev-         are emphasized: Native Hawaiians, British-American           holds? How do we define households and how can we
idence from archaeology, ethnography, ethnohistory,           whites, Chinese, and Japanese. This course satisfies          identify and study them archaeologically? What re-
linguistics, biological anthropology, and native oral tra-    the American Cultures requirement. (F,SP)                    search questions, strategies, and methodologies does
ditions. Case studies from the Caribbean, Florida,                                                                         the archaeological investigation of households entail?
                                                              125. Asian Archaeology. Three hours of lecture per           How does the study of households contribute to mul-
Louisiana, Virginia, Alaska, Hawaii, and California will      week. Courses focus on past Asian peoples, culture,
be included.                                                                                                               tiscalar approaches for understanding social organi-
                                                              and societies through the study of archaeology,              zation? Why is this important? What are the causes
122C. Archaeology of Central America. (4) A survey of         ethnography, and other relevant fields. These courses         and effects of changing scales of analysis? (F,SP)
what archaeology can tell us about the pre-Columbian          meet the area requirement and may be taken in any
                                                              sequence. (F,SP)                                             130. History and Theory of Archaeology. (4) Three
cultures of Central America: the Olmec, Maya, Aztec,
                                                                                                                           hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 2. Formerly
and their neighbors.                                          125A. Archaeology of East Asia. (4) Students will re-        136. A critical review of the historical background and
                                                              ceive no credit for 125A after taking 123D Fall 2002 or      philosophical premises of past and present anthro-
122D. World of Ancient Maya. (4) A survey of the his-
                                                              2003. Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor. Pre-        pological theory with respect to its concepts of time
tory of development of Maya society and culture in
                                                              historic and protohistoric archaelogy in China, Japan,       and change. (F,SP)
Central American pri to Eurpean contact in the 16th
                                                              and Korea.
century AD. (F,SP)                                                                                                         C131. Geoarchaeological Science. (4) Three hours
                                                              125B. Archaelogy and Japanese Identities. (4) Course         of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. Pre-
122E. Andean Archaeology: People of the Andes. (4)            explores stereotypical images of traditional Japanese
This course covers the archaeology and history of the                                                                      requisites: 2 or Earth and Planetary Science 50, or
                                                              culture and people through archaeological analysis.          consent of instructor. Formerly 131. This survey and
indigenous societies of the Andean region of South            Particular emphasis will be placed on changing lifeways
America. The lectures and readings emphasize major                                                                         laboratory course will cover a broad range of current
                                                              of past residents of the Japanese islands, including         scientific techniques used in the field and in the anal-
political, economic, social, and symbolic processes in        commoners, samurai and nobles. Consideration will be
the development of the Andean civilizations. Particu-                                                                      ysis of geoarchaeological materials. The course in-
                                                              given to the implications of these archaeological stud-      cludes field and laboratory studies in analytical chem-
lar attention is paid to the development of the early         ies for our understanding of Japanese identities. (F,SP)
states along the coast of Peru. The development of                                                                         istry, geology, petrology/petography and a survey of
major centers in the highlands, and the relationship be-      127. Bioarchaeology. Two hours of lecture and four           dating materials in archaeology, the historical devel-
tween the political, economic, and religious systems of       hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 1, Biology      opment of geoarchaeological science and other as-
the later empires and earlier political structures and so-    1B. A variety of courses related to bioarchaeology.          pects of archaeological science applied to geoar-
cial processes, are also emphasized. (F,SP) Staff             (F,SP)                                                       chaeological materials. Also listed as Earth and
                                                                                                                           Planetary Science C171. (SP) Shackley
122F. California Archaeology. (4) Prehistory of Cali-         127A. Introduction to Skeletal Biology and Bioar-
                                                              chaeology. (4) Students will receive no credit for 127A      132. Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Three
fornia Indians; selected archaeological sites and cur-
                                                              after taking either C103 or Integrative Biology C142.        hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory per
rent issues in interpretations.
                                                              An introduction to skeletal biology and anatomy to un-       week. Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor. Prin-
122G. Archaeology of the American Southwest. (4)              derstand how skeletal remains can be used in recon-          ciples of analysis of inorganic archaeolological mate-
This course will outline the development of vative cul-       structing patterns of adaptation and biocultural evolution   rials, including, but not limited to stone, ceramics, and
tures in the American Southwest from Paleo-Indian             in past populations, emphasizing a problem-based ap-         metals, with laboratory instruction. These courses meet
times (ca. 11,500 BC) through early European contact          proach to bioarchaeological questions. (F,SP)                the method requirement for the major and may be
(ca. A.D. 1600). Topics to be covered include the                                                                          taken in any sequence. (F,SP)
greater environment, early foaging culture, the devel-        128. Special Topics in Archaeology. (4) Course may
                                                              be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per           132A. Analysis of Archaeological Ceramics. (4) Dis-
opment of agriculture and village life, the emergence                                                                      cussion of and laboratory instruction in methods of
and decline of regional alliances, abandonment, and           week. Prerequisites: 2. Current topics in method and
                                                              theory of archaeological research, varying with in-          analysis of ceramics used by archaeologists to es-
reorganization, and changes in social organization, ex-                                                                    tablish a time scale, to document interconnections be-
ternal relations and trade. The course is designed as         structor. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                           tween different areas, sites, or groups of people, to
an advanced upper division seminar for students ma-           128A. Special Topics in Archaeology/Area. (4) Course         suggest what activities were carried out at particular
joring in anthropology with an emphasis in archaeol-          may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per       sites, and to understand the organization of ceramic
ogy. Can be taught as a distance learning course with         week. Prerequisites: 2 recommended. Special topics           production itself. (F,SP)
another university. (F,SP)                                    in archaeology which meet the area requirement for
                                                              the anthropology major. (F,SP)                               134. Analysis of the Archaeological Record. (4)
123. Old World Cultures. Three hours of lecture per                                                                        Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory
week. Prerequisites: 2. A variety of courses that con-        128M. Special Topics in Archaeology/Method. (4)              per week. Prerequisites: 2 or consent of instructor.
sider the peoples and past cultures and societies of the      Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lec-       Guidance in the preparation of excavated materials for
Old World, through the study of archaeology, ethnog-          ture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prereq-         publication, including sampling and analysis strategy,
raphy, and other relevant fields. No specific sequence          uisites: 2 recommended. Special topics in archaeology        drawing, photography and write-up.
to courses; students may take any or all of the fol-          which meet the method requirement for the anthro-
lowing in any sequence.                                       pology major. (F,SP)                                         134A. Field Course in Archaeological Methods. (6)
                                                                                                                           Course may be repeated for credit. One hour of lecture
123A. Stone Age Archaeology. (4) Prerequisites: 2.            129. Topical Areas in Archaeology. Three hours of            and eight hours of fieldwork per week. Forty hours of
Overview of stone age cultures and development.               lecture per week. Prerequisites: 2. (2 or 3 for 129A.).      fieldwork for four weeks. Prerequisites: 2 or consent of
Selected topics or geographic areas of paleolithic            These courses explore contemporary topics in ar-             instructor. Formerly 133 and N133. Practical experi-
research.                                                     chaeology that transcend time periods or cultural ar-        ence in the field study of archaeological sites and ma-
                                                              eas. Courses may be taken in any sequence. (F,SP)            terials. Coverage may include reconnaissance, map-
123C. Archaeology of Europe. (4) Prerequisites: 2.
                                                                                                                           ping, recording, and excavation. (F,SP)
Formerly 127 Selected topics and research problems            129A. Prehistoric Art. (4) Draws on study of art in non-
in the archaeology of the Pleistocene and/or post-            literate societies and on archaeology to explore a           134B. Archaeological Laboratory Practicum. (1-4) One
Pleistocene of Europe.                                        range of prehistoric arts in cultural contexts; e.g., rock   hour of lecture and two to eleven hours of laboratory
                                                                                                                                                        Anthropology / 117

per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. This is     umentation strategy for collecting, processing, and in-        144. Social and Cultural Change. (4) Three hours of
a practical laboratory analysis course that offers a        tegrating digital data from a variety of different media       lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 or consent of in-
team of students the oppportunity to work closely with      into a dataset that holistically describes place, including    structor. Western theories of evolutionary and revo-
faculty on an aspect of their laboratory research in ar-    landscape, architecture, and other cultural artifacts.         lutionary change inform our general understanding of
chaeological physical or natural sciences, or archae-       (F,SP)                                                         societies past and present. This course will evaluate
ological material analysis. May be taken concurrently                                                                      these models by reading about the particular and mul-
                                                            136F. Digital Archaeology from Field to Classroom. (4)
with other laboratory courses or as the logical follow-                                                                    tifarious experiences of social change in different
                                                            Students will receive no credit for 136F after taking
up to a field school. Projects will vary by course. (F,SP)                                                                  times and places, and will consider new forms of con-
                                                            134B. This is a course that builds on the fieldwork con-
                                                                                                                           sciousness and culture generated by the colonial en-
135. Paleoethnobotany: Archaeological Methods               ducted by the participants in the Summer Sessions
                                                                                                                           counter, agrarian transition, industrialization, emigration,
and Laboratory Techniques. (4) Three hours of lec-          field schools in archaeology. Students who participated
                                                                                                                           and the impact of cosmopolitan culture on non-Western
ture and three hours of laboratory per week. Prereq-        in the field schools work as post-excavation leads in
                                                                                                                           societies. (F,SP)
uisites: 2 and consent of instructor. An introduction to    small groups to guide new students through the pro-
the basic approaches and techniques in archaeob-            cessing of the multimedia record and other digitized ar-       145. Urban Anthropology. (4) Three hours of lecture
otanical analysis. A series of different data types and     chaeological data.                                             per week. Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor. A
their unique approaches will be discussed, including                                                                       consideration of anthropological concepts and meth-
                                                            136H. Archaeology After-School Program. (4) Course
phytoliths, pollen, and DNA, with an emphasis on                                                                           ods for the urbanization process in towns and cities.
                                                            may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: 2 or consent
macrofloral remains. Laboratory study will include the                                                                      (F,SP)
                                                            of instructor. Formerly 128M. An opportunity to work
major classes of plant remains likely to be encountered     with sixth-graders in exploring the worlds of archae-          147A. Anthropology of Gender. (4) Three hours of
in archaeological sites. Discussion will emphasize the      ology, history, and computer-based technologies.               lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 or consent of in-
use of plant remains to answer archaeological ques-         Meets the method requirement for the anthropology              structor. The course explores major developments
tions, rather than study the plant remains for their own    major. (F,SP)                                                  within feminist theory in the 20th century within an in-
sake. Microscope work and computing will be included.
                                                            136I. Archaeology and the Media. (4) Prerequisites: 2.         ternational context, with special attention to issues of
136. Public Anthropology. Three hours of lecture per        Focus on the use of digital media to create narrative          class, culture, race, ethnicity, and sexuality. (F,SP)
week. A variety of courses that introduce principles in     about the practice and products of archaeology. Stu-           C147B. Sexuality, Culture, and Colonialism. (4)
the public aspects of anthropology. These courses           dents build a critical awareness of the way digital me-        Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 or
may be taken in any order. (F,SP)                           dia are used by archaeologists, journalists, film and TV        Sociology 3. An introduction to social theory and
136A. Museum Exhibit Curation and Design. (4) Three         producers, and others. Students will experience the in-        ethnographic methodology in the cross-cultural study
hours of lecture and four hours of studio per week. A       troductory stage of the digital media authoring process.       of sexuality, particularly sexual orientation and gender
practical introduction to contemporary museum ap-           (F,SP)                                                         identity. The course will stress the relationships be-
proaches to exhibition design, with particular appli-       136J. Archaeology and the Media Method. (4) Pre-               tween culture, international and local political economy,
cation to the design of exhibits that present cultural      requisites: 136I. Focus on the use of digital media to         and the representation and experience of what we will
heritage in anthropology, art, and natural history mu-      create narratives about the practice and products of ar-       provisionally call homosexual and transgendered de-
seums. Both the theory of museum exhibit design and         chaeology. Students work in teams to produce short             sires or identities. Also listed as Lesbian Gay Bisexual
practice will be covered, including critiques of repre-     videos (digital narrative or digital stories) from their own   Transgender St C147B.
sentation; issues of cultural heritage; conversation, ed-   research. Students share equally the responsibilities of       147C. Globalization and Gender in the Asia Pacific.
ucation, and installation standards; and incorporation      research and writing, directing, camera, sound record-         (4) Three hours of lecture per week. Globalization and
of interactivity, including through digital media. (F,SP)   ing, and editing. This course satisfies the method re-          its reworking of gender systems and rights is analyzed
                                                            quirement for the anthropology major. (F,SP)                   using market-state relations, and accelerated transna-
136B. Museum Methods. (4) This course will introduce
participants to the fundamentals of contemporary mu-                                                                       tionalism. Contemporary capitalism involves the re-
seum practices. It is intended for two groups of stu-
                                                            Social and Cultural Anthropology                               formation of the world economy, with consequences
dents: individuals who may be thinking of conducting        138A. History and Theory of Ethnographic Film. (4)             for relations between state and society. Transnation-
research in museums, and may benefit from an un-             Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per          alism refers to the flow of people, goods, cultures, and
derstanding of the way these institutions work; and in-     week. Prerequisites: 3 or 114. The course will trace the       politics across national borders prompted by markets,
dividuals who may be thinking of museum work as a           development of ethnographic film from its beginnings            migrations, criminal syndicates, etc. Interconnection
post-gradute career. The course will include both dis-      at the turn of the century to the present. In addition to      between regions and nation-states transforms modern
cussion of museum concepts and practical application        looking at seminal works in the field, more recent and          life. (F,SP)
of these concepts through real-world exercises. While       innovative productions will be viewed and analyzed.            148. Anthropology of the Environment. (4) Three
the course fulfills the method requirement, it covers        Topics of interest include the role of visual media in         hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 or consent
practices of art, natural history, and science museums      ethnography, ethics in filmmaking, and the problematic          of instructor. Surveys anthropological perspectives on
as well. (F,SP)                                             relationship between seeing and believing. Require-            the environment and examines differing cultural con-
                                                            ments include film critiques, a film proposal, and a final        structions of nature. Coverage includes theory,
136C. Multimedia Authoring Part 1. (4) One hour of          exam.
lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. This                                                                        method, and case materials extending from third world
course is the first part in a two-part series of courses     138B. Field Production of Ethnographic Film. (5)               agrarian contexts to urban North America. Topics may
that coach students in research and presentation of ar-     Three hours of lecture and three hours of laboratory           include cultural ecology, political ecology, cultural pol-
chaeological information through nonlinear multimedia       per week. Prerequisites: 138A (no exceptions). This            itics of nature, and environmental imaginaries.
authoring. The content of the course varies and may         course is devoted to training students in methods of           149. Psychological Anthropology. (4) Three hours
focus on an area or a topic depending on instructor.        ethnographic field film production. Based on the pre-            of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 or consent of in-
Students experience the first stage of multimedia au-        vious coursework in Anthro 138A, students will work            structor. The history of psychological anthropology
thoring process: research, planning, and design. The        toward the production of an ethnographic video from            from the culture and personality school through current
focus is on content development and evaluation of dig-      elected project proposals. In addition to weekly dis-          constructionist approaches to indigenous psychologies.
ital research sources, with an introduction to software     cussions of student projects, guest consultants and            Topics may include ethnopsychiatry, psychoanalysis,
skills and practice. (F,SP)                                 lecturers will lend their expertise on aspects of pro-         psychiatric approaches to possession and altered
                                                            duction as well as editing. (F,SP)                             states, emotion and culture, gender, sexuality, and
136D. Multimedia Authoring Part 2. (4) One hour of
                                                            139. Controlling Processes. (4) Three hours of lec-            erotics. The focus will be on the use of psychology in
lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Pre-
                                                            ture and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequi-            cultural analysis rather than medical approaches. Is
requisites: 136C. This course is the second part in a
                                                            sites: Those with at least one social science course will      cross-cultural psychological analysis possible, and if
two-part series of courses that coach students in re-
                                                            be more familiar with the subject matter. This course          so, how? (F,SP)
search and presentation of archaeological information
through nonlinear multimedia authoring. The content         will discuss key theoretical concepts related to power
                                                                                                                           150. Utopia: Art and Power in Modern Times. (4)
of the course varies and may focus on an area or a          and control and examine indirect mechanisms and pro-
                                                                                                                           Four hours of lecture per week. Modern times have
topic depending on instructor. Students work in a team,     cesses by which direct control becomes hidden, vol-
                                                                                                                           been dominated by utopian visions of how to achieve
building on research in 136C to design and develop an       untary, and unconscious in industrialized societies.
                                                                                                                           a happy future society. Artists in competing social sys-
interactive hypermedia project. There is a focus on the     Readings will cover language, law, politics, religion,
                                                                                                                           tems played a central role in the development of these
real-world practice of multimedia authoring, including      medicine, sex, and gender. (SP)
                                                                                                                           visions. But artistic experiments were filled with para-
detailed storyboarding, design of interactivity and nav-    141. Comparative Society. (4) Three hours of lecture           doxes, contributing to the creation not only of the most
igation, deep content research, and keeping to pro-         and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 3          liberating and progressive ideals and values but also
duction timetables. (F,SP)                                  or consent of instructor. Theories of social structure,        to the most oppressive regimes and ideologies. The
                                                            functional interrelationships of social institutions. Pri-     course questions: what is art, what can it achieve and
136E. Digital Documentation and Representation of
                                                            mary emphasis on non-Western societies. (F,SP)                 destroy, what is beauty, artistic freedom, and the rela-
Cultural Heritage. (4) One hour of lecture and four
                                                                                                                           tionship between esthetics, ethics, and power? (F,SP)
hours of laboratory per week. A practical, hands-on         142. Kinship and Family. (4) Three hours of lecture
overview of cutting-edge digital technology that is be-     per week. Prerequisites: 3. Comparative study of the           151. Anthropology of Tourism. (4) Three hours of
ing used and developed for the documentation of ar-         family and kinship systems in non-state and state so-          lecture per week. (1) Variations in touristic motivations
chaeological sites. This course outlines a digital doc-     cieties. (F,SP)                                                and behavior and (2) the political, economic, and


       B prefix=language course for business majors                R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                     *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                  †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                      requirement
118 / Anthropology
cultural impact of tourism on host cultures and                 to the courses; students may take any or all of the fol-       to prevailing anthropological theories at different times,
communities.                                                    lowing courses in any sequence.                                and in different regions of the continent.
152. Art and Culture. (4) Three hours of lecture per            169A. Data Analysis and Computational Methods. (4)             184. South Asia. (4) Three hours of lecture per week.
week. Graphic and plastic arts and their relations to           Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 2 or           Cultural traditions, social organization, and social
culture in non-literate societies; illustrative material from   consent of instructor. This course capitalizes on a suc-       change, with an emphasis on India and Pakistan.
the Hearst Museum of Anthropology.                              cessful approach of using definitional formulas to em-
                                                                                                                               C184. South Asia. (4) Students will receive no credit
                                                                phasize concepts of statistics, rather than rote memo-
156B. Culture and Power. (4) Three hours of lecture                                                                            for C184 after taking 184. Three hours of lecture per
                                                                rization in both qualitative and quantitative anthropology.
per week. The course examines how representations                                                                              week. Cultural traditions, social organization, and so-
                                                                This conceptual approach constantly reminds the stu-
are situated within fields of power and, in turn, how po-                                                                       cial change, with an emphasis on India and Pakistan.
                                                                dents of the logic behind what they are learning. Pro-
litical considerations are translated into cultural forms.                                                                     Also listed as South Asian C145. (F,SP)
                                                                cedures are taught verbally, numerically, and visually, to
Topics include: philosophy and history of social sci-
                                                                reach students with different learning styles. (F,SP)          186. Southeast Asia. (4) Three hours of lecture per
ence, power/knowledge, the social, difference and
                                                                                                                               week. Prerequisites: 3 or other social science intro-
power, social science and ethics. (F,SP)                        169B. Research Theory and Methods in Socio-Cultural
                                                                                                                               ductory course. This course examines the current po-
                                                                Anthropology. (5) Three hours of lecture and one hour
157. Anthropology of Law. (4) Three hours of lecture                                                                           litical, economic, and cultural dynamism of the region.
                                                                of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 3. Introduction
per week. Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor.                                                                           Topics include colonialism, patron-colonialism, gender
                                                                to research problems and research design techniques.
Comparative survey of the ethnography of law; meth-                                                                            relations, capitalism, and the postcolonial state. (F,SP)
                                                                Will involve local field research on the collection, anal-
ods and concepts relevant to the comparative analy-
                                                                ysis, and presentation of data. This course requires 15        C186. Southeast Asia. (4) Three hours of lecture per
sis of the forms and functions of law. (F)
                                                                hours of work per week including class time, outside           week. Prerequisites: 3 or other social science intro-
158. Religion and Anthropology. (4) Three hours of              work and preparation. One section meeting per week             ductory course. This course examines the current po-
lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 or consent of in-            will be required.                                              litical, economic, and cultural dynamism of the region.
structor. A consideration of the interplay between re-                                                                         Topics include colonialism, patron-colonialism, gender
                                                                Also see above descriptions for C103, 131, 132,
ligious beliefs and institutions and other aspects of                                                                          relations, capitalism, and the postcolonial state. Also
                                                                133, 134, 134B, 135, 135B, 138B, 141, C193.
culture. (F,SP)                                                                                                                listed as South and Southeast Asian Studies C186.
                                                                                                                               (F,SP)
160. Forms of Folklore. (4) Three hours of lecture per          Area Studies
week. Prerequisites: Upper division standing. A world-          170. China. (4) Three hours of lecture per week. Chi-          188. Topics in Area Studies. (4) Course may be re-
wide survey of the major and minor forms of folklore            nese culture and society with an emphasis on the vil-          peated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week.
with special emphasis upon proverbs, riddles, super-            lage level.                                                    Special topics in cultural areas not otherwise covered.
stitions, games, songs, and narratives. (F,SP)                                                                                 (F,SP)
                                                                171. Japan. (4) Three hours of lecture per week. Eth-
C160. Forms of Folklore. (4) Three hours of lecture
per week. Prerequisites: Upper division standing. A
                                                                nological treatment of historic and modern Japanese            General Topics
                                                                culture, covering history, art and religion; family, kinship
world-wide survey of the major and minor forms of folk-                                                                        189. Special Topics in Social/Cultural Anthro-
                                                                and community organization; political, economic and
lore with special emphasis upon proverbs, riddles, su-                                                                         pology. (4) Course may be repeated for credit. Three
                                                                occupational patterns; cultural psychology and social
perstitions, games, songs, and narratives.                                                                                     hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 or consent
                                                                problems in modern Japan. The approach utilizes both
                                                                                                                               of instructor. Various topics covering current research
160AC. Forms of Folklore. (4) Three hours of lecture            sociological and psycho-cultural forms of analysis.
                                                                                                                               theory, method; issues of social and cultural concern;
per week. Prerequisites: Upper division standing. A             (F,SP)
                                                                                                                               culture change, conflict, and adaptation. May combine
world-wide survey of the major and minor forms of folk-         172AC. Special Topics in American Cultures. (4)                more than one subdiscipline of Anthropology.
lore with special emphasis upon proverbs, riddles, su-          Course may be repeated for credit with different in-
perstitions, games, songs, and narratives. This course          structor. Three hours of lecture per week. Various top-        189A. Special Topics in Cultural Anthropology/
satisfies the American Cultures requirement. (F,SP)              ics which meet the American Cultures requirement,              Area. (4) Course may be repeated for credit. Three
                                                                taught by members of the Social/Cultural faculty. See          hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 recom-
161. Narrative Folklore. (4) Three hours of lecture per
                                                                the Schedule of Classes for each semester, and the             mended. Special topics in cultural anthropology which
week. Prerequisites: 3 or consent of instructor. The
                                                                department’s Internal Catalog for course title, de-            meet the area requirement for the major. (F,SP)
study of folktales, myths, legends, and other forms of
verbal art; methods and theories of folklore.                   scription, instructor name, and specific format. This           189M. Special Topics in Cultural Anthropology/
                                                                course satisfies the American Cultures requirement.             Method. (4) Course may be repeated for credit. Three
162. Topics in Folklore. (4) Course may be repeated             (F,SP)                                                         hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 recom-
for credit. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequi-
                                                                176. Contemporary Latin America. (4) Course may                mended. Special topics in cultural anthropology which
sites: 3 or consent of instructor. Special topics in folk-
                                                                be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per             meet the method requirement for the major. (F,SP)
lore or ethno-musicology. (F,SP)
                                                                week. Emphasis on Iberian-Indian assimilation, African
162AC. Topics in Folklore. (4) Course may be re-                influences, development of folk-peasant societies, and          Seminars and Independent Study
peated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-        the concept of national cultures. Discussion of con-           H195A-H195B. Senior Honors. (4;4) Three hours of
requisites: Upper division standing. This course satisfies       temporary issues will also be covered. (F,SP)                  tutorial per week. Credit and grade to be awarded on
the American Cultures requirement. (F,SP)                                                                                      completion of sequence. Prerequisites: Open only to
                                                                179. Ethnography of the Maya. (4) Students will re-
163AC. American Folklore. (4) Three hours of lecture                                                                           honors students. Systematic readings in history and
                                                                ceive no credit for 179 after taking 188 spring or fall
per week. The course will cover both the materials and                                                                         modern theory, collection and analysis of research ma-
                                                                2001. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:
scholarship of American folklore. Generally speaking,                                                                          terials, and the preparation of an honors thesis. Group
                                                                3 recommended. An introduction to the anthropologi-
the course will treat Native American folklore first, then                                                                      or individual tutorials. (F,SP)
                                                                cal study of Maya people in Southern Mexico,
European, Mexican, and Asian American folklore (in-             Guatemala, and Belize. The course focuses on certain           196. Undergraduate Seminar. (4) Course may be re-
cluding American immigrant traditions), and finally              parts of the Maya region, emphasizing selected                 peated for credit. Two hours of seminar per week. Pre-
African American folklore. There will be a midterm, a           themes and problems. We will explore regional history          requisites: Consent of instructor. Seminar for the ad-
final exam, and a library research paper of at least 7-          through the development of Maya studies and the his-           vanced study of the subject matter of a previously
10 pages. This course satisfies the American Cultures            torical transformations of Maya societies. These               given upper division course, emphasizing reading and
requirement.                                                    themes will be traced through studies of the Classic           discussion.
166. Language, Culture, and Society. (4) Three                  Maya, the Spanish conquest and colonization, in-
                                                                                                                               197. Fieldwork. (1-12) Course may be repeated for
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3 or consent          digenous resistance and rebellion, and recent pan-
                                                                                                                               credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to
of instructor. This course examines the complex rela-           Maya activism.
                                                                                                                               Courses and Curricula section of this catalog. Three to
tionships between language, culture, and society. The           180. European Society. (4) Three hours of lecture per          thirty-six hours of tutorial or fieldwork per week. Must
materials in the course draw on the fields of linguistic         week. Representative groups in historical and modern           be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites:
anthropology, linguistics, sociolinguistics, philosophy         perspective. Rural-urban relationships and the dy-             Upper-division status; consent of instructor. Individual
of language, discourse analysis, and literary criticism         namics of change.                                              field experience sponsored by a faculty member; writ-
to explore theories about how language is shaped by,                                                                           ten reports required.
and inb turn shapes, our understandings about the               181. Themes in the Anthropology of the Middle
world, social relations, identities, power, aesthetics, etc.    East and Islam. (4) Three hours of lecture per week.           198. Directed Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-
(F,SP)                                                          Prerequisites: 3 recommended. Cultures of the con-             peated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-
                                                                temporary Near East, with special emphasis upon                troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-
Methods                                                         Arab populations. (F,SP)                                       alog. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
                                                                                                                               Prerequisites: 60 units; good academic standing. Un-
169. Ethnographic Research Methods. (5) Course                  183. Topics in the Anthropological Study of Africa.
                                                                                                                               dergraduate research by small groups.
may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture and          (4) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 3
one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 3 and           and/or 114. The course will focus on African societies         199. Supervised Independent Study. (1-4) Course
consent of instructor. These courses deal with the              and cultures, as well as on issues relating to the history     may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted;
problems, design, methods, and applications of ethno-           of Africanist anthropology. Images and constructs of           see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula section
graphic field research. There is no specific sequence             Africa or Africans will thus be contextualized in relation     of this catalog. Must be taken on a passed/not passed
                                                                                                                          Applied Science and Technology / 119

basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Supervised      of all anthropology and medical anthropology graduate        280C. South Asia. (4)
independent study and research.                              students who have not been advanced to candidacy.
                                                                                                                          280D. China. (4)
                                                             Anthropological theory and practice—following the rest
Graduate Courses
                                                             of the world—have been undergoing important re-              280E. Japan. (4)
                                                             structuring in the past decade. The course is organized
Physical Anthropology                                        to reflect this fact. We will begin by looking at recent      290. Survey of Anthropological Research. (1)
C200. Human Evolution. (4) Course may be repeated            debates about the nature and purpose of anthropol-           Course may be repeated for credit. Two hours of lec-
for credit. Two hours of seminar per week. Prerequi-         ogy. This will provide a starting point for reading a se-    ture every other week. Must be taken on a satisfac-
sites: Consent of instructor. Topic to vary each semester.   ries of classic ethnographies in new ways as well as         tory/unsatisfactory basis. Required each term of all reg-
Also listed as Integrative Biology C265.                     examining some dimensions of the current research            istered graduate students prior to their advancement
                                                             agenda in cultural anthropology.                             to Ph.D. candidacy.
Medical Anthropology                                         250. Seminars in Social and Cultural Anthropology.           Independent Study
215B. Advanced Medical Anthropology. (4) Course              Course may be repeated for credit. Two to three hours
may be repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per                                                                    296A. Supervised Research. (2-12) Course may be
                                                             of seminar per week.
week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Anthropo-                                                                     repeated for credit. Variable units for field research per
logical theory, data, and methodology in relation to the     250A. Psychological Anthropology. (4)                        week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Practice in
health sciences. Lectures, readings, and supervised                                                                       original field research under staff supervision. One unit
                                                             250B. Gender Anthropology. (4)                               of credit for every four hours of work in the field.
field research. May be taken in association with Med-
ical Anthropology at UCSF.                                   250C. Globalization. (4)                                     296B. Supervised Research. (4) Course may be re-
219. Topics in Medical Anthropology. (4) Course              250D. Violence and Resistance. (4)                           peated for credit. Two hours of consultation per week.
may be repeated for credit. Two hours of seminar per                                                                      Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Analysis and
                                                             250E. Anthropology of Politics. (4)                          write-up of field materials.
week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Com-
parative study of mental illness and socially gener-         250F. Religion. (4)                                          298. Directed Reading. (1-8) Course may be re-
ated disease: psychiatric treatment, practitioners, and      250G. Anthropology of Ethics. (4)                            peated for credit. One to eight hours of conference per
institutions.                                                                                                             week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Individ-
                                                             250H. Art and Culture. (4)                                   ual conferences intended to provide directed reading
Archaeology                                                  250I. Anthropology of Law. (4)                               in subject matter not covered by available seminar
220. Western North America. (4) Course may be re-                                                                         offerings.
                                                             250J. Ethnographic Field Methods. (4)
peated for credit. Two hours of seminar per week. Pre-                                                                    299. Directed Research. (1-12) Course may be re-
requisites: Consent of instructor.                           250K. Colonialism and Postcolonialism. (4)                   peated for credit. Two to eight hours of conference per
221. Pre-Columbian Central America. (4) Course               250L. Urban Anthropology. (4)                                week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Individual
may be repeated for credit. Two hours of seminar per                                                                      conferences to provide supervision in the preparation
                                                             250M. Ecological Anthropology. (4)                           of an original research paper or dissertation.
week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
                                                             250N. Classic Ethnography. (4)                               602. Individual Study for Doctoral Students. (1-12)
222. Archaeology of South America. (4) Course may
be repeated for credit. Two hours of seminar per week.       250O. Practice Theory. (4)                                   Course may be repeated for credit. One to eight hours
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.                                                                                     of consultation per week. Must be taken on a satis-
                                                             250P. Development. (4)                                       factory/unsatisfactory basis. In preparation for Ph.D.
223. African Prehistory. (4) Course may be repeated                                                                       examinations. Individual study in consultation with ad-
for credit. Two hours of seminar per week. Prerequi-         250Q. Voices of the Subject. (4)
                                                                                                                          viser. Intended to provide an opportunity for qualified
sites: Consent of instructor.                                250R. Dissertation Writing. (4)                              students to prepare themselves for the various ex-
226. Archaeology of the Pacific. (4) Course may be            250S. Material Culture. (4)                                  aminations required of candidates for the Ph.D. May
repeated for credit. Two hours of seminar per week.                                                                       not be used for unit or residence requirements for the
Subject matter will vary; current issues and debates in      250T. Indigenous Peoples. (4)                                degree.
the archaeology of the Pacific, e.g., trade, exchange,        250U. Race, Ethnicity, and Identity. (4)                     Professional Courses
colonization, maritime adaptations, etc.
                                                             250V. Tourism. (4)                                           300. Graduate Pedagogy Seminar. (2) Two hours of
227. Historical Archaeology Research. (4) Course                                                                          seminar per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/un-
may be repeated for credit. Two hours of seminar per         250W. Process of Social Control. (4)
                                                                                                                          satisfactory basis. Training in both the logistics and the
week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing with some             250X. Special Topics. (4)                                    pedagogical issues of undergraduate teaching. (F,SP)
background in archaeology, or undergraduates who
                                                                                                                          301. Professional Training: Teaching. (1-6) Course
have taken 2, or consent of instructor. Historical ar-       Folklore                                                     may be repeated for a maximum of 12 units. Two
chaeology seminar. Subject matter will vary from year
to year.                                                     260. Problems in Folklore. (4) Course may be re-             hours of seminar and eight hours of lecture per week.
                                                             peated for credit. Two hours of seminar per week. Pre-       Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
228. Method. (4) Course may be repeated for credit.          requisites: Consent of instructor.                           Group consultation with instructor. Supervised training
Two hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: Con-                                                                        with instructor on teaching undergraduates.
sent of instructor. Various topics and issues in the         C261. Theories of Narrative. (4) Three hours of sem-
methods of archaeological analysis and interpretation:       inar per week. This course examines a broad range of

                                                                                                                          Applied Science
style, ceramics, architectural analysis, lithic analysis,    theories that elucidate the formal, structural, and con-
archaeozoology, etc.                                         textual properties of narratives in relation to gestures,

                                                                                                                          and Technology
                                                             the body, and emotion; imagination and fantasy; mem-
229A-229B. Archaeological Research Strategies.               ory and the senses; space and time. It focuses on nar-
(4;4) Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites:        ratives at work, on the move, in action as they emerge
Consent of instructor. Required for all first and second      from the matrix of the everyday preeminently, story-         (College of Engineering)
year graduate students in archaeology. Three hours of        telling in conversation—as key to folk genres—the folk-
seminar discussion of major issues in the history and        tale, the legend, the epic, the myth. Also listed as Folk-   Office: 230 Bechtel Engineering Center #1708,
                                                                                                                          (510) 642-8790
theory of archaeological research and practice (229A),       lore C261. (F,SP) Staff                                      www.coe.berkeley.edu/ast
and of the research strategies and design for various                                                                     Chair: Nathan Cheung, Ph.D.
kinds of archaeological problems (229B). To be offered       Linguistics                                                  Executive Committee
alternate semesters.                                                                                                      David T. Attwood, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering and
                                                             270B. Fundamentals of Language in Context. (4)
                                                                                                                            Computer Sciences)
229C. Writing the Field in Archaeology. (4) Two              Three hours of seminar per week. Intensive introduc-         Constance Chang-Hasnain, Ph.D. (Electrical Engineering
hours of seminar per week. This seminar is intended          tion to the study of language as a cultural system and         and Computer Sciences)
to guide students in the definition of a field within ar-      speech as socially embedded communicative practice.          Ronald Gronsky, Ph.D., Chair (Materials Science and
                                                             This is the core course for students wishing to take fur-      Engineering)
chaeology, from initial conceptualization to writing of a                                                                 Philip S. Marcus, Ph.D. (Mechanical Engineering)
field statement, dissertation chapter, or review article.     ther coursework in linguistic anthropology.                  Paulo Monteiro, Ph.D. (Civil and Environmental Engineering)
(F,SP)                                                                                                                    Rachel Segalman, Ph.D. (Chemical Engineering)

230. Special Topics in Archaeology. (4) Course may
                                                             Area Studies                                                 Yuri Suzuki, Ph.D. (Materials Science and Engineering)
                                                                                                                          Junqiao Wu, Ph.D. (Materials Science and Engineering)
be repeated for credit. Two hours of seminar per week.       280. Seminars in Area Studies. Course may be re-             Xiang Zhang, Ph.D. (Mechanical Engineering)
Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.                        peated for credit. Two hours of seminar per week. Pre-
                                                             requisites: Consent of instructor. Courses will vary from
Social and Cultural Anthropology                             year to year. See Departmental Internal Catalogue for        Program Overview
                                                             detailed descriptions of course offerings for each
240A-240B. Fundamentals of Anthropological The-                                                                           This graduate group is administered by the College
                                                             semester.
ory. (5;5) Four to six hours of seminar per week. Pre-                                                                    of Engineering’s Interdisciplinary Studies Center.
requisites: Enrollment is strictly limited to and required   280B. Africa. (4)                                            The program has three major areas of emphasis:

       B prefix=language course for business majors                 R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                   *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                 AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                       requirement
120 / Applied Science and Technology

applied physics, engineering science, and mathe-             using a semi-classical atomic model. Subject matter                 Mary C. Comerio, M.Arch., M.S.W. Washington University.
                                                             will include the generation of x-rays with laboratory                 Seismic design, post-disaster reconstruction policy and
matical sciences. Faculty associated with the pro-                                                                                 planning
gram are drawn from several departments within               tubes, synchrotron radiation, laser-plasma sources, x-              Galen Cranz, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Social factors in
the College of Engineering, as well as from the De-          ray lasers, and black body radiation. Concepts of spa-                design, sociology of taste, body-conscious design,
                                                             tial and temporal coherence will be discussed. Also                   sustainable parks
partments of Physics, Chemistry, Chemical Engi-                                                                                  *†Sam Davis, M.E.D. Yale University. F.A.I.A. Architectural
neering, and Mathematics. Topics of interest include         listed as Electrical Engineering C213. (SP) Attwood                   design
the novel properties and applications of nanostruc-                                                                              Anthony Dubovsky, M.A. University of California, Berkeley,
tures, thin films and interface science, microelec-           C225. Thin-Film Science and Technology. (3) Three                     Visual design
                                                             hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Graduate                  Richard Fernau, M.Arch. University of California, Berkeley.
tromechanical systems (MEMS), short wavelength                                                                                     Architectural design
coherent radiation, X-ray micro-imaging for the life         standing in engineering, physics, chemistry, or chem-               Harrison S. Fraker Jr., M.F.A. Princeton University. F.A.I.A.
and physical sciences, plasma physics and plasma-            ical engineering. Thin-film nucleation and growth, mi-                 Affordable housing, sustainable environments, passive
                                                             crostructural evolution and reactions. Comparison of                  solar, daylighting and energy conservation
assisted materials processing, laser-induced chem-                                                                               Paul Groth, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley. History
ical processes, laser probing of complex reacting            thin-film deposition techniques. Characterization tech-                of urban form and cultural landscape
systems, ultrafast phenomena, particle accelerators,         niques. Processing of thin films by ion implantation and             Yehuda E. Kalay, Ph.D. Carnegie-Mellon. F.A.I.A.
                                                             rapid annealing. Processing-microstructure-property-                  Computers, design theories and methods
nonlinear dynamcs, chaotic systems, numerical                                                                                    †Raymond Lifchez, M.S., M.A., M.C.P. Columbia University;
methods, and topics in computational fluid me-                performance relationships in the context of applications              University of California, Berkeley. Architectural design,
chanics and reacting flows. This program awards               in information storage, ICs, micro-electromechanical                  special populations
                                                             systems and optoelectronics. Also listed as Materials               *Donlyn Lyndon (The Eva Li Professor Emeritus of Architecture
the Doctor of Philosophy degree.                                                                                                   and Urban Design) M.F.A. Princeton University. F.A.I.A.
                                                             Science and Engineering C225. (SP) Dubon, Staff                       Architectural design, design of urban spaces
In addition, students who have been admitted to                                                                                  W. Mike Martin, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
the program may also apply for the newly created             C239. Partially Ionized Plasmas. (3) Three hours of                   Design and study of practice methods and theories
designated emphasis in nanoscale science and                 lecture per week. Prerequisites: Upper division course              *Jean-Pierre Protzen, Dipl. Arch. E.P.U.L. Universitæ
                                                             in electromagnetics or fluid dynamics. Introduction to                 de Lausanne, Switzerland. Design theories and methods
engineering (DE NSE), and the newly-created                                                                                      Stanley Saitowitz, M.Arch. University of California, Berkeley.
emphasis (DE) in Energy, Science, and Technol-               partially ionized, chemically reactive plasmas, includ-               Architectural design
ogy (DE EST). Students usually apply for these               ing collisional processes, diffusion, sources, sheaths,             *Stephen O. Tobriner, Ph.D. Harvard University.
                                                             boundaries, and diagnostics. DC, RF, and microwave                    Architectural history
DE during their first or second year of study. For                                                                                *†Marc Treib, M.Arch, M.A. University of California,
further information about the DE NSE, see                    discharges. Applications to plasma-assisted materials                 Berkeley. Architectural design, architecture of Japan and
nano.berkeley.edu/educational/DEGradGroup.html               processing and to plasma wall interactions. Also listed               Scandinavia, landscape architecture and the arts
                                                             as Electrical Engineering C239. Offered alternate                   Christopher Alexander (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University.
and for information about the DE EST, see                                                                                          Architectural design, pattern language
                                                             years. (SP) Lieberman                                               Richard Bender (Emeritus), M.Arch. Harvard University
www.mse.berkeley.edu/deest.html.
                                                                                                                                 Kenneth H. Cardwell (Emeritus), A.B. University of
                                                             C295R. Applied Spectroscopy. (3) Three hours of                       California, Berkeley
Graduate research in the AS&T Program benefits                                                                                    Margaret P. Dhaemers (d’Hamer) (Emerita), M.A., M.F.A.
                                                             lecture per week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing
from state-of-the-art experimental facilities at the                                                                               California College of Arts and Crafts, Mills College.
                                                             in engineering, physics, chemistry, or chemical en-
Berkeley campus and the Lawrence Berkeley Na-                                                                                      Electronic imaging, computer graphics
                                                             gineering; courses: quantum mechanics, linear vec-                  W. Russell Ellis Jr. (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California
tional Laboratory. Among these facilities are the                                                                                  at Los Angeles. Social factors in design
                                                             tor space theory. After a brief review of quantum
National Center for Electron Microscopy, with the                                                                                Norma D. Evenson (Emerita), Ph.D. Yale University
                                                             mechanics and semi-classical theories for the inter-
world’s highest resolution high-voltage microscope;                                                                              Sami Y. Hassid (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University. F.A.I.A.
                                                             action of radiation with matter, this course will survey            Sanford Hirshen (Emeritus), B.Arch. Columbia University.
a microfabrication lab for student work involving                                                                                  F.A.I.A. Architectural design
                                                             the various spectroscopies associated with the elec-
lithography, MEMS ion-implantation, and thin-film                                                                                 Henry J. Lagorio (Emeritus), M.A. University of California,
                                                             tromagnetic spectrum, from gamma rays to radio
deposition; an integrated sensors laboratory; fem-                                                                                 Berkeley
                                                             waves. Special emphasis is placed on application to                 Lars G. Lerup (Emeritus), M.Arch. Harvard University.
tosecond laser laboratories; optical, electrical, and                                                                              Architectural design, semiology
                                                             research problems in applied and engineering sci-
magnetic resonance spectroscopies; short wave-                                                                                   Clare Cooper Marcus (Emerita), M.A., M.C.P. University of
                                                             ences. Graduate researchers interested in systematic
length laser and X-ray research laboratories; an                                                                                   Nebraska; University of California, Berkeley. Social
                                                             in situ process characterization, analysis, or discovery              factors, geography
unparalleled variety of material, chemical, and sur-                                                                             Richard L. Meier (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California at
                                                             are best served by this course. Also listed as Chemi-
face science analytic equipment; and a soft X-ray                                                                                  Los Angeles
                                                             cal Engineering C295R.
synchrotron dedicated to materials, chemical, and                                                                                Donald E. Olsen (Emeritus), M.Arch. Harvard University. F.A.I.A.
biological research using high-brightness and par-                                                                               †Richard C. Peters (Emeritus), M.F.A. Princeton University.
                                                             298A. Group Studies, Lectures, or Seminars. (1-6)                     F.A.I.A. Architectural design, lighting design
tially coherent X-rays. The interdisciplinary, col-          One to six hours of group study/lecture/seminar per                 Herwin Schaefer (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University
laborative nature of the AS&T Program provides               week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Advanced                Daniel Solomon (Emeritus), M.Arch. University of California,
ample opportunity to develop new research direc-                                                                                   Berkeley. Architectural design
                                                             group studies, lectures, or seminars in subjects which              Claude Stoller (Emeritus), M.Arch. Harvard University. F.A.I.A.
tions by making the best use possible of these fa-           are interdisciplinary in the various fields of engineering           Dell Upton (Emeritus), Ph.D. Brown University. Architectural
cilities and of the other research instrumentation           or other sciences associated with engneering prob-                    history and theory
available to AS&T faculty.                                                                                                       Sim H. Van der Ryn (Emeritus), B.Arch. University of
                                                             lems. Topics which form the basis of seminars will be                 Michigan. Architectural design, appropriate technology
                                                             annnounced at the beginning of each semester. May
Graduate Courses. Students in the AS&T Pro-                                                                                      Associate Professors
                                                             be cross-listed with other engineering group studies,
gram take courses from regular departments with                                                                                  R. Gary Black, M.Arch., M.S. University of California,
                                                             lectures, or seminars. (F,SP)                                           Berkeley. Structures
the concurrence of faculty advisers. In addition,
                                                                                                                                 Dana Buntrock, M.Arch. University of Michigan. Japanese
AS&T sponsors the following courses: AST 210/EE              299. Individual Study or Research. (1-12) Course                        architecture and production, teamwork and multiple
213, Soft X-Rays and EUV Radiation (3 units);                may be repeated for credit. Must be taken on a satis-                   expertise in innovations, building systems and
AST 239/EE 239, Partially Ionized Plasmas (3                 factory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of                 technologies
                                                                                                                                 Raveevarn Choksombatchai, M.Arch., M.L.A. Harvard
units); AST 225/MSE 225, Thin-Film Science and               instructor; graduate standing. Investigations of ad-                    University. Architectural design
Technology (3 units); AST 295R/ChemE 295R, Ap-               vanced problems in applied science and technology.                  René;e Chow (The Eva Li Chair in Design Ethics) M.Arch.
plied Spectroscopy (3 units); Engineering 298A, In-          Sponsored by Engineering Interdisciplinary Studies                      Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Architectural
                                                                                                                                     design
troduction to Electron Beam Lithography and                  Center. (F,SP) Staff                                                C. Greig Crysler, Ph.D. State University of New York,
Nanofabrication Technology (3 units); Engineering                                                                                    Binghamton. Architectural theory and criticism
298B, Topics in Soft X-Rays, Nanostructures and                                                                                  René Davids, M.A. Royal College of Art, London.

                                                             Architecture
                                                                                                                                     Architectural design
Applications (1 unit); and Engineering 298B, Re-                                                                                 Jill L. Stoner, M.Arch. University of Pennsylvania.
seach Topics in Internal Combustion Engines.                                                                                         Architectural design
                                                                                                                                 M. Susan Ubbelohde, M.Arch. University of Oregon.
Admission. The complete application, including tran-         (College of Environmental Design)                                       Architectural design, energy, climate response,
scripts, GRE scores, three letters of reference, and                                                                                 daylighting
                                                                                                                                 Gary R. Brown (Emeritus), M.Arch. Harvard University.
a statement of academic and professional goals, is           Department Office: 232 Wurster Hall #1800,                               Architectural design
due the first Tuesday in January for the following fall       (510) 642-4942                                                      Sara S. Ishikawa (Emerita), B.Arch. University of California,
                                                             arch.ced.berkeley.edu                                                   Berkeley. Architectural design
semester. To obtain application forms, students              Chair: Mary C. Comerio, M.Arch., M.S.W.                             Kenneth H. Simmons (Emeritus), B.Arch. University of
should contact the Applied Science and Technology                                                                                    California, Berkeley. Architectural design
Graduate Group, 230 Bechtel Engineering Center               Professors
                                                                                                                                 Assistant Professors
#1708, University of California, Berkeley; Berkeley,         Nezar Alsayyad, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
                                                                                                                                 Mark Anderson, M.Arch. Harvard University. Design,
CA 94720-1708. Telephone: (510) 642-8790; e-mail:              Architecture and urban design, urban history, urban
                                                               development in the Third World                                       construction process
ast.program@coe.berkeley.edu                                 *Edward A. Arens, Ph.D. University of Edinburgh. Building           Nicholas de Monchaux, M.Arch. Princeton University.
                                                               technology, energy                                                   Design, urban theory, digital representation
Graduate Courses                                                                                                                 Lisa Iwamoto, M.Arch. Harvard University. Design,
                                                             Charles C. Benton, M.Arch. Massachusetts Institute of                  architectural fabrication, edge city landscape
                                                               Technology. Building technology                                   Andrew Shanken, Ph.D. Princeton University. History of
C210. Soft X-rays and Extreme Ultraviolet Radia-             Peter Bosselmann, M.Arch. University of California at Los              American architecture and urbanism, impact of World War
tion. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. This course         Angeles. Architecture and urban design                               II on design professions and American culture
will explore modern developments in the physics and          Jean-Paul Bourdier, D.P.L.G., M.Arch. École des Beaux
applications of soft x-rays. It begins with a review of        Arts, Versailles; University of Illinois. Architectural design,
                                                               African architecture
electromagnetic radiation at short wavelengths in-           Gail S. Brager, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
cluding dipole radiation, scattering and refractive index,     Building technology, comfort, energy
                                                                                                                                                     Architecture / 121
Adjunct Associate Professor                                     Master of Architecture. The professional degree,          Concurrent Program with the Department of
Charles A. Huizenga, M.S. University of California, Berkeley.   Master of Architecture, will be awarded to students       City and Regional Planning. The Department of
  Design and operation of building energy systems               who successfully complete a program of studies of         Architecture and the Department of City and Re-
                                                                from one to three years in duration depending upon        gional Planning offer a concurrent degree pro-
                                                                previous education and experience. The depart-            gram leading to the dual M.Arch. and M.C.P. de-
Department Overview                                             ment makes no restriction as to the field of un-           grees for students holding the five-year Bachelor
                                                                dergraduate preparation. However, the length of           of Architecture degree or a four-year Bachelor of
The Department of Architecture at UC Berkeley                   the required residence period, the number of re-          Arts/Bachelor of Science degree in architecture,
has a strong tradition of fostering independent de-             quired semester course units, and the specific list        or equivalent degrees in related disciplines. The
sign thinking and research. Our award-winning fac-              of required courses may vary depending upon un-           Master of City Planning degree portion of the
ulty offer vigorous undergraduate and graduate ed-              dergraduate major, professional and other work ex-        concurrent program requires completion of 36
ucational programs and carry out leading research               perience, and previous graduate study, if any.            semester units; the M.Arch. segment calls for 24-
in constructed and virtual environments, architec-                                                                        72 semester units, depending upon the under-
tural technologies, and architectural humanities.               Additional prerequisites for admission to the pro-
                                                                                                                          graduate degree. Applicants should indicate that
The multidisciplinary interests of our faculty and              fessional Master of Architecture program are col-
                                                                                                                          they wish to be considered for the Concurrent
graduate students form the basis of exciting new                lege-level or equivalent mathematics through an-
                                                                                                                          Program in Architecture and City and Regional
research collaborations with a variety of other dis-            alytical geometry and beginning calculus and
                                                                                                                          Planning when completing the UC Berkeley Grad-
ciplines, including anthropology, international stud-           beginning physics through mechanics.
                                                                                                                          uate Application.
ies, engineering, new media, and urban studies.
                                                                The basic course leading to the M.Arch. degree
                                                                takes three academic years and requires the com-          Concurrent Program with the Department of
Architecture is more than design. To create livable
                                                                pletion of at least 72 units during that period of res-   Landscape Architecture and Environmental
environments means balancing complex social, po-
                                                                idence. Persons who hold a B.A. or B.S. degree            Planning. The Departments of Architecture and
litical, economic, and technical requirements with
                                                                with a major in architecture may receive up to one        Landscape Architecture and Environmental Plan-
human needs. Students take courses in environ-
                                                                year of advanced standing. The Master of Archi-           ning have developed a concurrent degree program.
mental history, behavioral sciences, resource man-
                                                                tecture Committee of the department will determine        This program will lead to two professional degrees:
agement, and design theory, as well as in the tech-
                                                                the specific amount of advanced standing individ-          Master of Architecture and Master of Landscape
nical, aesthetic, and cultural components of design.
                                                                ually for each student at the time she or he first         Architecture. This new program brings together two
The department prides itself on educating not only
                                                                registers for graduate study in the department.           closely connected branches of environmental de-
good architects, but also environmentally knowl-
                                                                Special one-year M.Arch. programs are available           sign—the design of sites and the design of build-
edgeable citizens.
                                                                to persons holding the five-year, professional un-         ings. This program is for exceptionally qualified
                                                                dergraduate degree, Bachelor of Architecture,             students who have an undergraduate degree in ar-
Undergraduate Program                                           from an accredited school, or comparable five-             chitecture or landscape architecture and who sat-
                                                                year degrees from foreign universities and technical      isfy the admission requirements of the one-or two-
Undergraduates enroll in a four-year program lead-              institutes.                                               year M.Arch. program and/or the two-year M.L.A.
ing to the Bachelor of Arts degree with a major in                                                                        program. Applicants should apply by December 15
architecture.                                                   Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Architecture.              and indicate that they wish to be considered for the
                                                                The Doctor of Philosophy in Architecture program          Concurrent Program in Architecture and Land-
The undergraduate program in architecture com-                  is open to exceptionally qualified persons who pre-        scape Architecture when completing the UC Berke-
bines required courses in environmental design                  sent outstanding academic records along with clear        ley Graduate Application. Acceptance into the con-
and architecture with opportunities for highly varied           evidence of commitment and ability in architectural       current degree program is limited to outstanding
individual programs planned by the student with the             research and scholarship. Graduate Division re-           applicants. More information may be obtained from
assistance or guidance of an adviser. Through its               quirements with respect to admission, the language        the Graduate Office in 202 Wurster Hall or from the
core courses the program offers a broad intro-                  requirement, candidacy, and the dissertation under        Department of Landscape Architecture and Envi-
duction to the field of architecture, and students               Plan B apply (see Index). Applicants must hold a          ronmental Planning web site.
can specialize in community design, applied build-              bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution,
ing sciences, design methods, history and theory,               but the department makes no restriction as to the         Concurrent Degree Program with the Depart-
or the social basis of design. In addition to offering          discipline of the undergraduate preparation. Addi-        ment of Civil and Environmental Engineering,
a sound and well-rounded education, undergrad-                  tional information is available from the depart-          Division of Structural Engineering, Mechanics,
uate studies can provide preprofessional compe-                 mental graduate assistant.                                and Materials. The two departments offer a joint
tency for entry-level employment in architecture, for                                                                     program with a concurrent degree for exceptionally
graduate work in architecture, or for further studies           Master of Science Degree in Architecture. This            qualified students. Students must fulfill the course
in a related environmental design field.                         nonprofessional degree program was developed to           requirements for both departments but are allowed
                                                                offer the opportunity for advanced research in spe-       a reduction in elective units that will achieve a sav-
Accreditation. In the United States, most state                 cialized areas within the architecture curriculum. An     ings in the time enrolled, varying from one
registration boards require a degree from an ac-                academic degree, it is appropriate for those who al-      semester to one year, depending on undergradu-
credited professional degree program as a pre-                  ready hold a degree in architecture but wish to           ate preparation. Some engineering courses are
requisite for licensure. The National Architectural             study a particular subfield. Applicants from related       prerequisite to entering the program or may be
Accrediting Board (NAAB), which is the sole agency              disciplines may be accepted into the program, pro-        taken during the first year of enrollment without
authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree pro-            vided they demonstrate experience related to the          credit toward the minimum course requirements.
grams in architecture, recognizes two types of de-              discipline of architecture. Depending upon previous       Applicants should indicate that they wish to be con-
grees: the Bachelor of Architecture and the Master              preparation, students are required to complete a          sidered for the Concurrent Program in Architecture
of Architecture. A program may be granted a five-                minimum of 32 to 48 credit units, including a com-        and Civil and Environmental Engineering when
year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation,            bined research methods course taught by a faculty         completing the UC Berkeley Graduate Application.
depending on its degree of conformance with es-                 team. Remaining coursework will be determined by
tablished educational standards.                                the nature of the proposed research. A research           Concurrent M.A. in International and Area Studies.
                                                                thesis culminates the student’s program. Further in-      The concurrent M.A. program in International and
Master’s degree programs may consist of a pre-                  formation about requirements for admission and            Area Studies (IAS) is designed to complement
professional undergraduate degree and a profes-                 application materials may be obtained from the de-        the graduate degree programs in architecture. It
sional graduate degree, which, when earned se-                  partment’s graduate assistant.                            is intended to produce graduate students who
quentially, comprise an accredited professional                                                                           combine advanced professional training with a de-
education. However, the preprofessional degree is               Program in Visual Studies (Master of Arts                 tailed knowledge of contemporary international is-
not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.             Degree in Design). There is a small program in Vi-        sues or particular world areas or countries. The
                                                                sual Studies at the graduate level leading to the         content of each M.A. program will be shaped in
The four-year, preprofessional degree, where of-                Master of Arts degree in design. Students with an
fered, is not accredited by NAAB. The preprofes-                                                                          consultation with the departmental IAS adviser to
                                                                interest in pursuing graduate work in photography         meet the specific needs and interests of the indi-
sional degree is useful for those wishing a foun-               or involved with visual issues in the area of graph-
dation in the field of architecture as preparation for                                                                     vidual student.
                                                                ics may apply.
either continued education in a professional degree                                                                       In addition to satisfying all Graduate Division and
program or for employment options in architec-                  The present degree is offered under Plan 1 of the         departmental requirements for the Master of Ar-
turally related areas.                                          Graduate Division, which requires 20 semester             chitecture, M.S., or Ph.D. degrees, students in this
                                                                units plus a thesis. The length of time required for      concurrent program must complete a minimum of
                                                                completion varies with the individual, depending in       24 units outside architecture in the special area
Graduate Programs                                               part upon previous preparation. An undergraduate          agreed upon with the IAS adviser.
                                                                degree from the College of Environmental Design
The department offers the professional degree                   or in an art-related field is helpful but not neces-       For additional information on these degree pro-
Master of Architecture, the academic degree Doc-                sary. The principal emphasis in the admission pro-        grams, please consult the Announcement of the
tor of Philosophy, and several smaller degree pro-              cess is on the portfolio that all applicants for ad-      College of Environmental Design or the Graduate
grams as described below.                                       mission to the graduate program must submit.              Office.

        B prefix=language course for business majors                  R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                 *Professor of the Graduate School
        C prefix=cross-listed course                                  AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures              †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
        H prefix=honors course                                        requirement
122 / Architecture
                                                              209. Seminar: Architectural Design. Course may be            the environment they build; outlines the research meth-
Architectural Design                                          repeated for credit as topic varies. One to four hours of    ods appropriate to each theory. (SP) Cranz
                                                              lecture per week. Prerequisites: Second-or third-year
                                                                                                                           212. Body-Conscious Design: Shoes, Chairs,
Lower Division Courses                                        graduate standing. Topics deal with major problems
                                                                                                                           Rooms, and Beyond. (3) Three hours of seminar per
                                                              and current issues in architectural design. (F,SP) Staff
24. Freshman Seminars. (1) Course may be repeated                                                                          week. This seminar prepares students to evaluate and
for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per           209A. Seminar in Architectural Theory. (1-4) (F,SP)          design environments from the point of view of how
week. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade ba-                                                                      they interact with the human body. Tools and clothing
                                                              209C. Current Issues in Architecture. (1-4) (F,SP)           modify that interaction. Semi-fixed features of the near
sis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed
basis. The Berkeley Seminar Program has been de-              209D. Final Project Preparation Seminar: Thesis. (1-         environment, especially furniture, may have greater im-
signed to provide new students with the opportunity to        4) Prerequisites: Graduate standing. Formerly 209A.          pact on physical well being and social-psychological
explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a      This is a fall seminar for students who plan to work on      comfort than fixed features like walls, openings, and
small-seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered          final projects (theses and professional reports) during       volume. Today, designers can help redefine and le-
in all campus departments, and topics vary from de-           the spring. The seminar, including lectures by the in-       gitimize new attitudes toward supporting the human
partment to department and semester to semester.              structor, is meant to train students in pre-thesis or pro-   body by, for example, designing for a wide range of
(F,SP) Staff                                                  fessional project research and to help them in select-       postural alternatives and possibly designing new kinds
                                                              ing their thesis or professional report topic. The course    of furniture. At the urban design scale, the senses of
Upper Division Courses                                        includes weekly exercises ranging from writing articles      proprioception and kinesthetics can be used to shape
                                                              documenting, illustrating, and critiquing buildings to       architecture and landscape architecture. This course
100A-100B. Fundamentals of Architectural Design.
                                                              producing a thesis or professional report prospectus.        covers these topics with special emphasis on chair de-
(5;5) Three hours of lecture and five hours of studio
                                                              (F,SP)                                                       sign and evaluation. The public health implications of
per week. Prerequisites: ED 11A-11B. Must be taken
                                                                                                                           a new attitude toward posture and back support are
in sequence.Introductory courses in the design of             209X. Special Topics: Architectural Design. (1-4) (F,SP)     explored. The course heightens students’ conscious-
buildings. Problems emphasize the major social, tech-
                                                                                                                           ness of their own and others’ physical perceptions
nological and environmental determinants.
                                                                                                                           through weekly experiential exercises. Students pro-
100A focuses on the design process, social factors                                                                         duce three design exercises: shoe, chair, and a room
and site planning.                                            Architectural Humanities                                     interior. (SP) Cranz
100B stresses structures, materials, and energy con-                                                                       219. Seminar on Social and Cultural Bases in De-
siderations. Studio work is supplemented by lectures,                                                                      sign. Course may be repeated for credit as topic
discussions, readings and field trips. (F,SP) Staff            Social and Cultural Processes in                             varies. Formerly 211 and 219A through 219G. Se-
                                                              Architecture and Urbanism                                    lected topics such as social policy and building form,
101. Case Studies in Architecture. (5) Course may                                                                          environments for special populations, for birth and
be repeated for credit as topic varies. Three hours of        Upper Division Courses                                       death, social form and housing form, personal and so-
lecture and five hours of studio per week. Prerequi-                                                                        cietal values in design, participatory design, and urban
sites: 100A-100B. Problems in design of buildings of          110AC. Social and Cultural Factors in Design. (4)            parks. For current section offerings see departmental
intermediate complexity. Each section deals with a se-        Forty hours of lecture and 20 hours discussion per           announcement.
lected topic, such as housing, site planning, institutional   semester. The course is a survey of how political, cul-
buildings, community development, and interiors. Stu-         tural, social, and economic factors influence archi-          219A. Design and Housing in the Developing World.
dio work is supplemented by lectures, discussions,            tectural design. The focus for studying these broad top-     (3)
readings and field trips. (F,SP) Staff                         ics will be housing of all types and special needs           219B. Social Aspects of Housing Design. (1-4)
                                                              facilities. The twice-weekly one-hour sessions will be
109. Seminar in Architectural Design. Course may              a combination of student debates on a topic presented        219X. Special Topics:Social and Cultural Bases of De-
be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisites:        by the instructor, lectures, panels of guests, and stu-      sign. (1-4) Fifteen hours lecture/seminar per unit per
Consent of instructor. Selected topics in the theories        dent presentations. The one and one-half hour section        semester. Prerequisites: 210 or consent of instructor.
and concept of architectural design. For current se-          will focus on projects and field work. This course
lection offerings, see departmental announcement.             satisfies the American Cultures requirement. Cranz
                                                                                                                           History of Architecture and
109X. Special Topics: Architectural Design. (1-4) (F,SP)      111. Housing: An International Survey. (3) Three             Urbanism
Graduate Courses                                              hours of lecture per week. Introduction to international
                                                              housing from the Architectural and City Planning per-        Upper Division Courses
200A-200B. Fundamentals of Architectural Design.              spective. Housing issues (social, cultural, and policy)
(7;7) Sixty hours of lecture/seminar and 120 hours of         ranging from micro-scale (house) to macro-scale (city)       170A-170B. An Historical Survey of Architecture
studio per semester. 200A must be taken on a satis-           presented with a comparison of housing situations in         and Urbanism. (4;4) Forty-five hours of lecture and 15
factory/unsatisfactory basis. 200B must be taken for a        developed and developing countries. (SP) Staff               hours of seminar/discussion per semester. The first
letter grade. Introductory course in architectural design                                                                  part of this sequence studies the ancient and medieval
and theories for graduate students. Problems em-              118AC. Housing American Cultures. (3) Three hours            periods; the second part studies the period since 1400;
phasize the major social, technological and environ-          of lecture/discussion/student presentation/exercise per      the aim is to look at architecture and urbanism in their
mental determinants of building form. Studio work is          week. Residential communities that endure have a ca-         social and historical context. (F,SP) Staff
supplemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and          pacity to house multiple and evolving patterns of living.
                                                              What aspects of residential settings support or inhibit      173A. Modern Architecture. (3) Forty-five hours of
field trips. (F,SP) Staff                                                                                                   lecture per semester. Prerequisites: 170A-170B and
                                                              cultural variations and change? The course has three
201. Case Studies in Architectural Design. (5)                parts: a theory of residential design from the per-          consent of instructor.
Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lec-        spective of professional practice and cultural practices;    174C. San Francisco Architecture. (3) Forty-five
ture and five hours of studio per week. Prerequisites:         a comparative analysis of everyday patterns of in-           hours of lecture/seminar per semester. Prerequisites:
100A-100B or 200A-200B. Each section deals with a             habitation; and the design of environments that ac-          170A-170B and consent of instructor.
specific problem such as housing, high-rise design, in-        commodate a range of cultural readings. Students are
teriors, community development. Studio work is sup-           asked to draw plans, write, and conduct field surveys.        175B. Islamic Architecture. (3) Course may be repeat-
plemented by lectures, discussions, readings, and field        This course satisfies the American Cultures require-          ed for credit. Forty-six hours of lecture per semester.
trips. (F,SP)                                                 ment. (SP) Chow                                              Prerequisites: 170A-170B and consent of instructor.

202. Final Project Studio. Students may take 202A or          C119. Office of the Future. (3) Three hours of lecture        179. Proseminar in the History of Architecture. (1-
202B but not both; course must be taken in last               per week. Prerequisites: Upper division standing. Con-       4) Course may be repeated for credit. Fifteen hours of
semester of the Master of Architecture degree pro-            ventional office design will undoubtedly change, pri-         lecture/seminar per unit per semester. Prerequisites:
gram. Prerequisites: Three semesters of 201 and               marily in response to concerns about productivity and        170A-170B and consent of instructor. Special topics in
209D. This is the final project studio. Projects in 202        health. How can research, especially psychological re-       Architectural History. For current section offerings, see
are presented in the form of a design thesis or a re-         search, help us improve the design of offices? What           departmental announcement. (F,SP)
search thesis. Staff                                          should offices look like 10-50 years from now? How            Graduate Courses
                                                              will they be used? These are questions the course will
202A. Final Project Studio: Studio Thesis Option. (5)                                                                      271. Methods of Historical Research and Criticism
                                                              try to answer. Also listed as Undergrad Interdisciplinary
Course sections are organized by specific topics such                                                                       in Architecture. (4) Sixty hours of lecture/seminar per
                                                              Studies C137.
as housing, urban design, energy issues. Independent                                                                       semester. Prerequisites: Doctoral candidate or consent
projects may be pursued within the topic.                     Graduate Courses                                             of instructor. (SP)
202B. Final Project Studio: Independent Thesis Option.        211. Theory and Methods in the Social and Cultural           279. Seminar in the History of Architecture. Course
(5) Zero hours of lecture and zero hours of studio per        Basis of Design. (4) Course may be repeated for              may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequi-
week. Course intended primarily for research theses.          credit. Three hours of seminar per week plus individ-        sites: 179 or consent of instructor.
Students seeking permission to enroll in this section         ual advising. Prerequisites: 110 or consent of in-
                                                                                                                           279C. Modern Architecture. (1-4)
must petition the chair of graduate advisors before the       structor. Explores a variety of theories which explain
end of fall semester.                                         and document the relationship between humans and             279D. History of Housing. (1-4)
                                                                                                                                                       Architecture / 123

279X. Special Topics:Architectural History. (1-4)            and current animations, idea sessions, field trips, guest    seminar per week. Required for doctoral students in
                                                             reviewers and lectures. Idea development beyond the         the area of environmental physics. (SP) Brager
281. Methods of Inquiry in Architectural Research.
                                                             original project will result from the interaction of the
(4) Four hours of lecture/discussion per week. Pre-                                                                      243. Natural Cooling and Ventilation. (3) Forty-five
                                                             idea with the computer input and class discussions.
requisites: M.S. or Ph.D. standing or consent of in-                                                                     hours lecture/seminar per semester. Prerequisites:
                                                             Results may be either 2D or 3D, still or animated.
structor. This is the introductory course in methods of                                                                  140, 242 or consent of instructor. Course focuses on
                                                             Groups of two or more students may work on a pro-
inquiry in architecture research to be required of all en-                                                               a wide range of passive cooling strategies, including
                                                             ject. The class will be conducted in the Silicon Graph-
tering Ph.D. students in all areas of the program. The                                                                   solar control, natural ventilation, radiation, evaporation
                                                             ics Industries lab. Reviews will take place around the
purpose is to train students in predissertation and                                                                      and earth-contact cooling and their treatment in ar-
                                                             workstation. Staff
prethesis research strategies, expose them to variety                                                                    chitectural design. (SP)
of inquiry methods including the value of scholarly re-      139X. Special Topics:Design Theories and Methods.
                                                                                                                         245. Daylighting Analysis Using Physical Models.
search, the nature of evidence, critical reading as con-     (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit as topic
                                                                                                                         (3) Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites:
tent analysis and writing, presenting and illustrating       varies. Fifteen hours lecture/seminar per unit per
                                                                                                                         140 or consent of instructor. Scale models as a vehi-
scholarship in the various disciplines of architecture.      semester. Prerequisites: 130. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                         cle for the investigation of daylight in architectural
(F)
                                                             Graduate Courses                                            space including issues of photometric measurement,
                                                                                                                         qualitative assessment, temporal variability, and pre-
                                                             230. Advanced Design Theories and Methods. (3)              sentation technique. (SP)
                                                             Forty-five hours of lecture/seminar per semester. Pre-
Architectural Methods                                        requisites: 130A or consent of instructor. Design and       249. Special Topics in the Physical Environment in
and Practices                                                planning methods, their theoretical foundations and         Buildings. (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit as
                                                             practical applications.                                     topic varies. Fifteen hours lecture/seminar per unit per
                                                                                                                         semester. Prerequisites: 140.
                                                             231. Research Methods for Design. (2) Thirty hours
Professional Practices                                       of lecture/seminar per semester. Methods of scientific       249X. Special Topics in the Physical Environment in
                                                             research and the use of research in design. Required        Buildings. (1-4) Course maybe repeated for credit as
Upper Division Courses                                       for doctoral students in the area of Design Theories        topic varies. Fifteen hours lecture/seminar per unit per
                                                             and Methods. (SP)                                           semester. Prerequisites: 140. Selected topics such as
120. Introduction to the Practice of Architecture. (3)                                                                   climatic design, mechanical systems, natural lighting,
Two hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per          235. Seminar in Design Theories and Methods for             artificial lighting, acoustics. For current section offerings
week. Architect, owner, developer, and contractor re-        Doctoral Students. (1) Course may be repeated for           see departmental announcement.
lations; contract documents; and the ethics of the pro-      credit. Thirty hours of seminar/discussions per
fession. (F) Davis                                           semester. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatis-
128. Architectural Internship. (5) Twenty-four hours
                                                             factory basis. Required for doctoral students in this       Building Structures
                                                             study area. (F,SP)
of lecture/seminar and 160 hours of internship per
                                                                                                                         Upper Division Courses
semester. Prerequisites: 120 and consent of instructor.      239. Seminar in Design Theories and Methods.
An intensive and structured exposure to the profes-          Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Pre-     150. Introduction to Structures. (4) Forty-five hours
sional practice of architecture using the resources of       requisites: 130A or consent of instructor. (SP)             of lecture and thirty hours of discussion per semester.
practicing architects’ offices as the “laboratory.” (F,SP)                                                                Prerequisites: Physics 8A. Study of forces, materials,
Comerio                                                      239A. Design and Computers. (1-4)                           and structural significance in the design of buildings.
                                                             239C. Representation of Design Knowledge. (3) For-          Emphasis on understanding the structural behavior of
129X. Special Topics in the Practice of Design.
                                                             merly 239H. This course explores the essence and the        real building systems. (F) Black
(1-4) Fifteen hours lecture/seminar per unit per
semester. (F,SP)                                             nature of architectural design knowledge: What are its      154. Design and Computer Analysis of Structure.
                                                             major characteristics? What are the relationships be-       (3) Thirty hours of lecture and 45 hours of laboratory
Graduate Courses                                             tween them? How can they be represented? It does so         per semester. Prerequisites: 150. Design and analysis
229. Seminar on the Practice of Design. Course               in light of the new developments in AI, CAD, and in de-     of whole structural building systems with the aid of
may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequi-        sign methods research. the course also explores the         finite element analytical methods. Advanced structural
sites: Designated section of 129. Selected topics such       potential of employing new tools and methods that           concepts explored in a laboratory environment. Black
as issues of project development and professional            may help define and represent design knowledge.
                                                             Kalay                                                       159. Seminar in Building Structures. Course may be
practice, construction law, materials and specifications,
                                                                                                                         repeated for credit as topic varies. Fifteen hours of lec-
construction management, marketing and manage-               239X. Special Topics:Design Theories and Methods.           ture/seminar per unit per semester. Prerequisites: Con-
ment, professional writing, issues in community de-          (1-4) (F,SP)                                                sent of instructor. For current section offerings see de-
velopment and public policy. For current section of-
                                                                                                                         partmental announcement.
ferings see departmental announcement. Staff
                                                                                                                         159X. Special Topics: Building Structures. (1-4) Se-
229A. Introduction to Construction Law. (1-4) (F,SP)
                                                             Architectural Sciences                                      lected topics such as experimental structures and ar-
229X. Special Topics in the Practice of Design. (1-4)                                                                    chitectural preservation.
(F,SP)
                                                                                                                         Graduate Courses
                                                             Building Sciences                                           253. Seismic Design and Construction. (3) Forty-
Theories and Methods                                                                                                     five hours of lecture/seminar per semester. Prerequi-
                                                             Upper Division Courses                                      sites: 150. Seismic design and construction techniques
Upper Division Courses                                                                                                   for existing buildings and new construction. Topics will
                                                             140. Introduction to Energy and Environmental
130. Introduction to Design Theories and Methods.            Management. (4) Fifty hours of lecture and 30 hours         include: 1) Basic principles of seismic design and build-
(3) Forty-five hours of lecture and 20 hours of dis-          of discussion per semester. Prerequisites: Physics or       ing performance, 2) retrofit of existing buildings and
cussion per semester. Formerly 130A. Comparison              equivalent, or consent of instructor. Study of the ther-    evaluation of structural and functional obsolescence,
and discussion of the theories of environmental design,      mal and lighting environments in buildings, with em-        and 3) design and planning for disaster recovery and
and development and testing of various methods,              phasis on quantitative design techniques. (SP) Benton,      rebuilding. The course will use the campus construc-
tools, and techniques available for environmental de-        Brager                                                      tion as a laboratory for evaluating structural design and
signers. Particular emphasis lies on the difficulties of                                                                  construction techniques. A research paper and sem-
environmental design and related fields. (SP) Staff           149. Seminar on the Physical Environment in                 inar participation are the basis for grading. (F) Comerio
                                                             Buildings. Course may be repeated for credit as topic
132. Introduction to Computer-Aided Design in Ar-                                                                        259. Special Topics: Building Structures. (1-4)
                                                             varies. Prerequisites: 140. Special topics such as cli-
chitecture. (4) Three hours of lecture and three hours                                                                   Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Fif-
                                                             matic design, heating, ventilating, air-conditioning sys-
of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: IDS 110 or                                                                        teen hours of lecture per unit per semester. Prereq-
                                                             tems, lighting and acoustics. For current section of-
equivalent or consent of instructor. This course intro-                                                                  uisites: Consent of instructor. For current section of-
                                                             fering see departmental announcement. (F,SP)
duces students to the principles of CAD, the theories                                                                    ferings see departmental announcement. (F,SP)
and methods on which it is founded, and its principal        149A. Acoustics. (1-4)
                                                                                                                         259X. Special Topics: Building Structures. (1-4) Spe-
applications in practice (generating, evaluating, mod-       Graduate Courses                                            cial topics such as experimental structures and ar-
eling, drafting, and rendering design solutions). (F,SP)                                                                 chitectural preservation. (F,SP)
Kalay                                                        240. Advanced Study of Energy and Environmen-
                                                             tal Issues in Design. (3) Forty-five hours of lec-
138. Advanced Computer-Aided Rendering and
Animation. (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                             ture/seminar per semester. Prerequisites: 140 or con-       Construction and Materials
                                                             sent of instructor. Formerly 240A. This course covers
This is a computer class will enable students to carry       thermal and solar design.                                   Upper Division Courses
out self-determined architectural or other projects in
consultation with the professor and the GSI. There will      241. Research Methods in Building Sciences. (3)             160. Introduction to Construction. (4) Three hours
be discussions, demonstrations, viewing of historical        Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of           of lecture and three hours of laboratory per week. This


       B prefix=language course for business majors                 R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                  *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                 AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures               †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                       requirement
124 / Architecture
introduction to the materials and processes of con-          298. Special Group Study. (1-4) May be repeated for           185X. Special Topics: Word and Image. (1-4)
struction takes architecture from design to realization.     credit up to unit limitation. Sections 1-3 to be graded on
                                                                                                                           186. Selected Topics: Photography. Course may be
The course will cover four material groups commonly          a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Sections 4-10 to be
                                                                                                                           repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisites: 181.
used in two areas of the building assembly (structure        graded on a letter grade basis. Special group studies
                                                                                                                           Studio sections in Photography as an Art Form, Doc-
and envelope): wood, concrete, steel, and glass. You         on topics to be introduced by instructor or students.         umentary Photography, Light and Motion Studies,
will understand choices available and how materials          (F,SP)                                                        Artificial Lighting Photography. For current section of-
are conventionally used. By observing construction,                                                                        ferings see departmental announcement.
                                                             299. Individual Study and Research for Master’s
you’ll see how our decisions affect the size of materi-
                                                             and Doctoral Students. (1-12) Course may be repeat-           186A. Documentary Photography. (1-4) Fifteen hours
als, connections, and where they are assembled. Ar-
                                                             ed for credit. Individual studies including reading and in-   of lecture/seminar or sixty hours of studio per unit per
chitects must understand not only conventions, but
                                                             dividual research under the supervision of a faculty ad-      term for eight weeks. (F,SP)
also the potential in materials, so we will also study un-
                                                             viser and designed to reinforce the student’s background
usual and new developments. (SP) Buntrock                                                                                  186B. Photography as an Art Form. (1-4) (F,SP)
                                                             in areas related to the proposed degree. (F,SP)
169. Seminar in Building Process. (1-4) Course may           602. Individual Study for Doctoral Students. (1-8)            186X. Special Topics: Photography. (1-4) (F,SP)
be repeated for credit as topic varies. Fifteen hours of     Course may be repeated for credit. Must be taken on a
lecture/seminar per unit per semester. Special topics                                                                      187. Selected Topics: Drawing. Course may be re-
                                                             satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Individual study in con-   peated for credit. Prerequisites: Environmental Design
in construction and materials. (F,SP) Staff                  sultation with the major field adviser, intended to provide    11A-11B.
169X. Special Topics: Construction and Materials.            an opportunity for qualified students to prepare them-
                                                             selves for the various examinations required of candi-        187A. Freehand Drawing. (1-4) (F,SP)
(1-4) Course may be repeated for credit as topic
varies. Fifteen hours of lecture/seminar per unit per        dates for the Ph.D. This course may not be used for           187X. Special Topics: Drawing. (1-4) (F,SP)
semester. Selected topics such as construction man-          units or residence requirements for the doctoral degree.
                                                                                                                           197. Field Studies in Visual Studies. (1-4) No more
agement implementation and geological hazards to             Professional Courses                                          than 4 units allowed each semester. Course may be
construction. For current section offerings see de-
                                                             300. Seminar in the Teaching of Architecture. (2)             repeated for credit. Must be taken on a passed/not
partment announcement. (F,SP)                                                                                              passed basis. Supervised experience relevant to
                                                             Four hours of seminar per week, including short lec-
Graduate Courses                                             tures, meetings with the developer and owner of the           specific areas of design in off-campus organizations.
                                                                                                                           Regular individual meetings with faculty sponsor and
                                                             land, studies and discussions of precedents, and re-
264. Off-site Fabrication. (3) Two hours of lecture                                                                        written reports required. See General Catalog re-
                                                             views of student work with other members of the fac-
and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites:                                                                        garding unit limitation toward the degree. (F,SP)
                                                             ulty and visitors. Must be taken on a satisfactory/un-
160 or consent of instructor. This seminar looks at the
                                                             satisfactory basis. The subject for the class is to design    198. Special Group Study. (1-4) No more than 4 units
implications of off-site fabrication in architecture: con-
                                                             an urban neighborhood. Each student will be respon-           allowed each semester. Course may be repeated for
sistent, protected environments; worker efficiency and
                                                             sible for one city block of a 50-acre parcel of land in       credit. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
safety; trades are easy to coordinate; cheaper, semi-
                                                             West Sacramento, following a collectively developed           Studies developed to meet needs. See General Cata-
skilled labor can be used; construction periods can be                                                                     log regarding unit limitation toward the degree. (F,SP)
                                                             plan, and common design guidelines. We will stan-
shortened; and completion dates may be more pre-
                                                             dardize drawing scales, model materials, and tech-            199. Supervised Independent Study and Research.
dictable. Off-site fabrication can allow for increased
                                                             niques, and assemble individual designs into a con-           (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Must be
refinement and trial assemblies. However, it may also
                                                             tiguous description of the neighborhood. The second           taken on a passed/not passed basis. Enrollment is re-
create monotonous sameness when the processes
                                                             part of the project will focus on detailed design at the      stricted by regulations listed in General Catalog. Stud-
and results are not considered with care. (F)
                                                             scale of an individual unit of space for either living,       ies developed to meet individual needs. (F,SP)
265. Japanese Craft and Construction. (3) Two                working, or communal activities. (F) Staff
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.                                                                      Graduate Courses
Prerequisites: 150, 160, or consent of instructor. The                                                                     280. Advanced Visual Studies. (1-3) Course may be
class addresses the role craft and construction play in                                                                    repeated for credit as topic varies. Fifteen hours of lec-
Japanese architecture and applies these lessons to the       Visual Studies                                                ture/seminar per unit per semester. Prerequisites:
evaluation of an exemplary recent building having un-                                                                      181,186. Advanced work in visual studies and pho-
usual technical features. Buildings are expressions of       Upper Division Courses                                        tography. (F,SP)
theoretic and technical intent and a response to cul-
                                                             180A-180B. Introduction to Visual Studies: Word               298. Special Group Study. (1-5) No more than 5 units
tural and economic forces; Japanese architecture is re-
                                                             and Image. (4;4) Thirty hours lecture and 90 hours            allowed each semester. Course may be repeated for
garded as particularly innovative. In studying a system
                                                             studio per semester. Prerequisites: Environmental De-         credit. Special group studies on topics to be introduced
where there is an emphasis on collaboration, students
                                                             sign 11A-11B or consent of instructor; A is prerequisite      by instructor or students. (F,SP)
also see the values of North American systems of ar-
chitectural production. (F,SP) Buntrock                      to B. Projects in graphic form, color, and word-image         299. Individual Study and Research for Master’s
                                                             relationships.                                                Students. (1-5) Course may be repeated for credit. One
269. Seminar in Construction and Materials. Course                                                                         unit will be assigned for each 4 hours of student effort
may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Fifteen          181. Introduction to Photography. (4) Thirty hours
                                                             lecture and 75 hours studio per semester. Learn the           per week. Individual studies including reading and in-
hours of lecture/seminar per unit per semester. Special                                                                    dividual research under the supervision of a faculty ad-
                                                             classic methods of photography using film, paper, and
Topics in Construction and Materials.                                                                                      viser and designed to reinforce the student’s back-
                                                             the darkroom. The course will cover 35mm camera op-
                                                             eration, black and white film, and print processing            ground in areas related to the proposed topic. (F,SP)
269X. Special topics: Construction and Materials. (1-
4) One to four hours of seminar per week. Selected           along with essential aesthetic considerations. There
                                                             will be hands-on demonstrations, laboratory sessions,
                                                                                                                           Art and History of Art
topics such as construction management implemen-
tation and geological hazards to construction. For cur-      slide shows, and in-class critiques, all designed to fa-
rent section offerings see department announcement.          cilitate progress of assigned projects. There will be an
                                                             introduction to digital technology. Historical and con-       (College of Letters and Science)
                                                             temporary issues in photography will be discussed.
                                                             Each student will finish class with a portfolio of pho-
Special Studies Courses                                      tographs. (F,SP)                                              Practice of Art
                                                             185. Selected Topics: Word and Image. Course may              Department Office: 345 Kroeber Hall, (510) 642-2582
                                                             be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisites:        art.berkeley.edu
Upper Division Courses                                                                                                     Chair: Prof. Loren Partridge, Ph.D.
                                                             Environmental Design 11A-11B. Studio sections in ar-
198. Special Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-            eas such as calligraphy, the history of letter forms, and     Professors
peated for credit. Must be taken on a passed/not             typography. For current offerings see the departmen-          Richard B. Shaw, M.F.A.
passed basis. Studies developed to meet needs.               tal announcement.                                             Katherine D. Sherwood, M.F.A.
                                                                                                                           Robert L. Hartman, M.A. (Emeritus)
199. Supervised Independent Study and Research.              C185A. Visual Autobiography. (4) Six hours of lec-            Anne L. Healy, B.A. (Emerita)
(1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Must be             ture per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.          Karl A. Kasten, M.A. (Emeritus)
                                                             Since visual and literary studies have historically been      James F. Melchert, M.F.A. (Emeritus)
taken on a passed/not passed basis. Enrollment is re-                                                                      George J. Miyasaki, M.F.A. (Emeritus)
stricted by regulations in the General Catalog. Studies      viewed as separate disciplines, we will use theories          Mary L. O’Neal, M.F.A. (Emerita)
                                                             from both to study those forms of self-representation         David W. Simpson, M.A. (Emeritus)
developed to meet individual needs. (F,SP)
                                                             that defy disciplinary boundaries, or what we call “vi-       Brian A. Wall (Emeritus)
Graduate Courses                                             sual autobiography.” The course aims to help students         Associate Professor
                                                             become conversant with the elements of alphabetic lit-        Jerrold C. Ballaine, M.F.A. (Emeritus)
296. Directed Dissertation Research. (1-12) Course           eracy (reading and writing) and visual literacy (ob-
may be repeated for credit. Must be taken on a satis-        serving and making) in order to develop a third dis-          Assistant Professors
factory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Advance-        tinctive textual/visual literacy. Also listed as Undergrad    Greg Niemeyer, M.F.A.
ment to candidacy for the Ph.D. Open to qualified stu-        Interdisciplinary Studies C135, American Studies              Anne Walsh, M.F.A.
dents who are directly engaged in the doctoral               C174, and English C143V. This course satisfies the             Professor-in-Residence
dissertation. (F,SP) Staff                                   American Cultures requirement.                                Squeak Carnwath, M.F.A.
                                                                                                                                       Art and History of Art / 125

Department Overview                                     For the M.F.A., students must complete a total of              passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-
                                                        64 units that include six graduate seminars, one               grade basis. Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.
Four goals underlie the teaching in the Department      20th century art history course, one upper division            Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses of-
of Art:                                                 course and four studio and independent study                   fered by faculty members in departments all across the
                                                        courses. Students must also produce a compre-                  campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for
1. To advance the body of knowledge of human            hensive body of creative work to be exhibited in the           close, regular intellectual contact between faculty
experience through aesthetic investigation.             final M.F.A. exhibition.                                        members and students in the crucial second year. The
2. To help students learn to think visually.                                                                           topics vary from department to department and semes-
                                                        Further information about this program may be ob-              ter to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sophomores.
3. To help students understand the strategies that      tained from the Art Office, 345 Kroeber Hall.                   (F,SP) Staff
artists have devised to deal with aesthetic prob-       Lower Division Courses                                         98. Directed Group Study. (1-2) Course may be re-
lems in both traditional and nontraditional methods
                                                        8. Introduction to Visual Thinking. (4) One hour of            peated for credit. Three hours of studio work per unit
of artmaking.
                                                        lecture and six hours of studio per week. Formerly 8A-         per week. Must be taken on a passed/not passed ba-
4. To help students develop a creative intelligence     8B. A first course in the language, processes, and me-          sis. Prerequisites: Open to freshmen and sophomores.
through practicing a visual arts discipline.            dia of visual art. coursework will be organized around         This is a student-initiated course to be offered for aca-
                                                        weekly lectures and studio problems that will introduce        demic credit. The subject matter will vary from
While the undergraduate major is made up largely                                                                       semester to semester and will be taught by the student
of studio courses, it also requires at least three      students to the nature of art making and visual think-
                                                        ing. (F,SP) Staff                                              facilitator under the supervision of the faculty sponsor.
courses in art history. An art student should be fa-                                                                   Topics to be related to art practice. (F,SP) Staff
miliar with ways in which visual ideas have been        12. The Language of Drawing. (4) Three hours of
manifested and developed in the past and how            lecture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites:       99. Supervised Independent Study. (1-2) One to two
specific notions have affected the perception that       8. A study of drawing as a tool for articulating what the      hours of independent study per week. Must be taken
human beings have of themselves and their cir-          eyes, hand, and mind discover and investigate when             on a passed/not passed basis. This course will be a
cumstances.                                             coordinated. Some sessions will be devoted to draw-            rubric for all one and two credit Independent Study
                                                        ing the human figure. Lectures and demonstrations in-           courses in Art Practice that concentrate on the prac-
Work by students is featured in the exhibitions of                                                                     tical aspects of art production. Some students will
the Worth Ryder Art Gallery, an adjunct educa-          troduce students to techniques and varied applications.
                                                        (F,SP) Staff                                                   study gallery work by participating in every phase of
tional facility that is open to the public.                                                                            producing art exhibitions—from selecting works to
                                                        13. Language of Painting. (4) Three hours of lecture           hanging and insuring them. Other students will learn
                                                        and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8. A          concepts, skills and information they can use in their
Major Program                                           concentrated investigation of what painting on a two-          major courses. All students gaining credit from these
                                                        dimensional surface can elicit from what is both ob-           courses will have to produce at least three short term
Prospective art majors should contact the Art Prac-     served and felt. Illustrated talks will help familiarize you   papers analyzing their experiences and reflecting on
tice Department regarding their application to the      with issues that have concerned painters in the 20th           the principles involved in their work. (F,SP) Staff
major.                                                  century. Lectures and demonstrations introduce stu-
                                                        dents to techniques and varied applications. (F,SP)            Upper Division Courses
Transfer Students: If you are transferring to
Berkeley with no previous college-level art courses,    Staff                                                          102. Approaches to Painting. (4) Course may be re-
you are subject to the new art major. All new ma-       14. The Language of Sculpture. (4) Three hours of              peated for credit. Three hours of lecture and six hours
jors must complete Art 8 and 12, and two of the fol-    lecture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites:       of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 13 or
lowing: 13, 14, 16, and 23AC. You must also com-        8. A study of how interactions between physical form           equivalents. Inquiry into concepts of order, process,
plete six upper division studio courses, and three      and the space it generates can serve as a metaphor.            and content as related to human experience. While
specified courses in history of art (see below).         Field trips and illustrated talks will help acquaint you       faculty contact with students is highly individualized,
                                                        with the ideas that sculptors have explored in the 20th        the course involves group critiques and lectures as well
Lower Division: Art 8 and 12 (required of all Art                                                                      as assigned field trips. Lectures and demonstrations in-
majors), and two from the following: 13, 14, 16, and    century. Lectures and demonstrations introduce stu-
                                                        dents to techniques and varied applications. (F,SP)            troduce students to techniques and varied applications.
23AC.                                                                                                                  (F,SP) Staff
                                                        Staff
Upper Division: Art 117 or 118, and five additional                                                                     117. Drawing and Composition. (4) Course may be
upper division courses in practice of art.              16. Introduction to Printmaking. (4) Six hours of lec-
                                                                                                                       repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture and six
                                                        ture and three hours of studio per week. This course
History of Art: A minimum of three courses, one                                                                        hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8 and 12; and
                                                        examines and explores various print disciplines. Stu-
chosen from each of the following three course                                                                         one from 13, 14, 16, 23 or equivalents. Advanced
                                                        dents study and create traditional forms of fine art
clusters:                                                                                                              drawing and composition, color and black-and-white,
                                                        printmaking including woodcut, lithography, intaglio,
                                                                                                                       primarily on paper. 117 or 118 is required of all art ma-
A. Any one lower division History of Art class;         and screenprinting as well as newer approaches which
                                                                                                                       jors. Lectures and demonstrations introduce students
                                                        include transfer and digital printmaking. This course is
                                                                                                                       to techniques and varied applications. (F,SP) Staff
B. Twentieth-Century Art: HA 180 through HA 190         a prerequisite for upper division print courses. Lectures
series;                                                 and demonstrations introduce students to techniques            118. Figure Drawing. (4) Course may be repeated for
                                                        and varied applications. (F,SP) Staff                          credit. Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio
C. One upper division art history course of the stu-
                                                                                                                       per week. Prerequisites: 8 and 12; and one from 13,
dent’s choosing.                                        23AC. Foundations of American Cyber-Culture. (4)
                                                                                                                       14, 16 and 23 or equivalents. Emphasis on the human
                                                        Six hours of lecture/studio per week. This new course
With the consent of the major adviser, a student                                                                       figure seen in the context of pictorial space, dark and
                                                        will enable students to think critically about, and engage
may be given credit toward the major for up to two                                                                     light and color. Various media. 118 or 117 is required
                                                        in practical experiments in, the complex interactions be-
art-related courses taken outside the department,                                                                      of all art majors. Lectures and demonstrations intro-
                                                        tween new media and perceptions and performances of
e.g., Set Design (Theater, Dance, and Perfor-                                                                          duce students to techniques and varied applications.
                                                        embodiment, agency, citizenship, collective action, in-
mance Studies), Photography (College of Envi-                                                                          (F,SP) Staff
                                                        dividual identity, time and spatiality. We will pay par-
ronmental Design), etc.                                 ticular attention to the categories of personhood that         120. Approaches to Printmaking: Intaglio. (4)
Honors Program in the Practice of Art. Students         make up the UC Berkeley American Cultures rubric               Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lec-
with an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher who are in         (race and ethnicity), as well as to gender, nation, and        ture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8,
their senior year may, with the permission of a reg-    disability. The argument threading through the course          12, and 16, or equivalents. An opportunity to discover
ular faculty member, enroll in the honors program.      will be the ways in which new media both reinforce             what an artist can do with an etching press and a fa-
This is an independent study course, taken for a        pre-existing social hierarchies, and yet offer possibil-       miliarity with such processes as etching, drypoint,
minimum of one semester and a maximum of two            ities for the transcendence of those very categories.          aquatint, color, and monotype printing. The difference
semesters and comprising a minimum of 4 units           The new media—and we will leave the precise defini-             in the ways that these mediums enhance and condition
and a maximum of 8 units. A final grade is given at      tion of the new media as something to be argued                your ideas will be made clear through individual and
the completion of the program. Honors courses           about over the course of the semester—can be yet an-           group critiques. Lectures and demonstrations introduce
count toward the art major as they are taken for a      other means for dividing and disenfranchising, and can         students to techniques and varied applications. (F,SP)
letter grade.                                           be the conduit of violence and transnational domi-             Staff
                                                        nance. This course satisfies the American Cultures re-
                                                        quirement. (F,SP) Staff                                        122. Approaches to Printmaking: Lithography. (4)
Graduate Program                                                                                                       Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lec-
                                                        84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-                 ture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8,
The Department of Art offers a two-year program         peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar         12, and 16, or equivalents. In the course of making
of study leading to the M.F.A. degree in the prac-      per week per unit for 15 weeks. One and one-half               lithographs, you will be encouraged to find an aesthetic
tice of art.                                            hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two           direction of your own. Your instructor will also help you
                                                        hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.            develop skill in using both stone and metal plates. Lec-
The B.A. or B.F.A. in studio art or its equivalent is   Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five               tures and demonstrations introduce students to tech-
prerequisite to the M.F.A. degree.                      weeks. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not               niques and varied applications. (F,SP) Staff


      B prefix=language course for business majors             R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                     *Professor of the Graduate School
      C prefix=cross-listed course                             AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                  †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
      H prefix=honors course                                   requirement
126 / Art and History of Art
124. Advanced Projects in Printmaking. (4) Course              audiotape. Lectures and demonstrations introduce stu-         graphics for motion simulations, or animations. We will
may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture and         dents to techniques and varied applications. (F,SP)           also probe these tools for their use in creative ex-
six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8, 12, and        Staff                                                         pression and analyze their impact on our own per-
16, or equivalents. Non-traditional projects in print-                                                                       ception of motion. Software used: Maya. Each week
making. Lectures and demonstrations introduce stu-             160. Special Topics in Visual Studies. (4) Course             will include relevant readings, class discussions, guest
dents to techniques and varied applications. (F,SP)            may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture and        speakers, demonstrat ion of examples, and studio time
Staff                                                          three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Con-       for training and working on student assignments.
                                                               sent of instructor. Topics of concern to the instructor,      (F,SP) Staff
130. Approaches to Sculpture: Concept and Con-                 usually related to current research, which may fall out-
struction. (4) Course may be repeated for credit.              side of the normal curriculum or be of more restricted        174. Advanced Digital Video. (4) Three hours of lec-
Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per             content than regular studio courses. An opportunity to        ture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8,
week. Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 14, or equivalents.            investigate topics and mediums on an ad hoc basis             12, and 23; or equivalents. This advanced studio
More advanced instruction in metal and wood shop.              when there is a compelling reason to do so, providing         course is designed for students who have mastered
Course is geared toward constructing objects, forms,           there is no other course that deals with these con-           basic skills and concepts involved in digital video pro-
and spatial structures to reveal concept. Further cul-         cerns. Primarily intended for advanced undergraduates         duction, and are interested in further investigating crit-
tivation of ideas through illustrated talks of artists who     and graduates in Art Practice but open to others. For         ical, theoretical, and creative research topics in digital
have innovated the notion of sculpture. Architectural          special topics and enrollment see listings outside of         video production. Each week will include relevant read-
considerations, physical experience of space explored.         238 Kroeber. (F,SP)                                           ings, class discussions, guest speakers, demonstrat
Lectures and demonstrations introduce students to                                                                            ion of examples, and studio time for training and work-
techniques and varied applications. (F,SP) Staff               165. Art, Medicine, and Disabilities. (4) Three hours         ing on student assignments. (F,SP) Staff
                                                               of lecture and six hours of studio and/or supervised re-
132. Approaches to Sculpture: Ceramics. (4)                    search and/or internship per week. This course will ex-       C174. Advanced Digital Video. (4) Nine hours of stu-
Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lec-         amine how visual artists have responded to illness and        dio per week. Prerequisites: Film 100, 185 with a grade
ture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8,       disability. We will consider visual representations of        of A-or better and consent of instructor. This advanced
12, and 14, or equivalents. An opportunity to learn the        disability and healing, as well as the expressive work        studio course is designed for students who have mas-
many ways of shaping and giving form to wet clay,              of visual artists working from within the personal ex-        tered basic skills and concepts involved in digital video
then making it permanent by firing it. Illustrated talks        perience of disability; in other words, we will look at       production and are interested in further investigating
will examine the ideas that have engaged ceramic               disability as both a subject and a source of artistic cre-    critical, theoretical, and creative research topics in dig-
sculptors in many traditions and the processes that            ation. Several topics, historical and contemporary, will be   ital video production. Also listed as Film Studies C187.
they have used to expand them. Lectures and demon-             explored. Students will complete either a semester-long       (F,SP) Staff
strations introduce students to techniques and varied          internship with an arts and disability organization, a re-    175. Advanced Computer Graphics Production. (4)
applications. (F,SP) Staff                                     search paper, or a creative project. (F,SP) Sherwood          Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio per
133. Approaches to Sculpture: Meaning in Material.             171. Digital Video: The Architecture of Time. (4)             week. Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 23 or equivalents. Sim-
(4) Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of          Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lec-        ulation of small, team-based CGI creative production
lecture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites:       ture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8,      environment based on skills developed in Art 160
8, 12, and 14, or equivalents. Further experience with         12, and 23; or equivalents. This hands-on studio              (Computer Animation II) or Film Studies Screenwriting.
three-dimensional form in real space. Investigation of         course is designed to present students with a foun-           Completed projects will be presented at final PFA
non-traditional art materials to build forms. Deeper ex-       dation-level introduction to the skills, theories and con-    screening, and work will be available for student ani-
ploration of the current state of art practice. Multiple ap-   cepts used in digital video production. Non-linear and        mation reels. UCB will provide duplication services for
plications are used to mediate ideas in space, includ-         non-destructive editing methods used in digital video         all completed projects. Each week will include relevant
ing sculpture, installation, video, photography, and the       are defining new “architectures of time” for cinematic         readings, class discussions, guest speakers, demon-
computer. Lectures and demonstrations introduce stu-           creation and experience, and offer new and innovative         stration of examples, and studio time for training and
dents to techniques and varied applications. (F,SP)            possibilities for authoring new forms of the moving im-       working on student assignments. (F,SP) Staff
Staff                                                          age. This course will expose students to a broad range        H195A-H195B. Special Study for Honors Candi-
                                                               of industry standard equipment, film and video history,        dates in the Practice of Art. (4;4) Course may be ap-
137. Advanced Projects in Ceramic Sculpture. (4)
                                                               theory, terminology, field and post-production skills.         plied toward major requirements. Hours to be ar-
Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lec-
                                                               Students will be required to techinically master the dig-     ranged. Prerequisites: Eligibility for admission to the
ture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8,
                                                               ital media tools introduced in the course. Each week          Honors Program. Honors students are required to take
12, and 14, or equivalents. Students who are experi-
                                                               will include relevant readings, class discussions, guest      three units of H195A. They may elect to take an ad-
enced in clay may enroll in this course to continue de-
                                                               speakers, demonstration of examples, and studio time          ditional three units (H195B) the following semester.
veloping their ideas and their technical command of
                                                               for training and working on student assignments.              (F,SP) Staff
ceramic materials and processes. Lectures and
                                                               (F,SP) Staff
demonstrations introduce students to techniques and                                                                          198. Directed Group Study. (1-3) Course may be re-
varied applications. (F,SP) Staff                              C171. Digital Video: The Architecture of Time. (4)            peated for credit. Three hours of group study per unit
                                                               Nine hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: Film 25A        per week. Must be taken on a passed/not passed ba-
138. Approaches to Sculpture: Installations. (4)
                                                               and 28A or 28B with a grade of B+ or better and con-          sis. Prerequisites: Upper division standing. This is a
Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lec-
                                                               sent of instructor. This hands-on studio course is de-        student-initiated course to be offered for academic
ture and six hours of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8,
                                                               signed to present students with a foundation-level in-        credit. The subject matter will vary from semester to
12, 14, or equivalents. Installation and site-specific
                                                               troduction to the skills, theories, and concepts used in      semester and will be taught by the student facilitator
work. Active use of all architectural sites on campus,
                                                               digital video production. As digital technologies con-        under the supervision of the faculty sponsor. Topics to
both indoors and outdoors, ranging from enclosed four
                                                               tinue to expand our notion of time and space, value           be related to art practice. (F,SP) Staff
walls of a gallery to the parameters of a public garden.
                                                               and meaning, artists are using these tools to envision
Students work on different sites in class to explore full                                                                    199. Supervised Independent Study for Advanced
                                                               the impossible. Nonlinear and nondestructive editing
range of “installation.” Ultimately, each student will se-                                                                   Undergraduates. (1-4) Course may be repeated for
                                                               methods used in digital video are defining new “ar-
lect a site on campus and make a piece for that site.                                                                        credit. Course does not satisfy major requirement for
                                                               chitectures of time” for cinematic creation and expe-
Drawings of site, written proposals are integral to the                                                                      art. Hours to be arranged. Must be taken on a
final project. Lectures and demonstrations introduce            rience, and offer new and innovative possibilities for
                                                                                                                             passed/not passed basis. (F,SP) Staff
students to techniques and varied applications. (F,SP)         authoring new forms of the moving image. Through di-
Staff                                                          rect experimentation, this course will expose students        Graduate Courses
                                                               to a broad range of industry-standard equipment, film
                                                               and video history, theory, terminology, field, and post-       218. Seminar: Theory and Criticism. (4) Course may
141. Temporal Structures: Video and Performance
                                                               production skills. Students will be required to techni-       be repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per
Art. (4) Course may be repeated for credit. Three
                                                               cally master the digital media tools introduced in the        week. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent
hours of lecture and six hours of studio per week. Pre-
                                                               course, and personalize the new possibilities digital         of instructor. Weekly meetings will provide a forum for
requisites: 8, and 12; and one from 13, 14, 16, 23, or
                                                               video brings to time-based art forms. Also listed as          the discussion of issues related to assigned readings
equivalents. Projects are aimed at understanding and
                                                               Film Studies C185. (F,SP) Staff                               in the fields of esthetics, theory and art criticism. Staff
inventing ways in which time and change can become
key elements in an artwork. Regular screenings of pro-                                                                       290. Independent Study. (4) Course may be repeated
fessional tapes will illustrate uses of the mediums and        172. CGI Animation Studies. (4) Course may be re-
                                                                                                                             for credit. Hours to be arranged. Prerequisites: Grad-
provide a historical context. Lectures and demon-              peated for credit. Three hours of lecture and six hours
                                                                                                                             uate standing and consent of instructor. Individual pro-
strations introduce students to techniques and varied          of studio per week. Prerequisites: 8, 12, and 23; or
                                                                                                                             jects by first-year graduate students with one assigned
applications. (F,SP) Staff                                     equivalents. Motion is a ubiquitous element of human
                                                                                                                             instructor. (F,SP) Staff
                                                               experience, yet attempts to explain it remain incom-
142. New Genres. (4) Course may be repeated for                plete. The representation of motion with technical            294. Seminar for M.F.A. Students. (4) Course may
credit. Three hours of lecture and six hours of studio         means is in continuous development, starting perhaps          be repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per
per week. Prerequisites: 8 and 12; and one from 13,            with sculptural representations of celestial movements        week. Prerequisites: Admission to the M.F.A. program.
14, 16, 23, or equivalents. A survey intended to ex-           in antiquity and leading to dynamic computer graphics         Studio work emphasizing various aspects of form.
pose you to the nature and potential of such non-tra-          simulations of molecular processes today. In this pro-        Group criticism. Intended especially for M.F.A. candi-
ditional tools for artmaking as performance, video, and        duction-intensive studio course, we will study computer       dates. (F,SP) Staff
                                                                                                                                          Art and History of Art / 127

295. Independent Study for M.F.A. Students. (4-12)               Double Majors: Two courses may overlap be-                history of art may have to complete some addi-
Course may be repeated for credit. Hours to be ar-               tween separate degree programs.                           tional study to meet breadth requirements.
ranged. Prerequisites: Admission to the M.F.A. pro-
gram. M.F.A. candidates, special study—M.F.A. Com-               Undergraduate Curriculum. The major in history            2. Post-M.A. Transfer Students. Students ap-
mittee members as well as other faculty. (F,SP)                  of art consists of no fewer than 12 courses, and          plying with an M.A. degree in history of art or a
                                                                 must include the following:                               closely related field from another institution must
298. Directed Group Study. (4) Course may be re-                                                                           submit their M.A. thesis or two substantial research
peated for credit. Three hours of seminar per week.              1. Any three lower division lecture courses in the        papers with their application.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing or consent of in-               history of art;
structor. Directed group study in special problems,                                                                        3. Statement of Purpose. Students should be as
                                                                 2. One lower or upper division course in the prac-        precise as possible in describing their intellectual
group research, and/or interdisciplinary topics. (F,SP)          tice of art;
Staff                                                                                                                      background and interests in the history of art, their
                                                                 3. Five upper division lecture courses in five of six      expectations for graduate study at Berkeley, and
299. Supervised Independent Study for Graduate                   fields presently taught in the department: Asian,          their academic and career goals.
Students. (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit.               Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and
Hours to be arranged. Prerequisites: Graduate stand-                                                                       4. Languages. Students are expected to be
                                                                 Modern. One of these courses must be in Asian art         proficient in one or more of the appropriate foreign
ing and consent of instructor, graduate adviser, and             unless the student has already taken a lower divi-
Department Chair. Special projects by graduate stu-                                                                        languages when they begin graduate study. The
                                                                 sion course in this field;                                 specific languages will vary according to the field
dents undertaken with a specific member of the faculty.
(F,SP) Staff                                                     4. Two additional upper division courses in the his-      of study (see Languages, below). Students are
                                                                 tory of art, one of which must be a seminar;              strongly urged to do everything possible to satisfy
Professional Courses                                                                                                       both language requirements before entering the
                                                                 5. One upper division course outside the depart-          program. We particularly recommend the summer
301. The Teaching of Art: Practice. (1) Course may               ment, related to the student’s main focus of study.
be repeated for credit. One hour of lecture/discussion
                                                                                                                           before enrolling as a time to improve language
                                                                 This course must be approved in advance by a de-          proficiency.
per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatis-               partmental undergraduate major adviser.
factory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Uti-                                                                  5. Graduate Division Requirements. Applicants
lizing aspects of pedagogical and andragogical teach-            All courses must be taken for a letter grade.             are encouraged to become familiar with Graduate
ing, the interactive lecture, collaborative learning,                                                                      Division regulations as described in the beginning
                                                                 Honors Program. Students with at least a 3.5
simulations, and brainstorming-freewriting, this semester-                                                                 sections of this catalog, specifically regarding GRE
                                                                 grade-point average both overall and in all upper
long seminar will focus on these various intergrative                                                                      and TOEFL examinations, and minimum grade-
                                                                 division courses taken to fulfill the requirements of
teaching approaches, to facilitate communication in the                                                                    point average.
                                                                 the major are eligible for admission into the Honors
diverse and wide-ranging arena which is fine arts to-
                                                                 Program. Candidates for honors in the History of
day. Discussion of course aims, instructional methods,
                                                                 Art are required to complete satisfactorily, within       Requirements for Completion of
grading standards, and special problems in the teach-                                                                      Stage I of the M.A./Ph.D. Program
                                                                 their senior year, an honors thesis, consisting of at
ing of art practice. (F,SP) Staff
                                                                 least two semesters of continuing academic work           1. Breadth. (a) Students of Western art: one upper
                                                                 under faculty supervision (usually a seminar, di-         division course or seminar in Asian art and in four
                                                                 rected research, or independent study course in           of the following areas: Ancient; Medieval; Renais-
                                                                 the first semester plus, in the second semester, an        sance; Baroque (1600-1800); Modern (1800 to pre-
History of Art                                                   H195 special study). Those who have completed             sent). (b) Students of Asian art: one upper division
                                                                 the program will graduate with honors, high honors,       course or seminar in each of the three Asian areas
Office: 416 Doe Library #6020, (510) 643-7290
ls.berkeley.edu/dept/arthistory                                  or highest honors in the major depending upon             (Japan, China, and India/Southeast Asia), and at
Chair: Whitney Davis, Ph.D.                                      their final GPAs in upper division courses taken to        least two upper division courses or seminars in one
Professors
                                                                 fulfill the major requirements. Applications, which        or two of the areas of Western art listed above in
Timothy J. Clark, Ph.D. London University. Modern art
                                                                 require the signature of the project director and un-     (a). These requirements may be satisfied by pre-
Whitney Davis, Ph.D. Harvard University. Ancient, modern,        dergraduate major adviser, are available in the His-      vious coursework at the undergraduate level.
  and theory of art history                                      tory of Art office.
Margaretta Lovell, Ph.D. Yale University. American and                                                                     2. Coursework. Ten courses selected to fulfill
  British art                                                                                                              breadth requirements above (if necessary); at least
Loren Partridge, Ph.D. Harvard University. Italian
  Renaissance art                                                Minor Program                                             five must be graduate-level art history courses, in-
Andrew F. Stewart, Ph.D. Cambridge University. Greek and                                                                   cluding three graduate seminars taught by de-
  Roman art                                                      Required: Five upper division courses in at least         partment faculty. One course may be taken in con-
Anne M. Wagner, Ph.D. Harvard University. Modern art                                                                       nection with teaching (History of Art 300) and
Joanna Williams, Ph.D. Harvard University. Indian and            three of the six fields presently taught in the de-
  Southeast Asian art                                            partment: Asian, Ancient, Medieval, Renaissance,          another to prepare the qualifying paper or M.A. the-
David H. Wright, Ph.D. Harvard University. First Millenium       Baroque, and Modern. One course may be an up-             sis (History of Art 601). Additional courses may in-
  A.D.                                                           per division seminar; the rest must be lecture            clude upper division undergraduate courses; the
†Svetlana Alpers (Emerita), Ph.D. Harvard University. 17th-
  and 18th-century art and the northern tradition                courses. All courses must be taken for a letter           proseminar designed especially for first-year grad-
Michael Baxandall (Emeritus), M.A. Cambridge University.         grade. An overall GPA of 2.0 is required in all           uate students (History of Art 200); additional grad-
  European art                                                   courses applied to the minor. A minimum of three          uate seminars inside or outside the department;
†James Cahill (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of Michigan.
  Chinese and Japanese art                                       courses must be taken at Berkeley. The minor is           and individual study on selected topics (History of
*Jacques de Caso (Emeritus), Ph.D. Yale University. 18th-        not open to practice of art majors.                       Art 299).
  19th century European art
Peter H. Selz (Emeritus), Ph.D. D.F.A. (hon.) University of      Recommended: R1B and two other lower division             3. Languages. Two are required. (a) Students of
  Chicago. Modern and contemporary art                           art history survey courses (11, 30, 31, 34, 35, 40,       Western art: German, and one other ancient or
Associate Professors                                             41, 51, 62) and one course in the practice of art,        modern language as appropriate and determined
Patricia Berger, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.       preferably drawing.                                       by the graduate adviser. (b) Students of Asian art:
   Chinese art                                                                                                             One European language (normally French or Ger-
Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby, Ph.D. University of Michigan.                                                                      man), and one major Asian language (normally
   European art since 1700
Christopher Hallett, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.   Graduate Study                                            Chinese, Japanese, Sanskrit, or Hindi), or two
   Roman art                                                                                                               Asian languages (one from the previous list and
Elizabeth Honig, Ph.D. Yale University. European art, 1400-      The department offers a two-stage integrated mas-         one determined in consultation with the graduate
   1700                                                          ter’s and doctoral program in preparation for college
Gregory P. Levine, Ph.D. Princeton University. Japanese art                                                                adviser). (c) Students of ancient art: German,
Todd Olson, Ph.D. University of Michigan. Early modern           teaching, writing, and specialized curatorial careers.    Greek and Latin. (N.B. German and either Greek
   European art                                                  Students are not admitted to work specifically for         or Latin are required to complete stage I. The third
                                                                 the M.A. degree, although it may be awarded to            language must be mastered by the completion of
                                                                 those working toward the Ph.D. after fulfillment           the Ph.D.)
Major Program                                                    of the requirements for Stage I of the M.A./Ph.D.
                                                                 program.                                                  4. Qualifying Paper or M.A. Thesis. The quali-
The major provides an introduction to the history of                                                                       fying paper is a perfected version of a seminar pa-
the visual arts in western and Asian culture as well             Preparation and Application                               per, or a paper evolving out of independent re-
as the opportunity to do specialized study in areas                                                                        search, normally no longer than 50 pages including
of the student’s choice. Taking a multidisciplinary              for Admission                                             footnotes and bibliography. It should demonstrate
and fundamentally humanistic approach, the pro-                  1. Undergraduate Training. Applicants must hold           scholarly competence in the investigation of a lim-
gram provides majors with essential training in the              a Bachelor of Arts or its equivalent from an insti-       ited problem. The qualifying paper is read and ap-
perceptual, research, and critical skills required in            tution of acceptable standing. An undergraduate           proved by three department faculty members. If the
many professions. Majors frequently go on to ca-                 major in the history of art is not necessary. Stu-        paper is to serve as a thesis for the M.A. degree, it
reers in the arts, law, or business as well as to                dents with high academic achievement in history,          must be submitted in accordance with Graduate Di-
graduate study in the history of art and careers in              literature, practice of art, or similar humanistic dis-   vision regulations and be approved by a committee
teaching, museum work, and conservation.                         ciplines are welcome. Those with little work in the       of three readers, two of whom will usually be mem-

        B prefix=language course for business majors                   R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                 *Professor of the Graduate School
        C prefix=cross-listed course                                   AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures              †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
        H prefix=honors course                                         requirement
128 / Art and History of Art

bers of the qualifying paper committee, and one of        side History of Art. Normally the Colloquium Com-          8. Length of Stage II. Good progress means one
whom must be from another Berkeley department.            mittee is made up of four people. At the colloquium,       year to the qualifying examination, plus three or
Applications for candidacy for the master’s degree        the precise scope of the examination is also re-           four additional years for research and completion
may be obtained from the Graduate Division or             viewed and determined. This involves selection of a        of the doctoral dissertation. Total time for Stage I
graduate student affairs officer, and must be filed         general field for the exams, special topics, and a re-      and Stage II is six to seven years (seven to eight
by the end of the third week of instruction in            lated outside subject, which together provide the ap-      years for students of Asian or Ancient art).
whichever semester the degree is expected. All de-        propriate background for dissertation research.
grees are awarded in December or May.                                                                                For further information concerning the M.A./Ph.D.
                                                          2. Registration Requirements. During Stage II              program, go to ls.berkeley.edu/dept/arthistory, or
5. Proceeding to Stage II. (a) Students enrolled in       students are expected to enroll for 12 units of            e-mail arthist@socrates.berkeley.edu.
the M.A./Ph.D. program at Berkeley: The qualifying        coursework each semester. To make up these
paper is submitted for discussion by the whole fac-       units, students may enroll in lecture courses or           Berkeley Art Museum
ulty as part of a general review of the student’s         seminars inside or outside the department; lan-            The Berkeley Art Museum plays an active role in
work so far. For this review the student submits a        guage courses; History of Art 296 (dissertation re-        instruction and research, giving students an op-
petition, in the form of a letter addressed to the        search); History of Art 299 (special study); History       portunity for experience in connoisseurship and or-
graduate adviser, outlining work accomplished in          of Art 300 (taken in conjunction with GSI appoint-         ganization of exhibitions. See Berkeley Art Mu-
Stage I and plans for Stage II, including field of         ments); and History of Art 602 (individual study for       seum in the Index for further information.
concentration, and requesting permission to begin         the qualifying examinations).
Stage II. Petitions are accepted four times a year.                                                                  Lower Division Courses
(b) Post-M.A. transfer students: Students must            3. Languages. More than two languages are often
complete one year of coursework, including at least       necessary for research in a student’s general field.        R1B. Reading and Writing about Visual Experi-
two graduate seminars with department faculty.            These additional language requirements are deter-          ence. (4) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequi-
They also must be reviewed by the faculty in the          mined by the graduate adviser in consultation with         sites: UC Entry Level Writing Requirement, English 1A,
first semester of the second year. For this review,        the student and the colloquium committee. For stu-         or equivalent. Formerly 1B. How do mechanisms of
the student submits a petition to begin Stage II, in-     dents of Medieval art, Latin and/or Greek is required.     perception structure responses to visual art? What is
cluding field of concentration, and requesting per-                                                                   at stake when words describe images? By means of
                                                          4. Qualifying Examination. The examination is              intensive looking, thinking, speaking, and writing, this
mission to begin Stage II. The basis for this review
                                                          conducted by a five-member committee nominated              course introduces the student to a series of problems
will be the M.A. thesis (or equivalent) and course
                                                          bythe student and advisers and appointed by the            and issues in the description and analysis of works of
and seminar work during the first year at Berkeley.
                                                          dean of the Graduate Division on behalf of the             art. Because the course is also an introduction to the
6. Graduate Student Instructors (GSIs). Since             Graduate Council. This committee is normally the           historical study of art, it is intended for students with no
teaching is considered an important part of grad-         Colloquium Committee plus a chair from the de-             previous coursework in the field. Satisfies the second
uate training, each student in the program will nor-      partment. The exam consists of one three-hour              half of the Reading and Composition requirement.
mally serve several times as an instructor. Appli-        written part followed a few days later by an oral ex-      (F,SP) Staff
cations for GSI appointments are distributed each         amination, andincludes consideration of specific
spring, usually in March or April. Appointments are       works of art, sources, and the state of scholarship        10. Introduction to Western Art: Ancient to Me-
decided at a subsequent faculty meeting and are           in the field. The examination tests the student’s ba-       dieval. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of dis-
announced before the end of the spring semester.          sic knowledge of a general field, detailed knowl-           cussion per week. Prerequisites: May follow 1B or pre-
Entering students are normally not eligible during        edge of special topics within it, and the ability to in-   cede 11, though neither is required. Formerly 10A. An
their first year’s residence, unless they have al-                                                                    introduction to the art of Egypt, Greece, Rome, and the
                                                          tegrate studies in an appropriate outside field with
ready had teaching experience elsewhere. To qual-                                                                    European Middle Ages. Works of painting, sculpture,
                                                          work in the History of Art. When the qualifying ex-
ify as a GSI, students in Western art must have                                                                      and architecture are presented chronologically and in-
                                                          amination is passed and appropriate forms filed at
satisfied both language requirements, and students                                                                    terpreted within their particular historical circumstances.
                                                          the Graduate Division, the student is formally ad-
in Asian art must have satisfied one language re-                                                                     The course focuses on themes such as the social and
                                                          vanced to candidacy. The only further requirement
quirement and be making good progress in the                                                                         ideological functions of art, strategies of realism and
                                                          is the dissertation.
second. Ancient art students must satisfy their                                                                      abstraction, rhetorics of the material and immaterial,
modern language requirement and be making                 5. Dissertation. The dissertation is a book-length         patronage and the construction of viewing, etc. It en-
good progress on their Greek or Latin requirement.        study of a problem in the history of art written un-       ables students to acquire the perceptual and critical
Before teaching begins, all students must clear           der the supervision of a dissertation committee.           skills to enjoy, interpret, and question works of art. Like
from their records any incomplete grades that are         The dissertation committee is nominated by the             11, this course is recommended for potential majors
more than a year old. Moreover, per Graduate Di-          graduate adviser following consultation with the           and for students in other disciplines, both humanities
vision policy, GSIs may not have more than two in-        student. It consists of three Academic Senate              and sciences.
completes at the time teaching begins. All first-time      members from the Berkeley campus, one of whom              11. Introduction to Western Art: Renaissance to
GSIs are required to attend an orientation work-          must be from outside the department. Dissertation          the Present. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour
shop sponsored by the University, as well as the          chapters should be submitted to the committee, to-         of discussion per week. Prerequisites: May follow 1B
teaching workshop offered in the department each          gether with appropriate illustrations, as they are         or 10, though neither is required. Formerly 10B. An in-
semester. Mandatory training and pedagogy ses-            written. Normally the committee must receive the           troduction to the historical circumstances and visual
sions are offered for all GSIs at the start of each       entire dissertation, with illustrations, at least three    character of Western art from the Renaissance to the
semester. In addition, first-time international GSIs       months before the filing deadline.                          present. Not a chronological survey, but an exploration
must pass an examination to demonstrate English           6. Dissertation Writing Colloquium (History of             of topics and themes central to this period. For ex-
language proficiency.                                      Art 296). In order to break down the isolation of          ample: What tasks did painting and sculpture perform
                                                          dissertation writing, establish dialogue among ad-         in the past? For whom, at whose expense? How do
7. Length of Stage I. For students in Western art
                                                          vanced graduate students, encourage productivity,          the rise of landscape painting, the cult of the artist, and
other than Ancient, good progress means two
                                                          and improve mentoring between advisers and stu-            the new emphasis on the nude relate to the emer-
years, or two years and a summer; for Asian or An-
                                                          dents, all students in residence who have passed           gence of modern society? Do stylistic labels like Clas-
cient art, three years. (Although it is not required,
                                                          their qualifying exams and have written at least a         sicism, Realism, Impressionism, and Modernism help
students should expect to spend summers study-
                                                          first chapter of their dissertation will be expected to     us answer such questions? This course is recom-
ing languages, working on the qualifying paper, or
                                                          enroll in the dissertation colloquium under the di-        mended for potential majors and for students in other
travelling to study works of art.)
                                                          rection of the graduate adviser. The colloquium will       disciplines, both humanities and sciences.
Requirements for Completion of                            meet at regular intervals throughout the academic          24. Freshman Seminar. (1) Course may be repeated
Stage II of the M.A./Ph.D. Program                        year with appropriate faculty members. Enrollment          for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per
                                                          in the colloquium is expected until at least two           week. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade ba-
1. Dissertation Prospectus/Colloquium. As the             chapters have been presented (normally two                 sis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed
first part of Stage II, a student prepares a written       semesters), but students are encouraged to enroll          basis. The Freshman Seminar Program has been de-
proposal that defines the scope, approach, and ra-         and present chapters until the dissertation is com-        signed to provide new students with the opportunity to
tionale of the dissertation. This is the point at which   pleted. Colloquium members also will be encour-            explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member in a
a student formalizes the choice of dissertation ad-       aged to take part in campus symposia such as the           small-seminar setting. Freshman Seminars are offered
viser(s), who consult on the preparation of the           Berkeley Symposium.                                        in all campus departments, and topics may vary from
prospectus and help the student devise a plan of                                                                     department to department and semester to semester.
study toward the Ph.D. qualifying examination. The        7. Annual Review of Ph.D. Candidates. All doc-
                                                                                                                     Enrollment limited to fifteen freshman. (F,SP) Staff
prospectus is presented in preparation for the col-       toral students at the dissertation stage must meet
loquium to a faculty committee for review and sug-        annually with at least two members of the disser-          29. Prehistoric and Archaic Art. (4) Three hours of
gestions. The colloquium is scheduled to take             tation committee. The purpose is to review and             lecture per week. Introduces prehistoric and archaic
place four to six months before the qualifying ex-        evaluate progress on the dissertation and to map           arts (art in Paleolithic, Neolithic, preliterate societies;
amination. This Colloquium Committee consists of          out a plan for the next year. Students who are             art in early phases of complex civilizations), including
two or more faculty members from History of Art           away from campus may complete the evaluation               cave art (Lascaux), petroglyphs or rock art, megalithic
and one or more from a campus department out-             process by mail.                                           construction (Stonehenge), and ritual objects (the
                                                                                                                                              Art and History of Art / 129

Narmer Palette). Examples drawn from Europe, north-            84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-                 C121B. Topics in Islamic Art. (4) Course may be re-
ern and southern Africa, Egypt and the ancient Near            peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar         peated for credit as topic varies. Three hours of lecture
East northern and central Australia, and the Southwest         per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half           and one hour of discussion per week. The course will
and Northwest Coast in North America. (F,SP)                   hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two           treat in depth topics in Islamic architecture and topics
                                                               hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.            in Islamic art. Subjects addressed may include paint-
30. Art of India and Southeast Asia. (4) Three hours           Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five               ing, calligraphy, and book production. Also listed as
of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. This           weeks. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not               Near Eastern Studies C121B. Open to nonmajors.
course surveys the arts of South and Southeast Asia            passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-           General prerequisite: Upper division standing or con-
from 2000 BC to the present, including painting, sculp-        grade basis. Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.       sent of the instructor. Unless otherwise stated, the “A”
ture and architecture. It treats prehistoric material (In-     Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses of-           part of a sequence is not prerequisite to the “B” part.
dus Valley, Don Song), Buddhist sculpture, Hindu tem-          fered by faculty members in departments all across the
ples and their images, and miniature painting. Art will                                                                       130A. Early Chinese Art, Part I. (4) Three hours of lec-
                                                               campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for
be considered in relation to its religious, political, and                                                                    ture and one hour of discussion per week. Chinese art
                                                               close, regular intellectual contact between faculty
social contexts. The course will normally focus on ma-                                                                        of the Neolithic and Bronze Age. From the earliest pe-
                                                               members and students in the crucial second year. The
jor monuments, seen from multiple viewpoints, or upon                                                                         riod to the end of the Han dynasty (early third century
                                                               topics vary from department to department and                  A.D.), especially ceramics, bronzes, jade, and lacquer.
problems and issues that relate the art of this area to        semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sopho-
traditions of other parts of the world (or differentiate it    mores. (F,SP)                                                  131A. Early Chinese Painting. (4) Three hours of lec-
from them). No previous background is presumed, and                                                                           ture and one hour of discussion per week. The history
students will be introduced to basic art-historical meth-      98. Directed Group Study for Freshmen and                      of Chinese pictorial art and painting from the begin-
ods of viewing and analysis.                                   Sophomores. (1-4) Course may be repeated for                   nings in the late Chou dynasty through the Sung dy-
                                                               credit. Three hours of work per week per unit. Must be         nasty (fourth century B.C. to ca. A.D. 1270), with con-
34. Arts of China. (4) Three hours of lecture and one          taken on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites:
hour of discussion per week. An introduction to the arts                                                                      centration on the later periods (10th-13th centuries).
                                                               Consent of instructor. Instruction for a small group of
of China, designed for newcomers to the history of art         students on a topic initiated by those students. (F,SP)        131B. Later Chinese Painting. (4) Three hours of lec-
or to the study of Chinese culture. Lectures will survey       Staff                                                          ture and one hour of discussion per week. The history
six millennia of Chinese art thematically and chrono-                                                                         of Chinese painting in the Yuan, Ming, and early Ch’ing
logically, including the burial arts of the Neolithic period   Upper Division Courses                                         dynasties (14th-17th centuries).
through the Tang dynasty (4th M. BCE-10th C. CE),
Buddhist and Daoist ritual arts, and painting and cal-         100. Theories and Methods of Art History. (4) Three            134. The Arts of the Japanese Temple. (4) Three
ligraphy. Lectures, readings, and discussions will in-         hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.          hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
troduce students to various systems of Chinese                 How art has been studied in the past and how it is cur-        Primarily the architecture and sculpture of Japanese
thought, modes of visual analysis, and art historical          rently studied, its historiography and methodology.            Buddhist temples, seventh to 13th centuries.
method. (F,SP) Berger                                          Consideration of the earliest writers (Pliny, Vasari) but
                                                               also modern approaches, from traditional style analysis        135A. Early Japanese Painting. (4) Three hours of
35. Art and Architecture in Japan. (4) Three hours of          and connoisseurship through the “founders” of modern           lecture and one hour of discussion per week. The
lecture and one hour of discussion per week. This              art history (Panofsky, Riegl) to more recent ap-               three main topics within a careful survey are Buddhist
course is an introduction to art and architecture in           proaches, e.g. psychoanalysis, feminism, social his-           painting; narrative handscrolls; and painting in the Zen
Japan. It is intended for newcomers to the history of art      tory, anthropology, semiotics, etc.                            milieu.
and/or to the study of Japanese history and culture.                                                                          135B. Later Japanese Painting. (4) Three hours of
Lectures will proceed chronologically, beginning with          104. Gender and Representation. (4) Course may be
                                                               repeated for credit as topic varies. Three hours of lec-       lecture and one hour of discussion per week. There
the archaeological objects and tumuli of neolithic                                                                            are three major themes: decorative screenpainting (in
Japan and ending with the popular graphic arts of the          ture and one hour of discussion per week. A consid-
                                                               eration of historical and theoretical issues posed for vi-     its architectural context); genre painting and ukiyo-e;
17th to 19th centuries and modern transformations of                                                                          and literati painting (bunjin-ga). (SP) Levine
art. (F,SP)                                                    sual media by attention to issues of gender. Previous
                                                               coursework in art history recommended. Detailed de-            136A. The Art of India: Indus Valley Through 550
39. Freshman/Sophomore Seminar. Course may be                  scriptions of current and future offerings available in        A.D.. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of dis-
repeated for credit as topic varies. Seminar format.           room 416 Doe Library.                                          cussion per week. A survey of Indian art from the In-
Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sopho-                                                                          dus civilization through 550 A.D. This class will focus
mores. Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower             108. Cities and the Arts. (4) Course may be repeated
                                                               for credit as topic varies. Three hours of lecture and         on Buddhist architecture and sculpture with emphasis
division students the opportunity to explore an intel-                                                                        on the development of (pictorial) narrative, the evolu-
lectual topic with a faculty member and a group of             one hour of discussion per week. The study of various
                                                               urban centers at particular times in relation to the art       tion of style and iconography and problems of dating.
peers in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are of-
fered in all campus departments; topics vary from de-          produced there. Emphasis may be placed on the rise             136B. The Art of India: 500-1350 A.D. (4) Three
partment to department and from semester to semester.          of artistic centers and professional communities, the          hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
                                                               representation of places of power, learning or recre-          A survey of Hindu sculpture and architecture in India
41. Introduction to Greek and Roman Art. (4) Three             ation, the construction of urbanity, the reaction to cities,   from the sixth to 14th centuries. (F,SP)
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.          etc. Detailed descriptions of current and future offer-
An introduction to the major works, themes, and agen-          ings available in room 416 Doe Library.                        136C. The Art of India: 1350 A.D. to the Present. (4)
das of Greek and Roman art and architecture. Par-                                                                             Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per
ticipants will learn to acquire the perceptual and criti-      C120A. The Art of Ancient Mesopotamia: 3500-                   week. A selective survey of major developments in
cal skills necessary for understanding these works; to         1000 BCE. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of           Muslim and Rajput painting from 1350 to the present.
analyze and interpret them; and to relate them to              discussion per week. The art and architecture of early
                                                               Mesopotamia will be explored in terms of the social,           137. The Art of Southeast Asia. (4) Three hours of
broader visual traditions, historical contexts, and so-                                                                       lecture and one hour of discussion per week. The art
cial/cultural issues. Wherever possible, newly dis-            political, and cultural context of ancient Sumer, Baby-
                                                               lonia, and Assyria during the period of urbanization and       of Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand, Burma, and Indonesia
covered work will be illustrated and discussed. (F,SP)                                                                        focusing on the period from 400 to 1500 A.D. Sculp-
Stewart                                                        early kingdoms. The course provides an integrated pic-
                                                               ture of the arts of Mesopotamia and neighboring re-            ture and architecture will be considered as a balance
51. Introduction to Medieval Art. (4) Three hours of           gions from 3500-1000 BCE with an emphasis on the               of Indian and indigenous elements.
lecture and one hour of discussion per week. A se-             development of visual narrative, the use of art in the         C140. Minoan and Mycenaean Art. (4) Three hours
lective, thematic exploration of the visual arts from the      expression of authority and legitimacy, and artistic in-       of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. This
decline of the Roman empire to the beginnings of Early         terconnections between cultures. Collections on cam-           course analyzes the art, architecture, and archaeology
Modern period. The emergence of new artistic media,            pus or in the area will be incorporated whenever pos-          of prehistoric Greece, concentrating on the Minoan and
subject matter, and strategies of making and viewing           sible. Also listed as Near Eastern Studies C120A.              Mycenaean palatial arts of the Bronze Age (3000-1200
will be discussedagainst the ever-shifting historical cir-                                                                    BCE). The evocative yet still enigmatic remains of
cumstances of medieval Europe. Emphasis will be                C120B. The Art of Ancient Mesopotamia: 1000-330
                                                                                                                              palaces and funerary complexes, frescoes and vase
placed on the methods of interpreting the works, es-           BCE. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of dis-
                                                                                                                              paintings, and precious worked pieces will be closely
pecially in relation to then-current social practices and      cussion per week. The royal art and architecture of
                                                                                                                              examined in terms of their forms and cultural contexts.
cultural values. (F,SP)                                        later Mesopotamia will be explored in terms of the so-
                                                                                                                              The place of prehistoric Greece in the international
                                                               cial, political, and cultural context of the great empires
                                                                                                                              world of the eastern Mediterranean will also be ex-
62. Introduction to Italian Renaissance Art. (4) Four          of Assyria, Babylon, and Persia. The course provides
                                                                                                                              plored. Also listed as Near Eastern Studies C129.
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.          an integrated picture of the arts of Mesopotamia and
Using a few selected examples drawn from Florence,             neighboring regions from 1000-330 BCE with an em-              141. The Art of Ancient Greece. Three hours of lec-
Rome, Milan, and Venice, this course will introduce            phasis on the development of visual narrative, the use         ture and one hour of discussion per week. In addition
most types of art and architecture produced in the Ital-       of art in the expression of authority and legitimacy, and      to close study of the major works, particular emphasis
ian Renaissance—including city squares, churches,              artistic interconnections between cultures. Collections        upon their cultural context and upon key issues such
palaces and libraries, and their painted and sculptural        on campus or in the area will be incorporated when-            as narrative strategies, gender and the body, modes of
decoration. Special attention will be paid to various ap-      ever possible. Also listed as Near Eastern Studies             address in sculpture and painting, political propaganda
proaches used in interpreting works of art.                    C120B.                                                         in art, and the rise of the creative artist. Special at-


       B prefix=language course for business majors                   R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                     *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                   AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                  †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                         requirement
130 / Art and History of Art
tention, wherever possible, will be paid to newly-dis-      cerns (realism, optics) and social issues (domestic val-     sideration of major issues in European and American
covered work.                                               ues, poverty and wealth, colonialism, national identity).    post-war art to the present day. Emphases include
                                                                                                                         conceptual, video, and performance art, as well as tra-
141A. Archaic Greek Art and Architecture (750-480           173. The Age of Rubens. (4) Three hours of lecture
                                                                                                                         ditional media.
B.C.). (4) The early development of the major genres        and one hour of discussion per week. The culture of
of Greek art in the era of the emerging city-states.        early 17th-century Europe as it was known (and cre-          187B. Problems in 20th-Century Sculpture. (4)
                                                            ated) by Sir Peter Paul Rubens, painter, scholar, and        Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per
141B. Classical Greek Art and Architecture (500-320         diplomat. Begins in Flanders and travels (with Rubens)       week. An examination of key issues, artists, and
B.C.). (4) The maturity of the major genres of Greek art    to Italy, Spain, France and England, examining politics,     works, including sculpture and primitivism, sculpture in
in Periclean Athens and the other leading centers.          religion and visual culture in each place. Key issues in-    mass society, sculpture, the body, and the surreal. Pre-
141C. Hellenistic Art and Architecture (330-30 B.C.).       clude the concept of artistic tradition; art and politics;   vious coursework in history of art recommended.
(4) A survey of the major genres of Greek art in the        crafting social status; workshop practice.
                                                                                                                         C189. The American Forest: Its Ecology, History,
Hellenic world from Italy to India.                         180A. 19th Century Europe: Age of Revolution. (4)            and Representation. (4) Three hours of lecture and
145. Roman Art. (4) Four hours of lecture per week.         Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per        one hour of discussion per week. The American forest
The art of Rome and of the Roman Empire, from its           week. Topics in late 18th- and early 19th-century Eu-        will be examined in terms of its ecology, history, and
sources in the Republican era to the Age of Con-            ropean art, either focusing on a pertinent theme and/or      representations in paintings, photographs, and literary
stantine the Great.                                         nation (e.g. Romanticism and gender in France) or in-        essays. This examination seeks to understand the
                                                            troducing the art of Europe as a whole during this tu-       American forest in its scientific and economic param-
151. Art in Late Antiquity. (4) Four hours of lecture       multuous period of revolution and reaction.                  eters, as well as the historic, social, and ideological di-
per week. Imperial art from Gallienus through the col-                                                                   mensions which have contributed to the evolution of
                                                            180B. Nineteenth-Century Europe: Realism and
lapse of the western empire. Christian art from the                                                                      our present attitudes toward the forest. Also listed as
                                                            Modernity. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of
beginning around 200 through the age of Justinian.                                                                       Undergrad Interdisciplinary Studies C136, Environ Sci,
                                                            discussion per week. The visual arts in Europe in the
Revivals in the seventh and eighth centuries. A look                                                                     Policy, and Management C191, and American Studies
                                                            mid-19th century, with reference to the capitalist city
back from the court of Charlemagne and contemporary                                                                      C112F. (F,SP) Lovell, McBride
                                                            and its environs. May focus on Paris, or on Paris’s ri-
Constantinople.
                                                            valry with other European centers.                           190. Special Topics in Fields of Art History. Course
156A. Gothic Art in Northern Europe: 1150-1270.             180C. Nineteenth-Century Europe: The Invention of
                                                                                                                         may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture and
(4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion       Avant-Gardes. (4) Three hours of lecture and one
                                                                                                                         one hour of discussion per week. Topics explore
per week. Gothic art and architecture from its origins                                                                   themes and problems, often reflect current research in-
                                                            hour of discussion per week. Visual arts in the later
in France about 1130. Emphasis on the related de-                                                                        terests of the instructor, and supplement regular cur-
                                                            19th century. Impressionism and after. The nature of
velopments of architecture, sculpture, and stained                                                                       ricular offerings. Open to all interested students, in-
                                                            avant-garde culture and its relation to emerging con-
glass at the major cathedrals, the impact of the early                                                                   cluding graduate students. Some background in art
                                                            sumer culture. May emphasize Paris, or the struggle
universities and scientific study, and the political role                                                                 history desirable. For specific questions concerning
                                                            for cultural mastery in Europe.
of the visual arts in the early nation states.                                                                           preparation for a 190 course, please see individual
                                                            181. French Art of the 19th Century. (4) Three hours         instructor. Detailed descriptions of current and future
160. Renaissance Art in Florence 1400-1600. (4)             of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. For-         offerings in this series available in 416 Doe Library.
Four hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per        merly 182. Introduction to French art from the Revo-         (F,SP)
week. A selective survey of major developments in Flo-      lution to the First World War. Proceeds chronologically,
rentine Renaissance painting, sculpture, and archi-         putting visual art in the context of French political and    190A. Asian. (4)
tecture organized by genre. Particular emphasis on the      social development.                                          190AC. Special Topics in American Art and Cul-
relationship between art and religion and the ideology
                                                            182. Histories of Photography. (4) Three hours of            tures. (4) Course may be repeated for credit. Three
of Florentine republicanism and ducal absolutism. Is-
                                                            lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Formerly        hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
sues of gender, the status of artists, and the function,
                                                            188. Topics in 19th- and 20th-century histories of pho-      Topics explore themes and problems, often reflect cur-
audience, and patronage of art will also be considered.
                                                            tography; for example, photography in relation to mod-       rent research interests of the instructor, and supple-
161. Renaissance Art in Rome 1400-1600. (4) Four            ernism, gender, pictorial genres, or consumerism.            ment regular curricular offerings. Open to all interested
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.                                                                    students, including graduate students. Some back-
A selective survey of major developments in Roman           183. Art and Colonialism. (4) Three hours of lecture         ground in art history desirable. For specific questions
Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture or-       and one hour of discussion per week. Consideration of        concerning preparation for a 190AC course, please
ganized by genre. Particular emphasis on the rela-          the relationship between visual representation and           see individual instructor. Detailed descriptions of cur-
tionship between art and religion and the ideology of a     conquest, colonialism and imperialism. Topics include        rent and future offerings available in 416 Doe Library.
theocratic papacy. Issues of gender, the status of          the history of visual ethnographies, representations         This course satisfies the American Cultures require-
artists, and the function, audience, and patronage of       and constructions of “race,” exoticism, orientalism, and     ment. (F,SP) Staff
art will also be considered.                                primitivism.
                                                                                                                         190B. Ancient. (4)
162. Renaissance Art in Venice 1400-1600. (4) Four          185A. American Art (1800-Present). (4) Three hours
                                                            of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Look-        190C. Medieval. (4)
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
A selective survey of major developments in Venetian        ing at major developments in architecture, decorative        190D. 15th-16th Century. (4)
Renaissance painting, sculpture, and architecture or-       arts, photography, and painting from Romanticism to
                                                            post-modernism, this course addresses art and its so-        190E. 17th-18th Century. (4)
ganized by genre. Particular emphasis on the rela-
tionship between art and religion and the ideology of       cial context over the last two centuries in what is now      190F. 19th-20th Century. (4)
the Venetian commune. Issues of gender, the status of       the United States. Issues include patronage, audience,
artists, and the function, audience, and patronage of       technology, and the education of the artist as well as       190G. American/British. (4)
art will also be considered.                                style and cultural expression. Field trips.
                                                                                                                         190H. Precolumbian/Latin American. (4)
166. Van Eyck to Brueghel. (4) Three hours of lecture       185B. American Architecture: Domestic Forms. (4)
                                                                                                                         192. Undergraduate Seminar: Problems in Re-
and one hour of discussion per week. The great age of       Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per
                                                                                                                         search and Interpretation. Course may be repeated
Netherlandish art, from its roots in manuscript illumi-     week. Taking as a point of departure specific exem-
                                                                                                                         for credit. Three hours of seminar per week plus ex-
nation through the masters of panel painting (Van           plary houses, both vernacular and high-style archi-
                                                                                                                         tensive outside work. Prerequisites: Primarily for juniors
Eyck, Van der Weyden, Bosch, Brueghel) up to the            tectural forms are studied from the perspectives of the
                                                                                                                         and seniors in the major or consent of instructor. Con-
time of the iconoclasm of 1566. Focus on the relation       history of style, of technology and of social use. Both
                                                                                                                         centration on specific problems or works in a particu-
of painting to the beholder; iconic vs. narrative images;   the class as a whole and the student research projects
                                                                                                                         lar area of art history. Assigned readings, discussion,
rise of genres; art’s expression of social and economic     take a case-study approach. Field trips.
                                                                                                                         and a substantial paper. For specific topics and en-
ideals; and class and gender issues.                        186A. Art in the Early 20th Century. (4) Three hours         rollment, see listings outside 416 Doe Library.
                                                            of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Pri-
170. Southern Baroque Art. (4) Three hours of lec-                                                                       192A. Asian. (4)
                                                            marily Europe. May focus on a particular place and pe-
ture and one hour of discussion per week. The major
                                                            riod (e.g., Art in Paris, 1900-1914, or Art and the First    192AC. Undergraduate Seminar: Folk Art in Amer-
artists (among them Caravaggio, Bernini, Velazquez,
                                                            World War) or on a major artistic problem (e.g., Ab-         ica. (4) Three hours of seminar per week plus exten-
and Poussin) and the major concerns (including gen-
                                                            straction and Figuration).                                   sive outside work. Prerequisites: Primarily for juniors
res such as history painting, landscape, low-life, and
notions of imitation and illusionism) of seventeenth                                                                     and seniors in the major or consent of instructor. This
                                                            186B. Art in the Mid-20th Century. (4) Three hours
century art in Italy, France, and Spain.                                                                                 seminar will look at specific case studies of the pro-
                                                            of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Art be-
                                                                                                                         duction and use of architecture, paintings, and quilting
                                                            tween the world wars and in the later 1940s and
172. The Dutch Golden Age. (4) Three hours of lec-                                                                       within specific communities in what is now the United
                                                            1950s. The focus may be on Europe or on Europe-
ture and one hour of discussion per week. The rise of                                                                    States. We will look, for instance, at Shaker water-
                                                            U.S. interaction. The culture of the avant-garde, art and
a rich visual culture in 17th-century Holland that ex-                                                                   colors and design; Puritan painting and city planning;
                                                            politics in the age of Lenin and Hitler, etc.
pressed the ideals, aspirations, and identity of the first                                                                Amish, Hawaiian, and Hmong quilting; the ledger draw-
bourgeois capitalist society. Rembrandt, Vermeer, and       186C. Art in the Later 20th Century. (4) Three hours         ings and domestic structures of specific Native Amer-
others in the context of contemporary aesthetic con-        of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. A con-       ican groups; and the sacred architecture of the His-
                                                                                                                                       Art and History of Art / 131

panic southwest. Our timeframe spans four centuries         for credit. Three hours of seminar per week. Prereq-       work. May be taken for 2.0 units on a satisfactory/un-
but our “geographies” will be very focused. We will         uisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.      satisfactory basis with consent of instructor. Prereq-
consider vernacular or folk production within the con-      An introduction to the fundamentals of art history, in-    uisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
text of politics and economics as well as aesthetic and     cluding traditional and innovative perspectives de-
                                                                                                                       260. Seminar in Italian Renaissance Art. (2,4)
social theory. This course satisfies the American Cul-       signed for candidates for higher degrees. Offerings
                                                                                                                       Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of
tures requirement. (F,SP) Lovell                            vary from year to year. Students should consult the de-
                                                                                                                       seminar per week plus extensive outside work. May be
                                                            partment’s “Announcement of Classes” for offerings
192B. Ancient. (4)                                                                                                     taken for 2.0 units on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory ba-
                                                            before the beginning of the semester.
                                                                                                                       sis with consent of instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate
192C. Medieval. (4)
                                                            203. Seminar in Material Culture: The Interpretation       standing and consent of instructor.
192D. 15th-16th Century. (4)                                of Objects. (2,4) Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                       262. Seminar in European Art. (2,4) Course may be
                                                            Three hours of seminar per week plus extensive out-
192E. 17th-18th Century. (4)                                                                                           repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per week
                                                            side work. This seminar looks at both material culture
                                                                                                                       plus extensive outside work. May be taken for 2 units
192F. 19th-20th Century. (4)                                theory and the practice of interpreting objects in the
                                                                                                                       on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with consent of
                                                            West and in Asia. It draws on the practices and in-
192G. American/British. (4)                                                                                            instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and con-
                                                            quiries of multiple disciplines including archaeology,
                                                                                                                       sent of instructor.
192H. Museum Studies. (4)                                   anthropology, cultural geography, and art history. We
                                                            will consider the variety of ways and contexts in which    270. Seminar in Baroque Art. (2,4) Course may be
193. Directed Research. (4) Prerequisites: Consent          objects have been understood to “speak” as aesthetic       repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per week
of instructor and departmental adviser. Intended for ad-    vehicles and as cultural texts. Taught by two faculty      plus extensive outside work. May be taken for 2.0 units
vanced undergraduates wishing to continue research          members who have extensive experience as museum            on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with consent of
on topics already begun in a lecture or seminar or to       curators—one of American Art, the other of Asian Art,      instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and con-
pursue at a high level specialized topics not ordinarily    this class will combine theory with hands-on learning.     sent of instructor.
covered in the curriculum. Usually results in a sub-        (F,SP) Berger, Lovell
stantial paper. For general independent study see 199;                                                                 281. Seminar in 19th-Century Art. (2,4) Course may
for honors research, see H195.                              C204. Proseminar in Classical Archaeology and              be repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per
                                                            Ancient Art. (4) Three hours of seminar per week.          week plus extensive outside work. May be taken for
194. Museum Internship. (4) Course may be re-               Prerequisites: Working knowledge of Latin, Greek, and      2.0 units on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with
peated for credit. Ten hours of fieldwork per week plus      German or French or Italian. This seminar is intended      consent of instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate stand-
conferences. Must be taken on a passed/not passed           to introduce graduate students—both archaeologists         ing and consent of instructor.
basis. Prerequisites: Approval of undergraduate ad-         and non-archaeologists—to the discipline of classical
viser; 192H recommended. Study and practical pro-           archaeology, history, and evolution, and its research      285. Seminar in 20th-Century Art. (2,4) Course may
fessional experience, usually for no fewer than 10          tools and bibliography. Since it is both impossible and    be repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per
hours per week, involving a substantial project of a cu-    undesirable to attempt to cover the entire discipline in   week plus extensive outside work. May be taken for
ratorial nature. Jointly supervised by a member of the      one semester, after two introductory lectures on the       2.0 units on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with
professional staff of the participating museum and a        history of the field, we will address a selection of top-   consent of instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate stand-
faculty member. Internships ordinarily must be ar-          ics that seems representative of its concerns. Also        ing and consent of instructor.
ranged well in advance; for further information, inquire    listed as Classics C204. (SP) Hallett, Stewart             286. Seminar in 20th-Century Painting and Sculp-
at 416 Doe Library. (F,SP)
                                                            230. Seminar in Chinese Art. (2,4) Course may be           ture. (2,4) Course may be repeated for credit. Three
H195. Special Study for Honors Candidates in the            repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per week       hours of seminar per week plus extensive outside
History of Art. (4) Individual conferences and thesis.      plus extensive outside work. May be taken for 2.0 units    work. May be taken for 2.0 units on a satisfactory/un-
Prerequisites: Senior standing and qualifying scholas-      on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with consent of     satisfactory basis with consent of instructor. Prereq-
tic record (3.5 GPA overall and 3.5 GPA in upper di-        instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and con-      uisites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
vision courses completed in the major). Directed study      sent of instructor.                                        289. Seminar in American Art. (2,4) Course may be
leading to the completion of the honors thesis. Consult
                                                            234. Seminar in Japanese Art. (2,4) Course may be          repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per week
the description of the Honors Program in Art History.
                                                            repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per week       plus extensive outside work. May be taken for 2.0 units
C196W. Special Field Research. (10.5) Course may            plus extensive outside work. May be taken for 2.0 units    on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with consent of
be repeated for a maximum of 12 units. 240-300 hours        on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with consent of     instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and con-
of work per semester plus regular meetings with the         instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and con-      sent of instructor.
faculty supervisor. Students work in selected internship    sent of instructor.                                        290. Special Topics in Fields of Art History. (2,4)
programs approved in advance by the faculty coordi-
                                                            236. Seminar in the Art of India. (2,4) Course may         Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of
nator and for which written contracts have been es-
                                                            be repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per         seminar per week plus extensive outside work. Two
tablished between the sponsoring organization and the
                                                            week plus extensive outside work. May be taken for         units to be graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory ba-
student. Students will be expected to produce two
                                                            2.0 units on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with      sis with consent of instructor. Four units to be graded
progress reports for their faculty coordinator during the
                                                            consent of instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate stand-      on a letter-grade basis. Prerequisites: Graduate stand-
course of the internship, as well as a final paper for the
                                                            ing and consent of instructor.                             ing and consent of instructor. Topics explore themes
course consisting of at least 35 pages. Other restric-
                                                                                                                       and problems, often reflect current research interests
tions apply; see faculty adviser. Also listed as Gender
                                                            240. Seminar in Greek Art. (2,4) Course may be re-         of the instructor, and supplement regular curricular of-
and Women’s Studies C196W, Undergrad Interdisci-
                                                            peated for credit. Three hours of seminar per week         ferings. Detailed descriptions of current and future of-
plinary Studies C196W, Mass Communications C196W,
                                                            plus extensive outside work. May be taken for 2.0 units    ferings available in 416 Doe Library. (F,SP)
History C196W, Political Economy of Industrial Soc
                                                            on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with consent of
C196W, Political Science C196W, and Sociology
                                                            instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and con-      291. Judith Stronach Graduate Travel Seminar in
C196W.
                                                            sent of instructor.                                        Art History. (4) Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                       Three hours of seminar per week plus two to three
198. Supervised Group Study. (1-4) Course may be
                                                            244. Seminar in Roman Art. (2,4) Course may be re-         weeks of travel to a selected area or site. Prerequi-
repeated for credit. Tutorial. Must be taken on a
                                                            peated for credit. Three hours of seminar per week         sites: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Consent of in-
                                                            plus extensive outside work. May be taken for 2.0 units    This course explores site-specific themes, topics, and
structor. Instruction for a small group of students on a
                                                            on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with consent of     problems, reflects current research interests of the in-
topic initiated by those students. (F,SP) Staff
                                                            instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and con-      structor(s), and suppplements regular curricular of-
199. Supervised Independent Study. (1-4) Course             sent of instructor.                                        ferings. Detailed descriptions of current and (where
may be repeated for credit. Individual conferences.                                                                    known) future offerings available in 416 Doe Library.
                                                            254. Seminar in Early Medieval Art. (2,4) Course
Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Pre-                                                                       (SP) Staff
                                                            may be repeated for credit. Three hours of seminar per
requisites: Consent of instructor, major adviser and de-
                                                            week plus extensive outside work. May be taken for         296. Directed Dissertation Research. (3-12) Course
partment chair. For students wishing to pursue an in-
                                                            2.0 units on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis with      may be repeated for credit. Independent study. Must
terest not represented in the curriculum by developing
                                                            consent of instructor. Prerequisites: Graduate stand-      be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Inde-
an individual program of study supervised by a faculty
                                                            ing and consent of instructor.                             pendent study open to qualified students directly en-
member. Study may involve readings, projects, papers,
                                                                                                                       gaged upon the doctoral dissertation. (F,SP)
fieldwork, etc. For continuing or advanced research          257. Seminar in Romanesque and and Gothic Art.
projects, see 193.                                          (2,4) Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours       299. Special Study for Graduate Students in the
                                                            of seminar per week plus extensive outside work. May       History of Art. (1-12) Course may be repeated for
Graduate Courses
                                                            be taken for 2.0 units on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory    credit. Individual conferences. Must be taken on a sat-
General prerequisites: Graduate standing and con-           basis with consent of instructor. Prerequisites: Grad-     isfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Graduate
sent of the instructor, and possibly courses in the         uate standing and consent of instructor.                   standing and consent of instructor. (F,SP)
history of art and reading knowledge of languages.
                                                            258. Seminar in Late Medieval Art in Northern Eu-          601. Individual Study for Master’s Students in the
200. Graduate Proseminar in the Interpretation of           rope. (2,4) Course may be repeated for credit. Three       History of Art. (1-12) Course may be repeated for
Art Historical Materials. (4) Course may be repeated        hours of seminar per week plus extensive outside           credit. Course does not satisfy unit or residence re-


       B prefix=language course for business majors                R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                 *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures              †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                      requirement
132 / Art and History of Art
quirements for master’s degree. Individual confer-           Upper Division. Ethnic Studies 101A, 101B, and              per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half
ences. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory        103; completion of four elective courses from Asian         hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two
basis. Prerequisites: For candidates for master’s de-        American Studies: 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125,             hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.
gree. Individual study in consultation with the graduate     126, 127, 129, 130, 131, 141, 142, 145, 146, 150,           Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five
adviser. (F,SP)                                              151, 165, 171, 172, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180,           weeks. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not
602. Individual Study for Doctoral Students in the
                                                             181, 183, 190, 190AC; Asian American Studies                passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-
History of Art. (1-12) Course may be repeated for
                                                             197 (4 units cumulative).                                   grade basis. Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.
                                                                                                                         Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses of-
credit. Course does not satisfy unit or residence re-        Honors. The Asian American Studies Program                  fered by faculty members in departments all across the
quirements for doctoral degree. Individual conferences.      provides an option leading to the A.B. degree with          campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for
Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.        honors. To be recommended for honors, students              close, regular intellectual contact between faculty
Prerequisites: For candidates for doctoral degree. In-       must have (1) completed at least 30 units and two           members and students in the crucial second year. The
dividual study, in consultation with the graduate ad-        semesters with grade-point averages of at least 3.3         topics vary from department to department and
viser, intended to provide an opportunity for qualified       for all work undertaken in the Asian American Stud-         semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sopho-
students to prepare themselves for the various ex-           ies Program, and (2) been approved specifically for          mores. (F,SP)
aminations required of candidates for the Ph.D. de-          honors by the Department of Ethnic Studies chair
gree. (F,SP)                                                 and the Asian American Studies coordinator upon             97. Field Studies in Asian American Communities.
Professional Courses                                         recommendation by the faculty adviser for the ma-           (1-3) Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours
                                                             jor. Honors students must complete H195, the se-            of fieldwork per week per unit. Must be taken on a
300. Teaching the History of Art. (1-5) Course may           nior honors seminar for Asian American studies              passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Restricted to
be repeated for credit. Must be taken on a satisfac-         majors. To graduate with an A.B. with honors, stu-          freshmen and sophomores; consent of instructor. Uni-
tory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Graduate           dents must obtain at least a 3.3 GPA for all course-        versity organized and supervised field program in-
standing and concurrent appointment as a graduate            work undertaken at the University.                          volving experiences in schools, school-related activi-
student instructor. Weekly meetings with the instructor                                                                  ties, community and community-related activities.
to discuss the methods and aims of the course, to plan                                                                   (F,SP)
the content and presentation of the material for the dis-    The Minor
cussion sections, and to set standards and criteria for                                                                  98. Supervised Group Study. (1-3) Course may be
grading and commenting upon papers and exams. In             Requirements. Five elective courses from Asian              repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-
addition, after visiting sections early in the semester,     American Studies 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125,              troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-
the instructor will discuss with each GSI individually his   126, 127, 129, 130, 131, 141, 142, 145, 146, 150,           alog. Three hours of work per week per unit. Must be
or her performance and make any necessary recom-             151, 165, 171, 172, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180,           taken on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites:
mendations for improvement.                                  181, 183, 190, 190AC.                                       Restricted to freshmen and sophomores; consent of
                                                                                                                         instructor. Group study of selected topics which will
                                                             Lower Division Courses                                      vary from semester to semester. (F,SP)

Asian American                                               R2A. Reading and Composition. (4) Three hours of
                                                             lecture and one hour of tutorial per week. Prerequi-
                                                                                                                         99. Supervised Independent Study and Research.
                                                                                                                         (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is
Studies                                                      sites: 1, UC Entry Level Writing Requirement or equiv-
                                                             alent. Formerly 2A. Through the study of the literary,
                                                                                                                         restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-
                                                                                                                         ricula section of this catalog. Three hours of inde-
(College of Letters and Science)                             political, social and psychological dimensions of rep-      pendent study per week per unit. Must be taken on a
                                                             resentative works of Asian American literature, this        passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Consent of in-
Program Office: 506 Barrows Hall, (510) 643-0796              course introduces students to close textual analysis,       structor. Individual research on a topic which leads to
ethnicstudies.berkeley.edu                                   fosters critical judgment, and reinforces academic writ-
Chair: Beatriz Manz, Ph.D.                                                                                               the writing of a major paper. Regular meetings with
                                                             ing skills. Satisfies the first half of the Reading and       faculty sponsor. (F,SP) Staff
Professors                                                   Composition requirement. (F,SP)
Evelyn N. Glenn, Ph.D.                                                                                                   Upper Division Courses
Elaine H. Kim, Ph.D.                                         R2B. Reading and Composition. (4) Three hours of
Sau-ling C. Wong, Ph.D.                                      lecture and one hour of tutorial per week. Prerequi-        120. Comparative History of Asian American Ex-
†Ronald T. Takaki (Emeritus), Ph.D.
                                                             sites: 2A, English 1A or equivalent. Formerly 2B. This      periences in America. (4) Three hours of seminar per
Associate Professors                                         course examines literary works by Asian American,           week. Prerequisites: 20A or equivalent. Analysis of the
Catherine C. Choy, Ph.D.                                     African American, Chicano, and Native American writ-        similarities and dissimilarities of the Asian experience
†Michael A. Omi, Ph.D.
Khatharya Um, Ph.D.                                          ers in their political and social contexts, focusing on     in America; methods of comparative approach to Asian
L. Ling-chi Wang (Emeritus), M.A.                            similarities and differences between the experiences        American history; common Asian experiences in areas
Lecturers                                                    of ethnic minorities in the U.S. Emphasis is on literary    such as immigration, labor, economic development,
Anna Leong, M.A.                                             interpretation and sustained analytical writing. Satisfies   race relations, community institutions and develop-
Jerrold H. Takahashi, Ph.D.                                  the second half of the Reading and Composition re-          ment. Occupational patterns will be analyzed and com-
                                                             quirement. (F,SP)                                           pared. (SP)
Undergraduate Major Adviser: Mr. St. Germaine.               20A. Introduction to the History of Asians in the           121. Chinese American History. (4) Three hours of
                                                             United States. (4) Three hours of lecture and one           lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prereq-
Undergraduate Program                                        hour of discussion per week. Introductory comparative       uisites: 20A or equivalent. Chinese American history,
                                                             analysis of the Asian American experience from 1848         1848 to present. Topics include influence of traditional
The Asian American Studies Program offers a                  to present. Topics include an analysis of the Asian         values, Eastern and Western; patterns of immigration
unified and comprehensive undergraduate cur-                  American perspective; cultural roots; immigration and       and settlement; labor history; the influence of public
riculum which seeks to make at least three major             settlement patterns; labor, legal, political, and social    policy, foreign and domestic, on the Chinese individual
contributions. First, it prepares students for posi-         history. (F,SP)                                             and community. (SP)
tions of service and leadership in Asian American                                                                        122. Japanese American History. (4) Three hours of
                                                             20B. Introduction to the Contemporary Issues in
communities. To do this, the program draws heav-                                                                         lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prereq-
                                                             the Asian American Communities. (4) Three hours
ily on the curricula of such schools and depart-                                                                         uisites: 20A or equivalent. This course will be pre-
                                                             of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. An in-
ments as Education, Public Health, Law, and So-                                                                          sented as a proseminar with selected topics in order to
                                                             troduction to Asian American communities and the so-
ciology. The program itself offers instruction in                                                                        give students an opportunity to participate in the dy-
                                                             cial, economic, and political issues they confront. The
those areas relating to the special needs of Asian                                                                       namics of the study of Japanese American history.
                                                             diverse range of communities, both suburban and ur-
American communities. Second, the program ex-                                                                            Topics include immigration, anti-Japanese racism, la-
                                                             ban, will be surveyed and situated within a domestic
plores the hitherto neglected aspects of the cul-                                                                        bor, concentration camps, agriculture, art and literature,
                                                             and global context. (F)
tural, political, and historical experience of Asians                                                                    and personality and culture. (SP)
in America. In doing so, it provides the under-              39. Freshman/Sophomore Seminar. Course may be
graduate with thorough instruction on the experi-            repeated for credit as topic varies. Seminar format.        123. Korean American History. (4) Three hours of
ence of Asians in the United States, and prepares            Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sec-     lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prereq-
students for graduate work in their own and allied           tions 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.        uisites: 20A or equivalent. Koreans in America from
fields. Third, the program broadens the curriculum            Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sopho-        1876 to the present. Topics include comparative im-
at Berkeley to include instruction which reflects the         mores. Freshman and sophomore seminars offer lower          migration and settlement patterns; labor and socio-eco-
conditions of Asians and other Third World people            division students the opportunity to explore an intel-      nomic life; political activities; community organization;
living in America.                                           lectual topic with a faculty member and a group of peers    and issues related to the contemporary population
                                                             in a small-seminar setting. These seminars are offered      influx. (SP)
                                                             in all campus departments; topics vary from department
Major Requirements                                           to department and from semester to semester.                124. Filipino American History. (4) Three hours of
                                                                                                                         lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prereq-
Lower Division. Ethnic Studies 10A, 10B; Asian               84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-              uisites: 20A or equivalent. Topics include conse-
American Studies 20A, 20B.                                   peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar      quences of the Spanish-American War on Pilipino em-
                                                                                                                                         Asian American Studies / 133

igration; conditions in Hawaii and California and the         150. Gender and Generation in Asian American                  placement; gender, nation-state and subjecthook; mul-
need for Pilipino labor; community development;               Families. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of          tiple migrations; constructions of home; postcolonial,
changing relations between the U.S. and the Philip-           discussion per week. Prerequisites: 20A or 20B. The           postmodernist, diasporic, and globalized views of
pines; effects of independence movement and World             influence of cultural legacy, ethnic background, im-           transnational movement. (F,SP)
War II on Pilipino Americans; and contemporary is-            migration history, community structure, class and eco-
sues. (F,SP)                                                  nomic status, and racism on gender and generational           180. Chinese-Language Literature and Film on the
                                                              relations in the Asian American family. (SP)                  Immigrant Experience. (4) Three hours of lecture and
125. Contemporary Issues of Southeast Asian                                                                                 one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Read-
Refugees in the U.S. (4) Three hours of lecture and           151. Asian American Women: Theory and Experi-                 ing knowledge of Chinese; consent of instructor. An-
one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 20A or        ence. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of dis-         alyzes representations of the life of Chinese immi-
equivalent. This course will introduce students to the        cussion per week. Prerequisites: 20A or 20B. Exam-            grants in the U.S. in Chinese-language literature and
sociocultural, economic, educational, and political is-       ines the historical and contemporary experiences of           film since the early 20th century, with emphasis on
sues facing Southeast Asian refugees in the U.S.              Asian American women in relation to work, sexuality,          1960s and beyond. All readings in Chinese; lectures
While the course focus is on the Asian American ex-           intellectual and artistic activity, and family and com-       primarily in English; in-class discussion and written as-
perience, references will be made to the pre-migration        munity life as well as the development of Asian Amer-         signments in either Chinese or English. (F,SP)
experiences and histories of the Southeast Asian              ican feminist thought and its relation to cultural na-
                                                              tionalism. (SP)                                               181. Chinese American Literature. (4) Three hours
refugee groups. The processes and problems in the
                                                                                                                            of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Pre-
formulation of refugee programs and services in the           165. Research Methodologies in Asian American                 requisites: Consent of instructor. Analyzes literary rep-
U.S. also will be addressed in their implications for         Communities. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour          resentations of contemporary and/or historical expe-
refugee resettlement and adaptation experience. Em-           of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 20A or 20B. Ap-        riences of Chinese Americans; genre, formal, and
phasis will be placed on comparative analyses of the          proaches to research in the Asian American commu-             stylistic features; definition of cultural identity and de-
Southeast Asian refugee communities. (F,SP)                   nity with emphasis on the San Francisco Bay Area.             velopment of literary tradition. Primarily English-lan-
126. Southeast Asian Migration and Community                  Problems of research design, measurement, and data            guage works, some translations from Chinese. (F,SP)
Formation. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of         collection, processing,and analysis will be considered.
                                                              (SP)                                                          183. Korean American Literature. (4) Three hours of
discussion per week. Prerequisites: 20A or equivalent.                                                                      lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prereq-
This course will examine Southeast Asian migration            171. Asian Americans in Film and Video. (4) Three             uisites: Consent of instructor. Critical readings of ma-
and resettlement in the U.S. in the context of the            hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.         jor Korean American literary work, including autobi-
United States involvement in Vietnam, Laos, and Cam-          Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Introduces stu-         ography and personal memoir, autobiographical fiction,
bodia during the Vietnam War. It will also address the        dents to films and videos by and about Asian Ameri-            poetry, short stories and novel, with attention to con-
post-war “legacies” and their impact on the societies         cans; presents an overview of the development of the          ditions surrounding the production and consumption of
and politics of the three countries as well as neigh-         Asian American media arts field in relation to current         these writings. (F,SP)
boring states in the region. Asylum politics and refugee      cultural theories and American film history and theory.
camp experiences will be addressed in the discussion          (F,SP)                                                        190. Seminar on Advanced Topics in Asian Amer-
of the formation of U.S. resettlement policies and of the                                                                   ican Studies. (4) Course may be repeated for credit
adaptation of Southeast Asian refugees. (F,SP)                172. Asian American Literature. (4) Course may be             as topic varies. Three hours of seminar per week. Pre-
                                                              repeated for credit with different topic. Three hours of      requisites: Consent of instructor. Advanced seminar in
127. South Asian American Historical and Con-                 lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Intro-           Asian American Studies with topics to be announced
temporary Issues. (4) Course may be repeated for              duces students to representative works of Asian Amer-         at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)
credit. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:       ican literature by writers from the major ethnic sub-
20A or equivalent. Examines immigration and social            groups; examines the works in their sociohistorical           190AC. Seminar on Advanced Topics in Asian
history of South Asian Americans from the early 20th          context; analyzes thematic and formal elements in-            American Studies. (4) Course may be repeated for
century to present. Development of South Asian Amer-          tertextually to form a coherent understanding of the          credit as topic varies. Three hours of seminar per
ican communities within the social, political and eco-        Asian American literary tradition. (F,SP)                     week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Advanced
nomic contexts of South Asia and the U.S.                                                                                   seminar in Asian American Studies with topics to be
                                                              175. Contemporary Narratives on the Philippines               announced at the beginning of each semester. This
130. Asian Americans and Foreign Policy. (4) Three            and the United States. (3) Three hours of lecture and         course satisfies the American Cultures requirement.
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.         one hour of discussion per week. The course will ex-          (F,SP)
Prerequisites: 20A or consent of instructor. This course      amine the various strategies of (re-)narrating colo-
is an introduction to the political, economic, and cultural   nial/neocolonial history in three genres: literature (nov-    195. Senior Thesis. (4) Independent study. Prereq-
relations between the United States and Asia and their        els, short fiction, poetry), essays, and films from the         uisites: Consent of instructor. Writing of a thesis under
implications for Asian American communities. In an-           Philippines and the United States. Notions such as im-        the direction of member(s) of the faculty. (F,SP) Staff
alyzing interstate relations, students will gain insight      perialism, nation, narration, history, nationalism, mem-
                                                                                                                            H195A-H195B. Senior Honors Seminar for Asian
into U.S. policies and interests in Asian-Pacific and the      ory, ethnicity, language, power, gender, and subject
                                                                                                                            American Studies Majors. (3;3) Credit and grade to
interplay of internal and external forces that shaped the     formation will be discussed. (F,SP) Staff
                                                                                                                            be awarded on completion of sequence. Prerequisites:
Asian American experience and influenced the emer-                                                                           Approval of faculty committee; 3.3 GPA on all Uni-
                                                              176. Genre in Asian American Literature. (4) Three
gence and development of Asian American commu-                hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.         versity work and a 3.3 GPA in courses in the major.
nities. (F,SP)                                                Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Investigates specific    Formerly H195. Research seminar for senior Asian
141. Law in the Asian American Community. (4)                 genres in Asian American literature (e.g., autobiography,     American studies majors designed to support and
Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per         biography, drama, etc.) in terms of formal characteris-       guide the writing of a senior thesis. (F,SP) Staff
week. Prerequisites: 20A or 20B. Course will examine          tics, innovations, comparisons of works from various
                                                                                                                            197. Field Study in Asian American Communities.
the nature, structure, and operation of selected legal in-    subgroups in relation to counterparts in dominant Anglo-
                                                                                                                            (1-3) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is
stitutions as they affect Asian American communities          American tradition. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                            restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-
and will attempt to analyze the roles and effects of law,     177. Asian American Art: Remapping Modernity:                 ricula section of this catalog. Three hours of fieldwork
class, and race in American society. May be taken with        Art and Artists in the 20th Century. (3) Three hours          per week per unit. Must be taken on a passed/not
197.                                                          of seminar per week. Seminar in contemporary Asian            passed basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Uni-
145. Politics, Public Policy, and Asian American              American visual art, with focus on the politics of pro-       versity organized and supervised field program in-
                                                              duction and reception. Works by such artists as Y.            volving experiences in schools, school-related activi-
Communities. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour
                                                              David Chung, Hung Liu, Yong Soon Min, Long Nguyen,            ties, community, and community-related activities.
of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 20A or 20B. An
                                                              and Manuel Ocampo will be studied. (F,SP)                     (F,SP) Staff
examination of the purpose, power, and function of the
executive, legislative and judicial branches of the fed-      178. Gender and Sexuality in Asian American Lit-              198. Supervised Group Study. (1-3) Course may be
eral government and their relationship to the Asian           erature and Culture. (4) Three hours of lecture and           repeated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-
American community. The course presents a range of            one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Con-          troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-
contemporary issues to illustrate how government in-          sent of instructor. Explores gender/sexuality issues in       alog. Three hours of work per week per unit. Must be
stitutions and the Asian community define issues and           Asian American literature and culture, such as simul-         taken on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites:
respond to political challenges.                              taneous construction of gender/ethnicity/race/culture;        Consent of instructor. Group study of selected topics
                                                              heterosexual (masculinist/feminist) and gay/lesbian cul-      which will vary from semester to semester. (F,SP)
146. Asian Americans and Education. (4) Three
                                                              tural projects; the body; family relations; matrilineal and   Staff
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
                                                              patrilineal traditions. Instructor selects focus. (F,SP)
This course examines the historical and contemporary                                                                        199. Supervised Independent Study and Research.
issues which shape the educational experiences of             179. Transnational Narratives by Asian Americans.             (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is
Asian Americans. Critical issues such as bilingual ed-        (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion         restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-
ucation, university admissions, and the education of          per week. Prerequisites: 20A or 170 and consent of in-        ricula section of this catalog. Three hours of work per
Asian immigrants as well as theoretical models of             structor. Analyzes prose narratives by Asian American         week per unit. Must be taken on a passed/not passed
Asian American academic success will be explored              writers which prominently feature the crossing of na-         basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Individual
and critically analyzed. (SP) Staff                           tional borders; explores sociohistorical factors in dis-      research on a topic which leads to the writing of a ma-


       B prefix=language course for business majors                  R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                    *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                  AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                 †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                        requirement
134 / Asian American Studies
jor paper. Regular meetings with faculty sponsor.           Film 100; History 103F; History of Art 100, 192; Po-     Optional Senior Thesis
(F,SP) Staff                                                litical Science 112A, 112B, 112C, 137A; Sociology
                                                            101A, 101B, 101C, 105.                                   Qualified students may complete a senior thesis
                                                                                                                     approximately 50 pages in length under the su-
Asian Studies                                               3. Other courses (one course must be in the same
                                                            discipline as the theory and methods course).            pervision of the major adviser or other appropriate
                                                                                                                     faculty member. Three units of upper division credit
(College of Letters and Science)                            Please see major adviser to determine appropriate
                                                            courses. Anthropology 123D, 170; Asian Studies           in Asian Studies 196 will be given for completion of
                                                            147, 148, 149; Chinese 101, 102, 120, 122, 132,          the thesis.
Undergraduate Office: 101 Stephens Hall, (510) 643-5814
Graduate Office: 2223 Fulton Street, Room 524,               134, 136, 138, 140, 155, 156, 157, 181A-181B,
(510) 642-0333                                              183, 188; Economics 162, 171; Film 160 (when on
ieas.berkeley.edu/gas
                                                            China); Geography 166; History 100 (when on
                                                                                                                     Honors Program
Chair and Head Adviser: Bonnie C. Wade, Ph.D.
                                                            China), 116A, 116B, 116C; History of Art 130A,           Open to seniors in the group major in Asian Stud-
Advisers
                                                            130B, 131A, 131B, 134; Legal Studies 161; Music          ies whose grade-point average is 3.5 or higher in all
Martin Backstrom (Institute of East Asian Studies)
Andrew Barshay (History)                                    134A; Philosophy 153; Political Science 128, 129C,       university work and 3.6 or higher in the major. The
Munis Faruqui (South and Southeast Asian Studies)           137A, 137B, 143A, 143B, 143C, 144A; Sociology            program consists of completion of Asian Studies
Jeffrey Hadler (South and Southeast Asian Studies)          172, 183, C183.                                          H195A-H195B (3,3), which includes the writing of
Michael Nylan (History)
Robert Sharf (East Asian Languages and Culture / Buddhist   4. History requirement (choose one): History 100         an honors thesis. The honors thesis is expected to
  Studies)                                                                                                           be a substantial research paper, both in its length
Bonnie Wade, Chair (Music)                                  (when on China), 103F (when on China), 116A,
Carolyn Wakeman (Journalism)                                116B, 116C.                                              and originality; it is read by two faculty members.

                                                            Japan
Group Major in Asian Studies                                                                                         Minor Program in Asian Studies
                                                            1. Students must complete two years of Japanese.
The undergraduate group major in Asian studies is           Further study of the language is encouraged and          Students in the College of Letters and Science may
a rigorous but flexible interdisciplinary program de-        will count toward the major unit requirement.            complete one or more minors of their choice, nor-
signed to assist students to take advantage of the          2. Disciplinary theory and methods course (choose        mally in a field both academically and administra-
rich course offerings in the Asian field campuswide          one): Anthropology 114, 125B, 141, 144, 169B,            tively distinct from their major.
in a way that is not available through departments.         171; Economics 100A, 100B, 101A, 101B; Film              There are three minor program options in Asian
Each student’s program is coordinated to assure             100; History 103F; History of Art 100, 192; Lin-         Studies: Chinese studies, Japanese studies, and
deeper knowledge of one East Asian culture and              guistics 111, 115, 123, 124, 125, 140 (when on           Korean studies. These programs give students an
language and also a broad range of inter-area and           Asia), 150; Political Science 112A, 112B, 112C,          introduction to the study of one region of Asia
interdisciplinary perspectives.                             117, 138B; Sociology 101A, 101B, 101C, 105.              through social science and humanities courses.
                                                            3. Other courses (one course must be in the same         Minimum requirements are five upper division
Prerequisite Courses in the Major                           discipline as the theory and methods course).            courses with a C or better in each course. At least
                                                            Please see major adviser to determine appropriate        three of the courses must be completed at Berke-
Students petitioning to enter the group major must          courses. Economics 171; Film 160 (when on                ley; only one may overlap with those credited to the
have completed (grade C or better) the following:           Japan); History 118A, 118B, 118C, 119; History of        student’s major. There is no Asian language re-
                                                            Art 134, 135A, 135B; Japanese 101, 102, 120,             quirement for the minor. Two upper division lan-
1. Asian Studies 10, Introduction to Asia.                                                                           guage/literature courses may be used. For specific
                                                            130, 132, 140, 142, 144, 155, 159, 162 (this course
2. one history course (choose one): History 6A              counts as Linguistics), 182A-182B, 186; Music            courses that satisfy minor requirements, see the
(China, Early empires); History 6B (Modern China);          134A, 134B; Political Science 143A, 143B, 144A.          department.
History 11 (India); History 14 (Japan); SEAsian 10A
Southeast Asia (mainland); SEAsian 10B South-               4. History requirement (choose one): History 100
east Asia (insular).                                        (when on Japan), 103F (when on Japan), 118A,             Graduate Program
                                                            118B, 118C.
                                                                                                                     The Group in Asian Studies offers an M.A. degree
Additional Major Requirements                               The remaining five courses needed to fulfill the 30-       program in Asian studies. Students in the program
                                                            unit requirement may be selected from “other             emphasize one of four areas of Asia: East Asia
Once accepted in the major, the student is ex-              courses” listed above or from the following inter-       (China), Northeast Asia (Japan/Korea), Southeast
pected to select an area focus (Area I—China;               area courses. Three of the five courses must focus        Asia, or South Asia. The group, in cooperation with
Area II—Japan) and a disciplinary cluster within            at least partially on your chosen area focus. At least   the Graduate School of Journalism, the Walter A.
that area. The following coursework is required:            one course must focus on a geographical area you         Haas School of Business, and Boalt Hall, School of
                                                            are not specializing in. Students concentrating on       Law, respectively, also offers a concurrent M.J./
1. Two years of language appropriate to the area            China may choose courses listed under the Japan          M.A. in journalism and Asian studies, and a con-
focus. After the second year, further study of the          focus to fulfill this requirement. Students concen-       current J.D./M.A. in law and Asian studies. The
language at the upper division level is encouraged          trating on Japan may choose courses listed under         group is authorized to award the degree of Doctor
and will count toward the major unit requirement.           the China focus to fulfill this requirement.              of Philosophy in Asian studies, but for practical and
2. Completion of a minimum of 30 units of upper di-                                                                  academic reasons this degree program is very re-
vision coursework.                                                                                                   stricted. Applicants with specific disciplinary inter-
                                                            Inter-Area/Interdisciplinary                             ests should apply to a particular department rather
3. Two courses must be in the same discipline.              Courses                                                  than to the interdisciplinary group. Only those who
One of the two must be a course whose primary                                                                        have first completed the M.A. with the Group in
purpose is to introduce the theories and methods            Anthropology 123D, 184, 186; Asian American              Asian Studies may apply to the Ph.D. program.
of the discipline.                                          Studies 124, 125, 126, 130; Asian Studies 150
                                                                                                                     Lower Division Courses
4. One upper division course must be a course               (when on South/Southeast Asia); Buddhist Studies
in Asian history appropriate to the student’s area          181, 182; City and Regional Planning 115*; Eco-          10. Introduction to Asia. (4) Three hours of lecture
focus.                                                      nomics 151*, 171*, 175*, 181*, 183; Geography            and one hour of discussion per week. Formerly 10A.
                                                            104, 107*, 133*, 163, 166; History 111A, 111B,           This course is designed to interest students in Asian
5. The remaining five courses needed to fulfill the           114A, 114B; History of Art 136A-136B-136C, 137;          cultures early in their undergraduate studies. Topics
30 unit requirement may be selected from the cat-           Linguistics 271, 272 (enrollment in linguistics          such as trade, social and political formations, religions,
egories of “other courses” and “inter-area courses”         courses requires consent of instructor); Music           food, and expressive culture that have been important
listed below. At least one course must focus on a           131A, 133A, 133B, 133C, 133D, 134A; Near East-           in history as well as in contemporary times in East,
geographical area outside the student’s area focus.         ern Studies 126; Political Science 129C, 137A,           South, and Southeast Asia will serve as unifying
                                                            137B*, 137C*, 138B*, 138E, 143A-143B, 144A,              themes. Comparative thinking across regions of Asia
Area Focus                                                  144B, 145B; Sociology 172*; South Asian Studies          and the perspectives of multiple disciplines will be
                                                            124, 127, 128, 129, 138, 140, 141, 142, 143, 145;        brought to bear on the themes. (F) Staff
China                                                       Southeast Asian Studies 122, 124, 128, 129, 130;
                                                            South and Southeast Asian Studies C112, 141;             98. Directed Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-
1. Students must complete two years of Chinese              Women’s Studies 141, 142.                                peated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-
(Mandarin). Further study of the language is en-                                                                     troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-
couraged and will count toward the major unit               *These courses are appropriate when they include         alog. Group meetings to be arranged. Must be taken
requirement.                                                Asia in their curriculum.                                on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Consent
                                                                                                                     of Instructor required. Group discussion, research and
2. Disciplinary theory and methods course (choose           In exceptional cases, individual waivers of specific      reporting on selected topics. (F,SP)
one): Anthropology 114, 141, 144, 169B, 170; Chi-           course requirements for valid academic reasons will
nese 142; Economics 100A, 100B, 101A, 101B;                 be considered with approval of the major adviser.
                                                                                                                                                               Astronomy / 135

Upper Division Courses                                      and supervised by a regular faculty member. The sem-             Adjunct Professors
                                                            inar will familiarize students with faculty, their Asian in-     Albert Glassgold, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of
149. Media and Society in Contemporary China. (4)           terests, research methods, and the courses they teach.             Technology. Interstellar medium, star formation,
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Con-                                                                           astrochemistry
                                                            It consists of presentations by faculty on their past, pre-      Richard I. Klein, Ph.D. Brandeis University. Star formation,
sent of instructor. This lecture and discussion course      sent, and future research. (F,SP) Staff                            accreting X-ray sources, radiation gas dynamics, instellar
examines the crucial role played by the news media in                                                                          medium
the establishment, perpetuation, and decline of Com-        202. Directed Research. (1) Course may be repeated
munist party authority in China. Students analyze the       for credit. Two hours of consultation per meeting for
development and the impact of the mass media (news-         eight weeks. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatis-            Department Overview
papers and magazines, radio and television) and of the      factory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Two
popular media (revolutionary operas, films, short sto-       hours of consultation per meeting to provide supervi-            The Department of Astronomy offers undergradu-
ries, reportage, wall posters, cartoons, advertisements)    sion in the preparation of an M.A. thesis. (SP) Staff            ate and graduate instruction in a wide variety of
from the period of the Communist victory and the Ko-                                                                         fields, including theoretical and observational as-
                                                            298. Directed Group Study. (2-6) Group meetings to
rean War through the period of the Cultural Revolution                                                                       trophysics; infrared, optical, and radio astronomy;
                                                            be arranged. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsat-
to the present. Readings focus on the changing role of                                                                       galactic structure and dynamics of stellar systems;
                                                            isfactory basis. Group study of selected topics that vary
the media in society, the relationship between news                                                                          high-energy astrophysics and cosmology; star and
                                                            from term to term. (F,SP) Staff
and propaganda, and the impact of new technology on                                                                          planet formation; and spectroscopy. A considerable
information. (F,SP) Wakeman                                 299. Independent Study. (1-7) Individual conferences             amount of research and teaching related to as-
                                                            to be arranged. Must be taken on a satisfactory/un-              tronomy is done in other units at Berkeley, includ-
150. Special Topics. (4) Course may be repeated for         satisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.        ing the Space Science Laboratory, Lawrence
credit. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:     Directed reading in subject matter not covered in                Berkeley Laboratory, and the Physics Department.
Consent of instructor. Advanced research in current is-     scheduled seminar offerings. (F,SP) Staff                        Various professors in the Chemistry, Earth and
sues or regions of Asian studies. The course will focus                                                                      Planetary Science, Mathematics, Statistics, and
on specific areas or topics with appropriate compara-                                                                         Engineering departments have an active interest in
tive material included. Topics change each semester.
(F,SP)                                                      Astronomy                                                        astronomy and are available for consultation.
                                                                                                                             A variety of instruments is available to students and
160. Undergraduate Seminar in Asian Studies. (4)            (College of Letters and Science)                                 staff, including a 30-inch telescope at Leuschner
Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.                                                                           Observatory (near the campus), two 10-meter tele-
Three hours of seminar per week. A reading and re-          Department Office: 601 Campbell Hall, (510) 642-5275
                                                            astro.berkeley.edu                                               scopes at the Keck Observatory on Mauna Kea in
search seminar for undergraduate students. Topics will      Chair: Donald Backer, Ph.D.                                      Hawaii, 30-inch, 40-inch and 120-inch telescopes
vary by semester. (F,SP)                                                                                                     at Lick Observatory, a 16-element millimeter-wave
                                                            University Professor
H195A-H195B. Senior Honors. (3;3) Individual study          Frank H. Shu (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University.               interferometer in Southern California, and the Allen
supervised by two faculty members. Credit and grade           Theoretical astrophysics, galactic dynamics, interacting       Telescope Array at the Hat Creek Radio Obser-
                                                              binaries, star formation, solar-system formation,              vatory. Laboratories are available for the devel-
to be awarded on completion of sequence. Prerequi-            meteoritics
sites: Open to seniors in the group major in Asian                                                                           opment of radio, infrared, and optical instruments,
                                                            Professors                                                       and for the precise measurement of images and
Studies whose GPA is 3.5 or higher in all university
                                                            Jonathan Arons, Ph.D. Harvard University. High-energy            spectra. Numerical simulations play an increasing
work and 3.6 or higher in the major. Supervised read-          astrophysics, pulsars, binary stars, dark matter (Physics)
ings or field research on a significant problem in Asian      Donald C. Backer, Ph.D. Cornell University. Neutron stars,       role in Astrophysics, and we have a variety of ex-
Studies, collection and analysis of research materials,        black holes, epoch of reionization,instrumentation            pertise and machines available for this.
                                                            Gibor Basri, Ph.D. University of Colorado, Boulder. Star
and the preparation of an honors dissertation in close         formation, magnetic activity, brown dwarfs, high resolution
consultation with two members of the faculty. (F,SP)           spectroscopy
                                                            Leo Blitz, Ph.D. Columbia University. Star formation, galaxy     The Major in Astrophysics
196. Senior Thesis. (3) A maximum of 3 units of credit         structure, formation and evolution, radio astronomy
to be applied toward the major. May be repeated with-       Josh Bloom, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology.            During the first two undergraduate years, students
                                                               Gamma ray bursts, transients, instrumentation
out credit toward the 36 unit major requirement. Indi-      Geoffrey Bower, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.        must, in addition to fulfilling certain specific re-
vidual study supervised by appropriate faculty adviser.        Transit radio sources, radio interferometry, extragalatic     quirements of the College of Letters and Science,
Prerequisites: Consent of adviser. Open to seniors in          radio sources                                                 pursue studies that will prepare them for future
                                                            Eugene Chiang, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology.
the Group in Asian Studies. Individual conferences to          Star and planet formation, planetary dynamics,                work in astronomy or in other careers that benefit
be arranged with the major adviser or other appropri-          circumstellar and circumplanetary disks (Earth and            from an education in a physical science, such as
ate faculty member for collection and analysis of re-          Planetary Science)                                            science teaching or technical positions in industry.
                                                            Marc Davis, Ph.D. Princeton University. Physical cosmology,
search materials and preparation of the undergraduate          large-scale structure, dark energy (Physics)                  Specifically, the department requires that during the
thesis. (F,SP)                                              Imke de Pater, Ph.D. University of Leiden. Solar system,         first two years, and in any case before declaring
                                                               radio and infrared astronomy (Earth and Planetary             the major, students take courses that provide a
197. Field Study. (1-4) Course may be repeated for             Science)
                                                                                                                             thorough understanding of the following:
credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction to   †Alexei Filippenko, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology.
                                                               Supernovae, cosmology, black holes, active galaxies,
Courses and Curricula section of this catalog. Indi-           gamma-ray bursts                                              1) Basic principles of physics: mechanics, prop-
vidual meetings to be arranged. Must be taken on a          James Graham, Ph.D. Imperial College, London. Interstellar       erties of matter, electricity and magnetism, heat,
passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Upper division         medium, active galaxies, infrared astronomy                   wave motion, sound and light (Physics 7A, 7B, 7C);
                                                            Carl E. Heiles, Ph.D. Princeton University. Interstellar
standing and consent of instructor. Supervised expe-           medium, magnetic fields                                        2) Basic mathematics: analytic geometry, differ-
rience relevant to specific aspects of Asian studies in      Raymond Jeanloz, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology.
                                                               Planetary interiors and origins (Earth and Planetary          ential and integral calculus, differential equations,
off-campus locations. Regular individual meetings with
                                                               Science)                                                      and linear algebra (Math 1A-1B, followed by Math
faculty sponsor and written reports required. (F,SP)        Chung-Pei Ma, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of                   53 and 54); and
Staff                                                          Technology. Cosmology, large-scale structure, dark
                                                               matter                                                        3) An introduction to astrophysics (Astronomy 7A-
198. Directed Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-          Geoff Marcy, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz.
                                                               Detection and study of extrasolar planets, planetary          7B).
peated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-
                                                               science, stellar activity
troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-    Christopher McKee, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.     The last two years, leading to the A.B. degree in
alog. Group meetings to be arranged. Must be taken             Interstellar medium, star formation (Physics)                 astrophysics, are spent in more intensive work, pri-
on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Upper di-      Eliot Quataert, Ph.D. Harvard University. Compact objects,       marily in the fields of astronomy, physics, earth and
                                                               accretion, galaxy formation
vision standing and consent of instructor. Directed         Martin White, Ph.D. Yale University. Physical cosmology,         planetary science, and mathematics. The specific
group study of special topics approved by the chair of         large-scale structure (Physics)                               plan of study to be followed by each student is to
the Group in Asian Studies. (F,SP)                          C. Stuart Bowyer (Emeritus), Ph.D. Catholic University of        be worked out in consultation with the departmental
                                                               America. Ultraviolet astronomy from space
                                                            Ivan R. King (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University. Structure     advisers for the major, and must include 30 units of
199. Independent Study. (1-4) Course may be re-
                                                               of stellar systems, stellar populations                       upper division work in astronomy and allied fields.
peated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-    Leonard V. Kuhi (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,      For students who are double majors in astro-
troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-       Berkeley. T Tauri Stars, star formation
                                                            Joseph I. Silk (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University.             physics and another science, the upper division re-
alog. Individual meetings to be arranged. Must be
                                                               Cosmology, galaxy formation, star formation                   quirement is reduced to 24 units.
taken on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites:          Hyron Spinrad (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,
Written proposal must be approved by faculty adviser.          Berkeley. Origin and evolution of galaxies, comets            All students are required to take at least one
Directed individual study on topics approved by the         Harold F. Weaver (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,     semester of undergraduate laboratory (Astronomy
                                                               Berkeley. Radio astronomy, interstellar medium, local
chair of the Group in Asian Studies. (F,SP) Staff              interstellar medium                                           120, 121, 122) and two of the senior-level courses
                                                            William J. Welch (Emeritus), (Alberts’ Chair), Ph.D.             Astronomy 160, C161, C162. Many students pur-
Graduate Courses                                               University of California, Berkeley. Star formation,
                                                               interferometry (Electrical Engineering and Computer
                                                                                                                             suing a dual-major of Astrophysics and Physics will
201. Asian Studies Proseminar. (1) Course may be               Sciences)                                                     be most interested in 160 and C161. Double-ma-
repeated for credit. Fifteen hours of seminar per                                                                            jors in Astrophysics and Earth & Planetary Science
semester. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatis-                                                                           will be most interested in 160 and C162. With the
factory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. This                                                                    approval of a graduate advisor, outstanding stu-
course is required of all first-year graduate students                                                                        dents may take a graduate course in Astronomy.

       B prefix=language course for business majors                R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                        *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                     †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                      requirement
136 / Astronomy

Honors Program. For honors in astrophysics a                  and the interstellar medium, galaxies, black holes,          passed basis. Prerequisites: Restricted to freshmen
student must fulfill the following additional re-              quasars, dark matter, the expansion of the universe          and sophomores; consent of instructor. Topics will vary
quirements: 1) maintain a grade-point average of              and its large-scale structure, and cosmology and the         with instructor. (F,SP) Staff
at least 3.5 in all courses in astronomy and related          Big Bang. The physics in this course includes that
fields, and an overall grade-point average of at               used in 7A (mechanics and gravitation; kinetic theory        99. Directed Study in Astronomy. (1-3) Course may
least 3.3 in the University; 2) carry out an individ-         of gases; properties of radiation and radiative energy       be repeated for credit. Must be taken on a passed/not
ual research or study project, involving at least             transport; quantum mechanics of photons, atoms, and          passed basis. Prerequisites: 7A-B, 10 and consent of
three units of H195. The student’s project is chosen          electrons; and magnetic fields) and adds the special          instructor. Supervised observational studies or directed
in consultation with a departmental adviser, and the          and general theories of relativity. (SP) Bloom, Marcy,       reading for lower division students. (F,SP) Staff
written report is judged by the student’s research            Quataert                                                     Upper Division Courses
supervisor and by a departmental adviser.
                                                              10. Introduction to General Astronomy. (4) Students          100. Communicating Astronomy. (1-2) Course may
For more detailed or complete information about               will receive no credit for 10 after taking 7A or 7B. Three   be repeated for credit. Two hours of lecture per week
the astrophysics major, an undergraduate hand-                hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.        plus time spent at K-12 schools. This course is for un-
book is available through the undergraduate as-               A description of modern astronomy with emphasis on           dergraduate or graduate students interested in im-
sistant in the department.                                    the structure and evolution of stars, galaxies, and the      proving their ability to communicate their scientific
                                                              Universe. Additional topics optionally discussed include     knowledge to the public and more specifically to K-12
                                                              quasars, pulsars, black holes, and extraterrestrial com-     students. The course combines lectures in science ed-
The Minor in Astrophysics                                     munication, etc. Individual instructor’s synopses avail-     ucation and teaching methodology and pedagogy with
                                                              able from the department. (F,SP) Basri, Blitz, Bloom,        six weeks of supervised teaching in local K-12 schools.
The minor program consists of two of (120, 121, or            Davis                                                        The students will use materials developed from the
122), C162, 160, C161 and three upper division
                                                              C10. Introduction to General Astronomy. (4) Stu-             Lawrence Hall of Science and other sources and will
electives. Courses 7A and 7B are recommended
                                                              dents will receive no credit for C10 after taking 10, 7A,    develop a demonstration of their own. They will receive
for the minor but not required.
                                                              or 7B. Three hours of lecture and one hour of discus-        feedback on their presentations. There will be some
                                                              sion per week. A description of modern astronomy             general discussion of the state and methods of science
Graduate Programs                                             with emphasis on the structure and evolution of stars,       education. (F,SP) Basri
                                                              galaxies, and the Universe. Additional topics optionally     120. Optical Astronomy Laboratory. (4) Four hours
The graduate program is aimed at the Ph.D. de-                discussed include quasars, pulsars, black holes, and         of discussion and one hour of lecture per week. Pre-
gree in astrophysics. Entering students need not              extraterrestrial communication, etc. Individual instruc-     requisites: 7A-7B; Mathematics 53, 54; Physics 7A-7B-
have majored in astronomy, although some back-                tor’s synopses available from the department. Also           7C (7C may be taken concurrently). Formerly 120A.
ground in astronomy is desirable. A strong back-              listed as Letters and Science C70U. (F) Filippenko           This course requires four to six experiments such as
ground in physics, however, is essential.                                                                                  the following: accurate position measurements of stars
                                                              C12. The Planets. (3) Three hours of lecture per
In addition to the qualifying examination required by         week. A tour of the mysteries and inner workings of          with subsequent derivation of the diameter of the Earth
the University, the department requires students to           our solar system. What are planets made of? Why do           and the refraction of the atmosphere; laboratory ex-
pass a preliminary examination which tests breadth            they orbit the sun the way they do? How do planets           ploration of the characteristics of charge-coupled de-
and depth of knowledge of three specialized re-               form, and what are they made of? Why do some                 vices; measurement of the distance, reddening, and
search areas chosen by the student from a list of             bizarre moons have oceans, volcanoes, and ice floes?          age of a star cluster; measurement of the Stokes pa-
about l0. Students choose, with the aid of their ad-          What makes the Earth hospitable for life? Is the Earth       rameters and linear polarization of diffuse synchrotron
viser, courses in the department which are useful             a common type of planet or some cosmic quirk? This           and reflection nebulae; measurement of the period and
in preparing for the preliminary and qualifying ex-           course will introduce basic physics, chemistry, and          pulse shape of the Crab pulsar using Fourier tech-
aminations. In addition, students must pass two               math to understand planets, moons, rings, comets, as-        niques. There is a heavy emphasis on error analysis,
graduate courses taken outside the department                 teroids, atmospheres, and oceans. Understanding              software development in the IDL language, and high-
and must acquire one year’s teaching experience.              other worlds will help us save our own planet and help       quality written reports. (F) Graham
The program normally takes five to six years. Ad-              us understand our place in the universe. Also listed as      121. Radio Astronomy Laboratory. (4) Four hours of
ditional information on the program is available              Letters and Science C70T and Earth and Planetary             discussion and one hour of lecture per week. Prereq-
upon request from the department.                             Science C12. (F,SP)                                          uisites: 7A-7B; Mathematics 53, 54; Physics 7A-7B-7C;
The requirements for the M.A. degree are 24 units             24. Freshman Seminars. (1) Course may be repeated            Physics 110B recommended. Formerly 120B. Several
in graduate or upper division undergraduate                   for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per          basic laboratory experiments that concentrate on mi-
courses (12 of them in graduate courses) and the              week. Section 1 to be graded on a pass/no pass basis.        crowave electronics and techniques; construction of re-
preliminary examination.                                      Section 2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. The          ceiving, observing, and data analysis systems for two
                                                              Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to pro-           radioastronomical telescopes, a single-dish 21-cm line
Lower Division Courses                                                                                                     system and a 12-GHz interferometer; use of these tele-
                                                              vide new students with the opportunity to explore an
3. Descriptive Cosmology. (2) Two hours of lecture            intellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-         scopes for astronomical observing projects including
per week. Non-mathematical description of research            seminar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all        structure of the Milky Way galaxy, precise position
and results in modern extragalactic astronomy and             campus departments, and topics vary from department          measurement of several radio sources, and mea-
cosmology. We read the story of discovery of the prin-        to department and semester to semester. (F,SP)               surement of the radio brightness distributions of the
ciples of our Universe. Bloom, Davis, Ma                                                                                   sun and moon with high angular resolution. There is a
                                                              39. Seminar. (1.5) Two hours of seminar per week.            heavy emphasis on digital data acquisition, software
7A. Introduction to Astrophysics. (4) Students will           Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sec-      development in the IDL language, and high-quality writ-
receive 2 units of credit for 7A after taking 10; 6 units     tions 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed basis.         ten reports. (SP) Backer, Blitz, Heiles
of credit for both 7A-7B after taking 10. Three hours of      A small-size undergraduate seminar exploring one as-
lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. Prereq-          tronomical topic in depth. Students are responsible for      122. Infrared Astronomy Laboratory. (4) Four hours
uisites: Physics 7A-7B (7B can be concurrent), or con-        much of the presentation. (SP) Basri, Filippenko, Davis      of discussion and one hour of lecture per week. Pre-
sent of the instructor. This is the first part of an                                                                        requisites: 7A-7B; Mathematics 53, 54; Physics 7A-7B-
overview of astrophysics, with an emphasis on the way         84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-               7C. Course consists of one basic laboratory experi-
in which physics is applied to astronomy. This course         peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar       ment to explore the fundamental properties and
deals with the solar system and stars, while 7B covers        per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half         characterize the performance of solid-state infrared
galaxies and cosmology. Solar system topics include or-       hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two         photon detectors. This will be followed by three to five
bital mechanics, geology of terrestrial planets, planetary    hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.          observational astronomical measurements using an in-
atmospheres, and the formation of the solar system.           Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five             frared detector array on the instructional telescopes at
The study of stars will treat determination of observa-       weeks. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not             Leuschner Observatory to study the Jovian planets;
tions, properties and stellar structure, and evolution. The   passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-         moons and rings; interstellar extinction and the colors
physics in this course includes mechanics and gravi-          grade basis. Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.     of stars; regions of star formation; and using the in-
tation; kinetic theory of gases; properties of radiation      Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses of-         frared Tully-Fisher method to estimate distances to
and radiative energy transport; quantum mechanics of          fered by faculty members in departments all across the       galaxies. (F) Graham, Marcy
photons, atoms, and electrons; and magnetic fields. (F)        campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for
                                                              close, regular intellectual contact between faculty          160. Stellar Physics. (4) Three hours of lecture and
Marcy, Quataert
                                                              members and students in the crucial second year. The         one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Senior
7B. Introduction to Astrophysics. (4) Students will           topics vary from department to department and                standing in astronomy/physics or consent of instructor.
receive 2 units of credit for 7B after taking 10; 6 units     semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sopho-        Physics 112 (may be taken concurrently) and either
of credit for both 7A-7B after taking 10. Three hours of      mores. (F,SP)                                                Physics 110A-110B or Physics 137A-137B. Formerly
lecture and one hour of laboratory per week. Prereq-                                                                       C160A and Physics C160A. Observational constraints
uisites: Physics 7A-7B (7B can be concurrent) or con-         98. Directed Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-            on the properties and evolution of stars. Theory of stel-
sent of the instructor. This is the second part of an         peated for credit as topic varies. Enrollment is re-         lar structure. Stellar atmospheres and stellar spec-
overview of astrophysics, which begins with 7A. This          stricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Curricula      troscopy. Evolution of high and low mass stars; su-
course covers the Milky Way galaxy, star formation            section of this catalog. Must be taken on a passed/not       pernovae. Degeneracy of matter and structure of
                                                                                                                                                            Astronomy / 137

collapsed stars. Elements of gas dynamics, accretion         217. Radiative Astrophysics. (3) Three hours of lec-          will be the physics of collisionless shock waves, both
onto compact objects, and x-ray sources. Dynamics            ture per week. Prerequisites: 201. The use of spec-           non-relativistic and relativistic, with application to su-
and evolution of close binary systems, either stellar        troscopy to diagnose physical conditions in optically         pernova remnants, nebulae, and jets driven by
pulsation or formation. (F) Arons, Backer, Basri, Fil-       thick objects is covered. Both continuum and spectral         outflows from compact objects, galaxy clusters, and
ippenko, Marcy                                               line formation (including NLTE) are treated. Modern re-       cosmic rays. Reconnection, including structure and in-
                                                             search topics in this core area of astrophysics, like stel-   stability of current sheets, with application to flaring be-
C161. Relativistic Astrophysics and Cosmology.               lar atmospheres, star formation, and accretion disks,         havior in the Earth’s magnetosphere, the Sun, and
(4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion        are used for illustration. Basri, Chang, Quataert             compact objects. Turbulence in magnetized plasmas,
per week. Prerequisites: 110A-110B; 112 (may be                                                                            including intermittency and current sheet formation,
taken concurrently). Formerly C160B and Physics              218. Stellar Dynamics and Galactic Structure. (3)
                                                             Three hours of lecture per week. A basic course.              with application to the solar wind, accretion disks, and
C160B. Elements of general relativity. Physics of pul-                                                                     molecular clouds. Arons
sars, cosmic rays, black holes. The cosmological dis-        Structure and kinematics of the galaxy; stellar popu-
tance scale, elementary cosmological models, prop-           lation concepts; dynamics of stellar systems with and         C285. Theoretical Astrophysics Seminar. (2) Two
erties of galaxies and quasars. The mass density and         without encounters. (F) Blitz, Davis, Graham                  hours of lecture per week. Must be taken on a satis-
age of the universe. Evidence for dark matter and dark       C228. Extragalactic Astronomy and Cosmology.                  factory/unsatisfactory basis. The study of theoretical
energy and concepts of the early universe and of             (3) Three hours of lecture per week. A survey of phys-        astrophysics. Also listed as Physics C285. (F,SP)
galaxy formation. Reflections on astrophysics as a            ical cosmology—the study of the origin, evolution, and        Arons, Chiang, Quataert
probe of the extrema of physics. Also listed as Physics      fate of the universe. Topics include the Friedmann-
C161. (SP) Staff                                                                                                           290A. Introduction to Current Research. (1) One
                                                             Robertson-Walker model, thermal history and big bang          hour of lecture per week. Must be taken on a satis-
C162. Planetary Astrophysics. (4) Three hours of             nucleosynthesis, evidence and nature of dark matter
                                                                                                                           factory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of
lecture per week. Prerequisites: Mathematics 53, 54;         and dark energy, the formation and growth of galax-
                                                                                                                           instructor. Survey of research currently being per-
                                                             ies and large scale structure, the anisotropy of the
Physics 7A-7B-7C. Formerly C149. Physics of plane-                                                                         formed in the Department or the University. (F) Backer
                                                             cosmic microwave radiation, inflation in the early uni-
tary systems, both solar and extra-solar. Star and
                                                             verse, tests of cosmological models, and current re-          290B. Introduction to Current Research. (1) One
planet formation, radioactive dating, small-body dy-
                                                             search areas. The course complements the material             hour of lecture per week. Must be taken on a satis-
namics and interaction of radiation with matter, tides,
                                                             of Astronomy 218. Also listed as Physics C228. (F)            factory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Consent of
planetary interiors, atmospheres, and magneto-
                                                             Davis, Holzapfel, Lee, Ma, White                              instructor. Continuation of 290A. Study of a research
spheres. High-quality oral presentations will be re-
quired in addition to problem sets. Also listed as Earth     C249. Solar System Astrophysics. (3) Three hours              topic with an individual staff member. (SP) Backer
and Planetary Science C162. Chiang, de Pater, Marcy          of lecture per week. The physical foundations of plan-        C290C. Cosmology. (2) Course may be repeated for
                                                             etary sciences. Topics include planetary interiors and        credit. Two hours of seminar per week. Must be taken
H195. Special Study for Honors Candidates. (2-4)             surfaces, planetary atmospheres and magnetospheres,
Individual project of research or study. (F,SP) Staff                                                                      on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites:
                                                             and smaller bodies in our solar system. The physical          For undergraduate students, consent of instructor re-
198. Directed Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-           processes at work are developed in some detail, and an        quired. Previous background in cosmology recom-
peated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-     evolutionary picture for our solar system, and each           mended. Physics C290C. (F,SP) White, Cohn
troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-     class of objects, is developed. Some discussion of
alog. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.            other (potential) planetary systems is also included.         292. Seminar. (1-2) Course may be repeated for
Topics will vary with instructor. (F,SP) Staff               Also listed as Earth and Planetary Science C249. (F)          credit. Two hours of seminar per week. Must be taken
                                                             Chiang, de Pater, Jeanloz                                     on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. In addition to the
199. Supervised Independent Study and Research.                                                                            weekly colloquium, the Department offers seminars in
                                                             250. Special Topics in Astrophysics. (3) Course
(1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is                                                                     advanced topics, several of which are announced at
                                                             may be repeated for credit. Three hours of lecture per
restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-                                                                       the beginning of each semester. A maximum of 5 units
                                                             week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Topics will
ricula section of this catalog. Independent study. Must                                                                    may be taken per semester with a limitation of 2 in any
                                                             vary from semester to semester. See department for
be taken on a passed/not passed basis. (F,SP) Staff                                                                        one section. (F,SP) Staff
                                                             announcements. (SP) Staff
Graduate Courses                                             252. Stellar Structure and Evolution. (3) Three hours         298. Directed Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-
                                                             of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Physics 110A-110B,        peated for credit. Tutorial. Must be taken on a satis-
201. Radiation Processes in Astronomy. (4) Three
                                                             112, 137A-137B. Formerly C252 and Physics C252.               factory/unsatisfactory basis. Tutorial for groups of two
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Physics 105,
                                                             Equations of stellar structure, radiative transfer and        or three students. (F,SP) Staff
110A; 110B concurrently; open to advanced under-
graduates with GPA of 3.70. Formerly 201A. An in-            convection, thermonuclear reactions and stellar energy        299. Advanced Study and Research. (2-12) Course
troduction to the basic physics of astronomy and as-         generations; stellar models, degenerate configurations,        may be repeated for credit. (F,SP) Staff
trophysics at the graduate level. Principles of energy       evolutionary sequences, supernovae, neutron stars,
transfer by radiation. Elements of classical and quan-       black holes, nucleosynthesis. (F,SP) Arons, Filippenko,       602. Individual Study for Doctoral Students. (1-8)
tum theory of photon emission; bremsstrahlung, cy-           Marcy                                                         Course may be repeated for credit. Must be taken on
clotron and synchrotron radiation. Compton scattering,                                                                     a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Individual study in
                                                             C254. High Energy Astrophysics. (3) Three hours of
atomic, molecular and nuclear electromagnetic tran-                                                                        consultation with the major field adviser, intended to
                                                             lecture per week. Prerequisites: 201 or consent of in-
sitions. Collisional excitation of atoms, molecules and                                                                    provide an opportunity for qualified students to prepare
                                                             structor. 202 recommended. Basic physics of high en-
nuclei. (F) Arons, Backer, Chiang, Quataert                                                                                themselves for the various examinations required of
                                                             ergy radiation processes in an astrophysics environment.
                                                             Cosmic ray production and propagation. Applications se-       candidates for the Ph.D. (and other doctoral degrees).
202. Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics. (4) Three hours                                                                         May not be used for unit or residence requirement for
                                                             lected from pulsars, x-ray sources, supernovae, in-
of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 201. Formerly 201B.                                                                    the doctoral degree. (F,SP) Staff
                                                             terstellar medium, extragalactic radio sources, quasars,
Principles of gas dynamics, magnetohydrodynamics
                                                             and big-bang cosmologies. Also listed as Physics              Professional Courses
and elementary kinetic theory with particular empha-
                                                             C254. (F) Arons, Boggs, Lin, Quataert
sis on ionized gases (plasmas). Aspects of convection,                                                                     300. Instruction Techniques in General Astronomy.
shock waves, high speed winds of astrophysical rel-          255. Computational Methods in Theoretical As-                 (2-6) Two hours of lecture per week. Must be taken on
evance and wave phenomena. Concepts of high en-              trophysics. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-         a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Con-
ergy particle acceleration and transport. Collective phe-    requisites: 201, 202, or consent of instructor. A broad       sent of instructor. Discussion and practice of teaching
nomena in stellar systems. (SP) Chiang, Graham,              survey of state-of-the-art approaches to astrophysical        techniques as applied to astronomy. Open to graduate
Quataert                                                     self-gravitational gas dynamics with application to large     students who are presently teaching assistants or as-
                                                             scale simulation of coupled non-linear astrophysical
204. Numerical Techniques in Astronomy. (3) Three                                                                          sociates. Two units for course plus one section; three
                                                             flows. Finite-difference approaches for Lagrangian and
hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: Mathematics                                                                      units for two discussion sections. (F,SP) Staff
                                                             Eulerian astrophysical hydrodynamics and coupled ra-
54. Methods of data analysis, model fitting, and data         diation-hydrodynamics. N-body gravitation techniques          301. Undergraduate Astronomy Instruction. (1-2)
display, all oriented towards the detailed analysis of as-   including direct N-body, P-M, P3M and hieracrchical           Course may be repeated for a maximum of 4 units.
tronomical observation data and/or numerical results         Tree. Particle gas dynamics methods such as Smooth            One hour of lecture and three to six hours of laboratory
from simulations. Specific topics include probability         Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH), Adaptive SPH and                per week. Must be taken on a passed/not passed ba-
density functions, error propagation, maximum likeli-        unification of SPH and Tree hierarchies (TREE-SPH).            sis. Prerequisites: An elementary astronomy course
hood, least squares, data and function fitting, Fourier       Advanced techniques such as higher order finite dif-           and consent of instructor. Open to a limited number of
transforms, wavelets, principal components analysis,         ference hydrodynamics with Adaptive Mesh Refine-               highly qualified undergraduate students interested in
color images. The software language used is the In-          ment (AMR). Applications of these approaches in three         astronomy teaching at the college level. Students will
teractive Data Language (IDL). (SP) Heiles                   broad areas: Cosmology; High Energy Astrophysics              participate in a seminar on educational methods and
                                                             and the Interstellar Medium. (SP) Klein                       engage in tutorial or laboratory teaching under su-
216. Interstellar Matter. (3) Three hours of lecture per
week. Prerequisites: 201. A survey of the observational      267. Plasma Astrophysics. (3) Three hours of lecture          pervision of a faculty member. Staff
data and theoretical ideas on the interstellar medium,       per week. Prerequisites: 201 and 202 recommended.
with emphasis on the inferred physical conditions. (F)       Applications of magnetohydrodynamics and plasma
Staff                                                        physics to astrophysical problems. Topics emphasized


       B prefix=language course for business majors                 R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                    *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                 AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                 †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                       requirement
138 / Bioengineering

                                                                 The Department of Bioengineering at UC Berkeley         Joint Major in Bioengineering/
Bioengineering                                                   is supported by exceptional faculty, strong ties to
                                                                 other departments on campus, and close collabo-
                                                                                                                         Materials Science and Engineering
(College of Engineering)                                         rations with other institutions like UC San Francisco   The Department of Bioengineering offers a joint
                                                                 and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. Our cur-            major with Materials Science and Engineering for
Department Office: 459 Evans Hall, (510) 642-5833                 riculum provides a solid foundation in engineering      students who have an interest in the field of bio-
bioeng.berkeley.edu                                              and the biological sciences, with the freedom to ex-    materials. The broad curriculum includes exposure
Chair: Dorian Liepmann, Ph.D.                                                                                            to fundamental courses in engineering and life sci-
                                                                 plore a variety of topics and specialize in advanced
University Professor                                             areas of research. This unique environment for          ences and will allow students to understand the in-
Richard M. Karp (The Class of 1939 Professor Emeritus),          learning and research in a rapidly growing disci-       terface between the two major fields. Students tak-
  Ph.D. Harvard University. Analysis of algorithms                                                                       ing this joint major will successfully compete for
                                                                 pline provides dedicated students with the unique
Professors                                                       education required to become a leader in the field       jobs in the field of biomaterials in academia, in-
†Stanley A. Berger, Ph.D. Brown University. Fluid                of bioengineering. Our graduates are prepared for       dustry, and government.
   mechanics
Thomas F. Budinger, M.D., Ph.D. University of California,        successful transitions to graduate school in bio-
   Berkeley. Biomedical imaging                                  engineering or related fields, medical school, or        Bioengineering Minor
James Casey, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.           careers in any of many bioengineering-related           The department offers a minor in bioengineering
   Continuum mechanics
Teresa Head-Gordon, Ph.D. Carnegie-Melon University.             industries.                                             that is open to all students who are not majoring in
   Theoretical chemistry, computational biology                                                                          bioengineering and who have completed the nec-
Kevin E. Healy, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania.                                                                        essary prerequisites for the minor requirements. In-
   Biomaterials and tissue engineering
Jay Keasling, Ph.D. University of Michigan. Synthetic biology
                                                                 Undergraduate Program                                   formation is available in 467 Evans Hall.
Tony M. Keaveny, Ph.D. Cornell University. Tissue
   engineering and biomechanics                                  The Department of Bioengineering at UC Berkeley         Berkeley Summer Bioengineering
Luke Lee, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.              is a multidisciplinary undergraduate major intended     Research Program
   Biomicroelectromechanical systems (BioMEMS),
   nanotechnology                                                for academically strong students who excel in the
Dorian Liepmann (Chair of the Department), Ph.D. University      physical sciences, mathematics, and biology. It of-     The Berkeley Summer Bioengineering Research
   of California, San Diego. Fluid dynamics, Bio-MEMS            fers students an opportunity to learn how to apply      Program provides intensive hands-on laboratory re-
Sharmila Majumdar (in residence), Ph.D. Yale University.         the physical sciences and mathematics in an en-         search internships in bioengineering for under-
   Quantitative magnetic imaging
Sarah J. Nelson, Dr. rer. Nat. University of Heidelberg.         gineering approach to biological systems. The un-       graduate students at UC Berkeley. Students are
   Biomedical imaging                                            dergraduate curriculum is designed to ensure that       selected each spring in a competitive application
Lisa A. Pruitt, Ph.D. Brown University. Tissue biomechanics,     students will be well grounded in the fundamental       process to join a faculty lab and perform full-time
   biomaterial science                                                                                                   research over a 10-week period during the summer.
David Rempel (in residence), Ph.D. University of California,     principles and methods of engineering, as well as in
   San Francisco. Tissue biomechanics, internal medicine         integrative and molecular biology. There are further    The program includes industry tours, workshops and
Boris Rubinsky, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of                 opportunities for specialization in advanced areas of   a poster session. During Summer 2006, each stu-
   Technology. Heat, mass transfer, cryopreservation                                                                     dent participant received a $3,000 fellowship and the
S. Shankar Sastry, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.     both engineering and biology, including laboratory
   Robotics, control systems                                     and clinical components on the two campuses.            opportunity to work closely with a faculty mentor.
Associate Professors
                                                                                                                         More information is available at bioeng.berkeley.
                                                                 The undergraduate program has three bioengineer-        edu/bsbrp.
Adam Arkin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.         ing major options: Bioengineering, Pre-Med, and
  Computational biology, systems biology
Steve Conolly, Ph.D. Stanford University. Medical imaging        Bioinformatics and Computational Biology. Within
  and electrical engineering                                     these majors, programs are available in Cell and        Graduate Study
Dan A. Fletcher, Ph.D. Stanford University. Optical force and    Tissue Engineering, Biomaterials, Biomechanics,
  microscopy, cellular mechanics, biomedical devices
Song Li, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego. Tissue       Imaging, Biomedical Instrumentation, Computa-           The graduate degree (Ph.D.) in bioengineering is
  engineering                                                    tional Bioengineering, Computational Biophysics,        administered by the Joint UCSF/UCB Bioengi-
Kimmen Sjölander, Ph.D. University of California, Santa          Synthetic and Systems Biology, and Bioinformatics.      neering Graduate Group, which operates in co-
  Cruz. Computational biology, phylogenomics                                                                             operation with the Department of Bioengineering.
                                                                 Bioengineering graduates may enter industry, go
Assistant Professors                                             on to medical school, and/or pursue graduate stud-      This program permits students to benefit from both
Irina Conboy, Ph.D. Stanford University. Stem cell biology,      ies in bioengineering and related disciplines.          the strong clinical and health sciences resources
    tissue engineeering                                                                                                  available on the San Francisco campus and the
Ian Holmes, Ph.D. University of Cambridge. Computational
    biology/genomics                                             Curriculum and Degree Requirements                      strong engineering and basic life sciences re-
Sanjay Kumar, M.D., Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University School                                                                sources available on the Berkeley campus.
    of Medicine. Molecular biophysics, tissue engineering        A minimum of 120 semester units is required for
Seung-Wuk Lee, Ph.D. University of Texas, Austin.                the bachelor’s degree in bioengineering, including:     The program is interdepartmental as well as in-
    Nanotechnology, nanomaterials                                                                                        tercampus. It combines related interests and re-
Mohammad Mofrad, Ph.D. University of Toronto.                    • Approximately 63 units in the lower division (de-
    Biomechanics, tissue engineering                                                                                     search activities of faculty from five of the seven
                                                                 scribed below) designed to provide a strong foun-       engineering departments and from several non-
                                                                 dation in the physical and biological sciences and      engineering departments at Berkeley with those of
Adjunct Professor
                                                                 mathematics, as well as an introduction to the var-     the faculty from all four professional schools (Den-
Mike West, Ph.D. Baylor College of Medicine. Stem cell
  engineering                                                    ious fields of engineering normally applied to biol-     tistry, Medicine, Nursing, and Pharmacy) at San
                                                                 ogy and medicine.                                       Francisco.
                                                                 • Upper division study that combines advanced           All students in the program are simultaneously en-
                                                                 courses in engineering, physical and biological sci-    rolled in the Graduate Divisions of both the San
Professor                                                        ences, and/or mathematics and statistics.
Rajendra S. Bhatnagar (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of
                                                                                                                         Francisco and Berkeley campuses and are free to
  California, San Francisco. Tissue                              • At least 42 units of upper division coursework in     take advantage of courses and research opportu-
  bioengineering/biochemistry
                                                                 technical subjects such as engineering, chemistry,      nities on both campuses. The program awards the
Associate Professors                                             physics, integrative biology, molecular and cell bi-    Doctor of Philosophy in Bioengineering degree
Steven E. Brenner, Ph.D. University of Cambridge.                ology, mathematics, or statistics. Of these, at least   from both campuses.
  Computational genomics
Frank Tendick, Ph.D. (in residence), University of California,
                                                                 22 units must be in bioengineering.                     Students with a B.A. or B.S. degree in engineering,
  San Francisco. Robotics/electrical engineering
                                                                 • Students are advised to consult the approved          biology, or other science are eligible for admission.
Visiting Professor                                               sample programs, or Options, described in the An-       Students can obtain additional information and ap-
David Saloner, Ph.D., Dr. rer. Nat. Karl-Ruprecht                nouncement of the College of Engineering to iden-       plication materials by contacting the Bioengineer-
  Universitaet. Vascular imaging, hemodynamics, MRI
                                                                 tify an appropriate course sequence for bioengi-        ing Graduate Program, 467 Evans Hall, University
                                                                 neering specialty areas.                                of California, Berkeley; Berkeley, CA 94720-1762;
                                                                                                                         (510) 642-9931; bioegrad.berkeley.edu.
Overview                                                         • Humanities/Social Studies Electives include six
                                                                 courses of at least 3 units each in humanities and
The field of bioengineering applies engineering                   social studies selected from an approved list of        Course Materials Fee
principles and practices to living things, integrating           courses. Two of these must fulfill the College of En-
biological and medical sciences with advanced                    gineering Reading and Composition requirement.          The Department of Bioengineering charges a
technology to help people live longer and healthier              Refer to www.coe.berkeley.edu/current_students/         course materials fee for Bioengineering 115. The
lives. No other field fulfills the potential for inter-            hssreq.pdf for details or go to 308 McLaughlin Hall     amount of the fee is listed in the online Schedule of
disciplinary research and education more than bio-               for a handout.                                          Classes.
engineering. We anticipate future breakthroughs
                                                                 • One course with substantial ethics component to       Lower Division Courses
ranging from the design of drugs customized to an
individual’s genome, to tiny implantable drug de-                be chosen from an approved list.                        10. Introduction to Biomedicine for Engineers. (4)
livery devices, to software and components that al-                                                                      Three hours of lecture and one hour of discus-
low researchers to design bacteria like electronic                                                                       sion per week. This course is intended for lower di-
circuits.                                                                                                                vision students interested in acquiring a foundation in
                                                                                                                                                   Bioengineering / 139

biomedicine with topics ranging from evolutionary bi-        sophomore seminars offer lower division students the        havior including elasticity, viscoelasticity, fatigue, and
ology to human physiology. The emphasis is on the in-        opportunity to explore an intellectual topic with a fac-    failure; beam theory, scaling, biological heterogeneity,
tegration of engineering applications to biology and         ulty member and a group of peers in a small seminar         and uncertainty. Applications, examples, and assign-
health. The goal is for undergraduate engineering stu-       setting. These seminars are offered in all campus de-       ments will elucidate normal and pathological human
dents to gain sufficient biology and human physiology         partments; topics vary from department to department        physiology, as well as diagnosis and treatment of ma-
fundamentals so that they are better prepared to study       and from semester to semester. Enrollment limits are        jor clinical problems. A series of mini-projects, some of
specialized topics, e.g., biomechanics, imaging, com-        set by the faculty, but the suggested limit is 25. (F,SP)   which will be computational assignments, will integrate
putational biology, tissue engineering, biomonitoring,       Staff                                                       the course material in an attempt to gain insight into
drug development, robotics, and other topics covered                                                                     more complex problems. Working in small teams, stu-
by upper division and graduate courses in UC Berke-          84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-              dents will also make a poster or oral presentation to
ley departments of Molecular and Cell Biology, Inte-         peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar      the class on a topic of their choice. (F,SP) Keaveny
grative Biology, Bioengineering, Electrical Engineering      per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half
                                                             hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two        104. Biological Transport Phenomena. (4) Three
and Computer Science, Mechanical Engineering, and
                                                             hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.         hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
courses in the UC San Francisco Division of Bioengi-
                                                             Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five            Prerequisites: Mathematics 54 and Physics 7A; 102 is
neering. The specific lecture topics and exercises will
                                                             weeks. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not            recommended. The transport of mass, momentum,
include the key aspects of genomics and proteomics
                                                             passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-        and energy in living systems. Application of scaling
as well as topics on plant and animal evolution, stem
                                                             grade basis. Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.    laws and methods of continuum mechanics to bio-
cell biomedicine, and tissue regeneration and re-
                                                             Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses of-        logical transport phenomena. Sample application areas
placement. Medical physiology topics include relevant
                                                             fered by faculty members in departments all across the      include biomolecular transport in biological tissues, liv-
engineering aspects of human brain, heart, muscu-
                                                             campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for            ing organs, and biomedical microdevices. Preliminary
loskeletal, and other systems. (F,SP) Conboy, Kumar
                                                             close, regular intellectual contact between faculty         understanding of biology and physiology is useful, but
22. Biotechnology. (3) Three hours of lecture per            members and students in the crucial second year. The        not assumed. (SP) Mofrad
week. Prerequisites: 22L (must be taken concurrently).       topics vary from department to department and
                                                                                                                         C105B. Thermodynamics and Biothermodynamics.
This course is intended to introduce students to a va-       semester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sopho-
                                                                                                                         (3) Students will receive no credit for C105B after taking
riety of fields that fall under the biotechnology umbrella.   mores. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                         Mechanical Engineering 105. Three hours of lecture and
In general, these fields include medical, microbial, agri-                                                                one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Chem-
                                                             98. Supervised Independent Group Studies. (1-4)
cultural, animal, and forensic biotechnology. Students                                                                   istry 1A, Mathematics 53, Physics 7A, and Engineering
                                                             Course may be repeated for credit. Group study meet-
in this course will learn the types of biotechnology pro-                                                                77, or equivalents. This course introduces the basic prin-
                                                             ings. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
jects currently being worked on, as well as the tech-                                                                    ciples of thermodynamics and their application to a va-
                                                             Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Organized group
niques and assays used within these projects. (F) Lee                                                                    riety of biological processes and systems. Some cov-
                                                             study on various topics under the sponsorship of a
22L. Biotechnology Laboratory. (2) Six hours of labo-        member of the Bioengineering faculty. (F,SP) Staff          erage of conventional engineering applications is also
ratory per week. Prerequisites: 22 (must be taken con-                                                                   included. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C105B.
                                                             99. Supervised Independent Study and Research.              (F,SP) Carey
currently). This course is intended to introduce stu-
                                                             (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is
dents to a variety of laboratory techniques that are                                                                     112. Molecular Cell Biomechanics. (4) Three hours
                                                             restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-
used in current day biotechnology projects. During this                                                                  of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Pre-
                                                             ricula section of this catalog. Must be taken on a
course, students will get hands-on molecular and cel-                                                                    requisites: Mathematics 54, Physics 7A, 102, or con-
                                                             passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Freshman or
lular biotechnology experience working with E. coli,                                                                     sent of instructors. This course develops and applies
                                                             sophomore standing and consent of instructor. Su-
Yeast, Human and Mouse Cell Lines, DNA, RNA, and                                                                         scaling laws and the methods of continuum and sta-
                                                             pervised independent study for lower division students.
proteins. This is a bioengineering course; the focus of                                                                  tistical mechanics to biomechanical phenomena over
                                                             (F,SP) Staff
these exercises will be on the critical understanding of                                                                 a range of length scales, from molecular to cellular lev-
biological, biochemical, or physical mechanisms, and         Upper Division Courses                                      els. It is intended for senior undergraduate students
theories of different experiemental methods, tech-                                                                       who have been exposed to differential equations, me-
niques, and instrumentation used. Second, students           100. Ethics in Science and Engineering. (3) Three
                                                                                                                         chanics, and certain aspects of modern biology. (F,SP)
leaving this class should understand how to address a        hours of lecture per week. The goal of this semester
                                                                                                                         Mofrad
critical biological question and design experiments in       course is to present the issues of professional conduct
a quantitative manner. (F) Lee                               in the practice of engineering, research, publication,      115. Cell Biology Laboratory for Engineers. (4) Two
                                                             public and private disclosures, and in managing pro-        hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory per week.
24. Aspects of Bioengineering. (1) Course may be             fessional and financial conflicts. The method is through      Prerequisites: Molecular and Cell Biology 110 or 130.
repeated for credit. One hour of seminar per week.           historical didactic presentations, case studies, pre-       The structural and functional characteristics of mus-
Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. This in-         sentations of methods for problem solving in ethical        culoskeletal tissues (e.g., bone, tendon, cartilage) are
troductory seminar is designed to give freshmen and          matters, and classroom debates on contemporary eth-         altered by cells in response to loading, injury, nutrition,
sophomores a glimpse of a broad selection of bio-            ical issues. The faculty will be drawn from national ex-    and other factors. A contemporary understanding of
engineering research that is currently underway at           perts and faculty from religious studies, journalism, and   the structural form, function and longevity includes
Berkeley and UCSF. The goal is to help students gain         law from the UC Berkeley campus. (F,SP) Budinger            knowledge of tissue ultra structure, composition of ma-
a feeling for the breadth of interesting problems in bio-                                                                trix, and cell function. Students will be introduced to
engineering and also the variety of ways that engi-          101. Instrumentation in Biology and Medicine. (4)
                                                                                                                         cellular and molecular biology and biochemistry tech-
neering principles can be applied to biological and          Three hours of lecture and three hours of discus-
                                                                                                                         niques as applied to musculoskeletal tissues including
medical problems. A series of one-hour seminars will         sion/computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites:
                                                                                                                         histology, image analysis, protein quantification, gene
be presented by researchers, professors, and doctors         Electrical Engineering 100, Mathematics 53, 54,
                                                                                                                         analysis and expression, and cell culture. By applying
on their particular research areas. (F,SP) Liepmann,         Physics 7A-7B, or consent of instructor. This course
                                                                                                                         these techniques to structural tissues in the laboratory,
Staff                                                        teaches the fundamental principles underlying modern
                                                                                                                         students can learn the reliability and limitations of these
                                                             instrumentation used in biology and medicine. Orga-
25. Careers in Biotechnology. (1) One hour of sem-                                                                       tools. (F,SP) Johnson, Li
                                                             nized around three classes of instruments—bioelec-
inar per week. Must be taken on a passed/not passed          tronics, optical microscopy, and medical imaging—the        116. Cell and Tissue Engineering. (4) Three hours of
basis. This introductory seminar is designed to give         course takes an integrative approach to measurement         lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prereq-
freshmen and sophomores an opportunity to explore            theory and practice by presenting and analyzing ex-         uisites: Engineering 45 and Molecular and Cell Biology
specialties related to engineering in the pharmaceuti-       ample instruments currently used for biological and         102 or consent of instructor. Introduction to tissue en-
cal/biotech field. A series of one-hour seminars will be      medical research. For each instrument, students will        gineering, analysis of cellular process, and cell engi-
presented by industry professionals, professors, and         learn the fundamentals of operation, methods of con-        neering. Topics include bioreactor and mass transport,
researchers. Topics may include biotechnology and            trol, mechanisms of contrast, devices for detection, and    transplantation, artifical tissues, cell-matrix interaction,
pharmaceutical manufacturing; process and control en-        methods for signal processing and error estimation.         cell migration and cell mechanics, cell proliferation,
gineering; drug inspection process; research and de-         Current biological questions and medical problems in-       stem cells, and cell manipulation. (SP) Li
velopment; compliance and validation; construction           vestigated with each type of instrument will be dis-
process for a GMP facility; project management; and          cussed. (F,SP) Conolly, D. Fletcher                         C117. Structural Aspects of Biomaterials. (4) Three
engineered solutions to environmental challenges. This                                                                   hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week.
course is of interest to students in all areas of engi-      102. Biomechanics. (4) Three hours of lecture and           Prerequisites: Biology 1A, Engineering 45, Bio Engi-
neering and biology, including industrial engineering        three hours of computer laboratory per week. Pre-           neering 102, and Civil Engineering 130. This course
and manufacturing, chemical engineering, and bio-            requisites: Math 53, 54; Physics 7A; programming            covers the structure and mechanical functions of load
engineering. (F,SP) Mofrad                                   experience; biology or anatomy is not assumed. In-          bearing tissues and their replacements. Natural and
                                                             troduction to the main concepts related to the mechanics    synthetic load-bearing biomaterials for clinical appli-
39. Freshman and Sophomore Seminar. (2-4)                    and material behavior of biological systems. Empha-         cations are reviewed. Biocompatibility of biomaterials
Course may be repeated for credit. Two to four hours         sis is placed on development of a fundamental math-         and host response to structural implants are examined.
of seminar per week. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a          ematical understanding of the key engineering princi-       Quantitative treatment of biomechanical issues and
letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a           ples and their application to biological systems.           constitutive relationships of tissues are covered in or-
passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Priority is          Examples of engineering concepts covered include            der to design biomaterial replacements for structural
given to freshmen and sophomores. Freshman and               statics and dynamics of solids and fluids; material be-      function. Material selection for load bearing applica-


       B prefix=language course for business majors                 R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                  *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                 AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures               †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                       requirement
140 / Bioengineering
tions including reconstructive surgery, orthopedics,         in teleoperation. Biological analogies and medical ap-           sign of circuits for sensing and controlling physical
dentistry, and cardiology are addressed. Mechanical          plications of robotics. Also listed as Electrical Engi-          quantities. Also listed as Electrical Engineering C145L.
design for longevity including topics of fatigue, wear,      neering C125. (F,SP) Tomlin                                      (F) Derenzo
and fracture are reviewed. Case studies that examine
failures of devices are presented. This course includes      131. Introduction to Computational Molecular and                 C145M. Introductory Microcomputer Interfacing
a teaching/design laboratory component that involves         Cell Biology. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour            Laboratory. (3) Two hours of lecture and three hours
design analysis of medical devices and outreach              of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Biology 1A,               of laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Electrical En-
teaching to the public community. Several problem-           Mathematics 53 and 54, and either Engineering 77,                gineering 40, Computer Science 61B or a working
based projects are utilized throughout the semester for      Computer Science 61A, or Computer Science 61B; or                knowledge of ANSI C programming or consent of in-
design analysis. In addition to technical content, this      consent of instructor. Topics include computational ap-          structor. Laboratory exercises constructing basic in-
course involves rigorous technical writing assignments,      proaches and techniques to gene structure and find-               terfacing circuits and writing 20-100 line C programs
oral communication skill development and teamwork.           ing, sequence alignment using dynamic programming,               for data acquisition, storage, analysis, display, and
Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C117. (SP)             protein folding and structure prediction, protein-drug in-       control. Use of the IBM PC with microprogrammable
Pruitt                                                       teractions, genetic and biochemical pathways and net-            digital counter/timer, parallel I/O port. Circuit compo-
                                                             works, and microarray analysis. Various case studies             nents include anti-aliasing filters, the S/H amplifier, A/D
C118. Biological Performance of Materials. (4)               in these areas are reviewed and web-based compu-                 and D/A converters. Exercises include effects of alias-
Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per        tational biology tools will be used by students. Com-            ing in periodic sampling, fast Fourier transforms of ba-
week. Prerequisites: Molecular and Cell Biology 102,         putational biology research connections to biotech-              sic waveforms, the use of the Hanning filter for leakage
130 (recommended), and Engineering 45, 115 or                nology will be explored. (F,SP) Holmes                           reduction, Fourier analysis of the human voice, digital
equivalent. This course is intended to give students the                                                                      filters, and control using Fourier deconvolution. Lec-
opportunity to expand their knowledge of topics related      C141. Statistics for Bioinformatics. (4) Three hours             tures cover principles explored in the lab exercises and
to biomedical materials selection and design. Struc-         of lecture and two hours of laboratory per week. Pre-            design of microcomputer-based systems for data ac-
                                                             requisites: Computer Science 9C or 9E or Engineering
ture-property relationships of biomedical materials and                                                                       quisitions, analysis and control. Also listed as Electri-
                                                             77 or equivalent; Math 53, 54. Study of bioinformatics
their interaction with biological systems will be ad-                                                                         cal Engineering C145M. (F) Derenzo
                                                             problems such as DNA pattern finding, gene expres-
dressed. Applications of the concepts developed in-
                                                             sion data analysis, molecular evolution models, and              C146. Topics in Computational Biology and Ge-
clude blood-materials compatibility, biomimetic mate-
                                                             biomolecular sequence database searching. Intro-                 nomics. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of
rials, hard and soft tissue-materials interactions, drug
                                                             duction of the necessary probability and statistics:             discussion per week. Prerequisites: Bioengineering
delivery, tissue engineering, and biotechnology. Also
                                                             events, (conditional) probability, random variables, es-         142, Computer Science 61A, or equivalent ability to
listed as Materials Science and Engineering C118. (F)
                                                             timation, testing, and linear regression. Also listed as         write programs in Java, Perl, C, or C++; Molecular and
Healy
                                                             Statistics C141. (F,SP)                                          Cell Biology 100, 102, or equivalent; or consent of in-
C119. Orthopedic Biomechanics. (4) Three hours of                                                                             structor. Instruction and discussion of topics in ge-
lecture and one hour of discussion/computer workshop
                                                             Upper Division Courses                                           nomics and computational biology. Working from evo-
per week. Prerequisites: Civil Engineering 130. Formerly     142. Programming and Algorithm Design for Com-                   lutionary concepts, the course will cover principles and
C176. Students will learn the application of engineer-       putational Biology & Genomics Applications. (4)                  application of molecular sequence comparison, genome
ing concepts including statics, dynamics, optimization       Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per            sequencing and functional annotation, and phyloge-
theory, composite beam theory, beam-on-elastic foun-         week. Prerequisites: Math 54 and Molecular and Cell              netic analysis. Also listed as Molecular and Cell Biol-
dation theory, Hertz contact theory and materials be-        Biology 102; Engineering 77, or Computer Science                 ogy C146 and Plant and Microbial Biology C146. (SP)
havior. Topics will include forces and moments acting        61A, or Science 61B or consent of instructor. This               Brenner, Eisen
on human joints; composition and mechanical behavior         course will introduce students to structured software
of orthopedic biomaterials; design/analysis of artificial                                                                      155. Introduction to Bioastronautics. (4) Three
                                                             development and select principles of computer science
joint, spine, and fracture fixation prostheses; muscu-                                                                         hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
                                                             with applications in computational biology and allied
loskeletal tissues including bone, cartilage, tendon, lig-                                                                    This course aims to bring undergraduate students into
                                                             disciplines. The principle language used for instruction
ament, and muscle; osteoporosis and fracture-risk                                                                             the world of space science related research including
                                                             will be Java with a course module on Perl. Examples
predication of bones; and bone adaptation. Students                                                                           bioastronautics and high altitude human physiology.
                                                             and tutorials will draw from problems in computational
will be challenged in a MATLAB-based project to in-                                                                           Students will gain a strong knowledge base of specific
                                                             biology. The course will require one significant pro-
tegrate the course material in an attempt to gain insight                                                                     topics in bioastronautics, an introduction to research
                                                             gramming project, preferably biologically oriented.
into contemporary design/analysis/problems. Also                                                                              methods, and will learn how to structure a research
                                                             (F,SP) Arkin
listed as Mechanical Engineering C176. (SP) Keaveny                                                                           team. Additionally, students will develop leadership,
                                                             143. Computational Methods in Biology. (4) Three                 management, teamwork, and communication skills.
121. Introduction to Micro and Nanobiotechnology:            hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Math 53 and            The topics to be covered include history of manned
BioMEMS. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-           Math 54; programming experience preferred but not re-            space flight, the space environment, Mars and lunar
requisites: Chemistry 3B and Physics 7B or consent           quired. An introduction to biophysical simulation meth-          environments, space flight and life support systems,
of instructor. Biophysical and chemical principles of        ods and algorithms, including molecular dynamics,                space suit technology, human physiological responses
biomedical microelectromechanical systems (bioMEMS)          Monte Carlo, mathematical optimization, and “non-                to space flight, countermeasures to space decondi-
for the measurement of biological phenomena and clin-        algorithmic” computation such as neural networks. Var-           tioning, and space medicine. (F,SP) Budinger
ical applications. Micro-and nano-scale devices for the      ious case studies in applying these areas in the areas
manipulation of cells and biomolecules. Topics include                                                                        164. Optics and Microscopy. (4) Three hours of lec-
                                                             of protein folding, protein structure prediction, drug
solid-state transducers, optical transducers, electro-                                                                        ture and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequi-
                                                             docking, and enzymatics will be covered. Core Spe-
chemical transducers, biomedical microelectronics, mi-                                                                        sites: Physics 7A-7B-7C, or 8A-8B or equivalent in-
                                                             cialization: Core B (Informatics and Genomics); Core
crofluidics, and hybrid integration of microfabrication                                                                        troductory physics course. This course teaches
                                                             D (Computational Biology); BioE Content: Biological.
technology. (F,SP) Lee, Liepmann                                                                                              fundamental principles of optics and examines con-
                                                             (F,SP) Head-Gordon
                                                                                                                              temporary methods of optical microscopy for cells and
121L. BioMems and BioNanotechnology Laboratory.              144. Introduction to Protein Informatics. (4) Stu-               molecules. Students will learn how to design simple
(4) Six hours of laboratory and two hours of lecture per     dents will receive no credit for 144 after taking 244.           optical systems, calculate system performance, and
week. Prerequisites: 121, Chemistry 130A, Electrical En-     Three hours of lecture and three hours of computer               apply imaging techniques including transmission,
gineering 143, Mechanical Engineering 106, or Chem-          laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Molecular and Cell           reflection, phase, and fluorescence microscopy to in-
ical Engineering 150A. Hands-on project experience in        Biology 100 or 102. This course will introduce students          vestigate biological samples. The capabilities of opti-
applying microfabrication techniques to problems in          to the fundamentals of molecular biology and to the              cal microscopy will be compared with complementary
biotechnology using the latest micro-and nano-tech-          bioinformatics tools and databases used for the pre-             techniques including electron microscopy, coherence
nological tools. Experimental design and analysis of         diction of protein function and structure. It is designed        tomography, and atomic force microscopy. Students
micro-and nano-scale device interfaces. Students will        to impart both a theoretical understanding of popular            will also be responsible for researching their final pro-
give poster sessions and oral presentations on their re-     computational methods and practical hands-on ex-                 ject outside of class and presenting a specific appli-
sults. (F) L. Lee                                            perience with protein sequence analysis methods ap-              cation of modern microscopy to biological research as
                                                             plied to real data. (F,SP) Sjölander                             part of an end-of-semester project. (F,SP) Fletcher
C125. Introduction to Robotics. (4) Three hours of
lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Prereq-         C145L. Introductory Electronic Transducers Lab-                  C165. Image Processing and Reconstruction To-
uisites: Electrical Engineering 120 or equivalent, and       oratory. (3) Two hours of lecture and three hours of             mography. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour of
consent of instructor. An introduction to the kinematics,    laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Electrical Engi-             discussion per week. Prerequisites: Electrical Engi-
dynamics, and control of robot manipulators, robotic vi-     neering 40. Laboratory exercises exploring a variety of          neering 120; basic programming ability in C or FOR-
sion, sensing, and the programming of robots. The            electronic transducers for measuring physical quanti-            TRAN. Linear systems and Fourier transforms in two
course will cover forward, inverse kinematics of serial      ties such as temperature, force, displacement, sound,            and three dimensions. Basic image processing. The-
chain manipulators. The manipulator Jacobian, force          light, ionic potential; the use of circuits for low-level dif-   ory and algorithms for image reconstruction from pro-
relations, dynamics and control-position, and force con-     ferential amplification and analog signal processing;             jections. Physics of imaging systems including mag-
trol. Trajectory generation, collision avoidance, auto-      and the use of microcomputers for digital sampling and           netic resonance, X-ray tomography, positron emission
matic planning of fine and gross motion strategies,           display. Lectures cover principles explored in the lab-          tomography, ultrasound, and biomagnetic imaging.
robot programming languages. Proximity, tactile, and         oratory exercises; construction, response and signal to          Data analysis including hypothesis testing, parameter
force sensing. Network modeling, stability, and fidelity      noise of electronic transducers and actuators; and de-           estimation by least squares, and compartmental kinetic
                                                                                                                                                    Bioengineering / 141

modelling. Field trips to medical imaging laboratories.       specific case studies and organization of this rapidly        215. Models of Cell Mechanics: Dynamics of the
Also listed as Electrical Engineering C145B. (SP)             expanding and diverse field. (F) Staff                        Cytoskeleton and Nucleus. (3) Three hours of lecture
Conolly                                                                                                                    per week. Prerequisites: Open to bioengineering grad-
                                                              210. Cell Mechanics and the Cytoskeleton. (3)                uate students or consent of instructor. The field of cell
190. Advanced Topics in Bioengineering. Course                Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Un-          mechanics has recently undergone rapid development
may be repeated for credit. One to four hours of lecture      dergraduate physics and cell biology or consent of in-       with particular attention to the dynamics of the cy-
per week. Sections 1-3 to be graded on a letter-grade         structor. This course explores emerging biophysical          toskeleton as well as its interactions with the extra-
basis. Sections 4-6 to be graded on a passed/not              descriptions of the cell based on molecular details of       cellular matrix and how this interaction may cause
passed basis. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.           the cytoskeleton and its interactions with the cellular      changes in cell architecture, consequently leading to
These courses cover current topics of research inter-         microenvironment. Through lectures, discussions, and         functional adaptation or pathological conditions. A wide
est in bioengineering. The course content may vary            reading of the research literature, students will learn      range of models exist for cytoskeletal mechanics, rang-
from semester to semester. (F,SP) Staff                       about current questions facing the field of cell me-          ing from continuum models for cell deformation to actin
190A. Advanced Topics in Biomechanics and Tissue              chanics and its connections with health and disease.         filament-based models for cell mobility. Numerous ex-
Engineering. (1-4) (F,SP)                                     Fundamental biology of the cytoskeleton and associ-          perimental techniques have also been established to
                                                              ated molecular motors will be discussed in the context       quantify the cytoskeletal mechanics via perturbing the
190B. Advanced Topics in Bioinformatics and Ge-               of cell motility, shape change, and mechanotrans-            cell by exerting some sort of deformation and exam-
nomics. (1-4) (F,SP)                                          duction. Modern techniques for quantifying mechani-          ining the static and dynamic response of the cell.
                                                              cal properties of the cell and its structural components,    These experimental observations along with theoret-
190C. Advanced Topics in Micromachines and Ro-
                                                              including optical trapping, magnetic tweezers, atomic        ical approaches to the cell have given rise to several
botics. (1-4) (F,SP)
                                                              force microscopy, and traction-force microscopy will be      theories for describing the mechanics of living cells,
190D. Advanced Topics in Computational Bioengi-               presented, and recent models of cell mechanics and           modeling the cytoskeleton as a simple mechanical
neering. (1-4) (F,SP)                                         their predictions will be discussed and debated. (F,SP)      elastic, viscoelastic, or poroviscoelastic continuum,
                                                              Fletcher                                                     porous gel or soft glassy material, tensegrity network
190E. Advanced Topics in Neural and Sensory Sys-
                                                                                                                           incorporating discrete structural elements that bear
tems Bioengineering. (1-4) (F,SP)                             211. Cell and Tissue Mechanotransduction. (3)
                                                                                                                           compression. (F,SP) Mofrad
                                                              Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Un-
190F. Advanced Topics in Biomedical Imaging and
                                                              dergraduate cell biology or consent of instructor. This      C216. Macromolecular Science in Biotechnology
Signal Processing. (1-4) (F,SP)
                                                              course will focus on biophysical and bioengineering as-      and Medicine. (4) Three hours of lecture and one hour
190G. Advanced Topics in Radiological Bioengineer-            pects of mechanotransduction, the process through            of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Bioengineering
ing. (1-4) (F,SP)                                             which living cells sense and respond to their me-            115 or equivalent; open to seniors with consent of in-
                                                              chanical environment. Students will learn how me-            structor. Overview of the problems associated with the
190H. Advanced Topics in Biomedical Systems En-               chanical inputs to cells influence both subcellular bio-      selection and function of polymers used in biotech-
gineering. (1-4) (F,SP)                                       chemistry and whole-cell behavior. They will also study      nology and medicine. Principles of polymer science,
191. Junior and Senior Seminar. (1-3) Course may              newly-engineered technologies for force manipulation         polymer synthesis, and structure-property-performance
be repeated for credit. One to three hours of seminar         and measurement in living cells, and synthetic strate-       relationships of polymers. Particular emphasis is
per week. Must be taken on a passed/not passed ba-            gies to control the mechanics and chemistry of the ex-       placed on the performance of polymers in biological
sis. Prerequisites: Priority given to juniors and seniors.    tracellular matrix. Finally, students will learn about the   environments. Interactions between macromolecular
Junior and senior seminars are small interactive              role of mechanotransduction in selected human organ          and biological systems for therapy and diagnosis.
courses offered by faculty members in Bioengineering.         systems and how these mechanisms may go awry in              Specific applications will include drug delivery, gene
These seminars offer opportunity for close, regular in-       the setting of the disease. Instruction will feature lec-    therapy, tissue engineering, and surface engineering.
tellectual contact between faculty members and stu-           tures, discussions, analysis of relevant research pa-        Also listed as Materials Science and Engineering
dents. The topics vary from semester to semester.             pers, assembly of a literature review and a research         C216. (SP) Healy
(F,SP) Staff                                                  proposal, and an oral presentation. (F,SP) Kumar
                                                                                                                           C217. Biomimetic Engineering—Engineering from
H194. Honors Undergraduate Research. (3,4)                    C212. Heat and Mass Transport in Biomedical En-              Biology. (3) Prerequisites: Graduate standing in en-
Course may be repeated for a maximum of 8 units.              gineering. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-         gineering or consent of instructor. Study of nature’s so-
Variable format. Prerequisites: Upper division techni-        requisites: Mechanical Engineering 106, 109. Funda-          lutions to specific problems with the aim of determin-
cal GPA 3.3 or higher and consent of instructor and           mental processes of heat and mass transport in               ing appropriate engineering analogs. Morphology,
adviser. Supervised research. Students who have               biological systems; organic molecules, cells, biological     scaling, and design in organisms applied to engi-
completed 3 or more upper division courses may pur-           organs, whole animals. Derivation of mathematical            neering structures. Mechanical principles in nature and
sue original research under the direction of one of the       models and discussion of experimental procedures.            their application to engineering devices. Mechanical
members of the staff. May be taken a second time for          Applications to biomedical engineering. Also listed as       behavior of biological materials as governed by un-
credit only. A final report or presentation is required. A     Mechanical Engineering C212. (SP) Rubinsky                   derlying microstructure, with the potential for synthe-
maximum of 4 units of this course may be used to fulfill                                                                    sis into engineered materials. Trade-offs between re-
the research or technical elective requirement or in the      C213. Fluid Mechanics of Biological Systems. (3)             dundancy and efficiency. Students will work in teams
Bioengineering program. (F,SP) Staff                          Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Me-          on projects where they will take examples of designs,
                                                              chanicl Engineering 106, or equivalent, or consent of        concepts, and models from biology and determine their
196. Undergraduate Design Research. (4) Course                instructor. Fluid mechanical aspects of various phys-        potential in specific engineering applications. Also
may be repeated for credit once. Individual research.         iological systems, the circulatory, respiratory, and re-     listed as Integrative Biology C217 and Mechanical En-
Prerequisites: Junior or senior status, consent of in-        nal systems. Motion in large and small blood vessels.        gineering C217. (F,SP) Dharan
structor and faculty adviser. Supervised research. This       Pulsatile and peristaltic flows. Other biofluidmechan-
course will satisfy the Senior Bioengineering Design          ical flows: the ear, eye, etc. Instrumentation for fluid       C218. Stem Cells and Directed Organogenesis. (3)
project requirement. Students with junior or senior sta-      measurements in biological systems and for medical           Three hours of lecture/laboratory per week. Grading:
tus may pursue research under the direction of one of         diagnosis and applications. Artifical devices for re-         Letter; Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory for CIRM humanities
the members of the staff. May be taken a second time          placement of organs and/or functions, e.g. blood oxy-        and law fellows. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
for credit only. A final report or presentation is required.   genators, kidney dialysis machines, artifical hearts/cir-     This course will provide an overview of basic and ap-
(F,SP) Staff                                                  culatory assist devices. Also listed as Mechanical           plied embryonic stem cell (ESC) biology. Topics will in-
                                                              Engineering C213. (F) Berger                                 clude early embryonic development, ESC laboratory
198. Directed Group Study for Advanced Under-
                                                                                                                           methods, biomaterials for directed differentiation and
graduates. (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                              C214. Advanced Tissue Mechanics. (3) Three hours             other stem cell manipulations, and clinical uses of stem
Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Pre-
                                                              of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Pre-         cells. Also listed as Molecular and Cell Biology C237.
requisites: Upper division standing and good academic
                                                              requisites: C176, 185; graduate standing or consent of       (SP) Conboy
standing. (2.0 grade point average and above). Group
                                                              instructor. Knowledge of MATLAB or equivalent. The
study of a selected topic or topics in bioengineering,                                                                     221. Introduction to Micro and Nanobiotechnology:
                                                              goal of this course is to provide a foundation for char-
usually relating to new developments. (F,SP) Staff                                                                         BioMEMS. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-
                                                              acterizing and understanding the mechanical behav-
                                                                                                                           requisites: Chemistry 3B and Physics 7B or consent
199. Supervised Independent Study. (1-4) Course               ior of load-bearing tissues. A variety of mechanics top-
                                                                                                                           of instructor. Biophysical and chemical principles of
may be repeated for credit. Must be taken on a                ics will be introduced, including anisotropic elasticity
                                                                                                                           biomedical microelectromechanical systems (bioMEMS)
passed/not passed basis. Supervised independent               and failure, cellular solid theory, biphasic theory, and
                                                                                                                           for the measurement of biological phenomena and clin-
study. (F,SP) Staff                                           quasi-linear viscoelasticity (QLV) theory. Building from
                                                                                                                           ical applications. Micro- and nano-scale devices for the
                                                              this theoretical basis, we will explore the constitutive
Graduate Courses                                                                                                           manipulation of cells and biomolecules. Topics include
                                                              behavior of a wide variety of biological tissues. After
                                                                                                                           solid-state transducers, optical transducers, electro-
200. The Graduate Group Introductory Seminar. (1)             taking this course, students should have sufficient
                                                                                                                           chemical transducers, biomedical microelectronics, mi-
Course may be repeated for credit. One hour of sem-           background to independently study the mechanical be-         crofluidics, and hybrid integration of microfabrication
inar per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsat-         havior of most biological tissues. Formal discussion         technology. (F,SP) Lee
isfactory basis. Prerequisites: Enrollment in PhD Pro-        section will include a seminar series with external
gram in Bioengineering or consent of instructor. An           speakers. Also listed as Mechanical Engineering C214.        C223. Polymer Engineering. (3) Three hours of lec-
introduction to research in bioengineering including          (SP) Staff                                                   ture and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequi-


       B prefix=language course for business majors                  R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                   *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                  AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                        requirement
142 / Bioengineering
sites: Civil Engineering 130, Engineering 45. A survey       244. Introduction to Protein Informatics. (4) Stu-          299. Individual Study or Research. (1-12) Course
of the structure and mechanical properties of advanced       dents will receive no credit for 244 after taking 144.      may be repeated for credit. Must be taken on a satis-
engineering polymers. Topics include rubber elasticity,      Three hours of lecture and three hours of computer          factory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: Graduate
viscoelasticity, mechanical properties, yielding, de-        laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Molecular and Cell      standing. Investigations of advanced problems in bio-
formation, and fracture mechanisms of various classes        Biology 100 or 102. This course will introduce students     engineering. (F,SP) Staff
of polymers. The course will discuss degradation             to the fundamentals of molecular biology and to the
                                                                                                                         Professional Courses
schemes of polymers and long-term performance is-            bioinformatics tools and databases used for the pre-
sues. The class will include polymer applications in bio-    diction of protein function and structure. It is designed   301. Teaching Techniques for Bioengineering. (1)
engineering and medicine. Also listed as Mechanical          to impart both a theoretical understanding of popular       Course may be repeated for credit. One hour of sem-
Engineering C223. (F) Staff                                  computational methods and practical hands-on ex-            inar per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsat-
                                                             perience with protein sequence analysis methods ap-         isfactory basis. Prerequisites: Graduate standing.
C230. Implications and Applications of Synthetic             plied to real data. (F,SP) Sjölander                        Weekly seminars and discussions of effective teach-
Biology. (3) Two hours of lecture and one hour of dis-                                                                   ing techniques. Use of educational objectives, alter-
cussion per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.      C246. Topics in Computational Biology and Ge-
                                                                                                                         native forms of instruction, and special techniques for
Explore strategies for maximizing the economic and           nomics. (4) Three hours of lecture, one and one-half
                                                                                                                         teaching key concepts and techniques in bioengi-
societal benefits of synthetic biology and minimizing         hours of paper review, and discussion per week. Pre-
                                                                                                                         neering. Course is intended to orient new graduate stu-
the risks; create “seedlings” for future research projects   requisites: 142, Computer Science 61A, or equivalent
                                                                                                                         dent instructors to teaching in the Bioengineering de-
in synthetic biology at UC Berkeley; increase multi-         ability to write programs in Java, Perl, C, or C++;
                                                                                                                         partment at Berkeley. (F,SP) Staff
disciplinary collaborations at UC Berkeley on synthetic      Molecular and Cell Biology 100, 102, or equivalent; or
biology; and introduce students to a wide perspective        consent of instructor. Instruction and discussion of top-
of SB projects and innovators as well as policy, legal,
and ethical experts. Also listed as Chemical Engi-
                                                             ics in genomics and computational biology. Working
                                                             from evolutionary concepts, the course will cover prin-     Biology
neering C295L. (SP) Arkin, Keasling                          ciples and application of molecular sequence com-
                                                             parison, genome sequencing and functional annota-
                                                                                                                         (College of Letters and Science or
231. Introduction to Computational Molecular and             tion, and phylogenetic analysis. Also listed as Plant       College of Natural Resources)
Cellular Biology. (4) Students will receive no credit for    and Microbial Biology C246 and Molecular and Cell Bi-
231 after taking 131. Three hours of lecture and one         ology C246. (SP) Brenner, Eisen                             The three interdepartmental biology courses pro-
hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Mathe-                                                                       vide a broad, basic introduction to the biological
matics 53 and 54, and either Computer Science 61A            C279. Occupational Biomechanics. (4) Three hours
                                                             of lecture/fieldwork per week. Overview of ergonomics        sciences for both majors and nonmajors. The
or 61B or Engineering 77. Topics include computa-                                                                        courses are taught by faculty from all three of the
tional approaches and techniques to gene structure           and occupational biomechanics. Course covers patho-
                                                             physiology and risk factors of upper extremity and back     biology departments on campus. Although there is
and finding, sequence alignment using dynamic pro-                                                                        no department of biology at Berkeley, the name “bi-
gramming, protein folding and structure prediction, pro-     loading at work, measurement of force and posture,
                                                             models for risk assessment, anthropometry applied to        ology” has been retained for these courses to
tein-drug interactions, genetic and biochemical path-                                                                    reflect their interdepartmental character. Additional
ways and networks, and microarray analysis. Various          task and workstation design, tool design, and structure
                                                             of successful ergonomics programs. Students will con-       courses in the biological sciences may be found by
case studies in these areas are reviewed and web-                                                                        consulting the offerings of the departments of In-
based computational biology tools will be used by stu-       duct a detailed job analysis and design a workplace in-
                                                             tervention. Also listed as Public Health C269C. (SP)        tegrative Biology, Molecular and Cell Biology, and
dents. Computational biology research connections to                                                                     Plant and Microbial Biology in this catalog.
biotechnology will be explored. Bioengineering content:      Rempel
fulfills biological and statistical requirement. Bioengi-                                                                 Biology 1A and 1B are each taught both semesters,
                                                             290. Advanced Topics in Bioengineering. (1-3)
neering Breadth, Core B (Informatics and Genomics)                                                                       and students may enroll in either (but not both) dur-
                                                             Course may be repeated for credit. One hour of lecture
and Core D (Computational Biology). (F,SP) Holmes                                                                        ing either the fall or spring semester.
                                                             per week per unit. One to three hours of lecture per
240. Topics in Computational Biology and Evolu-              week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. This course     Lower Division Courses
tion. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequi-         covers current topics of research interest in bioengi-
                                                             neering. The course content may vary from semester          1A. General Biology Lecture. (3) 1B may be taken
sites: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. This                                                                  before 1A. Three hours of lecture and one hour of dis-
class is aimed at graduate students from both the life       to semester. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                         cussion per week. Prerequisites: Chemistry 3A or
sciences and engineering/mathematics. In addition to         290A. Advanced Topics in Biomechanics and Tissue            112A, and 3B or 112B (may be taken concurrently Fall
learning about bioinformatics methods in computational       Engineering. (1-3) (F,SP)                                   or Spring only). General introduction to cell structure
biology and evolution, we will focus on research and                                                                     and function, molecular and organism genetics, animal
(oral and written) presentation skills and on the de-        290B. Advanced Topics in Bioinformatics and Ge-             development, form and function. Intended for biolog-
velopment of critical and analytical skills. Readings for    nomics. (1-3) (F,SP)                                        ical sciences majors, but open to all qualified students.
the class will be selected from the best papers in the                                                                   (F,SP) Staff
                                                             C290C. Topics in Fluid Mechanics. (1,2) Course may
field over the past 20 years, with a focus on review pa-
                                                             be repeated for credit. One hour of seminar per week.       1AL. General Biology Laboratory. (2) Formerly part of
pers and papers presenting important methods. (F,SP)
                                                             Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.       1A. One hour of lecture and three hours of laboratory
Sjölander
                                                             Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Lectures on spe-      per week. Prerequisites: 1A must be taken concur-
241. Probabilistic Modeling in Computational Bi-             cial topics which will be announced at the beginning of     rently. Laboratory that accompanies 1A lecture course.
ology. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prereq-          each semester that the course is offered. Topics may        Intended for biological science majors, but open to all
uisites: Mathematics 53 and 54 or equivalent; Molec-         include transport and mixing, geophysical fluid dy-          qualified students. (F,SP) Staff
ular and Cell Biology C100A/102 or equivalent,               namics, bio-fluid dynamics, oceanography, free surface
programming class or consent of instructor. The              flows, non Newtonian fluid mechanics, among other             1B. General Biology. (4) Three hours of lecture, three
course is designed to be a self-contained, advanced          possibilities. Also listed as Environ Sci, Policy, and      hours of laboratory, and one hour of discussion per
introduction to the techniques used in designing and         Management C291, Physics C290I, Mathematics                 week. General introduction to plant development, form,
implementing probabilistic models for bioinformatics,        C290C, Chemical Engineering C295M, Nuclear En-              and function; population genetics, ecology, and evo-
genomics, and other applications in computational bi-        gineering C290F, Civil and Environmental Engineering        lution. Intended for students majoring in the biological
ology and sequence analysis. A high mathematical fa-         C290K, and Mechanical Engineering C298A. (F,SP)             sciences, but open to all qualified students. Students
cility is assumed: this is a course for graduate students    Staff                                                       must take both Biology 1A and 1B to complete the se-
(and advanced undergraduates) who are interested in                                                                      quence. Sponsored by Integrative Biology. (F,SP) Staff
                                                             290D. Advanced Topics in Computational Bioengi-
designing their own, novel probabilistic models and ap-      neering. (1-3) (F,SP)                                       11. Introduction to the Science of Living Organ-
proaches, rather than for the casual user of bioinfor-                                                                   isms. (3) Students will receive no credit for 11 after re-
matics software. (F,SP) Holmes                               290F. Advanced Topics in Biomedical Imaging and             ceiving credit for both Integrative Biology 15 and 30.
                                                             Signal Processing. (1-3) (F,SP)                             Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per
243. Computational Methods in Biology. (4) Stu-
                                                             290H. Advanced Topics in Biomedical Systems En-             week. Prerequisites: For students not majoring in a bi-
dents will receive no credit for 243 after taking 143.
                                                             gineering. (1-3) (F,SP)                                     ological science and for non-science majors. Principles
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Math-
                                                                                                                         of biological organization and function using examples
ematics 53 and 54. Must be able to program in sci-
                                                             290I. Advanced Topics in Special Topics in Bioengi-         from plant and animal kingdoms. Similar in scope to Bi-
entific computing language (C, C++, Fortran), Matlab,
                                                             neering. (1-3) (F,SP)                                       ology 1 except that knowledge of physical sciences is
or Java. An introduction to biophysical simulation meth-
                                                                                                                         neither required nor assumed. Sponsored by Plant and
ods and algorithms, including molecular dynamics,            298. Group Studies, Seminars, or Group Research.
                                                                                                                         Microbial Biology. (SP) Jones, Quail
Monte Carlo, mathematical optimization, and “non-            (1-8) Course may be repeated for credit. Variable for-
algorithmic” computation such as neural networks. Var-       mat. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory ba-     11L. Laboratory for Biology 11. (2) Three hours of lab-
ious case studies in applying these areas in the areas       sis. Advanced studies in various subjects through spe-      oratory and one hour of discussion per week. Pre-
of protein folding, protein structure prediction, drug       cial seminars on topics to be selected each year.           requisites: Must be taken concurrently with Biology 11.
docking, and enzymatics will be covered. Core Spe-           Informal group studies of special problems, group par-      Laboratory designed to accompany Biology 11, Intro-
cialization: Core B (Informatics and Genomics); Core         ticipation in comprehensive design problems, or group       duction to the Science of Living Organisms. Weekly
D (Computational Biology); Bioengineering Content: Bi-       research on complete problems for analysis and ex-          laboratory exercises and one field trip to the UC Berke-
ological. (F,SP) Head-Gordon                                 perimentation. (F,SP) Staff                                 ley Botanical Garden. (SP) Jones, Quail
                                                                                                                                                                Biostatistics / 143
                                                                Lu Chen, Ph.D. University of Southern California.

Biophysics                                                         Mechanisms of synapse formation during development
                                                                   and synapse modification in plasticity
                                                                Michael Eisen, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco.
                                                                                                                                Biostatistics
(College of Letters and Science)                                   Genomics, bioinformatics                                     (College of Letters and Science and
                                                                Phillip Geissler, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
                                                                   Theoretical chemistry                                        School of Public Health)
Graduate Group Office: 299 Life Sciences Addition,
#3200, (510) 642-0379                                           Jay Groves, Ph.D. Stanford University. Principles of
biophysics.berkeley.edu                                            molecular organization in cell membranes                     Group Major Office: 101 Haviland Hall, (510) 642-3241
Chair: Ehud Isacoff, Ph.D.                                      Teresa Head-Gordon, Ph.D. Carnegie-Mellon University.           Mailing Address: 140 Warren Hall #7360
Graduate Adviser: Susan Marqusee, M.D., Ph.D.                      Theoretical chemistry                                        www.stat.berkeley.edu/biostat
                                                                Ian Holmes, Ph.D. University of Cambridge. Computational        Chair: Nicholas P. Jewell, Ph.D.
Professors                                                         biology/genomics                                             Professors
Thomas C. Alber, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of               Bryan A. Krantz, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Molecular
  Technology. Protein folding, stability, and function             mechanism of protein translocation across membranes          David R. Brillinger, Ph.D. Princeton University. Random
James M. Berger, Ph.D. Harvard University. Crystallographic                                                                       process data analysis
                                                                Sanjay Kumar, M.D., Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University School
  and biochemical studies of protein machines                      of Medicine. Molecular biophysics, tissue engineering        David A. Freedman, Ph.D. Princeton University. Statistical
Carlos J. Bustamante, Ph.D. University of California,                                                                             inference, probability
                                                                Ham Lim, Ph.D. University of Cambridge. Systems biology,        Nicholas P. Jewell, Ph.D. University of Edinburgh. Sampling
  Berkeley. Development and application of single molecule         microbiology, and genome evolution
  methods to the study of nucleic acid-binding molecular                                                                          and survival analysis
                                                                Jan T. Liphardt, Ph.D. Cambridge University. Physics            Michael J. Klass, Ph.D. Theoretical and applied probability
  motors, protein and RNA folding, and mechanical
  properties of macromolecules                                  Mohammad Mofrad, Ph.D. University of Toronto.                   Sophia Rabe-Hesketh, Ph.D. Kings College London.
Steven Chu, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley. Atomic,      Biomechanics, tissue engineering                               Generalized linear mixed models and latent variable
  polymer, and biophysics and molecular and cell biology        Kristin Scott, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego.         models
Yang Dan, Ph.D. Columbia University. Information                   Establishment of nerve cell connectivity in developing       John Rice, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley. Applied
  processing by brain neuronal circuits                            nervous systems                                                statistics, stochastic problems in neurophysiology
Jennifer A. Doudna, Ph.D. Harvard University. Ribozymes         Haw Yang, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley. Physical    †Steve Selvin, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
  and RNA machines                                                 chemistry and biophysics                                       Application of data analysis and graphical methods to
                                                                                                                                  environmental and epidemiologic problems
Robert Dudley, Ph.D. University of Cambridge.
  Biomechanics and comparative physiology                                                                                       Terence P. Speed, Ph.D. Monash (Australia). Applied
                                                                                                                                  statistics
Graham Fleming, Ph.D. University of London. Physical
  chemistry                                                     Program Overview                                                Michael E. Tarter, Ph.D. University of California, Los
                                                                                                                                  Angeles. Computer and graphical methodology
John G. Forte, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Membrane                                                                       Mark J. van der Laan, Ph.D. University of Utrecht, The
  proteins, transport and energetics                            The graduate program is administered by the                       Netherlands. Semi-parametric methods, computational
Ralph D. Freeman, O.D. Ohio State University; Ph.D.             Graduate Group in Biophysics. This campuswide,                    biology, survivalanalysis
  University of California, Berkeley. Optometry                                                                                 Bin Yu, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley. Machine
†Robert J. Full, Ph.D. State University of New York, Buffalo.   interdepartmental group provides an opportunity for
                                                                                                                                  learning, classification and unmixing in remote sensing,
  Comparative biomechanics, physiology, and functional          interested students to receive training leading to                network tomography, Minimum Description Length (MDL)
  morphology                                                    the Ph.D. in biophysics. Students may work under                  principle and information theory, and computational
Wayne M. Getz, Ph.D. University of Witwatersrand, South                                                                           neuroscience
  Africa. Population modeling, epidemiology, resource and       the supervision of any faculty member belonging to
                                                                                                                                *Peter J. Bickel (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,
  wildlife conservation and management                          the group.                                                        Berkeley. Nonparametric inference, asymptotic methods
Robert M. Glaeser, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.                                                                    *Chin Long Chiang (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,
  Membrane proteins, structural biology                         Students interested in pursuing graduate work in                  Berkeley. Stochastic processes, life tables, competing
Donald A. Glaser, Ph.D., Sc.D. California Institute of          biophysics typically acquire undergraduate training               risks
  Technology, Psychophysics and theoretical physics,                                                                            Kjell A. Doksum (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,
  psychophysics of vision, biotechnology                        in one of the basic physical or biological sciences               Berkeley. Nonparametrics, survival analysis
Ehud Isacoff, Ph.D. McGill University. Potassium channels,      and take key courses in biology, physics, and                   Charles J. Stone (Emeritus), Ph.D. Stanford University.
  synaptic plasticity                                           chemistry during the first two years at Berkeley.                  Nonparametric statistical modelling. Statistical software
Sung-Hou Kim, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh. Biophysical                                                                       *Warren Winkelstein Jr. (Emeritus), M.D., M.P.H. Syracuse
  chemistry                                                     Relevant graduate courses are listed below. Ad-                   University. Ecology, cancer, AIDS
Stanley A. Klein, Ph.D. Brandeis University. Optometry,         ditional courses may be found under the Depart-
  spatial vision, psychophysical methods and vision test        ments of Molecular and Cell Biology, Chemistry,                 Associate Professor
  design, nonlinear analysis of visual processes                                                                                Sandrine Dudoit, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
Robert Knight, M.D. Northwestern University. Attention and      Physics, and Bioengineering. Further information
                                                                                                                                  Applications of statistics to problems in genetics and
  memory, neuropsychology and physiology, cognitive             is available from the group office in 299 LSA.                     molecular biology
  neuroscience
Mimi A. R. Koehl, Ph.D. Duke University. Invertebrate           Upper Division Courses                                          Assistant Professors
  functional morphology and biomechanics                                                                                        Haiyan Huang, Ph.D. University of Southern California.
John Kuriyan, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.      H196. Honors Research in Biophysics. (4) Course                   Bioinformatics, distributional approximation
  Structural and functional studies of signal transduction      may be repeated for a maximum of 12 units. Must be              Alan E. Hubbard, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
  and DNA replication                                                                                                             Survival analysis and missing data
Harold Lecar, Ph.D. Columbia University. Neural biophysics,     taken on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites:
  excitable membranes                                           Upper division standing; minimum GPA 3.2; consent of
Terry E. Machen, Ph.D. University of California, Los            instructor. Supervised independent honors research on
  Angeles. Epithelial transport, cellular and membrane
  physiology/biology                                            topics specific to biophysics, followed by brief written         Associate Clinical Professor
Susan Marquesse, Ph.D., M.D. Stanford University. Protein       report and presentation at year-end student research            Deryk Van Brunt, Dr.P.H. University of California, Berkeley.
  folding and structure                                         colloquim. (F,SP) Staff                                           Health informatics
Richard A. Mathies, Ph.D. Cornell University. Biophysical,
  bioanalytical, and physical chemistry                         Graduate Courses                                                Lecturers
Eva Nogales, Ph.D. University of Keele. Structure of                                                                            Maureen Lahiff, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Applied
  biological self-assembling systems
George F. Oster, Ph.D. Columbia University. Mathematical
                                                                290. Biophysics Seminar. (1) Course may be re-                    multivariate methods, time series, longitudinal data
                                                                peated for credit. One hour of seminar per week. Must           David Lein, M.S. Cal State University, East Bay. Statistical
  models in cell and developmental biology                                                                                        computing
Donald C. Rio, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.        be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. The ob-
  Molecular genetics, transposable elements, RNA splicing       jective of this course is to provide an overview of the         Graduate Advisers: Ms. Dudoit, Mr. Jewell, Mr.
Dan Rokhsar, Ph.D. Cornell University. Theoretical,
  statistical, and many body theory                             research activities conducted by faculty members of             Selvin, Mr. Tarter, Mr. van der Laan.
Boris Rubinsky, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of                the Graduate Group in Biophysics. The lectures will
  Technology. Heat, mass transfer, cryopreservation             cover a wide range of interdisciplinary research topics
Frédéric Theunissen, Ph.D. University of California,
  Berkeley. Auditory physiology, computational                  reflecting the breadth of the group. An important goal           Group Major in Biostatistics
  neuroscience                                                  of this course is to enhance intellectual and collabo-
David E. Wemmer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.      rative interactions between students and faculty of the         Many issues in the health, medical, and biological
  Biophysical chemistry
                                                                group by increasing awareness of the range of re-               sciences are addressed by collecting and explor-
Evan Williams, Ph.D. Cornell University. Analytic and                                                                           ing relevant data. The development and application
  physical chemistry                                            search projects. The course will be conducted in a
Robert S. Zucker, Ph.D. Stanford University. Cellular           seminar format and is required for students new to the          of techniques to better understand such data is the
  neurophysiology, synaptic biophysics                          group. It is also recommended for advanced students             fundamental concern of the Group in Biostatistics.
Associate Professors                                            currently in the group. (F) Staff                               The program offers training in theory of statistics
Adam Arkin, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.                                                                        and biostatistics, the computer implementation of
  Computational biology                                         292. Research. (3-12) Course may be repeated for                analytic methods, and opportunities to use this
Steven E. Brenner, Ph.D. University of Cambridge.               credit. Laboratory research, conference. Must be taken          knowledge in areas of biological/medical research.
  Computational genomics                                                                                                        The curriculum is taught principally by members of
Jamie H. Doudna Cate, Ph.D. Yale University. Molecular
                                                                on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites:
  basis for protein synthesis by the ribosome                   Consent of instructor. Individual research under the su-        the Department of Statistics (College of Letters and
Dan Fletcher, Ph.D. Stanford University. Microjet drug          pervision of a faculty member. (F,SP) Staff                     Science) and the Division of Biostatistics (School
  delivery                                                                                                                      of Public Health) and provides a wide range of
Jack Gallant, Ph.D. Yale University. Vision and visual          293A-293B. Research Seminar: Faculty Evening
  perception                                                                                                                    ideas and approaches to the analysis of data.
Richard Kramer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.
                                                                Research Presentations (FERPS) and Student
  Intracellular signal mechanisms                               Evening Research Presentations (SERPS). (2;2)
Kimmen Sjölander, Ph.D. University of California, Santa
  Cruz. Phylogenomics
                                                                Two hours of seminar per week. Credit and grade to              Graduate Programs and Degrees
                                                                be awarded on completion of sequence. Must be taken
Lydia Sohn, Ph.D. Harvard University. Micro-nano
  engineering                                                   on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites:          The Group in Biostatistics offers two graduate pro-
                                                                292. Seminar on presentation and evaluation of results          grams: M.A. and Ph.D. These programs are ap-
                                                                in area of student’s individual research interests. (F)         propriate for students who have either a strong
Assistant Professors                                            Staff                                                           mathematical and statistical background with a fo-

        B prefix=language course for business majors                   R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                       *Professor of the Graduate School
        C prefix=cross-listed course                                   AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                    †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
        H prefix=honors course                                         requirement
144 / Biostatistics

cus in the biomedical sciences, or degrees in the                   Asian Languages and Cultures offers a minor in              to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty member
biological sciences with a focus in mathematics                     Buddhism, and the Group in Religious Studies of-            and a group of peers in a small-seminar setting. These
and statistics. (The M.A. degree can be obtained                    fers an emphasis in Buddhism. Undergraduate                 seminars are offered in all campus departments; top-
under Plan II. The Ph.D. dissertation is adminis-                   courses with a Buddhism emphasis can also be                ics vary from department to department and from
tered according to Plan B.)                                         found in the Departments of History of Art and              semester to semester. (F,SP) Staff
                                                                    South and Southeast Asian Studies.
The Group in Biostatistics, in conjunction with other                                                                           C50. Introduction to the Study of Buddhism. (4)
departments on the Berkeley campus, offers a                                                                                    Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per
Ph.D. in biostatistics with a designated emphasis
                                                                    Graduate Program                                            week. Formerly Buddhism C50. This introduction to the
in computational and genomic biology. For infor-                    The Berkeley Group in Buddhist Studies offers an            study of Buddhism will consider materials drawn from
mation on this option, go to computationalbiology.                  interdisciplinary program of study and research             various Buddhist traditions of Asia, from ancient times
berkeley.edu.                                                       leading to a Ph.D. degree in Buddhist studies. The          down to the present day. However, the course is not
                                                                    group, which cooperates closely with the Depart-            intended to be a comprehensive or systematic survey;
For further information, consult www.stat.berkeley.                 ments of South and Southeast Asian Studies                  rather than aiming at breadth, the course is designed
edu/biostat.                                                        (SSEAS) and East Asian Languages and Cultures               around key themes such as ritual, image veneration,
                                                                    (EALC), emphasizes the study of Buddhism in its             mysticism, meditation, and death. The overarching em-
Preparation for Graduate Study                                      many forms within its Asian historical and cultural         phasis throughout the course will be on the hermeneu-
                                                                    context.                                                    tic difficulties attendant upon the study of religion in
For the M.A., minimum entrance requirements con-                                                                                general, and Buddhism in particular. Also listed as
                                                                    The ability to read and analyze Buddhist texts in           South and Southeast Asian Studies C52 and East
sist of two full-year courses in calculus, a course in              their original languages is an indispensable skill for
linear algebra, and a one-year course in statistics                                                                             Asian Languages and Cultures C50. (F,SP) Staff
                                                                    research in the field. Accordingly, the study of clas-
or biostatistics. Those applying for the Ph.D. should               sical Asian languages constitutes a core element            84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-
possess a strong quantitative background ex-                        of the doctoral program. The specific combination            peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar
ceeding the minimum requirements for the M.A.                       of Asian languages required for the Ph.D. will de-          per week per unit for fifteen weeks. One and one half
                                                                    pend on each student’s area of research, but all            hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two
                                                                    students will be expected to gain facility in a mini-       hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.
Research Facilities                                                 mum of two Asian languages, at least one of which           Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not passed ba-
Graduate students in the group have direct access                   will be Classical Chinese, Classical Japanese, Pali,        sis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-grade basis.
to a variety of specialized computers as well as                    Sanskrit, or Classical Tibetan.                             Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Sophomore sem-
the services of the campus computing facilities.                                                                                inars are small interactive courses offered by faculty
                                                                    While linguistic competence is crucial, it is not con-      members in departments all across the campus.
Research activity of the faculty currently includes                 sidered an end in itself. Students are expected to
biostatistical computing, statistical issues in AIDS                                                                            Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for close, reg-
                                                                    acquire a sophisticated appreciation of the histor-         ular intellectual contact between faculty members and
research, survival analysis, environmental health,                  ical, social, and cultural milieux from which the
epidemiology, and statistical methods in genetics                                                                               students in the crucial second year. The topics vary
                                                                    Buddhist textual legacy emerged. All students in            from department to department and semester to
and computational biology. Projects in research ar-                 the Ph.D. program are encouraged to broaden and
eas provide opportunities for both practical expe-                                                                              semester. (F,SP)
                                                                    deepen their understanding of Buddhist phenom-
rience and individual research. Cooperation with                    ena through incorporating archaeological, ethno-            98. Directed Group Study for Lower Division Stu-
other departments allows unusually broad and                        graphic, and visual materials and perspectives. Be-         dents. (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. En-
effective training in both theoretical and applied                  cause of Berkeley’s particular strength in the area         rollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses
directions.                                                         of Buddhist visual culture (three of the group’s fac-       and Curricula section of this catalog. Hours to be ar-
                                                                    ulty are specialists in Buddhist art), all students in      ranged. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
                                                                    the program are expected to take at least one               Prerequisites: Lower division standing, 3.5 GPA. Small
Courses of Instruction                                              course in art history. In addition, depending on their      group instruction in topics not covered by regularly
                                                                    research interests, students are encouraged to do           scheduled courses. (F,SP) Staff
A wide variety of appropriate courses from a num-                   additional work in fields such as anthropology, crit-
ber of departments is available to candidates for ei-               ical theory, history, literature or philosophy. The         99. Independent Study for Lower Division Stu-
ther the M.A. or the Ph.D. degree, giving both pro-                 goal of our program is not only to provide students         dents. (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. En-
grams considerable flexibility. Such flexibility allows               with the linguistic, methodological, and conceptual         rollment is restricted; see the Introduction to Courses
students in consultation with the graduate adviser                  skills to produce significant new research on Bud-           and Curricula section of this catalog. Hours to be ar-
to arrange an individualized program. See Public                    dhist phenomena, but also to have students bring            ranged. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.
Health and Statistics for course listings.                          their research into dialogue with ongoing issues            Prerequisites: Lower division standing, 3.5 GPA. In-
                                                                    and concerns in the humanities writ large.                  dependent study in topics not covered by regularly
                                                                                                                                scheduled courses. (F,SP) Staff
Buddhist Studies                                                    The Ph.D. program in Buddhist studies is designed
                                                                    for students who intend to become scholars and              Upper Division Courses
(College of Letters and Science)                                    teachers at the university level. Students wishing to       C114. Tibetan Buddhism. (4) Three hours of lecture
                                                                    enter the Ph.D. program must have a master’s de-            per week. Formerly Buddhism 114. This course is a
Group Office: 104 Durant Hall, (510) 642-3480                        gree in a relevant field, typically East Asian, South        broad introduction to the history, doctrine, and culture
buddhiststudies.berkeley.edu                                        Asian, or Southeast Asian studies. A master’s de-           of the Buddhism of Tibet. We will begin with the in-
Director: Robert Sharf, Ph.D.                                       gree in religion is deemed relevant only if it in-          troduction of Buddhism to Tibet in the eighth century
Professors                                                          cludes significant training in an Asian language rel-        and move on to the evolution of the major schools of
†Robert P. Goldman, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania.               evant to their intended area of research at the time        Tibetan Buddhism, Tibetan Buddhist literature, ritual
  (South and Southeast Asian Studies)                               of admission.
Eleanor Rosch, Ph.D. Harvard University. (Psychology)
                                                                                                                                and monastic practice, the place of Buddhism in Ti-
Alexander von Rospatt, Ph.D. University of Hamburg. (South                                                                      betan political history, and the contemporary situation
                                                                    For application procedures, financial support, and
  and Southeast Asian Studies)                                                                                                  of Tibetan Buddhism both inside and outside of Tibet.
Robert Sharf (The D. H. Chen Distinguished Professor of             program requirements, please refer to the Buddhist
                                                                                                                                Also listed as Tibetan C114. (F,SP) Staff
  Buddhist Studies), Ph.D. University of Michigan. (East            studies web site at buddhiststudies.berkeley.edu.
  Asian Languages and Cultures)                                                                                                 C115. Japanese Buddhism. (4) Three hours of lec-
Joanna Williams, Ph.D. Harvard University. (History of Art)         Lower Division Courses
Padmanabh S. Jaini (Emeritus) Ph.D. University of London.                                                                       ture per week. Formerly Buddhism 115. A critical sur-
  (South and Southeast Asian Studies)                               24. Freshman Seminar. (1) Course may be repeated            vey of the main themes in the history of Japanese
Lewis R. Lancaster (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of                  for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per         Buddhism as they are treated in modern scholarship.
  Wisconsin. (East Asian Languages and Cultures)
                                                                    week. Sections 1 and 3 to be graded on a passed/not         The course covers the transmission of Buddhism from
Associate Professors                                                passed basis. Sections 2 and 4 to be graded on a let-       China and Korea to Japan; the subsequent evolution
Patricia Berger, Ph.D. University of California. (History of Art)   ter-grade basis. The Freshman Seminar Program has           in Japan of the Tendai, Shingon, Pure Land, Nichiren,
Gregory Levine, Ph.D. Princeton University. (History of Art)
Duncan Ryuken Williams, Ph.D. Harvard University. (East
                                                                    been designed to provide new students with the op-          and Zen schools of Buddhism; the organization and
  Asian Languages and Cultures)                                     portunity to explore an intellectual topic with a faculty   function of Buddhist institutions (monastic and lay) in
                                                                    member in a small seminar setting. Freshman semi-           Japanese society; the interaction between Buddhism
Graduate Adviser: Please consult the Buddhist                       nars are offered in all campus departments and topics       and other modes of religious belief and practice preva-
studies office at (510) 642-3480.                                    vary from department to department and semester to          lent in Japan, notably those that go under the headings
                                                                    semester. (F,SP)                                            of “Shinto” and “folk religion.” Also listed as Japanese
                                                                                                                                C115. (F,SP) Staff
Group in Buddhist Studies                                           39. Freshman/Sophomore Seminar. Course may be
                                                                    repeated for credit as topic varies. One hour of semi-      C120. Buddhism on the Silk Road. (4) Three hours
                                                                    nar per week per unit. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a       of lecture per week. Formerly Buddhism 120. This
Undergraduate Program                                               letter-grade basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a          course is both an historical introduction to the Silk
There is currently no undergraduate degree in Bud-                  passed/not passed basis. Freshman and sophomore             Road, understood as an ever-changing series of peo-
dhist Studies. However, theDepartment of East                       seminars offer lower division students the opportunity      ples, places, and traditions, as well as an introduction
                                                                                                                                                   Buddhist Studies / 145

to the study of those same peoples, places, and tra-          own. Also listed as East Asian Languages and Cul-            C223. Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts. (2,4)
ditions in the modern period. In this way, the class is       tures C130. (F,SP) Staff                                     Course may be repeated for credit as topic varies.
intended both as a guide to the extant textual, ar-                                                                        Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: Con-
chaeological, and art historical evidence from the Silk       C140. Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts. (4) This           sent of instructor. Formerly Buddhism 222. This sem-
Road, but also as a framework for thinking about what         course is intended for students who already have             inar is an intensive introduction to various genres of
it means to study Asia and Asian religions in the con-        some facility in literary Chinese. Three hours of lecture    Buddhist literature in classical Chinese, including trans-
                                                              per week. Prerequisites: 110A. One semester of clas-         lations of Sanskrit and Central Asian scriptures. Chi-
text of a contemporary American classroom. All read-
                                                              sical Chinese. Prior background in Buddhist history          nese commentaries, philosophical treatises, ha-
ings will be in English. Also listed as East Asian Lan-
                                                              and thought is helpful, but not required. This course is     giographies, and sectarian works. It is intended for
guages and Cultures C120. (F,SP) Staff
                                                              an introduction to the study of medieval Buddhist lit-       graduate students who already have some facility in
C122. Buddhist Meditation: Historical, Doctrinal,             erature written in classical Chinese. We will read sam-
                                                                                                                           classical Chinese. It will also serve as a tools and
and Ethnographic Perspectives. (4) Three hours of             ples from a variety of genres, including early Chinese
                                                                                                                           methods course, covering the basic reference works
lecture and one hour of discussion per week. This             translations of Sanskrit and Central Asian Buddhist
                                                                                                                           and secondary scholarship in the field of East Asian
course will explore the nature and function of Buddhist       scriptures, indigenous Chinese commentaries, philo-
                                                                                                                           Buddhism. The content of the course will be adjusted
meditation as it developed within various Buddhist tra-       sophical treatises, and sectarian works, including Chan
                                                                                                                           from semester to semester to best accommodate the
ditions of South, Southeast, and East Asia. Emphasis          gongan (Zen koans). The course will also serve as an
                                                                                                                           needs and interests of students. Also listed as Chinese
will be on the historical evolution, doctrinal foundations,   introduction to resource materials used in the study of
                                                                                                                           C223. (F,SP) Staff
and monastic and extra-monastic regimens associated           Chinese Buddhist texts, and students will be expected
with Buddhist meditation practices. We will make use          to make use of a variety of reference tools in prepa-        C224. Readings in Tibetan Buddhist Texts. (2,4)
of a wide variety of primary and secondary readings as        ration for class. Readings in Chinese will be supple-        Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: Con-
well as visual materials (including films) to attempt to       mented by a range of secondary readings in English           sent of instructor. This graduate seminar provides an
place the historical and doctrinal accounts within their      on Mahayana doctrine and Chinese Buddhist history.           introduction to a broad range of Tibetan Buddhist texts
cultural and institutional contexts. Also listed as East      Also listed as Chinese C140.                                 as well as to the methods and resources for their
Asian Languages and Cultures C122. (F,SP) Staff                                                                            study. Readings for the course will be drawn from a
                                                              C174. Japanese Buddhism in Diaspora. (4) Three
                                                                                                                           variety of genres and historical periods, including (1)
C124. Buddhism and Film. (4) Two to three hours of            hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: One lower-di-
                                                                                                                           chronicles and histories, (2) biographical literature, (3)
lecture and three to four hours of discussion/film             vision course in Buddhist Studies or consent of in-
                                                                                                                           doctrinal treatises, (4) canonical texts, (5) ritual man-
screening per week. Formerly Buddhism 124. This               structor. This course focuses on Japanese Buddhism
                                                                                                                           uals, (6) pilgrimage guides, and (7) liturgical texts. The
course will use the medium of film to explore various          during the late 19th and early 20th centuries in its en-
                                                                                                                           seminar is designed to be of interest to graduate stu-
themes in the study of Buddhism. At the same time,            counter with modernity, colonialism, and immigration
                                                                                                                           dents interested in premodern Tibet from any per-
we will use ideas culled from Buddhism to reflect back         history. Looking at the Japanese diaspora around the
                                                                                                                           spective (literature, religion, art, history, philosophy,
on the nature and power of film. We will be screening          Pacific Rim, we will begin with Japanese Buddhism’s
                                                                                                                           law, etc.). Students are required to do all of the read-
a wide variety of international and domestic films, from       relationship with the Meiji state, State Shinto, Chris-
                                                                                                                           ings in the original classical Tibetan. The course will
Hollywood blockbusters to small independent films              tianity, and the West. Regions covered include
                                                              Manchuria, Korea, Hawaii, the U.S., Canada, and              also introduce students to “tools and methods” for the
amd documentaries. Themes to be considered include                                                                         study of Tibetan Buddhist literature, including standard
the epistemic status of the viewing subject, the place        Brazil. Also listed as Japanese C174. (F,SP) Williams
                                                                                                                           lexical and bibliographic references, digital resources,
of imagination and visualization in Buddhist mediation        198. Directed Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-           and secondary literature in modern languages. The
and ritual, contesting Asian and Western notions of           peated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-     content of the course will vary from semester to
Buddhist authority, Orientalism, and the role of pro-         troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-     semester to account for the needs and interests of par-
jection and fantasy in cinematic representations of           alog. Hours to be arranged. Must be taken on a               ticular students. Also listed as Tibetan C224. (F,SP)
Buddhism. The films will be accompanied by primary             passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Junior or Se-        Staff
and secondary readings in Buddhist history and liter-         nior standing. Small group instruction not covered by
ature, religious studies, and film theory. Also listed as      regularly scheduled courses. (F,SP) Staff                    C225. Readings in Japanese Buddhist Texts. (2,4)
East Asian Languages and Cultures C124. (F,SP)                                                                             Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of
Staff                                                         199. Independent Study. (1-4) Course may be re-              seminar per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instruc-
                                                              peated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-     tor. Formerly Buddhism 225. This graduate seminar
C126. Buddhism and the Environment. (4) Three                 troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-     serves as an introduction to a broad range of
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: One lower-          alog. Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis.            Japanese Buddhist literature belonging to different his-
division course in Buddhist Studies or consent of in-         Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing. Independent        torical periods and genres, including (1) liturgical texts;
structor. A thematic course on Buddhist perspectives          study in topics not covered by regularly scheduled           (2) monastic records, rules, and ritual manuals; (3)
on nature and Buddhist responses to environmental is-         courses. (F,SP) Staff                                        doctrinal treatises; (4) biographies of monks; and (5)
sues. The first half of the course focuses on East                                                                          histories of Buddhism in Japan. The seminar is de-
Asian Buddhist cosmological and doctrinal perspec-            Graduate Courses                                             signed to be of interest to a range of graduate students
tives on the place of the human in nature and the re-         200. Proseminar in Buddhist Studies. (1) Course              working on premodern Japanese culture (literature,
lationship between the salvific goals of Buddhism and          may be repeated for credit as topic varies. Three hours      philosophy, intellectual history, religion, art, etc.). Stu-
nature. The second half of the course examines Bud-           of seminar every three to four weeks. Prerequisites:         dents are required to do all the readings in the original
dhist ethics, economics, and activism in relation to en-      Graduate standing in the Buddhist Studies Ph.D. pro-         languages, which are classical Chinese (Kanbun) and
vironmental issues in contemporary Southeast Asia,            gram or consent of instructor. This seminar provides         classical Japanese. The seminar will also serve as a
East Asia, and America. Also listed as East Asian Lan-        an opportunity for all students and faculty in the Group     “tools and methods” course, covering basic reference
guages and Cultures C126. (F,SP) Williams                     in Buddhist Studies to gather together on a regular ba-      works for the study of Japanese Buddhism as well as
                                                              sis to discuss recent theoretically significant works in      secondary scholarship in Japanese. The content of the
C128. Buddhism in Contemporary Society. (4)
                                                              the field of Buddhist Studies, as well as pertinent and       course will be adjusted from semester to semester to
Three hours of lecture per week. A study of the Bud-
                                                              important works in related disciplines (anthropology, art    accommodate the needs and interests of the students.
dhist tradition as it is found today in Asia. The course
                                                              history, literature, history, philosophy, and religious      Also listed as Japanese C225. (F,SP) Staff
will focus on specific living traditions of East, South,
and/or Southeast Asia. Themes to be addressed may             studies). The content of the course will be adjusted
                                                                                                                           C240. Readings in Chan and Zen Buddhist Litera-
include contemporary Buddhist ritual practices; fu-           from semester to semester so as to best accommo-
                                                                                                                           ture. (2,4) Course may be repeated for credit as topic
nerary and mortuary customs; the relationship between         date the needs and interest of the students, but the fo-
                                                                                                                           varies. Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequi-
                                                              cus will be on recent works representing the “state of
Buddhism and other local religious traditions; the re-                                                                     sites: One year of classical Chinese or Kanbun, as well
                                                              the field.” (F,SP) Staff
lationship between Buddhist institutions and the state;                                                                    as familiarity with East Asian history and culture. For-
Buddhist monasticism and its relationship to the laity;       220. Seminar in Buddhism and Buddhist Texts.                 merly Buddhism 240. This graduate seminar is an in-
Buddhist ethics; Buddhist “modernism,” and so on.             (2,4) Course may be repeated for credit as topic             tensive introduction to primary sources used in the
Also listed as South and Southeast Asian Studies              varies. Three hours of seminar per week. Prerequi-           study of Chan and Zen Buddhism. It is designed to be
C145 and East Asian Languages and Cultures C128.              sites: Consent of instructor. Content varies with student    of interest to a range of graduate students working on
(F,SP) Staff                                                  interest and needs. The course will normally focus on        premodern Chinese and Japanese culture (literature,
                                                              classical Buddhist texts that exist in multiple recensions   philosophy, intellectual history, religion, art, etc.). The
C130. Zen Buddhism. (4) Three hours of lecture and                                                                         seminar will also introduce students to Asian and
                                                              and languages, including Chinese, Sanskrit, and Ti-
one hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: One                                                                        Western language reference tools for the study of East
                                                              betan. (F,SP) Staff
lower division course in Asian religion recommended.                                                                       Asian Buddhist texts, including web resources. The
Formerly Buddhism 130. This course will introduce stu-        C220. Seminar in Buddhism and Buddhist Texts.                content of the course will vary from semester to
dents to the Zen Buddhist traditions of China and             (2,4) Three hours of seminar per week. Formerly Bud-         semester to best accommodate the needs and inter-
Japan, drawing on a variety of disciplinary perspectives      dhism 220. Content varies with student interests. The        ests of students. Also listed as East Asian Languages
(history, anthropology, philosophy, and so on). The           course will normally focus on classical Buddhist texts       and Cultures C240. (F,SP) Sharf
course will also explore a range of hermeneutic prob-         that exist in multiple recensions and languages, in-
lems (problems involved in interpretation) entailed in        cluding Chinese, Sanskrit, and Tibetan. Also listed as       298. Directed Study for Graduate Students. (1-8)
understanding a sophisticated religious tradition that        East Asian Languages and Cultures C220. (F,SP)               Course may be repeated for credit as texts vary. Hours
emerged in a time and culture very different from our         Staff                                                        to be arranged. Special tutorial or seminar on selected


       B prefix=language course for business majors                  R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                   *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                  AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                        requirement
146 / Buddhist Studies
topics not covered by available courses or seminars.           Jonathan S. Leonard (The George Quist Chair in Business            Mark B. Garman (Emeritus), Ph.D. Carnegie-Mellon
(F,SP) Staff                                                      Ethics), Ph.D. Harvard University. Employment,                     University. Finance, options, arbitrage theory
                                                                  productivity, collective bargaining                             Nils H. Hakansson (The Sylvan C. Coleman Professor of
                                                               David I. Levine (The Eugene E. and Catherine M. Trefethen             Finance and Accounting Emeritus), Ph.D., C.P.A.
299. Thesis Preparation and Related Research. (1-                 Chair in Business Administration), Ph.D. Harvard                   University of California, Los Angeles. Investment theory,
8) Course may be repeated for credit. Hours to be ar-             University. Macroeconomics, labor issues, corporate                financial markets, accounting
ranged. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory            investment                                                      Austin C. Hoggatt (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of Minnesota.
                                                               James R. Lincoln (The Warren E. and Carol Spieker Chair in            Simulations, modeling, experimental economics
basis. Prerequisites: Consent of thesis supervisor and            Leadership), Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Organization        Daniel Kahneman (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California.
graduate adviser. (F,SP) Staff                                    theory, Japanese management, organizational networks               Judgment, decision making, attention
                                                               †Richard K. Lyons (The S. K. and Angela Chan Chair in              Van Dusen Kennedy (Emeritus), Ph.D. Columbia University.
601. Individual Study for Master’s Students. (1-8)                Global Management), Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of               Industrial relations, environment of business
Course may be repeated for credit. Hours to be ar-                Technology. International finance management,                    Ernest Koenigsberg (Emeritus), Ph.D. Iowa State University.
                                                                  international economics                                            Distribution, materials handling, manufacturing systems
ranged. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory         Thomas A. Marschak, Ph.D. Stanford University. Economics           Baruch I. Lev (The Emile R. Niemela Chair in Accounting
basis. Prerequisites: Consent of graduate adviser. In-            mechanisms, decision theory                                        Emeritus), Ph.D. University of Chicago. Financial analysis,
dividual study for the comprehensive or language re-           Barbara A. Mellers (The Milton W. Terrill Chair in Business           accounting, financial regulation
                                                                  Administration), Ph.D. University of Illinois, Urbana-          Sherman J. Maisel (The California State Chair in Real Estate
quirements in consultation with the graduate adviser.             Champaign. Social judgment, decision making, functional
Units may not be used to meet either unit or residence                                                                               and Urban Economics Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard
                                                                  measurement theory                                                 University. Capital markets, housing economics
requirements for a master’s degree. (F,SP) Staff               John Morgan (The Gary and Sherron Kalbach Chair in                 Robert A. Meyer (Emeritus), Ph.D. Stanford University.
                                                                  Entrepreneurship), Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University.            Economics, strategy, market structure
602. Individual Study for Doctoral Students. (1-8)                Internet and pricing competition, decision making,
                                                                  auctions, lotteries                                             Raymond E. Miles (The Eugene E. and Catherine M.
Course may be repeated for credit. Hours to be ar-             David C. Mowery (The William A. and Betty H. Hasler Chair             Trefethen Chair in Business Administration Emeritus),
ranged. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory            in New Enterprise Development), Ph.D. Stanford                     Ph.D. Stanford University. Organizational structure,
                                                                  University. Economics and policy of technological change,          design, strategy
basis. Individual study in consultation with the major                                                                            Maurice Moonitz (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,
                                                                  business history
field adviser, intended to provide an opportunity for           Terrance Odean (The Willis H. Booth Chair in Banking and              Berkeley. Accounting
qualified students to prepare for various examinations             Finance I), Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.           John G. Myers (Emeritus), Ph.D. Northwestern University.
                                                                  Behavioral finance                                                  Advertising, communications, marketing management
required of candidates for the Ph.D. (F,SP) Staff                                                                                 Charles A. O’Reilly (The Lorraine Tyson Mitchell Chair in
                                                               Trond K. Petersen, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Career
                                                                  systems, payment systems, organizational behavior                  Leadership and Communication II Emeritus), Ph.D.
                                                               John M. Quigley (The I. Donald Terner Distinguished                   University of California, Berkeley. Employee commitment,

Business                                                          Professorship in Affordable Housing and Urban Policy),
                                                                  Ph.D. Harvard University. Microeconomics, public finance
                                                                                                                                     organizational culture, productivity
                                                                                                                                  David H. Pyle (The Willis H. Booth Professor in Banking and
                                                                                                                                     Finance Emeritus), Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of
Administration
                                                               Andrew K. Rose (The Bernard T. Rocca Chair in
                                                                  International Trade), Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of             Technology. Financial institutions, corporate finance
                                                                  Technology. International finance, macroeconomic policy          *Karlene A. Roberts (Emerita), Ph.D. University of California,
                                                               Mark E. Rubinstein, Ph.D. University of California, Los               Berkeley. Organizational communication, high reliability
(Walter A. Haas School of Business)                               Angeles. Options and portfolio insurance                           systems
                                                               Carl Shapiro (The Transamerica Chair in Business Strategy),        George J. Staubus (The Michael N. Chetkovich Chair in
                                                                  Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Competitive           Accounting Emeritus), Ph.D., C.P.A. University of
Office: S545 Student Services Building #1900                                                                                          Chicago. Financial, accounting, cost accounting
www.haas.berkeley.edu                                             strategy, innovation and intellectual property, antitrust and
                                                                  regulation                                                      George Strauss (Emeritus), Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of
Dean: Tom Campbell, Ph.D.                                      Stephen M. Shortell (The Blue Cross of California                     Technology. Industrial relations, negotiations
Associate Deans:                                                  Distinguished Professorship in Health Policy and                John T. Wheeler (Emeritus), Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute
Richard K. Lyons, Ph.D. (Academic Affairs)                        Management), Ph.D. University of Chicago. Healthcare               of Technology. Managerial accounting, budgeting,
Andrew W. Shogan, Ph.D. (Instruction)                             management, health services                                        strategic planning
                                                               Pablo T. Spiller (The Jeffrey A. Jacobs Distinguished              *Oliver E. Williamson (The Edgar F. Kaiser Chair in Business
Directors:                                                        Professorship in Business and Technology), Ph.D.                   Administration Emeritus), Ph.D. Carnegie-Mellon
Jennifer Chizuk, M.A. (Evening & Weekend M.B.A.                   University of Chicago. Political economy, industrial               University. Economics of organizations, applied
Program)                                                          organization, regulation and antitrust, regulation in              microeconomics
Robert Gleeson, M.A., M.B.A. (Berkeley-Columbia                   developing countries                                            Janet L. Yellen (The Eugene E. and Catherine M. Trefethen
Executive M.B.A. Program)                                      Barry M. Staw (The Lorraine Tyson Mitchell Chair in                   Chair in Business Administration Emerita), Ph.D. Yale
Dan Himelstein, M.Sc. (Undergraduate Program)                     Leadership and Communication I), Ph.D. Northwestern                University. International economics, macroeconomics
Julia Min, M.A. (M.B.A. Program)                                  University. Decision making, attitudes, behavior
John O’Brien, M.S. (Master’s in Financial Engineering          David J. Teece (The Mitsubishi Bank Chair in International         Associate Professors
Program)                                                          Business and Finance), Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania.        Pierre Collin Dufresne, Ph.D. HEC School of Management,
Philip E. Tetlock,Ph.D. (Ph.D. Program)                           Organizational economics and public policy                         Jouy-en-Josas, France. Finance
                                                               Philip E. Tetlock (The Lorraine Tyson Mitchell Chair in            Rui Jose P. de Figueiredo Jr., Ph.D. Stanford University.
Professors                                                        Leadership and Communication II), Ph.D. Yale University.           American politics, political organizations, formal theory,
Jennifer Aaker (The Thomas W. Tusher Chair in Global              Political psychology, cognitive style, cognitive biases and        quantitative methods
  Business), Ph.D. Stanford University. Culture, goals,           heuristics, accountability in decision making                   Gregory Duffee, Ph.D. Harvard University. Credit risk, term
  emotions, psychology of brand relationships                  †Laura D. Tyson, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of                     structure of interest rates, derivative instruments, risk
Jonathan B. Berk (The Sylvan C. Coleman Chair in Finance          Technology. Comparative economic systems, economic                 management for financial institutions
  and Accounting), Ph.D. Yale University. Theoretical and         development and planning, international trade,                  Sunil Dutta (The Egon and Joan von Kaschnitz
  empirical issues in finance, size-related anomalies              macroeconomics                                                     Distringuished Professorship in Accounting and
Severin Borenstein (The Ewald T. Grether Chair in Business     Hal R. Varian, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.              International Business), Ph.D. University of Minnesota.
  Administration and Public Policy), Ph.D. Massachusetts          Information management systems                                     Financial and managerial accounting
  Institute of Technology. Industrial organization and         J. Miguel Villas-Boas (The J. Gary Shansby Chair in                Christopher Hennessy, Ph.D. Princeton University. Financial
  government regulation, law and economics, applied               Marketing Strategy), Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of              economics, corporate finance, contract theory, public
  macroeconomic theory                                            Technology. Marketing models and strategy, new product             finance
Tom Campbell (Bank of America Dean), PhD. University of           development                                                     Ganesh K. Iyer (The Harold Furst Chair in Management
  Chicago, J.D. Harvard University                             David J. Vogel (The Solomon P. Lee Chair in Business                  Philosophy and Values), Ph.D. University of Toronto.
Jennifer A. Chatman (The Paul J. Cortese Distinguished            Ethics), Ph.D. Princeton University. Business-government           Distribution channels and information issues in marketing
  Professorship in Management), Ph.D. University of               relations, American and comparative                                strategy
  California. Organizational culture, socialization,           Nancy E. Wallace, Ph.D. University of Michigan. Urban
                                                                  economics and real estate                                       Laura Kray, Ph.D. University of Washington. Organizational
  commitment                                                                                                                         behavior, negotiations, justice, judgment, personal
Robert H. Edelstein, Ph.D. Harvard University. Real estate     James A. Wilcox (The Kruttschnitt Family Chair in Financial
                                                                  Institutions), Ph.D. Northwestern University. Finance,             decision making versus advising
  finance and institutions                                                                                                         Christine Parlour, Ph.D. Queens University at Kingston.
                                                                  interests rates, forecasting
Tülin Erdem (The Ewald T. Grether Chair in Business            Candace Yano, Ph.D. Stanford University. Integrated                   Economics
  Administration and Marketing), Ph.D. University of              marketing-manufacturing models of product scheduling,           Priya Raghubir, Ph.D. New York University. Consumer
  Alberta. Consumer behavior, marketing research, product         selection, and pricing                                             behavior, marketing research, marketing management
  and brand management                                         David A. Aaker (The E. T. Grether Chair in Marketing and           Christine M. Rosen, Ph.D. Harvard University.
John H. Freeman (The Leo B. and Florence Helzel Chair in          Public Policy Emeritus), Ph.D. Stanford University.                Environmental regulation, business, government
  Entrepreneurship and Innovation), Ph.D. University of           Strategy, advertising, market research                          Richard H. Stanton, Ph.D. Stanford University. Securities
  North Carolina. Organizational theory and                    David A. Alhadeff (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University.               valuation, contingent claims and deferred annuities,
  entrepreneurship                                                Financial institutions, economic behavior                          investor behavior and investment strategies of financial
Paul J. Gertler (The Li Ka Shing Foundation Chair in Health    Hector R. Anton (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of Minnesota.            institutions
  Management), Ph.D. University of Wisconsin. Economic            Accounting                                                      Steven Tadelis, Ph.D. Harvard University. Economics of
  development, industrial organization, health economics       K. Roland A. Artle (Emeritus), Econ. Dr. Stockholm School of          organization, procurement contracting, theory of the firm
Rashi H. Glazer, Ph.D. Stanford University. Marketing             Economics. Economics of population aging,                          and industrial organization, contract theory, game theory
  strategy, decision making                                       macroeconomics                                                  Catherine Wolfram, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of
Benjamin E. Hermalin (The Thomas and Alison Schneider          Frederick E. Balderston (Emeritus), Ph.D. Princeton                   Technology. Industrial organization and regulation
  Distinguished Professorship in Finance), Ph.D.                  University. Strategy, financial services, marketing systems      Florian Zettelmeyer, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of
  Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Theory of             Louis P. Bucklin (Emeritus), Ph.D. Northwestern University.           Technology. Internet marketing
  contracts, mechanism design                                     Marketing strategies, distribution systems                      Xiao-Jun Zhang (The Emile R. Nimela Chair in Accounting),
Teck H. Ho (The William Halford Jr. Family Chair in            Alan R. Cerf (Emeritus), Ph.D., C.P.A. Stanford University.           Ph.D. Columbia University. Financial accounting, equity
  Marketing), Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania. Quantitative      Taxation, real estate, accounting                                  variation
  marketing using economics, psychology, operations            †Earl F. Cheit (The Edgar F. Kaiser Professor of Business          *Michael L. Gerlach (Emeritus), Ph.D. Yale University.
  research, and computer science                                  Administration Emeritus and Dean Emeritus), Ph.D., J.D.,           International business, strategy and policy
Dorit S. Hochbaum, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania.              D.H.L. (hon.) University of Minnesota. Business,                Robert G. Harris (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of California,
  Operations research, computer systems, algorithms               government, trade policy, education                                Berkeley. Industry economics, regulation,
Dwight M. Jaffee (The Willis H. Booth Chair in Banking and     Robert E. Cole (The Lorraine Tyson Mitchell Chair in                  telecommunications, antitrust
  Finance II), Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.       Leadership and Communication II Emeritus), Ph.D.                Terry A. Marsh (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of Chicago.
  Housing finance, mortgage lending, financial futures and          University of Illinois. Work organization, industrial              Investments, corporate finance, econometrics, accounting
  options, thrift industry                                        relations, organizational change, Japan                         Milo W. Smith (Emeritus), Ph.D. Iowa State University.
Michael L. Katz (The Sarin Chair in Strategy and               Michael Conant (Emeritus), Ph.D., J.D. University of                  Accounting
  Leadership), Ph.D. Oxford University. Competitive               Chicago. Antitrust economics, law, regulation                   *†M. Frances Van Loo (Emeritus), Ph.D. University of
  strategy, microeconomics, managerial compensation            Edwin M. Epstein (Emeritus), LL.B., M.A. Yale University.             California, Berkeley. Management of public and nonprofit
Hayne E. Leland (The Arno A. Rayner Chair in Finance and          Business ethics and corporate political behavior                   institutions
  Management), Ph.D. Harvard University. Portfolio             Joseph W. Garbarino (Emeritus), Ph.D. Harvard University.
  strategies and optimal pricing                                  Employee relations, bargaining arbitration                      Assistant Professors
                                                                                                                                           Business Administration / 147
Cameron Anderson, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.      Peter L. Thigpen, M.B.A. Stanford University. Business and     policy, economic analysis and policy, finance, gen-
   Power and politics, negotiation and conflict resolution,         public policy
   emotion, groups and teams                                     Steven A. Wood, Ph.D. Claremont Graduate School.
                                                                                                                                eral management, marketing, operations and in-
Eduardo Andrade, Ph.D. University of Flordia. Marketing and        Finance                                                      formation technology management, organizational
   consumer behavior                                                                                                            behavior and industrial relations, and real estate
G. Pino Audia, Ph.D. University of Maryland. Organizational                                                                     and urban land economics.
   change, strategic decision making, and industrial             Adjunct Professors
   evolution processes                                           Meghan R. Busse, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of
Hai Che, Ph.D. Washington University. Marketing and                 Technology. Economics
                                                                                                                                Contact Information: Haas School of Business,
   competitive strategies                                        Henry Chesbrough, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.    University of California, Berkeley, S450 Student
Ernesto Dal Bó, Ph.D. University of Oxford. Applied                 Innovation, internal and external research and              Services Building #1900, Berkeley, CA 94720-
   microeconomic theory, political economy, collective              development, intellectual property
   decision making, coercion                                                                                                    1900; Telephone (510) 642-1421; www.haas.
                                                                 Jerome S. Engel, M.S. University of Pennsylvania.
Thomas Davidoff, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of                   Entrepreneurship                                            berkeley.edu/Undergrad.
   Technology. Real estate, household lifetime consumption,      Andrew W. Isaacs, M.S. University of Michigan. Technology
   investment decisions                                             company strategy, high-tech entrepreneurial enterprises
Waverly Ding, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Academic
   entrepreneurship in biotechnology, technology strategy,
                                                                 Kellie McElhaney, Ph.D. University of Michigan. Socially
                                                                    responsible business
                                                                                                                                Graduate Degrees
   strategic alliances                                           Noel W. Nellis, J.D. University of California, Berkeley.
Hillary Anger Elfenbein, Ph.D. Harvard University. Emotion          Entrepreneurship                                            The Haas School of Business offers curricula lead-
   in the workplace, individual and cross-cultural differences   John W. O’Brien, M.S. University of California, Los Angeles.   ing to the Master of Business Administration de-
   in the communication of emotion                                  Finance
Qintao Fan, Ph.D. Stanford University. Financial reporting       N. Terry Pearce, B.S. Linfield College, Oregon.
                                                                                                                                gree, Master’s in Financial Engineering, and the
   and capital market efficiency                                     Communications                                              Ph.D. degree. The Haas School offers three M.B.A.
Terrence Hendershott, Ph.D. Stanford University. Effects of      Kristiana Raube, Ph.D. Rand Graduate School of Policy.         programs: a two-year program for full-time stu-
   new information technology on financial and nonfinancial           Health management
   markets                                                                                                                      dents, the Evening & Weekend M.B.A. Program,
                                                                 Mario M. Rosati, J.D. University of California, Berkeley.
Nicole Bastian Johnson, Ph.D. Stanford University.                  Entrepreneurship and venture capital, corporate law         and the Berkeley-Columbia Executive M.B.A., a
   Divisional performance measurement, management                Domingo Tavella, Ph.D. Stanford University. Finance            19-month program for senior professionals.
   incentives, transfer pricing                                  Sebastian Teunissen, M.S. Duke University. International
Shai Levi, Ph.D. New York University. Financial disclosure          business
   choices, corporate governance and quality of financial         Leo B. Helzel (Emeritus), M.B.A., J.D., C.P.A. University of
   reporting                                                        California, Berkeley. Entrepreneurship                      Full-Time M.B.A. Program
Alexandre Mas, Ph.D. Princeton University. Economics and
   labor economics
Maria E. Nondorf, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at                                                                         The Full-Time M.B.A. program at the Haas School
   Chapel Hill. Accounting, corporate financing activities,
   mergers and acquisitions, employee stock options
                                                                 Undergraduate Program                                          of Business offers an unsurpassed education in the
                                                                                                                                fundamentals of management and in-depth expo-
Santiago Oliveros, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin.
   Microeconomic theory and political economy                    The highly competitive, two-year Haas Under-                   sure to the trends shaking the foundations of busi-
Jacob S. Sagi, Ph.D. University of British Columbia.             graduate Program accepts applications from both                ness. It brings together outstanding men and
   Modeling preferences over risk                                transfer and continuing UC Berkeley applicants.                women from around the world and teaches them to
Mark S. Seasholes, Ph.D. Harvard University. International
   capital market, cross-border equity flows                      The program’s goal is to provide students with the             be innovative leaders in any type of organization.
José C. Silva, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.      knowledge and technical skills necessary to un-                At the end of the two-year program, students will
   Consumer behavior, decision making, behavioral                derstand the modern business world, to prepare for             receive the Berkeley M.B.A., embodying a spirit of
   economics, management science
Xuanming Su, Ph.D. Stanford University. Information and          subsequent graduate work, and to achieve the                   challenge that will become their approach to lead-
   incentives in operations                                      highest levels of success in their professional ca-            ership throughout their professional lives. Students
Marko Terviö, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.       reers. Students earn a Bachelor of Science degree              learn to pursue new ideas aggressively, to defy
   Applied microeconomics, labor economics, superstar
   markets, economics of education and experimentation           that takes a general management perspective.                   convention, and to lead through innovation. In ad-
Johan Walden, Ph.D. Yale University and Uppsala                  Coursework is fully integrated with the University’s           dition, the program is shaped by its flexible cur-
   University. Bubbles and crashes in economics with long        liberal arts curriculum, allowing students to gain a           riculum, distinguished faculty, and strong connec-
   horizons, heavy-tailed distributions in financial markets,
   human capital and capital markets, numerical option           broad perspective on business management and                   tions with business in nearby Silicon Valley and the
   pricing                                                       its environment. Students are challenged to de-                San Francisco Bay Area.
Senior Lecturer                                                  velop creative and innovative solutions to con-
                                                                                                                                Students are marked by a unique blend of en-
†Sara L. Beckman, Ph.D. Stanford University. Manufacturing       temporary business problems and to develop lead-
                                                                                                                                trepreneurial drive and team spirit, underpinned by
  strategy and organization design, cost management              ership skills and a sense of community service
  systems                                                                                                                       serious scholarship and a global outlook. With ap-
                                                                 through classroom experiences and extracurricu-
                                                                                                                                proximately 33 percent international students
                                                                 lar activities.
                                                                                                                                (evenly divided between Europe, Asia, and South
                                                                 Students preparing for admission to the Under-                 America) and 26 percent women, the program
Affiliated Professors                                             graduate Program may complete required lower di-               reflects the diverse global environment in which its
Vinod K. Aggarwal, Ph.D. (Political Science)                     vision courses in any college in the University or             graduates will pursue their careers. The diverse
Joseph V. Farrell, Ph.D. (Economics)                             equivalent courses at other institutions. Before ap-           student body of some 480 students represents
Richard J. Gilbert, Ph.D. (Economics)                            plying to the school, you should visit our web site            more than 200 colleges and universities, 40 coun-
Robert P. Merges, Ph.D. (Law)
Howard A. Shelanski, Ph.D. (Law)                                 at www.haas.berkeley.edu/Undergrad. The web                    tries, and a wide range of academic and profes-
Senior Lecturers
                                                                 site contains complete information concerning aca-             sional backgrounds.
                                                                 demic qualifications for admission, with details
Homa Bahrami, Ph.D. University of Aston, UK.                                                                                    The Haas School co-sponsors four concurrent-de-
   Organizational behavior, strategic management                 about prerequisites and degree requirements. Be-
                                                                                                                                gree programs:
Cristina G. Banks, Ph.D. University of Minnesota. Personnel      cause there are many more applicants than spaces
   management and assessment                                     available, completion of the prerequisites does not            • M.B.A./J.D. with Boalt Hall or Hastings College of
Trudy L. Kehret-Ward, Ph.D. University of Washington.
   Advertising, consumer behavior, marketing management          guarantee admission.                                           the Law;
David O. Robinson, Ph.D. Brown University. Business,
   psychology                                                    Upon admission, business majors must take the                  • M.B.A./M.P.H. in health services management
Holly Schroth, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara.    following upper division core courses at Haas:                 with the School of Public Health; and
   Negotiations, procedural justice, sunk cost
William H. Sonnenschein, M.A. San Francisco State                UGBA 100—Business Communication                                • M.B.A./M.I.A.S. in international and area studies.
   University. Communications
Paul A. Tiffany, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.       UGBA 101A—Microeconomic Analysis for Busi-                     In addition, two joint curriculum programs are
   Competitive strategy, business and public policy              ness Decisions
Peter C. Wilton, Ph.D. Purdue University. Marketing                                                                             offered:
Lecturers                                                        UGBA 101B—Macroeconomic Analysis for Busi-                     • The Management of Technology Certificate, a
George S. Cluff, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.       ness Decisions                                                 joint program with the College of Engineering;
   Microeconomics, strategy
John Danner, J.D. University of California, Berkeley.            UGBA 102A—Introduction to Financial Accounting                 • The Real Estate Development Program with the
   Entrepreneurship                                                                                                             Department of City and Regional Planning and the
Timothy Dayonot, M.P.A. Harvard University. Public policy        UGBA 102B—Introduction to Managerial Ac-
David C. Distad, Ph.D. Michigan State University. Finance        counting                                                       Center for Real Estate and Urban Economics.
Stephen W. Etter, M.B.A. University of California, Berkeley.
   Finance                                                       UGBA 103—Introduction to Finance                               Curriculum. Students in the full-time program must
Nancy A. Euske, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley.                                                                       complete 51 semester units to graduate: 20 units
   Nonprofit management, organizational culture, control          UGBA 105—Organizational Behavior                               of core required courses and 31 units of electives.
   systems
Richard M. Grant, B.S. Stanford University. Information                                                                         Students who pass a waiver exam may replace
                                                                 UGBA 106—Marketing
   technology                                                                                                                   core courses with electives. There is also a two-
Ernest Gundling, Ph.D. University of Chicago. Global             UGBA 107—Social, Political, and Ethical Envi-                  year residency requirement.
   leadership development, cross-border organization
   development, global teams                                     ronment of Business
                                                                                                                                Haas students may apply 6 units of credit toward
Ericka Lutz (Teacher, Special Programs), B.A. San
   Francisco State University. Writing                           Beyond these required core courses and other                   their degrees from courses outside the department,
Arturo Perez-Reyes, M.A. University of Chicago.                  courses outside the Haas School needed to fulfill               such as languages or law, and they are encour-
   Communications                                                the degree requirements, business majors must                  aged to take full advantage of the range of course
John H. Phillips, J.D. Hastings College. Communications
F. Victor Stanton, J.D., M.B.A. Harvard University.              take additional classes from the following nine busi-          offerings at Berkeley. Students may petition to take
   Accounting                                                    ness disciplines: accounting, business and public              more than 6 units.

        B prefix=language course for business majors                    R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                     *Professor of the Graduate School
        C prefix=cross-listed course                                    AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                  †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
        H prefix=honors course                                          requirement
148 / Business Administration

Students outside the M.B.A. program may take           Students in the Evening & Weekend M.B.A. pro-             work. The program also enrolls students with in-
courses on a space-available basis only. They          gram must complete 42 semester units to gradu-            terests in real estate, provided they take the re-
should consult the Full-Time M.B.A. program office      ate, including 16 units of required core courses and      quired coursework in either accounting or finance.
directly before attempting to register for courses.    24 units of elective courses. Evening classes are         The Ph.D. program includes periods of intensive
                                                       held on the Berkeley campus Monday through                work in formal courses as well as individually de-
Exchange Programs. The Haas School offers              Thursday from 6 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Students attend         veloped and executed reviews of special topics
seven exchange programs with some of the finest         classes two nights per week. Weekend classes are          and programs of research. It provides the oppor-
business schools in Europe, Asia, and North Amer-      held Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and alternate        tunity to work closely with an internationally known
ica. The following schools participate: London Busi-   between Berkeley and a South Bay campus.                  faculty both in the classroom and in individual
ness School in Great Britain, L’Ecole des Hautes                                                                 scholarly investigation.
Etudes Commerciales (HEC) outside Paris, the           Applications. The Evening & Weekend M.B.A. pro-
Rotterdam School of Management in the Nether-          gram accepts applications online at ewmba.haas.           The purpose of the program is to train men and
lands, SDA Bocconi in Milan, IESE in Barcelona,        berkeley.edu/apply.html. If you are not able to ap-       women for careers in the research, study, and
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology,        ply online, you may download a printable applica-         teaching of business administration. It is designed
and Columbia Business School in New York City.         tion on our web site. For more information, please        to enable students not only to become critically fa-
In addition, the Washington Campus Program in          contact The Evening & Weekend M.B.A. Program,             miliar with the sophisticated technical and theo-
Washington, D.C., and the M.B.A. Enterprise Corps      Haas School of Business, University of California,        retical disciplines underlying the practice of busi-
in emerging economies provide Berkeley students        Berkeley, #1906, Berkeley, CA 94720-1906; tele-           ness administration, but to develop the capacity to
with opportunities to enhance their education.         phone (510) 642-0292; web site: ewmba.haas.               contribute to their extension. A distinguishing fea-
                                                       berkeley.edu.                                             ture of Berkeley’s program is an emphasis on re-
Admission. Applications for the Full-Time M.B.A.                                                                 search. Since the end of World War II, the appli-
program are accepted for fall entry only. Typically,                                                             cation to business of theory and methodology from
the school receives 3,000-4,000 applications for       Master’s in Financial Engineering                         the social sciences and quantitative methods from
about 240 positions in the entering class. The av-     Program                                                   the applied sciences has resulted in an accelerated
erage age of entering students is 28 years and all                                                               rate of knowledge acquisition. This change has
have significant full-time business experience be-      The Master’s in Financial Engineering (M.F.E.) de-        significantly deepened the sophistication of re-
fore entering the program.                             gree is a full-time, one-year graduate degree of-         search work and broadened the range of analytical
                                                       fered by the Haas School of Business. Students            concepts with which the student in business must
We admit candidates with substantial professional      enrolled in the M.F.E. program learn to use theo-         be familiar. The intention of the Berkeley faculty is
experience and considerable leadership potential       retical finance, mathematics, and computer pro-            to train students who will take leadership roles in
who come from a wide variety of industries and         gramming skills to make pricing, hedging, trading,        the future expansion and communication of this
backgrounds. In addition, we seek candidates who       and portfolio management decisions.                       knowledge.
will add to the richness of the classroom experience
and participate actively in the Haas community.        Admission is extremely competitive, with 60 stu-          Instruction in the program may be separated into
                                                       dents admitted annually. The program starts and           three general periods. The first encompasses for-
Applicants are strongly urged to submit completed      ends during the spring semester, and applications         mal coursework in basic and advanced subjects.
applications as early as possible. Applications are    are accepted only for spring enrollment. In addition      The time devoted to these studies, typically two
reviewed beginning in November and are evalu-          to meeting the UC Berkeley Graduate Division ad-          years, depends largely upon a student’s prior
ated in four decision periods, or rounds.              missions requirements, applicants should have             preparation. In the second period, directed study,
                                                       solid backgrounds in advanced mathematics and             students work closely with faculty members to pre-
Career Center. The Career Center guides stu-           computer programming. Most students admitted to           pare for research in their selected fields. In the last
dents through their career-planning process. Job       the program have academic and work experience             period, individual research, students work on their
search preparation includes workshops on inter-        in engineering, finance, statistics, physics, eco-         dissertations. Together, periods two and three usu-
viewing, résumés, networking, and industry-specific     nomics, and computer science.                             ally require two to three years to complete.
informational sessions. Workshops are presented
by Career Center staff and outside experts. On-        The M.F.E. curriculum consists of 28 units of             Preparation for the Ph.D. Program. Admission to
campus recruitment opportunities include formal        coursework taught over four terms of eight weeks          the Ph.D. program is open to students with an ac-
job interviews and informal opportunities to meet      each. Advanced courses cover topics in credit risk        credited bachelor’s degree, or higher, from any
company representatives.                               modeling, derivatives pricing, fixed income secu-          field. No preference in admission is given to any
                                                       rities, bond portfolio management, equity and cur-        previous field of study or to applicants who have
Campus Visits. The Haas School encourages              rency markets, corporate finance, dynamic asset            had some graduate training. Applicants should pos-
prospective students to attend information sessions    management, arbitrage, hedging, futures and op-           sess strong skills in writing and oral communica-
at Berkeley. Organized by first-and second-year         tions pricing, trading, and dynamic investment            tions and have a basic understanding of differen-
students, these presentations cover life in the pro-   strategies. An applied finance project of 1-3 units        tial calculus.
gram from the student perspective. Information         is also required for graduation. Credits and trans-
sessions are held daily at 1 p.m. throughout the       fers from other universities and programs are not         Ph.D. applications will be evaluated on the basis of
academic year (September through mid-May, with         accepted.                                                 evidence of a high level of scholarly ability in both
the exception of school holidays). The sessions last                                                             quantitative and qualitative skills, the motivation to
                                                       Graduates of the M.F.E. program find positions in          complete a strenuous academic program, and a
approximately one hour. During a visit, prospective
                                                       commercial and investment banking, insurance              clear statement of career objectives that are con-
students may arrange to visit classes or request a
                                                       and reinsurance, corporate treasuries, corporate          sistent with the Ph.D. degree.
Dutch-treat lunch and school tour with current stu-
                                                       strategy, and money management. Specializations
dents. For further information or to arrange for a                                                               Applications for the Ph.D. program may be ob-
                                                       include risk management, asset/liability model-
classroom visit, call (510) 642-5610.                  ing/optimization, security structuring, derivative val-   tained by writing to the Ph.D. Program Office, Haas
Applications. Candidates should apply online           uation and trading, consulting, asset management,         School of Business, University of California, Berke-
through the Haas School of Business web site at        research, option-based securities valuation, special      ley; F655 Faculty Wing #1900, Berkeley, CA
www.haas.berkeley.edu. The online application is       hedging, and real-option investment analysis.             94720-1900; web site: haas.berkeley.edu/Phd.
typically available in mid-August. Please read the     For complete admissions, curriculum, and pro-
application information carefully.                     gram information, please visit the Master’s in
                                                       Financial Engineering Program’s web site at
                                                       www.haas.berkeley.edu/MFE/index.html.
                                                                                                                 Undergraduate Business
Evening & Weekend M.B.A.                                                                                         Administration
Program
                                                       The Ph.D. Program                                         Lower Division Courses
The Haas School of Business also offers the
Berkeley M.B.A. in a three-year program for work-      The Ph.D. program of the Haas School of Business          10. Principles of Business. (3) Three hours of lecture
ing professionals who are seeking to add value to      is an advanced and scholarly course of study in the       and one hour of discussion per week. Formerly Busi-
their academic backgrounds and professional            functioning of business and its interaction with the      ness Administration 10. This course provides an in-
experience while maintaining their current career      environment. It combines an in-depth examination          troduction to the study of the modern business enter-
momentum.                                              of one or more of the traditional fields of study in       prise. The course is taught in five modules, the order
                                                       business administration with a broader, integrative       of which may vary from semester to semester. The first
Students enter the program in the fall semester.       investigation of basic and applied theory in the so-      examines the role and governance of business en-
They must have completed two prerequisite              cial sciences and in quantitative methods. Fields of      terprise in a market economy. The second concen-
courses in mathematics and statistics or their         primary specialization include accounting, business       trates on financial issues, while the third looks at the
equivalents before enrollment. Waiver examina-         and public policy, finance, marketing, and organi-         problems of managing people in organizations. The
tions are also available. Admission criteria for the   zational behavior and industrial relations. Students      fourth examines product pricing, marketing, and dis-
Evening & Weekend M.B.A. program are similar to        in any primary specialization may also choose to          tribution issues and the last concentrates on the in-
those for the full-time program.                       concentrate in strategy by taking additional course-      ternational business environment. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                                        Business Administration / 149

24. Freshman Seminars. (1) Course may be repeated             110. Economic analysis applicable to the problems of          tors of the American economy. Application of economic
for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar per           business enterprises with emphasis on the determi-            analysis to the administrative regulation of prices, in-
week. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a letter-grade ba-         nation of the level of prices, outputs, and inputs; effects   vestment, service quality, and other managerial deci-
sis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a passed/not passed         of the state of the competitive environment on busi-          sions. Analysis of regulatory policies and alternatives
basis. Formerly Business Administration 24. The               ness and government policies. (F,SP)                          to economic regulation, including market competition
Berkeley Seminar Program has been designed to pro-                                                                          and public ownership. (F,SP)
                                                              101B. Macroeconomic Analysis for Business De-
vide new students with the opportunity to explore an in-
                                                              cisions. (3) Students will receive no credit for 101B af-     113. Managerial Economics. (3) Three hours of lec-
tellectual topic with a faculty member in a small-sem-
                                                              ter taking Economics 100B or 101B or International            ture per week. Prerequisites: 101A-101B or equiva-
inar setting. Berkeley Seminars are offered in all
                                                              and Area Studies 107. A deficient grade in Economics           lents. Formerly Business Administration 113. Analysis
campus departments, and topics vary from department
                                                              100A, 101A. or International and Area Studies 107             of the theory and practice of decision-making in busi-
to department and semester to semester. (F,SP)
                                                              may be repeated by taking 101B. Three hours of lec-           ness firms, utilizing the concepts and techniques of
39. Freshman/Sophomore Seminar. Course may be                 ture and one hour of optional discussion per week.            managerial economics. The business decisions to be
repeated for credit as topic varies. Seminar Format.          Prerequisites: Economics 1, Mathematics 1A or 16A,            investigated include pricing policies, internal transfer
Prerequisites: Priority given to freshmen and sopho-          Statistics 21, or equivalents. Formerly Business Ad-          pricing, and various choices under uncertainty. (F,SP)
mores. Formerly Business Administration 39. Fresh-            ministration 111. Analysis of the operation of the mar-
man and sophomore seminars offer lower division stu-          ket system with emphasis on the factors responsible           114. Forecasting for Managerial Decisions. (3)
dents the opportunity to explore an intellectual topic        for economic instability; analysis of public and business     Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 101A-
with a faculty member and a group of peers in a small-        policies which are necessary as a result of business          101B or equivalents. Formerly Business Administration
seminar setting. These seminars are offered in all cam-       fluctuations. (F,SP) Staff                                     114. Theory and analysis of the long-run and short-run
pus departments; topics vary from department to de-                                                                         forecasts of economic activity. (F,SP)
                                                              102A. Introduction to Financial Accounting. (3)
partment and from semester to semester. (F,SP)                                                                              117. Special Topics in Economic Analysis and Pol-
                                                              Two hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per
39AC. Philanthropy: A Cross-Cultural Perspective.             week. Formerly Business Administration 120. The               icy. (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. One to
(3) Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Busi-           identification, measurement, and reporting of financial         four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 101A-
ness Administration 39AC. This class will compare and         effects of events on enterprises, with a particular em-       101B or equivalents. Formerly Business Administration
contrast the variety of gift giving and sharing traditions    phasis on business organization. Preparation and in-          119. A variety of topics in economic analysis and pol-
that make up American philanthropy. Both the cultural         terpretation of balance sheets, income statements, and        icy with emphasis on current problems and research.
antecedents and their expression in this country will be      statements of cash flows. (F,SP)                               (F,SP)
explored from five ethnic and racial groups: Native                                                                          118. International Trade. (3) Three hours of lecture
                                                              102B. Introduction to Managerial Accounting. (3)
American, European American, African American, His-                                                                         per week. Prerequisites: 101A or equivalent. Formerly
                                                              Two hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per
panic American, and Asian American. The goal is to                                                                          Business Administration 187. This course will develop
                                                              week. Prerequisites: 102A. Formerly Business Ad-
gain a greater understanding of the many dimensions                                                                         models for understanding the economic causes and ef-
                                                              ministration 123. The uses of accounting systems and
of philanthropy as it is practiced in the United States to-                                                                 fects of international trade, will investigate the effects
                                                              their outputs in the process of management of an en-
day. This course satisfies the American Cultures re-                                                                         of economic policies that inhibit trade, and will exam-
                                                              terprise. Classification of costs and revenue on several
quirement. (F,SP) Van Loo                                                                                                   ine the political economy of trade. By integrating the
                                                              bases for various uses; budgeting and standard cost
84. Sophomore Seminar. (1,2) Course may be re-                accounting; analyses of relevant costs and other data         findings of the latest theoretical and empirical research
peated for credit as topic varies. One hour of seminar        for decision making. (F,SP)                                   in international economics, this course help students
per week per unit for 15 weeks. One and one-half                                                                            learn how to explore the current political debates in the
                                                              103. Introduction to Finance. (4) Three hours of lec-         U.S. and elsewhere regarding the benefits and costs
hours of seminar per week per unit for 10 weeks. Two
                                                              ture and one and one-half hours of discussion per             of international trade. (F,SP) Staff
hours of seminar per week per unit for eight weeks.
                                                              week. Prerequisites: 101A. Formerly Business Ad-
Three hours of seminar per week per unit for five                                                                            119. Strategic Planning. (3) Three hours of lecture
                                                              ministration 130. Analysis and management of the flow
weeks. Sections 1-2 to be graded on a passed/not                                                                            per week. Prerequisites: 101A-101B, 102A-102B, 103,
                                                              of funds through an enterprise. Cash management,
passed basis. Sections 3-4 to be graded on a letter-                                                                        105, and senior standing. Formerly Business Admin-
                                                              source and application of funds, term loans, types and
grade basis. Prerequisites: At discretion of instructor.                                                                    istration 190. Class format consists of online instruc-
                                                              sources of long-term capital. Capital budgeting, cost of
Sophomore seminars are small interactive courses of-                                                                        tion, student presentations, and case discussion. This
                                                              capital, and financial structure. Introduction to capital
fered by faculty members in departments all across the                                                                      course will cover the study of the concepts and tech-
                                                              markets. (F,SP)
campus. Sophomore seminars offer opportunity for                                                                            niques required to design and implement business
close, regular intellectual contact between faculty           105. Introduction to Organizational Behavior. (3)             strategies for private, public, and/or not-for-profit or-
members and students in the crucial second year. The          Students will receive no credit for 105 after taking Psy-     ganizations. Students work in teams with a client or-
topics vary from department to department and sem-            chology 180 or Industrial Engineering and Operations          ganization and present their strategic recommenda-
ester to semester. Enrollment limited to 15 sopho-            Research 171. A deficient grade in Psychology 180 or           tions. (F,SP)
mores. (F,SP)                                                 Industrial Engineering and Operations Research 171
                                                              may be repeated by taking 105. Three hours of lecture         120A. Intermediate Financial Accounting. (4) Three
96. Lower Division Special Topics in Business Ad-                                                                           hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.
                                                              per week. Formerly Business Administration 150. A
ministration. (1-4) One to four hours of lecture per                                                                        Prerequisites: 102A. Formerly Business Administration
                                                              general descriptive and analytical study of organiza-
week. Study in various fields of business administra-                                                                        121. An intermediate-level course in the theory and
                                                              tions from the behavioral science point of view. Prob-
tion for lower division students. Topics will vary from                                                                     practice of financial accounting. The measurement and
                                                              lems of motivation, leadership, morale, social structure,
year to year and will be announced at the beginning of                                                                      reporting of the economic effect of events involving
                                                              groups, communications, hierarchy, and control in
each semester. (F,SP)                                                                                                       working capital and long-term plant assets, investment
                                                              complex organizations are addressed. The interaction
98. Directed Group Study. (1-4) Course may be re-             among technology, environment, and human behavior             in securities, intangible assets. (F,SP)
peated for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the In-      are considered. Alternate theoretical models are dis-
                                                                                                                            120B. Advanced Financial Accounting. (4) Three
troduction to Courses and Curricula section of this cat-      cussed. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                            hours of lecture and two hours of discussion per week.
alog. Three to twelve hours of group study per week.
                                                              106. Marketing. (3) Three hours of lecture per week.          Prerequisites: 120A. Formerly Business Administration
Must be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Formerly
                                                              Formerly Business Administration 160. The evolution           122. Continuation of 120A. Sources of long term cap-
Business Administration 98. Organized group study on
                                                              of markets and marketing; market structure; marketing         ital; funds statements, financial analysis, accounting for
topics selected by lower division students under the
                                                              cost and efficiency; public and private regulation; the        partnerships, consolidated financial statements, ad-
sponsorship and direction of a member of the Haas
                                                              development of marketing programs including deci-             justments of accounting data using price indexes; ac-
School of Business faculty. (F,SP)
                                                              sions involving products, price, promotional distribution.    counting for the financial effects of pension plans; other
Upper Division Courses                                        (F,SP)                                                        advanced accounting problems. (F,SP)
100. Business Communication. (2) Two hours of lec-            107. The Social, Political, and Ethical Environment           121. Federal Income Tax Accounting. (4) Three
ture per week. Formerly Business Administration 100.          of Business. (3) Three hours of lecture or two hours          hours of lecture and one and one-half hours of dis-
Theory and practice of effective communication in a           of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. For-          cussion per week. Prerequisites: 102A (120A recom-
business environment. Students practice what they             merly Business Administration 170. Study and analy-           mended). Formerly Business Administration 128A. De-
learn with oral presentations and written assignments         sis of American business in a changing social and po-         termination of individual and corporation tax liability;
that model real-life business situations. (F,SP)              litical environment. Interaction between business and         influence of federal taxation on economic activity; tax
                                                              other institutions. Role of business in the development       considerations in business and investment decisions.
101A. Microeconomic Analysis for Business De-                                                                               (F,SP)
                                                              of social values, goals, and national priorities. The ex-
cisions. (3) Students will receive no credit for 101A af-
                                                              panding role of the corporation in dealing with social
ter taking Economics 100A or 101A or International                                                                          122. Financial Information Analysis. (3) Three hours
                                                              problems and issues. (F,SP)
and Area Studies 106. A deficient grade in Economics                                                                         of lecture and one and one-half hours of discussion per
100A, 101A. or International and Area Studies 106             112. Economics of Regulated Industries. (3) Three             week. Prerequisites: 120A. This course is designed to:
may be repeated by taking 101A. Three hours of lec-           hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 101A or             1) develop basic skills in financial statement analysis;
ture and one hour of discussion per week. Prerequi-           equivalent. Formerly Business Administration 112. Sur-        2) teach students to identify the relevant financial data
sites: Economics 1, Mathematics 1A or 16A, Statistics         vey of industry structures and regulations in the trans-      used in a variety of decision contexts, such as equity
21, or equivalents. Formerly Business Administration          portation, energy, communications, and financial sec-          valuation, forecasting firm-level economic variables,


       B prefix=language course for business majors                  R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                    *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                  AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                 †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                        requirement
150 / Business Administration
distress prediction and credit analysis; 3) help students   to game theory and decision analysis. Game theory is           trative, and judicial efforts to define the rights, duties,
appreciate the factors that influence the outcome of the     concerned with strategic interactions among players            and responsibilities of employers and labor relations.
financial reporting process, such as the incentives of       (multi-player games), and decision analysis is con-            Includes programs to deal with racial, ethnic, sex, and
reporting parties, regulatory rules, and a firm’s com-       cerned with making choices under uncertainty (single-          age discrimination as well as the law of union-man-
petitive environment. (F,SP) Staff                          player games). Emphasis is placed on applications.             agement relations. (F,SP)
                                                            (F,SP) Staff
126. Auditing. (4) Three hours of lecture and one and                                                                      155. Leadership. (3) Three hours of lecture per week.
one-half hours of discussion per week. Prerequisites:       144. Fundamentals of e-Business. (4) Three hours               The purpose of this course is for the students to de-
120A (120B recommended). Formerly Business Ad-              of lecture/work and one hour of discussion per week.           velop understanding of the theory and practice of lead-
ministration 126. Concepts and problems in the field of      Prerequisites: Computer Science 3 or equivalent. For-          ership in various organizational settings. It is designed
professional verification of financial and related infor-     merly Business Administration 147. A survey course             to allow students the opportunity to develop leadership
mation, including ethical, legal and other professional     concerned with the importance of computers in orga-            skills through experiential exercises, behavorial and
issues, historical developments, and current concerns.      nizations, including small groups, universities, firms,         self-assessments, case studies, class disscussions,
(F,SP)                                                      government, and society at large. Topics include his-          and lectures. (F,SP) Staff
                                                            tory of development of computers, characterization of
127. Special Topics in Accounting. (1-4) Course                                                                            157. Special Topics in Organizational Behavior. (1-
                                                            scientific versus business problems, information stor-
may be repeated for credit. One to four hours of lecture                                                                   4) Course may be repeated for credit. One to four
                                                            age and retrieval, compilers, problem-oriented lan-
per week. Prerequisites: 102A-102B. Formerly Busi-                                                                         hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 105. Formerly
                                                            guages, simulation models, current developments in
ness Administration 129. A variety of topics in ac-                                                                        Business Administration 159. A variety of topics in or-
                                                            computer systems. (F,SP)
counting with emphasis on current problems and re-                                                                         ganizational behavior and industrial relations with em-
search. (F,SP)                                              146. Planning and Design of E-Business Systems.                phasis on current problems and research. (F,SP)
                                                            (4) Three hours of lecture and one and one-half hours
131. Corporate Finance and Financial Statement                                                                             160. Consumer Behavior. (3) Three hours of lecture
                                                            of discussion per week. Prerequisites: Computer Sci-
Analysis. (3) Three hours of lecture and one hour of                                                                       per week. Prerequisites: 106. Consumer behavior is
                                                            ence 3 or equivalent. Formerly Business Administra-
discussion per week. Prerequisites: 103. Formerly                                                                          the study of how consumers process information, form
                                                            tion 148. Study of principles and procedures of man-
Business Administration 134. This course will cover the                                                                    attitudes and judgments, and make decisions. Its study
                                                            agement information systems (MIS) planning, design,
principles and practice of business finance. It will focus                                                                  is critical to understand how consumers think and be-
                                                            and analysis in various organizations. Topics relate to
on project evaluation, capital structure, and corporate                                                                    have, which is critical for a company wishing to de-
                                                            successful and efficient implementation strategies of
governance. Firms’ policies toward debt, equity, and                                                                       velop a customer focus. Given how different people
                                                            business systems. “Real-world” projects encompass-
dividends are explored. The incentives and conflicts                                                                        are, it is amazing how similarly their minds work. Con-
                                                            ing all phases of systems analysis, feasibility study,
facing managers and owners are also discussed.                                                                             sumer psychology is the systematic study of how con-
                                                            systems design, development, prototyping, testing,
(F,SP)                                                                                                                     sumers perceive information, how they encode it in
                                                            documentation, and evaluation. Both technical and
                                                                                                                           memory, integrate it with other sources of information,
132. Financial Institutions and Markets. (3) Three          managerial issues will be emphasized. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                           retrieve it from memory, and utilize it to make deci-
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.
                                                            147. Special Topics in Manufacturing and Infor-                sions. It is one of the building blocks of the study of
Prerequisites: 101A-101B, and 103. Formerly Business
                                                            mation Technology. (1-4) Course may be repeated                marketing and provides the student with a set of tools
Administration 132. Organization, behavior, and man-
                                                            for credit. One to four hours of lecture per week. Pre-        with diverse applications. (F,SP) Staff
agement of financial institutions. Markets for financial
                                                            requisites: Business Administration 140. Formerly Busi-
assets and the structure of yields, influence of Federal                                                                    161. Marketing Research: Tools and Techniques
                                                            ness Administration 149. A variety of topics in manu-
Reserve System and monetary policy on financial as-                                                                         for Data Collection and Analysis. (3) Three hours of
                                                            facturing and information technology with emphasis on
sets and institutions. (F,SP)                                                                                              lecture per week. Prerequisites: 106. Formerly Busi-
                                                            current problems and research. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                           ness Administration 161. Marketing research objec-
133. Investments. (3) Three hours of lecture and one
                                                            149A. Information Technology Strategy. (3) Three               tives; qualitative research, surveys, experiments, sam-
hour of discussion per week. Prerequisites: 103. For-
                                                            hours of lecture per week. This course focuses on the          pling, data analysis. (F,SP) Staff
merly Business Administration 133. Sources of and de-
                                                            use of IT by traditional firms and startups, rather than
mand for investment capital, operations of security                                                                        162. Brand Management and Strategy. (3) Three
                                                            the details of the technology, with the goals of under-
markets, determination of investment policy, and pro-                                                                      hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 106. Formerly
                                                            standing how IT enables new strategies and how ex-
cedures for analysis of securities. (F,SP)                                                                                 Business Administration 162. This course is an intro-
                                                            isting strategies adapt to IT innovations. Covers IT
                                                                                                                           duction to product management in marketing con-
136F. Behavioral Finance. (3) Three hours of lecture        technologies used throughout the organization, in-
                                                                                                                           sumer and industrial goods and services. The course
per week. Prerequisites: 103. This course looks at the      cluding mobile communications, systems for online
                                                                                                                           will cover analysis of market information, development
influence of decision heuristics and biases on investor      payment, business-to-consumer and business-to-busi-
                                                                                                                           of product strategy, programming strategy, and im-
welfare, financial markets, and corporate decisions.         ness transactions, customer relationship management,
                                                                                                                           plementation. (F,SP) Staff
Topics include overconfidence, attribution theory, rep-      and supply chain management. (F,SP) Staff
resentative heuristic, availability heuristic, anchoring                                                                   163. Information- and Technology-Based Marketing.
                                                            151. Management of Human Resources. (3) Three
and adjustment, prospect theory, “Winner’s Curse,”                                                                         (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:
                                                            hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 105. Formerly
speculative bubbles, IPOs, market efficiency, limits of                                                                     106. Information technology has allowed firms to
                                                            Business Administration 151. The designs of systems
arbitrage, relative mis-pricing of common stocks, the                                                                      gather and process large quantities of information
                                                            of rewards, assessment, and manpower development.
tendency to trade in a highly correlated fashion, in-                                                                      about consumers’ choices and reactions to marketing
                                                            The interaction of selection, placement, training, per-
vestor welfare, and market anomalies. (F,SP) Staff                                                                         campaigns. However, few firms have the expertise to
                                                            sonnel evaluation, and career ladders within an on-go-
                                                                                                                           intelligently act on such information. This course ad-
137. Special Topics in Finance. (1-4) Course may be         ing organization. Role of the staff manager. Introduc-
                                                                                                                           dresses this shortcoming by teaching students how to
repeated for credit. One to four hours of lecture per       tion of change. Implications of behavioral research for
                                                                                                                           use customer information to better market to con-
week. Prerequisites: 103. Formerly Business Admin-          management problems and policies. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                           sumers. In addition, the course addresses how infor-
istration 139. A variety of topics in finance with em-
                                                            152. Negotiation and Conflict Resolution. (3) Three             mation technology affects marketing strategy. (F,SP)
phasis on current problems and research. (F,SP)
                                                            hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 105. Formerly        Staff
140. Introduction to Management Science. (4)                Business Administration 152. The purpose of this
                                                                                                                           165. Integrated Marketing Communication. (3)
Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per       course is to understand the theory and processes of
                                                                                                                           Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 106.
week. Prerequisites: Computer Science 3, Economics          negotiation as practiced in a variety of settings. It is de-
                                                                                                                           Formerly Business Administration 165. Basic concepts
1, Math 1A or 16A, or equivalents. Formerly Business        signed to be relevant to the broad spectrum of nego-
                                                                                                                           and functions of advertising in the economy; consumer
Administration 140. Survey of management science            tiation problems faced by managers and professionals.
                                                                                                                           motivation; problems in utilizing advertising and mea-
and its applications to business problems. Topics cov-      By focusing on the hehavior of individuals, groups, and
                                                                                                                           suring its effectiveness. (F,SP)
ered include linear and integer linear programming,         organizations in the context of competitive situations,
project management, dynamic programming, inventory          the course will allow students the opportunity to de-          166. Retailing. (3) Three hours of lecture per week.
control, queuing theory, and simulation. (F,SP)             velop negotiation skills experientially in useful analyt-      Prerequisites: 106. Formerly Business Administration
                                                            ical frameworks (e.g.-simulations, cases). (F,SP) Staff        166. History and development of retail management
141. Production and Operations Management. (3)
                                                                                                                           types; geographical structure of retail trade; assort-
Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per       153. Industrial Relations. (3) Students will receive no
                                                                                                                           ments of goods and services; store management; gov-
week. Prerequisites: 140 or equivalent. Formerly Busi-      credit for 153 after taking Economics 151. Three hours
                                                                                                                           ernment regulations. (F,SP)
ness Administration 142. A survey of the concepts and       of lecture per week. Formerly Business Administration
methodologies for management control of production          154. An analysis of manual, white collar, and profes-          167. Special Topics in Marketing. (1-4) Course may
and operations systems. Topics include inventory con-       sional employee relations. Background and function-            be repeated for credit. One to four hours of lecture per
trol, material requirements planning for multistage pro-    ing of employer and employee organizations. Func-              week. Prerequisites: 106. Formerly Business Admin-
duction systems, aggregate planning, scheduling, and        tioning of labor markets and wage and income security          istration 169. A variety of topics in marketing with em-
production distribution. (F,SP)                             issues. Questions of public policy in labor economics          phasis on current problems and research. (F,SP)
                                                            and industrial relations. (F,SP)
143. Game Theory and Business Decisions. (3)                                                                               170. Business Ethics for the 21st Century. (2) Two
Three hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per       154. Labor and the Law. (3) Three hours of lecture             hours of lecture per week. The purpose of this class is
week. Prerequisites: Mathematics 1A or 16A, or con-         per week. Formerly Business Administration 155. Anal-          to enhance the ability of students to anticipate, critically
sent of instructor. This course provides an introduction    ysis of the issues arising out of legislative, adminis-        analyze, and appropriately respond to the wide-range
                                                                                                                                          Business Administration / 151

social and ethical issues that challenge managers as         192P. Strategic Corporate Social Responsibility                  201A. Economics for Business Decision Making.
well as individuals in their roles as citizens, consumers,   and Consulting Projects. (3) Three hours of lecture              (2) Four hours of lecture per week for seven weeks.
investors, and employees. Instruction is based on lec-       per week. Discuss the field of strategic CSR through a            Prerequisites: Knowledge of calculus and algebra as-
tures and case analysis, supplemented by topical and         series of lectures, guest speakers, and projects. The            sumed. Business success depends on the successful
philosophical articles and essays. (F,SP) Staff              course will examine best practices used by companies             positioning of the firm and the management of its re-
                                                             to engage in socially responsible business practices.            sources. The goal of this course is to think systemat-
C172. Business in Its Historical Environment. (3)            It will provide students with a flavor of the complex             ically about achieving competitive advantage through
Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Business           dilemmas one can face in business in trying to do both           the management of the firm’s resources. We will an-
Administration C172. This course will examine selected       “good for society” and “well for shareholders.” It looks         alyze management decisions concerning real options,
aspects of the history of American business. Included        at CSR from a corporation perspective, and how this              cost determination, pricing, and market entry and exit.
will be discussions of the evolution of the large cor-       supports core business objectives, core competencies,            We will use readings and cases along with class dis-
poration, the development of modern managerial tech-         and bottom-line profits. (F,SP) Staff                             cussion to develop practical insights into managing for
niques, and the changing relationship of business, gov-                                                                       competitive advantage. (F,SP) Staff
ernment, and labor. Also listed as American Studies          195A. Entrepreneurship. (2) Two hours of lecture per
C172. (F,SP) Rosen                                           week. Formerly Business Administration 195. Princi-              201B. Macroeconomics in the Global Economy.
                                                             ples, theories, and practical aspects of entrepreneur-           (2) Four hours of lecture per week for seven weeks.
175. Legal Aspects of Management. (3) Three hours            ship. Building on functional subject knowledge, ex-              Prerequisites: 200S, 201A. This course develops and
of lecture per week. Formerly Business Administration        plores successes and failures of entrepreneurship.               applies models of the world’s economies to explain
175. An analysis of the law and the legal process, em-       Includes starting new ventures, writing business plans,          long-run trends and short-run fluctuations in key
phasizing the nature and functions of law within the         acquiring other businesses, and making existing en-              macroeconomic variables, such as GDP, wage and
U.S. federal system, followed by a discussion of the le-     terprises profitable. (F,SP)                                      profit rates, inflation, interest rates, employment and
gal problems pertaining to contracts and related topics,                                                                      unemployment, budget deficits, exchange rates, and
business association, and the impact of law on eco-          195P. Perspectives on Entrepreneurship. (3) Three                trade balances. (F,SP) Staff
nomic enterprise. (F,SP)                                     hours of lecture per week. This course explores and
                                                             examines key issues facing entrepreneurs and their               202. Financial Accounting. (2) Four hours of lecture
177. Special Topics in Business and Public Policy.           businesses. It is intended to provide a broad spectrum           and one and one-half hours of discussion per week for
(1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. One to four         of topics across many business disciplines including             seven weeks. Formerly Business Administration 202A.
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 107. Formerly      accounting, finance, marketing, organizational be-                This course examines accounting measurements for
Business Administration 179. A variety of topics in          havior, production/quality, technology, etc. Students will       general-purpose financial reports. An objective of the
business and public policy with emphasis on current          acquire a keen understanding of both the theoretical             course is to provide not only a working knowledge but
problems and research. (F,SP)                                and real world tools used by today’s entrepreneurial             also a clear understanding of the contents of published
178. Introduction to International Business. (3) Two         business leaders in achieving success in today’s global          financial statements. (F,SP) Staff
hours of lecture and one hour of discussion per week.        business environment. (F,SP) Staff
                                                                                                                              203. Introduction to Finance. (2) Four hours of lec-
Prerequisites: 101A-101B or equivalents. Formerly            196. Special Topics in Business Administration. (1-              ture per week for seven weeks. Prerequisites: 200S,
Business Administration 188. A survey involving en-          4) One to four hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:         202. This is an introductory MBA course in invest-
vironmental, economic, political, and social constraints     Upper division standing. Formerly Business Adminis-              ments. Students learn how to value assets given fore-
on doing business abroad; effects of overseas busi-          tration 196. Study in various fields of business ad-              casts of future cash flows and about the risk charac-
ness investments on domestic and foreign economies;                                                                           teristics of different asset classes. The first part of the
                                                             ministration. Topics will vary from year to year and will
foreign market analysis and operational strategy of a                                                                         course focuses on the time value of money. The sec-
                                                             be announced at the beginning of each semester.
firm; management problems and development po-                                                                                  ond part of the course deals with measuring and pric-
                                                             (F,SP)
tential of international operations. (F,SP)                                                                                   ing risk. Finally, the course touches on derivative-ba-
                                                             198. Directed Study. (1-4) Course may be repeated                sics and capital market efficiency. An effort will be
180. Introduction to Real Estate and Urban Land
                                                             for credit. Enrollment is restricted; see the Introduction       made to tie the theoretical underpinnings of finance to
Economics. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-
                                                             to Courses and Curricula section of this catalog. One            real-world examples. (F,SP) Staff
requisites: Economics 1, Mathematics 16A or 1A, or
                                                             to four hours of directed group study per week. Must
equivalents. Formerly Business Administration 180.                                                                            204. Operations Management. (2) Four hours of lecture
                                                             be taken on a passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites:
The nature of real property; market analysis; con-                                                                            per week for seven weeks. Prerequisites: 200S. This
                                                             Consent of instructor. Formerly Business Administra-
struction cycles; mortgage lending; equity investment;                                                                        course provides a broad overview of strategic, opera-
                                                             tion 198. Organized group study on topics selected by
metropolitan growth; urban land use; real property val-                                                                       tional, and tactical issues facing manufacturing and ser-
                                                             upper division students under the sponsorship and di-
uation; public policies. (F,SP)                                                                                               vice companies. Major topics include process analysis,
                                                             rection of a member of the Haas School of Business
181. Valuation of Real Property. (3) Three hours of          faculty. (F,SP) Staff                                            quality management, project management, supply-
lecture per week. Prerequisites: 180 or equivalent. For-                                                                      chain management, service-systems management,
                                                             199. Supervised Independent Study and Research.                  and operations strategy. These issues are explored
merly Business Administration 181. Critical examina-
                                                             (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit. Enrollment is           through lectures, case studies, and videos pertaining
tion of appraisal concepts and methods; the role of
                                                             restricted; see the Introduction to Courses and Cur-             to a variety of industries, from fast food to fashion
value estimates in private land-use and real estate in-
                                                             ricula section of this catalog. Must be taken on a               goods to automobile manufacturing to telephone call
vestment decisions and in the implementation of pub-
                                                             passed/not passed basis. Prerequisites: Consent of in-           centers. (F,SP) Staff
lic policies affecting urban development. (F,SP)
                                                             structor. Formerly Business Administration 199. En-
183. The Financial Management of Real Estate Re-             rollment restrictions apply. (F,SP)                              205. Organizational Behavior. (2) Four hours of lec-
sources. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-                                                                            ture per week for seven weeks. How can you motivate
requisites: 180. Formerly Business Administration 183.                                                                        employees to go above and beyond the call of duty to
Real estate debt and equity financing; mortgage mar-                                                                           get the job done? How can you be sure that your de-
ket structure; effects of credit on demand; equity in-       Master’s in                                                      cisions are not biased? What influence tactics can you
                                                                                                                              use when you do not have the formal authority to tell
vestment criteria; public policies in real estate finance     Business Administration                                          someone what to do? This course adds to your un-
and urban development. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                              derstanding of life in complex organizations by cov-
185. Legal Aspects of Real Estate. (3) Three hours           Graduate Courses                                                 ering topics spanning the micro (individual level of
of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 180 recommended.                                                                          analysis), the macro (organizational level of analysis),
Formerly Business Administration 178. The law af-            200C. Leadership Communication. (1) One hour of                  and also topics that integrate these two levels. (F,SP)
fecting ownership and use of real property; transfers,       lecture and two hours of discussion per week for five             Staff
titles, development rights, and the regulation thereof in    weeks. Leadership Communication is a workshop in
the public interest. (F,SP)                                  the fundamentals of public speaking in today’s busi-             205L. Leadership. (1) Three hours of session for seven
                                                             ness environment. Through prepared and impromptu                 weeks. The objective of this course is to help students
187. Special Topics in Real Estate Economics and             speeches aimed at moving others to action, peer                  develop an understanding of their own strengths and
Finance. (1-4) Course may be repeated for credit as          coaching, and lectures, students will sharpen their au-          weaknesses as leaders and to nurture their confidence
topic varies. One to four hours of lecture per week. A       thentic and persuasive communication skills, develop             to envision themselves as, and aspire to be, leaders
variety of topics in real estate economics and finance        critical listening skills, improve abilities to give, receive,   throughout their careers. The course will include four
with emphasis on current problems and research.              and apply feedback, and gain confidence as public                 main components: 1) 360-degree assessment and
(F,SP) Staff                                                 speakers. (F,SP) Staff                                           an accompanying leadership self-assessment analy-
                                                                                                                              sis; 2) live cases run by leaders in organizations; 3) ad-
192A. Management in the Public and Not-for-Profit             200S. Data and Decisions. (2) Four hours of lecture              vanced practices about leadership; and 4) experiential
Sectors. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-           and one and one-half hours of discussion per week for            exercises. (F,SP)
requisites: 101A or equivalent. Formerly Business Ad-        seven weeks. Formerly Business Administration 200S.
ministration 115. Economic basis of the public and not-      The objective of this core course is to make students            206. Marketing Management. (2) Four hours of lec-
for-profit sectors. Institutional arrangements as they        critical consumers of statistical analysis using available       ture per week for seven weeks. This course is de-
impinge on operations in the public sectors. Emphasis        software packages. Key concepts include interpreta-              signed for students who need to understand the basic
on managerial approaches and tools to use in a non-          tion of regression analysis, model formation and test-           cncepts and techniques of marketing strategy as a
profit environment. (F,SP)                                    ing, and diagnostic checking. (F,SP) Staff                       foundation for more advanced study in the area. The


       B prefix=language course for business majors                 R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                       *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                 AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                    †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                       requirement
152 / Business Administration
course treats marketing from the perspective of strate-        history of the international financial system; arbitrage       centives and taxes, on financial decisions regarding
gic analysis and provides a framework for the deci-            and hedging; international aspects of financial deci-          capital budgeting, dividend policy, capital structure and
sions associated with the management of the mar-               sions. (F,SP)                                                 mergers. (F,SP)
keting function in the modern organization focusing on
                                                               218B. Theory and Institutions of International                232. Financial Institutions and Markets. (3) Three
customer analysis, competitive analysis and the anal-
                                                               Trade. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prereq-           hours of lecture and one hour of optional discussion
ysis of marketing investments. (F,SP) Staff
                                                               uisites: Business Administration 201A. Formerly               per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration 203.
207. Ethics and Responsibility in Business. (1) Two            Business Administration 287. The course focuses on            Formerly Business Administration 232. This course will
hours of lecture per week for seven weeks. Formerly            determinants of global trade flows, patterns of inter-         analyze the role of financial markets and financial in-
Business Administration 207A. This course provides             national competition, and governmental policies af-           stitutions in allocating capital. The major focus will be
students with the ability to anticipate, critically analyze,   fecting international trade. Topics include: tariff and       on debt contracts and securities and on innovations in
and appropriately respond to the social, ethical, and          nontariff barriers to trade, industrial policies in declin-   the bond and money markets. The functions of com-
political challenges that face managers operating in a         ing and emerging industries, strategic trade policy,          mercial banks, investment banks, and other financial
global economy. (F,SP) Staff                                   United States trade law, bilateral and multilateral ap-       intermediaries will be covered, and aspects of the reg-
                                                               proaches to trade liberalization, and current issues in       ulation of these institutions will be examined. (F,SP)
209F. Fundamentals of Business. (3) Three hours of
                                                               international trade policy. (F,SP)
lecture per week. An introduction to business methods                                                                        233. Investments. (3) Three hours of lecture and one
of analysis and terminology for nonbusiness graduate           222. Financial Information Analysis. (3) Three hours          hour of optional discussion per week. Prerequisites:
students. The course is taught in three five-week mod-          of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Admin-           Business Administration 203. Formerly Business Ad-
ules: (1) organizational behavior and management, (2)          istration 202A or consent of instructor. Formerly Busi-       ministration 233. This course will examine four differ-
accounting and finance, and (3) marketing and strat-            ness Administration 222. Issues of accounting infor-          ent types of asset markets: equity markets, fixed in-
egy. (F,SP) Staff                                              mation evaluation with special emphasis on the use of         come markets, futures markets and options markets.
                                                               financial statements by decision makers external to the        It will focus on the valuation of assets in these markets,
211. Game Theory. (3) Three hours of lecture per
                                                               firm. The implications of recent research in finance and        the empirical evidence on asset valuation models, and
week. A survey of the main ideas and techniques of
                                                               accounting for external reporting issues will be ex-          strategies that can be employed to achieve various in-
game-theoretic analysis related to bargaining, conflict,
                                                               plored. Emphasis will be placed on models that de-            vestment goals. (F,SP)
and negotiation. Emphasizes the identification and
                                                               scribe the user’s decision context. (F,SP)
analysis of archetypal strategic situations in bargain-                                                                      234. Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance. (2)
ing. Goals of the course are to provide a foundation for       223. Corporate Financial Reporting. (3) Three hours           Course may be repeated for credit. Two hours of lec-
applying game-theoretic analysis, both formally and in-        of lecture and one hour of discussion per week. Pre-          ture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration
tuitively, to negotiation and bargaining; to recognize         requisites: Business Administration 202A or consent of        234. Formerly Business Administration 237. Normative
and assess archetypal strategic situations in compli-          instructor. Formerly Business Administration 220. This        models of financial decisions by business firms, finan-
cated negotiation settings; and to feel comfortable in         course examines the theory and practice of financial           cial regulation and the business firm, and empirical
the process of negotiation. (F,SP) Staff                       accounting and the issues involved in determining cor-        studies in business finance. (F)
                                                               porate financial reporting policies. It provides an in-
212. Managerial Decisions in Regulated Industries.
                                                               depth knowledge of how financial statements are pre-           235. Advanced Topics in Financial Institutions and
(3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:
                                                               pared but emphasizes the evaluation of accounting             Financial Markets. (3) Course may be repeated for
Business Administration 201A or equivalent. Formerly
                                                               reports from a managerial perspective. Cases sup-             credit. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:
Business Administration 212. Introduction to admin-
                                                               plement lecture, discussion, and problem solving.             Business Administration 232. Formerly Business Ad-
istrative law and the regulatory process. Economic
                                                               (F,SP)                                                        ministration 235. Normative issues in financial insti-
principles of administrative regulation of pricing, in-
                                                                                                                             tutions, regulation of financial institutions, the analysis
vestment, and service quality. Analysis of critical prob-      224A. Managerial Accounting. (2) Three hours of
                                                                                                                             of money and capital markets, and empirical studies on
lems in regulated industries, including transportation,        lecture and one hour of optional discussion per week
                                                                                                                             financial institutions and financial markets. Topics to be
communications, energy, and financial sectors, with em-         for 10 weeks. Prerequisites: Business Administration
                                                                                                                             covered will vary. (F,SP) Staff
phasis on emerging competition in these industries. Po-        202A or equivalent. Formerly Business Administration
tential regulatory reforms with alternatives to regulation.    202B. This course emphasizes the use of accounting            236A. Futures and Option Markets. (2) Course may
                                                               information throughout the planning, operation and            be repeated for credit. Two hours of lecture per week.
214. Forecasting Methods for Business. (3) Three
                                                               control stages of managing an organization. The               Prerequisites: Business Administration 233. Formerly
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Ad-
                                                               course is divided into three sections to reflect these         Business Administration 236. Normative models for in-
ministration 200, 201A-201B, 204 or equivalents. For-
                                                               three stages of management: 1) information for plan-          vestment management, valuation of securities, be-
merly Business Administration 214. The course will focus
                                                               ning and decision making; 2) information received dur-        havior of security prices, the function and regulation of
on a variety of currently used forecasting techniques.
                                                               ing operations (cost accounting); and 3) information for      security markets, and empirical studies on securities
These include econometric techniques and purely ex-
                                                               control and performance evaluation. (SP)                      prices and portfolio behavior. Topics covered will vary.
trapolative (time series) methods, as well as combi-
nations of more than one procedure. The emphasis is            224B. Advanced Managerial Accounting. (2,3)                   (F,SP)
on data analysis; the student will learn a “forecasting        Forty-five hours of work per unit per term. Prerequi-          236B. Investment Strategies and Styles. (2) Course
process” which can be applied to all types of fore-            sites: Business Administration 202A and 202B or               may be repeated for credit. Two hours of lecture per
casting problems. To facilitate the “learning by doing”        equivalents. Formerly Business Administration 224.            week. Prerequisites: Business Administration 203 plus
aspect of the course, several computer-oriented prob-          This course includes the theory of management ac-             one additional graduate finance course. Formerly Busi-
lem sets and a forecasting project are required. (F,SP)        counting, its application in modern organizations, and        ness Administration 239. Introduction to alternative in-
                                                               related problem areas included in recent CPA and              vestment strategies and styles as practiced by leading
215. Business Strategies for Emerging Markets:
                                                               CMA examinations. (F,SP)                                      money managers. A money manager will spend ap-
Management, Investment, and Opportunities. (3)
Three hours of lecture per week. This course helps             225. Management Planning and Control Systems.                 proximately half of the class discussing his general in-
students to study the institutions of emerging markets         (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:           vestment philosophy. In the other half, students, prac-
that are relevant for managers, analyze opportunities          Business Administration 202A-202B. Formerly Busi-             titioner, and instructor will explore the investment
presented by emerging markets, analyze the additional          ness Administration 229. Planning and control systems         merits of one particular company. Students will be ex-
ethical challenges and issues of social responsibility         are an essential tool in the management of modern             pected to use the library’s resources, class handouts,
common in emerging markets, and learn to minimize              organizations. Strategic planning and management              and their ingenuity to address a set of questions re-
the risks in doing business in emerging markets. This          control are studied through the use of cases illustra-        lating to the firm’s investment value. (F,SP) Staff
course is a combination of lectures, class participation,      tive of management practice in both public and private        236C. Global Financial Services. (3) Three hours of
and cases. (F,SP)                                              organizations. (SP)                                           lecture per week. Survey of the forces changing and
217. Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy. (.5-              227B. Topics in Taxation. (3) Course may be re-               shaping global finance and intermediation, especially
3) Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three        peated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week. For-      the effects of greater ease of communication, dereg-
hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field          merly Business Administration 228. This course will           ulation, and globalized disciplines expected to continue
of economic analysis and policy. Topics will vary from         cover various topics in personal or corporate taxation        to be essential to corporate finance and intermedi-
year to year and will be announced at the beginning of         or both. Topics will vary from semester to semester.          ation, e.g., investment analysis, valuation, structured
each semester. (F,SP) Staff                                    (F,SP)                                                        finance/securitization, and derivative applications. The
                                                                                                                             case method is utilized with occasional additional as-
218A. International Finance. (3) Three hours of lec-           231. Corporate Finance. (3) Three hours of lecture            signed readings and text sources. (F,SP) Staff
ture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration          and one hour of optional discussion per week. Pre-
201B. Formerly Business Administration 285. This               requisites: Business Administration 203. Formerly Busi-       236D. Portfolio Management. (3) Three hours of lec-
course introduces students to the institutions and op-         ness Administration 234. This course will study the           ture per week. This course explores the broad range
eration of the international macroeconomic environ-            principles underlying alternative financial arrangements       of portfolio management in practice. The class will ex-
ment; special attention is paid to international financial      and contracts and their application to corporate finan-        amine the assets, strategies, characteristics, opera-
arrangements relevant for managers of multinational            cial management. In particular, it will examine the im-       tions, and concerns unique to each type of portfolio.
corporations. Topics include: foreign exchange and             pact of incentive, moral hazard, and principal-agent          Practitioners will present descriptions of their busi-
capital markets; the balance of payments; open econ-           problems, that arise as a consequence of asymmetric           nesses as well as methods and strategies that they
omy macroeconomics; exchange rate determination;               information, government intervention, managerial in-          employ. (F,SP) Staff
                                                                                                                                       Business Administration / 153

236E. Mergers and Acquisitions: A Practical                   eral managers and information systems specialists with       managers and subordinates, company units, compa-
Primer. (2) Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequi-          expertise in aspects of utilizing information in decision    nies and organizational agencies, and management
sites: 203 or consent of instructor. Survey of the day-       making. Topics covered include the role of information       and labor. Both two-party and multi-party relations are
to-day practices and techniques used in change of             systems in organizations, systems analysis, trade-offs       covered. coursework includes reading, lectures, dis-
control transaction. Topics include valuation, financing,      and economic consideration in systems development,           cussion of case material, and simulations of real ne-
deal structuring, tax and accounting considerations,          hardware selection and review of technological ad-           gotiations. Emphasis on the role of third parties in re-
agreements, closing document, practices used in man-          vancements relevant to modern organizations. (F,SP)          solving disputes. (F)
agement buyouts, divestitures, hostile takeovers, and
                                                              244C. MIS: Managerial and Organizational Issues.             253. Public Policy and the Management of Human
takeover defenses. Also covers distinctions in tech-
                                                              (2) Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Busi-      Resources. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-
nology M&A, detecting corruption in cross border trans-
                                                              ness Administration 204. Formerly Business Admin-            requisites: Business Administration 205 and 207, or
action attempts, and betting on deals through risk ar-
                                                              istration 248C. This course covers the management            consent of instructor. Formerly Business Administra-
bitrage. Blend of lecture, case study, and guest
                                                              and organizational issues associated with the imple-         tion 253. This course will analyze government regu-
lectures. (F,SP) Staff
                                                              mentation and growth in organizations of computer-           lation of personnel, including such issues as age, race
236F. Behavioral Finance. (3) Three hours of lecture          based administrative information systems. A man-             and gender discrimination, affirmative action, equal pay
per week. Prerequisites: 203. This course looks at the        agement perspective is maintained throughout and             and comparable worth, employment at will, and union
influence of decision heuristics and biases on investor        technical issues introduced are subordinate to this          relations. Discussion of case studies will focus on cor-
welfare, financial markets, and corporate decisions.           management perspective. (F,SP)                               porate and bureaucratic strategy and implementation
Topics include overconfidence, attribution theory, rep-                                                                     in light of the rights and responsibilities of employers
                                                              246A. Service Strategy. (3) Three hours of lecture per
resentative heuristic, availability heuristic, anchoring                                                                   and employees. (F,SP)
                                                              week. Prerequisites: 204 or Evening and Weekend
and adjustment, prospect theory, “Winners’s Curse,”
                                                              Master of Business Administration 204 or consent of          254. Power and Politics in Organizations. (2) Two
speculative bubbles, IPOs, market efficiency, limits of
                                                              instructor. This course is designed to teach general         hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Ad-
arbitrage, relative mis-pricing of common stocks, the
                                                              management principles involved in the planning, ex-          ministration 205 or consent of instructor. Formerly
tendency to trade in a highly correlated fashion, in-
                                                              ecution, and management of service businesses. It            Business Administration 257. This course addresses
vestor welfare, and market anomalies. (F,SP) Staff
                                                              covers both strategic and tactical aspects, including the    how organizations distribute various resources and
237. Topics in Finance. (.5-3) Course may be re-              development of a strategic service vision, building em-      how managers can learn where these resources are
peated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per     ployee loyalty, developing customer loyalty and sat-         concentrated and where they are scarce. Topics in-
week. Advanced study in the field of finance. Topics            isfaction, improving productivity and service quality,       clude communication skills, control issues, rewards
will vary from year to year and will be announced at          service innovation, and the role of technology in ser-       and penalties, and politics within the organization.
the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)                        vices. Blend of case studies, group projects, class dis-     (F,SP) Staff
                                                              cussions, and selected readings. (F,SP) Staff
240. Risk Management via Optimization and Sim-                                                                             255. Creativity in Business. (3) Three hours of lec-
ulation. (1) Two hours of lecture per week for eight          247A. Topics in Manufacturing and Operations. (.5-           ture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration
weeks. Prerequisites: 200S, 203, and 204, or consent          3) Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three      205 or consent of instructor. Formerly Business Ad-
of instructor. Survey of the formulation, solution, and in-   hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field        ministration 258. This course examines the concept of
terpretation of mathematical models to assist man-            of manufacturing and operations. Topics will vary from       creativity, bringing to light its nature in individuals,
agement of risk. Emphasis on applications from di-            year to year and will be announced at the beginning of       groups, and organizations. The course uses reading
verse businesses and industries, including inventory          each semester. (F,SP)                                        materials, cases, classroom, and home exercises to
management, product distribution, portfolio optimiza-         247B. Topics in Information Technology. (.5-3)               help students understand and be able to use creativ-
tion, portfolio insurance, and yield management. Two          Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three         ity in their own working lives. (F,SP)
types of models are covered: optimization and simu-           hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field
lation. Associated with each model type is a piece of                                                                      257. Special Topics in Organizational Behavior and
                                                              of information technology. Topics will vary from year to     Industrial Relations. (2-3) Course may be repeated
software: Excel’s Solver for optimization and Excel           year and will be announced at the beginning of each
add-in Crystal Ball for simulation. (F,SP)                                                                                 for credit. Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequi-
                                                              semester. (F,SP)                                             sites: Business Administration 205 or consent of in-
242. Strategic Planning of Production and Op-                 248A. Supply Chain Management. (3) Three hours               structor. Formerly Business Administration 259. Anal-
erations. (2) Two hours of lecture per week. Pre-             of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 204 or Evening and       ysis of recent literature and developments related to
requisites: Business Administration 240 or consent            Weekend Master of Business Administration 204 or             such topics as organization development, environ-
of instructor. Formerly Business Administration 241.          equivalent. Supply chain management concerns the             mental determinants of organization structure and
Strategic issues involved in planning the production          flow of materials and information in multi-stage pro-         decision-making behavior, management of profes-
and logistics of a firm and models of those functions          duction and distribution networks. This course provides      sionals and management in temporary structures,
that are useful for the firm’s strategic planning. Topics      knowledge of organizational models and analytical de-        cross-cultural studies of management organizations,
include models of a firm’s capacity expansion, facility        cision support tools necessary to design, implement,         and industrial relation systems and practices are
location, and technology selection decisions; learning        and sustain successful supply chain strategies. Topics       examined. (F,SP)
curve strategies; and industry cost models. (F,SP)            include demand and supply management, inventory              260. Consumer Behavior. (3) Two hours of lecture
243. Decisions, Games, and Strategies. (3) Three              management, supplier-buyer coordination via incen-           per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration 206
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Ad-        tives, vendor management, and the role of information        or equivalent. Formerly Business Administration 260.
ministration 200, 204 or equivalent. Formerly Business        technology in supply chain management. (F,SP) Staff          Examines concepts and theories from behavioral sci-
Administration 243. The course considers two tech-            249A. Information Technology Strategy. (3) Three             ence useful for the understanding and prediction of
niques for guiding a managerial decision maker who            hours of lecture per week. This course focuses on the        market place behavior and demand analysis. Em-
has to make a choice now but will only know later             use of IT by traditional firms and startups, rather than      phasizes applications to the development of marketing
whether the choice was good. Decision analysis helps          the details of the technology, with the goals of under-      policy planning and strategy and to various decision ar-
if the outcome of the choice depends on “nature”;             standing how IT enables new strategies and how ex-           eas within marketing. (F,SP) Staff
game models help if the outcome depends on human              isting strategies adapt to IT innovations. Covers IT
opponents (e.g., competitors). Foundations of the two                                                                      261. Marketing Research: Tools and Techniques
                                                              technologies used throughout the organization, in-
techniques, and a variety of applications, are studied.                                                                    for Data Collection and Analysis. (3) Three hours of
                                                              cluding mobile communications, systems for online
(SP)                                                                                                                       lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Adminis-
                                                              payment, business-to-business transactions, customer
                                                                                                                           tration 200 or comparable statistical course. Formerly
                                                              relationship management, and supply chain man-
244A. MIS: Data Management. (4) Three hours of                                                                             Business Administration 261. This course develops the
                                                              agement. (F,SP) Staff
lecture and one and one-half hours of discussion per                                                                       skills necessary to plan and implement an effective
week. Prerequisites: Business Administration 204. For-        251. Human Resources Management. (3) Three                   market research study. Topics include research de-
merly Business Administration 248A. This course cov-          hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Ad-       sign, psychological measurement, survey methods, ex-
ers several important topics in business data pro-            ministration 205 or consent of instructor. Formerly          perimentation, statistical analysis of marketing data,
cessing including file and data base systems. The              Business Administration 251. A study of the problems         and effective reporting of technical material to man-
problem of data management in large organizations is          and techniques associated with managing the per-             agement. Students select a client and prepare a mar-
analyzed, and the logical data modeling process and           sonnel function. Topics include the processes of re-         ket research study during the course. Course intended
its strategic importance are studied. Other topics in-        cruitment, selection, placement, training, and evalua-       for students with substantive interests in marketing.
clude future developments in computer technology and          tion of people within organizations. The role of the staff   (F,SP) Staff
acquiring and managing computer resources. A team             manager with respect to the planning, design, and al-
project consists of the design and implementation of a                                                                     262. Brand Management and Strategy. (3) Three
                                                              location of tasks and people is considered, with em-
data base using a relational database management                                                                           hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Ad-
                                                              phasis on the implications of research for management
system package. (F)                                                                                                        ministration 202B and 206, or equivalent. Formerly
                                                              problems and policies. (F)
                                                                                                                           Business Adminstration 262A. The focus of this course
244B. MIS: Systems Analysis and Design. (3) Three             252. Negotiations and Conflict Resolution. (3)                is on developing student skills to formulate and critique
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Ad-        Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Business           complete marketing programs including product, price,
ministration 204. Formerly Business Administration            Administration 252. A study of the negotiations pro-         distribution and promotion policies. There is a heavy
248B. The goal of this course is to provide future gen-       cess, including negotiations among buyers and sellers,       use of case analysis. Course is primarily designed for


       B prefix=language course for business majors                  R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                   *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                  AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                        requirement
154 / Business Administration
those who will take a limited number of advanced            dations of pricing. The second module discusses sev-          terprise systems and public policies toward business
marketing courses and wish an integrated approach.          eral innovative pricing concepts including price cus-         in Europe (272A) and the Pacific Rim (272B). Courses
(F,SP) Staff                                                tomization, nonlinear pricing, price matching, and prod-      also explore the relations between the United States
                                                            uct line pricing. The third module analyzes the               and Europe, or Pacific Rim nations, respectively.
263. Information- and Technology-Based Market-
                                                            strengths and weaknesses of several Internet-based,           (F,SP)
ing. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:
                                                            buyer-determined pricing models. (F,SP) Staff
Business Administration 206. Formerly Business Ad-                                                                        280. Real Estate and Urban Land Economics. (3)
ministration 262B. Information technology has allowed       270. Business and Public Policy. (2) Three hours of           Three hours of lecture and one hour of optional dis-
firms to gather and process large quantities of infor-       lecture for ten weeks. Formerly Business Administration       cussion per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
mation about consumers’ choices and reactions to            207B. Introduction to political economy, the role of gov-     Formerly Business Administration 280. Intensive re-
marketing campaigns. However, few firms have the ex-         ernment in a mixed economy, business-government re-           view of literature in the theory of land use, urban
pertise to intelligently act on such information. This      lations, the public policy process, regulation of business,   growth, and real estate market behavior; property
course addresses this shortcoming by teaching stu-          corporate political activity and corporate governance.        rights and valuation; residential and nonresidential
dents how to use customer information to better mar-        Compares United States corporate governance sys-              markets; construction; debt and equity financing; pub-
ket to consumers. In addition, the course addresses         tems, public policies and political system to those of        lic controls and policies. (F,SP)
how information technology affects marketing strategy.      Western Europe and Japan. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                          282. Seminar in Urban Economic Resource Policy.
(F,SP)
                                                            271. Managing the Political Environment of Busi-              (3) Course may be repeated for credit. Three hours of
264. High Technology Marketing Management. (3)              ness. (2-3) Two or three hours of lecture per week.           lecture per week. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.
Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Busi-       Prerequisites: Business Administration 207 or equiv-          Formerly Business Administration 282. The interaction
ness Administration 206 or equivalent. Formerly Busi-       alent, or consent of instructor. Formerly Business Ad-        of the private and public sectors in urban development;
ness Administration 264. High technology refers to that     ministration 271. This course examines the methods            modeling the urban economy; growth and decline of
class of products and services which is subject to tech-    and strategies by which business enterprises and as-          urban areas; selected policy issues: housing, trans-
nological change at a pace significantly faster than for     sociations attempt to influence public policies, primarily     portation, financing, local government, urban rede-
most goods in the economy. Under such circum-               in the United States, with some comparison to West-           velopment and neighborhood change are examined.
stances, the marketing task faced by the high tech-         ern Europe and Japan. Uses combination of scholarly           (F)
nology firm differs in some ways from the usual. The         articles, current periodicals and case studies to explore     283. Real Estate Financing. (3) Three hours of lec-
purpose of this course is to explore these differences.     the processes of government decision-making and pol-          ture and one hour of optional discussion per week.
(SP)                                                        icy implementation and how they affect, and are af-           Prerequisites: Business Administration 280 and back-
265. Integrated Marketing Communications. (2)               fected by, business interests and institutions. (F,SP)        ground in the basics of finance, micro-economics,
Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business      272. Corporate Environmental Strategy and Man-                macro-economics, statistics, and quantitative analysis.
Administration 206 or equivalent; 260 is recom-             agement. (2) Two hours of lecture per week. Overview          Formerly Business Administration 283. Students will be
mended. Formerly Business Administration 265. A             of critical developments in corporate environmental           introduced to the fundamentals of real estate financial
specialized course in advertising, focusing on man-         strategy and management. Prepares students to think           analysis, including elements of mortgage financing and
agement and decision-making. Topics include objec-          of strategic business opportunities present in the need       taxation. The course will apply the standard tools of
tive-setting, copy decisions, media decisions, bud-         to conserve resources and solve environmental prob-           financial analysis to specialized real estate financing
geting, and examination of theories, models, and other      lems. Topics include market and nonmarket drivers of          circumstances and real estate evaluation. (SP)
research methods appropriate to these decision areas.       beyond compliance environmental strategy; man-                284. Seminar in Real Estate Investment Analysis.
Other topics include social/economic issues of ad-          agement tools and system design technologies and              (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:
vertising by nonprofit organizations. (SP)                   concepts; and techniques for translating environmental        Consent of instructor. Formerly Business Administra-
266. Channels of Distribution. (2) Two hours of lec-        factors into effective business strategies. (F,SP) Staff      tion 284. Analysis of selected problems and special
ture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration       275. Business Law: Managers and the Legal En-                 studies; cases in residental and non-residental de-
202B, 206 or equivalent. Formerly Business Admin-           vironment. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-          velopment and financing, urban redevelopment, real
istration 266. The success of any marketing program         requisites: Completion of all core courses or consent         estate taxation, mortgage market developments, equity
often weighs heavily upon its co-execution by mem-          of instructor. A manager must understand the legal en-        investment, valuation, and zoning. (SP)
bers of the firm’s distribution channel. This course         vironments which impact business and understand               285. Real Estate Investments. (3) Three hours of lec-
seeks to provide an understanding of how the strate-        how to work effectively with lawyers. This course ad-         ture per week. The course covers the key financial and
gic and tactical roles of the channel can be identified      dresses the legal aspects of business relationships and       economic concepts in real estate investment. It begins
and managed. This is accomplished, first, through            business agreements. Topics covered include forms of          with pro forma investment analysis. We then value de-
studying the broad economic and social forces which         business organization, duties of officers and directors,       velopment sites across the main sectors: residential,
govern the channel evolution. It is completed through       intellectual property, antitrust, contracts, employment       retail, office, industrial, and hotel. We also cover con-
the examination of tools to select, manage and moti-        relationships, criminal law, and debtor-creditor rela-        tracting with public and private sector partners and re-
vate channel partners. (F,SP)                               tionships including bankruptcy. (F,SP) Staff                  lated steps. Finally, we study loan and equity struc-
266A. Sales Force Management. (1) Eight hours of            276. Media and Entertainment: Economics, Strat-               tures (REITs), the secondary mortgage market, real
lecture for two weeks. The sales force is a key (and        egy, and Policy. (3) Three hours of lecture per week.         estate in investment portfolios. (F,SP) Staff
not inexpensive) component of a firm’s overall mar-          An introduction to the economics of media and enter-          286. Housing and the Urban Economy. (3) Three
keting strategy. This class will provide students with a    tainment industries. Examines economic tools to un-           hours of seminar per week. Prerequisites: Public Policy
toolbox for handling a variety of sales force related is-   derstand some of the peculiarities of business that im-       210A-210B or equivalent. Formerly Business Adminis-
sues-both strategic and tactical. The primary focus is      pact the nature of contracting, and the organization of       tration C296. This course considers the economics of
on maximizing sales force productivity. Topics covered      firms and markets. Based on an understanding of the            urban housing and land markets from the viewpoints
include the selling process, organizational structure,      basic economic issues, the course will provide an             of investors, developers, public and private managers,
sales force sizing, territory design, compensation, eval-   overview of public policy issues and will explore di-         and consumers. It considers the interactions between
uation, motivation, and deployment. (F,SP)                  verse strategic responses. (F,SP) Staff                       private action and public regulation—including land use
267. Topics in Marketing. (.5-3) Course may be re-                                                                        policy, taxation, and government subsidy programs.
                                                            277. Special Topics in Business and Public Policy.
peated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per                                                                 We will also analyze the links between primary and
                                                            (1-3) One to three hours of lecture per week. Prereq-
week. Advanced study in the field of Marketing. Top-                                                                       secondary mortgage markets, securitization, and liq-
                                                            uisites: Business Administration 207 or equivalent, or
ics will vary from year to year and will be announced at                                                                  uidity. Finally, the links between local housing and re-
                                                            consent of instructor. Formerly Business Administra-
the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)                                                                                    lated markets—such as transportation and public
                                                            tion 278. Topics vary by semester at discretion of in-
                                                                                                                          finance—will be explored. (F) Quigley
268A. Global Marketing Strategy. (2) Two hours of           structor and by student demand. Topical areas include:
lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Adminis-          business and professional ethics and the role of cor-         287. Special Topics in Real Estate Economics and
tration 206 or equivalent. Formerly Business Admin-         porate social responsibility in the mixed economy;            Finance. (1-3) Course may be repeated for credit. One
istration 267. This course will cover a wide variety of     managing the external affairs of the corporation, in-         to three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Busi-
topics relating to the management of international mar-     cluding community, government, media and stake-               ness Administration 280 and consent of instructor. For-
keting strategy, including frameworks for developing in-    holder relations; technology policy, research and de-         merly Business Administration 281. Topics vary each
ternational marketing strategy; sources and sustain-        velopment and the effects of government regulation of         semester. Topic areas include advanced techniques
ability of competitive advantage; international market      business on technological innovation and adoption.            for real estate financial analysis and structuring and
structure analysis; market entry strategy; and inte-        (F,SP)                                                        evaluation; the securitization of real estate debt and
gration of marketing strategy with other functional                                                                       equity; issues in international real estate; cyclical be-
                                                            278A-278B. Comparative and International Busi-
strategies. (F,SP)                                                                                                        havior of real estate markets; portfolio theory and real
                                                            ness and Public Policy. (2-3;2-3) Two or three hours
                                                                                                                          estate asset allocation. (F,SP)
269. Pricing. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. This     of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Admin-
three-module course aims to equip students with             istration 207 or equivalent, or consent of instructor.        290A. Introduction to Management of Technology.
proven concepts, techniques, and frameworks for as-         Formerly Business Administration 272A-272B. Both              (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Busi-
sessing and formulating pricing strategies. The first        courses examine and compare business-government               ness Administration 290E. This course gives students
module develops the economics and behavorial foun-          relations, the public policy process, the business en-        an overview of the main topics encompassed by man-
                                                                                                                                        Business Administration / 155

agement of technology. It includes the full chain of in-       students to the innovation process and its manage-           291A. Speaking as a Leader. (2) One hour of lecture
novative activities beginning with R&D and extending           ment. It provides an overview of technological change        and two hours of discussion per week. Formerly Busi-
through production and marketing. Why do many ex-              and links it to specific strategic challenges; examines       ness Administration 291A. Leaders must be capable of
isting firms fail to incorporate new technology? What           the diverse elements of the innovation process and           inspiring commitment in their constituencies rather than
are the success factors at each stage of innovation?           how they are managed; discusses the uneasy rela-             merely demanding compliance. This course will teach
The course introduces students to Haas and College             tionship between technology and the workforce; and           future leaders the elements that are essential to inspire
of Engineering faculty working in the relevant areas           examines challenges of managing innovation globally.         such change. The instructor solicits students’ personal
and student projects at leading high tech firms. (F,SP)         (F,SP)                                                       convictions, then provides a structure and method for
Staff                                                                                                                       effectively communicating these beliefs. Participants
                                                               290M. High-Tech Product Design and Rapid Man-                will develop confidence in both the content of their
290B. Biotechnology Industry Perspectives and                  ufacturing. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-        message and their ability to convey it. (F,SP)
Business Development. (2) Two hours of lecture per             requisites: Graduate standing. Formerly Business Ad-
week. This course is designed to examine the strategic         ministration 290B. This course will study CAD/CAM,           291D. Data Visualization for Discovery and Com-
issues that confront the management of the de-                 rapid prototyping, metal products, semiconductors,           munication. (1) Eight hours of lecture for two weeks.
velopment-stage biotech company, i.e., after its               electronic packaging, biotechnology, and robotics tech-      This course exposes the problems of poor data pre-
startup via an initial capital infusion, but before it might   nologies and includes a hands-on laboratory using            sentation and introduces design practices necessary
be deemed successful (e.g., by virtue of a product             CAD and manufacturing techniques. Economic and so-           to communicate quantitative business information
launch), or otherwise has achieved “first-tier” status.         cial drivers, organizational structure, product lifecycle,   clearly, efficiently, and powerfully. This course identifies
The intention is to study the biotech organization dur-        and future trends are also covered. (F,SP) Staff             what to look for in the data and describes the types of
ing the process of its growth and maturation from an                                                                        graphs and visual analysis techniques most effective
early-stage existence through “adolescence” into an            290N. Managing the New Product Development                   for spotting what is meaningful and making sense of it.
“adult” company. (F,SP) Staff                                  Process. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-           (F,SP)
                                                               requisites: Graduate standing. Formerly Business Ad-
290C. Strategic Computing and Communications                   ministration 290A. An operationally focused course that      291T. Topics in Managerial Communications. (1-3)
Technology. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-          aims to develop the interdisciplinary skills required for    Course may be repeated for credit. One to three hours
requisites: Graduate standing in engineering, business         successful product development. Through readings,            of lecture per week. Formerly Business Administration
administration, information management and systems,            case studies, guest speakers, applied projects, and          291B. This course will provide the student with spe-
or consent of instructor. Formerly Business Adminis-           student research, students discover the basic tools,         cialized knowledge in some area of managerial com-
tration C290D. Factors strongly impacting the success          methods, and organizational structures used in new           munications. Topics include multimedia business pre-
of new computing and communications products and               product development management. Course covers                sentations, personal leadership development, diversity
services (based on underlying technologies such as             process phases: idea generation, product definition,          management, and making meetings work. Topics will
electronics and software) in commercial applications.          product development, testing and refinement, manu-            vary from semester to semester. (F,SP)
Technology trends and limits, economics, standard-             facturing ramp-up and product launch. (F,SP)
ization, intellectual property, government policy, and in-                                                                  292A. Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organi-
dustrial organization. Strategies to manage the design         290P. Project Management Case Studies. (2) Two               zations. (2,3) Two to three hours of lecture per week.
and marketing of successful products and services.             hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Graduate           This course prepares students conceptually and prac-
(SP) Messerschmitt, Varian                                     standing. Formerly Business Administration 290L. This        tically to create, lead, and manage nonprofit organi-
                                                               course presents case studies of projects that required       zations. Focuses on the centrality of the mission, gov-
290D. Design as Strategic Management Issue. (2)                                                                             erning board leadership, application of strategy and
                                                               intervention to avert catastrophic failure. Students will
Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Gradu-                                                                        strategic planning, and strategic management of issues
                                                               discuss case studies and review real management
ate standing. Formerly Business Administration 290K.                                                                        unique to or characteristic of the sector: performance
                                                               problems of major corporations. They will create strate-
This course is a study of product design, facilities de-                                                                    measurement, program development, financial man-
                                                               gic plans to alleviate problems and learn how to man-
sign, and corporate identity design. It will cover how                                                                      agement, resource development, community relations
                                                               age a large project to a successful completion. (F,SP)
these design strategies are integral to product devel-                                                                      and marketing, human resource management, advo-
opment and influence customer satisfication, quality is-         290Q. Quality Improvement: Strategy, Processes,              cacy, and management. (F,SP) Staff
sues, manufacturing procedures, and marketing tac-             and Customers. (3) Three hours of lecture per week.
tics. (F,SP)                                                                                                                292B. Nonprofit Boards. (1) Eight hours of lecture for
                                                               Formerly Business Administration 290Q. This course
                                                                                                                            two weeks. The purpose of this class is to acquaint
                                                               is intended to provide a strong introduction to students
290E. Marketing for High-Tech Entrepreneurs. (3)                                                                            Master of Business Administration students, many of
                                                               on contemporary issues concerning product and ser-
Three hours of lecture per week. Every successful en-                                                                       whom will be asked to serve on nonprofit boards
                                                               vice quality. A major premise is that quality competition
trepreneurial high tech venture has at its core indi-                                                                       throughout their careers, with the nonprofit sector and
viduals with mastery of two skill sets: marketing and          has moved rapidly to the foreground as a major arena         the roles and responsibilities of nonprofit boards. Stu-
management expertise, and technological skill. This            for competitive struggles, and firms that fail to recog-      dents will learn why nonprofit boards exist, how they
course is intended to provide the marketing skills             nize its importance and develop effective organiza-          are structured, how they differ from corporate boards,
needed for the management of an entrepreneurial high           tional responses will fall by the wayside. (F,SP)            what their legal responsibilities are, how boards and
technology venture, regardless of whether the indi-            290T. Topics in Management of Technology. (.5-3)             chief executives relate to each other, and how boards
vidual’s “home” skill set is technical or managerial. We       Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three         contribute to the effectiveness of nonprofit organiza-
examine in depth successful marketing approaches for           hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field        tions. (F,SP)
entrepreneurial companies as a function of markets             of Management of Technology. Topics will vary from
and technologies. Emphasis is placed on the special                                                                         292C. Strategic CSR and Consulting Projects. (3)
                                                               year to year and will be announced at the beginning of       Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly 292P. Dis-
requirements for creating and executing marketing              each semester. (F,SP)
plans and programs in a setting of rapid technological                                                                      cusses the field strategic of CSR through a series of
change and limited resources. This course is particu-          290V. Telecommunications. (3) Three hours of lec-            lectures, guest speakers, and projects. It will examine
larly suited for those who anticipate founding or op-          ture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration        best practices used by companies to engage in socially
erating technology companies. (F,SP) Staff                     204. Formerly 244D. This course is intended for stu-         responsible practices. It will provide students with a
                                                               dents who wish to gain better understanding of one of        flavor of the complex dilemmas one can face in busi-
290G. International Trade and Competition in High              the most important issues facing management today—           ness in trying to do both “good for society” and “well for
Technology. (2) Two hours of lecture per week. Pre-            designing, implementing, and managing telecommu-             shareholders.” It looks at CSR from a corporate strat-
requisites: Graduate standing. Formerly Business Ad-           nication and distributed computer systems. The fol-          egy perspective and how it supports core business ob-
ministration 290C. This course looks at who is winning         lowing topics are covered: a survey of networking            jectives, core competencies, and bottom-line profits.
or losing and why in international competition in high         technologies; the selection, design, and management          (F,SP) Staff
technology industries. It will emphasize the interaction       of telecommunication systems; strategies for dis-
between business strategies and the economic and                                                                            292F. Financial Management of Nonprofit Organi-
                                                               tributed data processing; office automation; and man-         zations. (1) Eight hours of lecture for two weeks. Pre-
political variables that shape the development and dif-
                                                               agement of personal computers in organizations.              requisites: 203, financial experience, or equivalent. The
fusion of new technologies. (F,SP)
                                                               (F,SP)                                                       course focuses on financial management issues faced
290H. Management of Technology—Doing Busi-                                                                                  by board members and senior and executive man-
                                                               290W. Wireless Communications. (3) Three hours of
ness in China. (2) Two hours of lecture per week.                                                                           agers in nonprofit organizations. Students learn tools
                                                               lecture per week. This course focuses on current is-
This course prepares students to found a startup busi-                                                                      and techniques for effective planning and budgeting
                                                               sues facing the global wireless communications in-
ness in China or to work with an MNC in China, de-                                                                          and how to control, evaluate and revise plans. Use and
                                                               dustry. Particular emphasis is placed on analyzing the
velops their critical analysis and strategic decision tools                                                                 development of internal and external financial reports
                                                               industry structure, value chain, and business models
and skills needed to compete in the world’s most dy-                                                                        are studied with an emphasis on using financial in-
                                                               of various players and investigating opportunities for
namic emerging market, and provides access and use-                                                                         formation in decision making. Tools and techniques of
                                                               startups and new entrants. Explores the role of regu-
ful introductions/Guanxi to aid future business devel-                                                                      financial statement analysis, interpretation, and pre-
opment in China. (F,SP) Staff                                  lation, technological innovation, and competition in         sentation are practiced. (F,SP)
                                                               shaping the future of the industry. Draws on various
290I. Managing Innovation and Change. (3) Three                disciplines such as public policy, law, economics,           292N. Topics in Nonprofit and Public Management.
hours of lecture per week. Formerly Business Ad-               finance, marketing, engineering, and physics. (F,SP)          (1-3) Course may be repeated for credit. One to three
ministration 274. This course is designed to introduce         Staff                                                        hours of lecture per week. Formerly 292M. Advanced


       B prefix=language course for business majors                   R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                   *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                   AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                         requirement
156 / Business Administration
study in the field of nonprofit and public management.        their investments; and (4) new frontiers—reviews many        tal venture project under development. The business
Topics will vary from year to year and will be an-          of the key ideas developed in the course. (F,SP) Staff       concept may be in the startup mode, or further along
nounced at the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)                                                                        in its evolution. The pedagogy is one of “guided” en-
Staff                                                       295C. Opportunity Recognition: Technology and                trepreneurship where students, often working in teams,
                                                            Entrepreneurship in Silicon Valley. (3) Three hours          undertake the real challenges of building a venture.
292R. Nonprofit Marketing and Fundraising. (2)               of lecture per week. Formerly 290O. This course is in-       Students must be willing to discuss their project with
Two hours of lecture per week. Thorough overview of         tended to provide the core skills needed for the             others in the workshop as group deliberation of the en-
fundraising principles as well as experience in all the     identification of opportunities that can lead to suc-         trepreneurial challenges is a key component of the
major fundraising strategies: direct mail, online, major    cessful, entrepreneurial high technology ventures, re-       class. (F,SP) Staff
gifts, planned giving, capital campaigns, proposal writ-    gardless of the individual’s “home” skill set, whether
ing, and corporate giving. The course further distin-       technical or managerial. We examine in depth the ap-         295J. Entrepreneurship in Biotechnology. (2) Two
guishes what is different about fundraising and mar-        proaches most likely to succeed for entrepreneurial          hours of lecture per week. An introduction to the com-
keting and looks at how fundraising is a subset of a        companies as a function of markets and technologies.         plexities and unique problems of entrepreneurship in
larger marketing plan. Students learn how to brand an       Emphasis is placed on the special requirements for           the life sciences and is designed for both en-
organization, make it more visible and turn marketing       creating and executing strategy in a setting of rapid        trepreneurs and students who may some day found or
strategies into fundraising opportunities. (F,SP) Staff     technological change and limited resources. This             work in an emerging life science-based company. Stu-
                                                            course is particularly suited for those who anticipate       dents are exposed to the topics most critical to suc-
292S. Introduction to Social Entrepreneurship. (2)
                                                            founding or operating technology companies. (F,SP)           cessfully founding, financing, and operating a life sci-
Two hours of lecture per week. The course will (1) In-
                                                            Staff                                                        ence company and are expected to perform many of
troduce emerging global social enterprises through
case analyses, guests, and a project, (2) introduce the                                                                  the tasks which founders and early venture managers
                                                            295D. New Venture Finance. (2) Three hours of lec-
emerging capital market for social ventures and the                                                                      normally undertake. (F,SP) Staff
                                                            ture for ten weeks. Prerequisites: Business Adminis-
possible trade-offs in social and financial return ex-       tration 295A or consent of instructor. Formerly Busi-        295T. Special Topics in Entrepreneurship. (1-3)
pectations from different capital sources, from venture     ness Administration 295D. This is a course about             One to three hours of lecture per week. Sections 1-10
firms to foundations, (3) introduce the management de-       financing new entrepreneurial ventures, emphasizing           to be graded on a letter-grade basis. Sections 11-15 to
cisions inherent in growing social enterprises, and (4)     those that have the possibility of creating a national or    be graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Pre-
help students become oriented in applying methods for       international impact or both. It will take two perspec-      requisites: All core courses or equivalents. Formerly
measuring and reporting social impact and return.           tives—the entrepreneur’s and the investor’s—and it will      Business Administration 295C. Courses of this kind will
(F,SP) Staff                                                place a special focus on the venture capital process,        cover issues in entrepreneurship that either appeal to
292T. Topics in Socially Responsible Business. (.5-         including how they are formed and managed, ac-               a specialized interest by type of firm being started
3) Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three     cessing the public markets, mergers, and strategic al-       (e.g., new ventures in computer software) or in the as-
hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field       liances. (SP) Staff                                          pect of the entrepreneurial process being considered
of Socially Responsible Business. Topics will vary from     295E. Case Studies in Entrepreneurship. (2) Two              (e.g., new venture funding). The courses typically will
year to year and will be announced at the beginning of      hours of lecture per week. This course integrates the        be designed to take advantage of the access offered
each semester. (F,SP)                                       learnings from summer entrepreneurships into aca-            by the University and the locale to knowledgeable and
                                                            demic experience. Classes will include development of        experienced members of the business community.
293. Individually Supervised Study for Graduate                                                                          (F,SP)
Students. Course may be repeated for credit. Pre-           an analysis of cases based on the internship, and op-
requisites: Graduate standing. Formerly Business Ad-        portunities to meet with management of the host pro-         296. Special Topics in Business Administration.
ministration 293. Individually supervised study of sub-     grams. By the end of the semester, students will bet-        (.5-3) Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to
jects not available to the student in the regular           ter understand what it takes to run an entrepreneurial       three hours of lecture per week. Sections 7A and 10A
schedule, approved by faculty adviser as appropriate        enterprise. (F,SP) Staff                                     (fall) and 7B and 10B (spring) will be offered In
for the student’s program. (F,SP)                           295F. Customer and Business Development in Hi-               Progress. Credit and grade to be awarded on com-
                                                            Tech Enterprise. (2) Two hours of lecture per week.          pletion of sequence. All other sections are offered on
293C. Curricular Practical Training Internship. Course
                                                            This course is about how to successfully organize            a letter-graded basis. Prerequisites: Graduate stand-
may be repeated. The course will be individually su-
                                                            sales, marketing, and business development in a              ing. Formerly Business Administration 296. Advanced
pervised and must be approved by the faculty adviser.
                                                            startup. For the purpose of this course, a “startup” can     study in various fields of business administration. Top-
Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.
                                                            either be a new venture, or an existing compmany en-         ics will vary from year to year and will be announced at
This is an independent study course for international
                                                            tering a new market. Both must solve a common set of         the beginning of each semester. (F,SP) Staff
students doing internships under the Curricular Prac-
tical Training program. Requires a paper exploring how      issues: Where is our market? Who are our customers?          297A. Introduction to the Health Care System. (3)
the theoretical constructs learned in MBA courses           How do we build the right team? How do we scale              Three hours of lecture per week. This course gives a
were applied during the internship. (F,SP) Staff            sales? These issues are at the heart of the “Customer        systematic overview of the U.S. health care system by
                                                            Development” process covered in this course. (F,SP)          providing students with an understanding of its struc-
294. Selected Topics for MBA Students. (1) Course           Staff
may be repeated for a maximum of 2 units. Two hours                                                                      ture, financing, and special properties. Applies social
of seminar per week. Sections 1-10 to be graded on a        295G. Investing in Entrepreneurial Opportunities:            science theory, disciplinary contributions, and research
letter-grade basis. Sections 11-15 to be graded on a        Building an Investment Screen, Methodology, and              findings to the understanding of health care delivery
satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisites: MBA       Process. (2) Two hours of lecture per week. This             problems; examines current courses of data about
students. Formerly Business Administration 294. The         course will provide students with an education in to the     health status, health services use, financing, and per-
course focuses on a specific industry, field of man-          complexities and unique problems of entrepreneurship         formance indicators; and analyzes the larger man-
agement, or region of the world and is initiated and or-    in companies with great growth potential, but that are       agement and policy issues that drive reform efforts.
ganized by students. It is usually a survey course. Top-    facing significant challenges to achieving that potential.    (F,SP) Staff
ics will vary from year to year and will be announced at    This class is designed to provide students with the
                                                                                                                         297B. Health Care Finance. (2) Two hours of lecture
the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)                      tools and skills most critical to successfully screening,
                                                                                                                         per week. Prerequisites: Master’s-level accounting and
                                                            investing in, and/or leading companies that have both
295A. Entrepreneurship. (3) Three hours of lecture                                                                       finance. This course covers the strategic financial man-
                                                            a great set future growth opportunities and a great set
per week. Prerequisites: All core courses or equiva-                                                                     agement in the health services industry, including
                                                            of current problems. This class will use case studies,
lents. Formerly Business Administration 295A. This                                                                       provider organizations (e.g., hospitals and physician
                                                            practical valuation and other exercises, and the en-
course is about how to start a new business and how                                                                      groups) and insurance firms. Cases are used to apply
                                                            ergy, enthusiasm, and intellectual capacity of its stu-
to write a business plan. Students are organized in                                                                      the financial analysis and planning skills learned in the
                                                            dents to create a great learning environment. (F,SP)
teams of four around new venture ideas of their own                                                                      course. Topic areas include financial statement anal-
                                                            Staff
choosing. They conduct research, consult with mem-                                                                       ysis, cost behavior, pricing and service decisions, plan-
bers of the business community, perform analysis, and       295H. Top-Down Law. (2) Two hours of lecture per             ning and budgeting, management control, debt and eq-
write a formal business plan. They then present an ap-      week. Survey of legal and regulatory issues and prob-        uity financing, risk and return, capital budgeting, and
peal for funding to a panel consisting of the instructors   lems that confront founders and CEOs of en-                  project risk assessment. (F,SP) Staff
and members of the investing community. (F,SP)              trepreneurial ventures. The course is intended to
                                                                                                                         297C. Health Care Technology Policy. (2) Two
                                                            broaden students’ perspective and knowledge about
295B. Venture Capital and Private Equity. (3) Three                                                                      hours of lecture per week. An examination of the pub-
                                                            the legal system/process so that they are prepared to
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 295A and 234                                                                   lic policy institutions and processes influencing inno-
                                                            (a) identify, analyze, and deal with legal issues, (b) un-
recommended. This is an advanced case-based                 derstand and respond to legal and policy grounds for         vation, regulation, and payment for biotechnology,
course intended to provide the background, tools, and       laws and regulations, and (c) work effectively and           pharmaceuticals, and medical devices. Topics include
themes of the venture capital industry. The course is       efficiently with inside and outside legal counsel to re-      technology transfer and patent law; FDA review for
organized in four modules of the private equity cycle:      solve legal problems and manage legal risk. (F,SP)           safety/efficacy; Center for Medicare and Medicaid Ser-
(1) fund raising—examines how private equity funds          Staff                                                        vices insurance coverage policy; coverage, payment,
are raised and structured, (2) investing—considers the                                                                   benefit design by private insurers for new technology;
interactions between private equity investors and the       295I. Entrepreneurship Workshop for Start-ups. (2)           and cost-effectiveness analysis. Examples and case
entrepreneurs that they finance, (3) exiting—examines        Two hours of lecture per week. This workshop is in-          studies are drawn from all three technology sectors.
the process through which private equity investors exit     tended for students who have their own experiemen-           (F,SP) Staff
                                                                                                                                        Business Administration / 157

297E. Public Policy in the Business of Health Care.         merly Business Administration 299G. This is a course             weeks. Prerequisites: E204. Formerly Business Ad-
(2) Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Pub-      in strategic management of health services organiza-             ministration E201A. This course uses the tools and
lic Health 223A or equivalent. The purpose of this          tions. It systematically addresses system-wide, orga-            concepts of microeconomics to analyze decision prob-
course is to provide students with a framework for an-      nization-wide, group-level, and individual-level issues          lems within a business firm. Particular emphasis is
alyzing policy problems, a working knowledge of the         in strategy formulation, content, implementation, and            placed on the firm’s choice of policies in determining
public process, and an opportunity to discuss, debate,      performance. It considers internal and external factors          prices, inputs usage, and outputs. The effects of the
and analyze important policy topics facing the health       that affect organizational performance. Emphasis is on           state of the competitive environment on business poli-
care system. (F,SP) Staff                                   the development and implementation of strategies to              cies are also examined.
                                                            meet stakeholders’ demands, and total quality man-
298A-298B. International Business Development               agement approaches. This course covers a wide va-                201B. Macroeconomics in the Global Economy. (2)
for MBAs. (2;1) Two hours of lecture per week ex-           riety of health care organizations including providers,          Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or
tending for three weeks following the spring semester.      plans, systems, suppliers, pharmaceuticals, and                  three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine
Credit and grade to be awarded on completion of se-         biotechs. The course builds on 205 and Public Health             weeks. Prerequisites: Business Administration E201A.
quence. Prerequisites: First semester MBA core              223A. (F,SP)                                                     Formerly Business Administration E201B. This course
courses. Formerly Business Administration 297A-                                                                              builds on the foundations developed in E201A to de-
297B. This course explores the issues of conducting         299M. Marketing Strategy. (3) Three hours of lecture             velop theories of fiscal policy, monetary policy, and
business in an international context, including an anal-    per week. Prerequisites: All core courses. Formerly              other macro-economic policies. Both the issues and
ysis of project management, information resources,          Business Administration 299D. Strategic planning the-            the evidence in connection with these policies will be
and cultural differences. The three-week project, typ-      ory and methods with an emphasis on customer, com-               examined. Other topics covered in the course range
ically in a developing economy, provides a real-life ap-    petitor, industry, and environmental analysis and its ap-        from the specifics of the U.S. balance of payments sit-
plication of theories of this course and of the first-year   plication to strategy development and choice. (F,SP)             uation to the broader problems associated with eco-
MBA courses. The fall segment highlights the pre-           Staff                                                            nomic growth and decay in the world.
sentations of each returning team on their project find-
                                                            299O. Organizing for Strategic Advantage. (3) Three              202. Financial Reporting. (2) Four hours of lecture
ings and experiences. (SP)
                                                            hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: All core               per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-half
298S. Seminar in International Business. (2,3) Four         courses. Formerly Business Administration 299C.                  hours of lecture per week for nine weeks. Formerly
to five and one-half hours of fieldwork per week for          Course examines current models of strategy, structure,           Business Administration E202A. Published financial re-
eight weeks. This course involves a series of speaker       process interaction, and their historical foundations.           ports provide the most important single set of data on
and seminar-type classes in preparation for a two-          Students will apply current theory to traditional cases          modern organizations. This course is designed to pro-
week study tour of a specific country or region. Par-        and to current examples of organization adaptation in            vide a working knowledge of accounting measure-
ticipants will visit companies and organizations and        the business press. In addition, the course will exam-           ments which are necessary for a clear understanding
meet with top-level management to learn about the op-       ine in detail emerging patterns of strategy, structure,          of published financial reports.
portunities and challenges of operating in a specific        and process—the beginnings of what appear to be
country or region. Evaluation is based on student pre-      “new” organizational forms. Finally, comparisons will be         203. Introduction to Finance. (2) Four hours of lec-
sentations, participation, and a research paper. (F,SP)     drawn between U.S. and foreign patterns of adapta-               ture per weekend for seven weeks or three and one-
Staff                                                       tion. (F,SP)                                                     half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks. Formerly
                                                                                                                             Business Administration E203. This course will ex-
298X. MBA Exchange Program. (1-15) Course may               299T. Strategic Planning: Perspectives and Decisions.            amine the wide menu of available assets, the institu-
be repeated for credit. One to fifteen hours of lecture      (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: All          tional structure of U.S. and international financial mar-
per week. Must be taken on a satisfactory/unsatis-          core courses. Formerly Business Administration 299F.             kets, and the market mechanisms for trading
factory basis. Prerequisites: Successful completion of      Concepts of strategy and planning are developed.                 securities. Topics include discounting, capital bud-
all core courses; good academic standing. Students          Several major types of planning models and tech-                 geting, historical behavior of asset returns, and di-
who participate in one of the Haas School’s domestic        niques are evaluated for strategic policy choices, or-           versification and portfolio theory. Course will also pro-
or international exchange programs receive credit           ganizational design, and the allocation of resources.            vide introductions to asset pricing theory for primary
(usually 12 units) at Haas for the set of courses that      (F,SP)                                                           and derivative assets and to the principles governing
they successfully complete at their host school. The        Professional Courses                                             corporate financial arrangements and contracting.
courses that the students take at the host school are                                                                        (F,SP) Staff
subject to review by the MBA Program office to ensure        300. Teaching Business. (.5) Six hours of lecture per
that they match course requirements at the Haas             week for one week. Must be taken on a satisfac-                  204. Qualitative Analysis for Business Decisions.
School. (F,SP) Staff                                        tory/unsatisfactory basis. This course will cover the im-        (2) Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks
                                                            portant skills and resources necessary to be an ef-              or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine
299. Strategy. (2) Four hours of lecture per week for       fective graduate student instructor (GSI) in the Haas            weeks. Prerequisites: Admission to the program. For-
seven weeks. Prerequisites: 201A. Course covers core        School of Business. GSIs are an integral part of in-             merly Business Administration E204. An introduction
topics in strategy, including selection of goals; the       struction at Haas, supporting faculty teaching through           to the application of quantitative methods to man-
choice of products and services to offer; competitive       administrative and pedagogical support. This course              agement decision problems. Topics include linear pro-
positioning in product markets; decisions about scope       seeks to prepare MBA students for their first GSI po-             gramming, probability theory, decision analysis, re-
and diversity; and the design of organizational struc-      sitions, ensuring that they are ready for the many po-           gression and correlation, and time series analysis.
ture, administrative systems, and other issues of con-      tential challenges that might await them in the ensuing
trol and internal regulation. (F,SP) Staff                                                                                   205. Organizational Behavior. (2) Four hours of
                                                            semester. Students will learn effective teaching strate-         lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three and
299B. Global Strategy and Multinational Enterprise.         gies from faculty and veteran GSIs, as well as re-               one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks.
(2,3) Two to three hours of lecture per week. Prereq-       sources available to them both through Haas and the              Prerequisites: Admission to the program. Formerly
uisites: All core courses. Formerly Business Admin-         Berkeley campus. This course will also teach MBA stu-            Business Administration E205. A survey of knowledge
istration 299E. Identifies the management challenges         dents the common pitfalls of any class—both in ped-              about behavior in and of organizations. Covered will be
facing international firms. Attention to business strate-    agogical style and in student interaction. (F,SP) Staff          issues of individual behavior, group functioning, and
gies, organizational structures, and the role of gov-                                                                        the actions of organizations in their environments.
ernments in the global environment. Special attention                                                                        Problems of work motivation, task design, leadership,
to the challenges of developing and implementing                                                                             communication, organizational design, and innovation
global new product development strategies when in-          Evening/Weekend Master’s in                                      will be analyzed from multiple theoretical perspectives.
dustrial structures and government policies differ.         Business Administration                                          Implications for the management of organizations will
Efficacy of joint ventures and strategic alliances. Im-                                                                       be illustrated through examples, cases, and exercises.
plications for industrial policy and global governance.     Graduate Courses
(F,SP)                                                                                                                       206. Marketing Organization and Management. (2)
                                                            200C. Leadership Communications. (1) Four hours                  Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or
299E. Competitive and Corporate Strategy. (2,3) Three       of lecture per weekend for seven weeks or three                  three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: All core          and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine weeks.           weeks. Prerequisites: Business Administration E200.
courses. Formerly Business Administration 299B. Ex-         Leadership communication is a workshop in the                    Formerly Business Administration E206. Topics include
amines optimal production and pricing policies for firms     fundamentals of public speaking in today’s busi-                 an overview of the marketing system and the mar-
in competitive environments; optimal strategies through     ness environment. Through prepared and impromptu                 keting concept, buyer behavior, market research, seg-
time; strategies in the presence of imperfect informa-      speeches aimed at moving others to action, peer                  mentation and marketing decision making, marketing
tion. How differing market structures and government        coaching, and lectures, students will sharpen their au-          structures, and evaluation of marketing performance in
policies (including taxation) affect output and pricing     thentic and persuasive communication skills, develop             the economy and society. (F,SP) Staff
decisions. Social welfare implications of decisions by      critical listening skills, improve abilities to give, receive,
competitive firms also explored. (F,SP)                                                                                       207. Ethics and Responsibility in Business. (1)
                                                            and apply feedback, and gain confidence as public
                                                                                                                             Four hours of lecture per weekend for four weeks or
                                                            speakers. (F,SP) Staff
299H. Strategic Management and the Organization of                                                                           three hours of lecture per week for five weeks. Pre-
Health Services. (3) Three hours of lecture per week.       201A. Economics for Business Decision Making.                    requisites: Admission to the program. Formerly Busi-
Prerequisites: Business Administration 205 or Public        (2) Four hours of lecture per weekend for seven weeks            ness Administration E207. A study of basic ideas, con-
Health 223A and 224A, or consent of instructor. For-        or three and one-half hours of lecture per week for nine         cepts, attitudes, rules, and institutions in our society


       B prefix=language course for business majors                R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                       *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                    †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                      requirement
158 / Business Administration
that characterize the legal, political, and social frame-     222. Financial Information Analysis. (3) Three hours           235. Advanced Topics in Financial Institutions. (3)
work within which the system operates. (F,SP) Staff           of lecture per week. Formerly Business Administration          Course may be repeated for credit. One 3-hour
                                                              E222. Issues of accounting information evaluation with         evening lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Ad-
211. Game Theory. (3) Three hours of lecture per              special emphasis on the use of financial statements by          ministration E232. Formerly Business Administration
week. A survey of the main ideas and techniques of            decision makers outside the firm. The implications of           E235. Normative issues in financial institutions, regu-
game-theoretic analysis related to bargaining, conflict,       recent research in finance and accounting for external          lation of financial institutions, the analysis of money
and negotiation. Emphasizes the identification and             reporting issues will be explored. Emphasis will be            and capital markets, and empirical studies on financial
analysis of archetypal strategic situations in bargain-       placed on models that describe the user’s decision             institutions and financial markets. Topics covered will
ing. Goals of the course are to provide a foundation for      context. (SP)                                                  vary. (F)
applying game-theoretic analysis, both formally and in-
tuitively, to negotiation and bargaining; to recognize        223. Corporate Financial Reporting. (3) Three hours            236A. Futures and Option Markets. (2) Course may
and assess archetypal strategic situations in compli-         of evening lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business           be repeated for credit. Two hours of lecture per week.
cated negotiation settings; and to feel comfortable in        Administration E202B and E203 or equivalent. For-              Prerequisites: Business Administration E233. Formerly
the process of negotiation. (F,SP) Staff                      merly Business Administration E220. Intensive study            Business Administration E236. Normative models for
                                                              of the theory and practice of financial accounting. As-         investment management, valuation of securities, be-
212. Managerial Decisions in Regulated Industries.                                                                           havior of security prices, the function and regulation of
                                                              set and liability measurement, income determination,
(3) Three hours of evening lecture per week. Prereq-                                                                         security markets, and empirical studies on securities
                                                              financial reporting.
uisites: Business Administration E201A or equivalent.                                                                        prices and portfolio behavior. Topics covered will vary.
Formerly Business Administration E212. Survey of the          224A. Managerial Accounting. (2) Six hours of                  (F,SP)
rationale for and effects of regulation and deregulation      evening lecture per week for five weeks. Prerequisites:
of American industries. Economic principles if industry                                                                      236B. Investment Strategies and Styles. (2) Course
                                                              E204. Formerly Business Administration E202B. Man-
will be applied to the study of five key sectors of the                                                                       may be repeated for credit. Two hours of lecture per
                                                              agement is dependent on an information system which
U.S. economy: transportation, communications, energy                                                                         week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E203
                                                              provides dependable, timely, and relevant information
utilities, financial services, and health care. Includes re-                                                                  plus one additional graduate finance course. Formerly
                                                              to all decision makers. The goal of this course is to
cent changes in regulatory policy and analysis of the                                                                        Business Administration E239. Introduction to alter-
                                                              identify the information needs of managers and to de-
                                                                                                                             native investment strategies and styles as practiced by
implications of continuing regulation or deregulation for     velop the methods by which managerial accountants
                                                                                                                             leading money managers. A money manager will
the management of, and public policies toward, these          can provide the necessary data through appropriate             spend approximately half of the class discussing his
industries.                                                   budget, cost, and other informational systems.                 general investment philosophy. In the other half, stu-
214. Forecasting Methods for Business. (3) Three              224B. Advanced Managerial Accounting. (2,3)                    dents, practitioner, and instructor will explore the in-
hours of evening lecture per week. Prerequisites: Busi-       Forty-five hours of work per unit per term. Prerequi-           vestment merits of one particular company. Students
ness Administration E201B. Formerly Business Ad-              sites: Business Administration E202A and E202B. For-           will be expected to use the library’s resources, class
ministration E214. The course will focus on a variety of      merly Business Administration E224. This course in-            handouts, and their ingenuity to address a set of ques-
currently used forecasting techniques. These include          cludes the theory of management accounting, its                tions relating to the firm’s investment value. (F,SP)
econometric techniques and purely extrapolative (time         application in modern organizations, and related prob-         Staff
series) methods, as well as combinations of more than         lem areas included in recent CPA and CMA exami-                236C. Global Financial Services. (3) Three hours of
one procedure. The emphasis is on data analysis; the          nations. (F,SP) Staff                                          lecture per week. Survey of the forces changing and
student will learn a “forecasting process” which can be                                                                      shaping global finance and intermediation, especially
applied to all type of forecasting problems. To facilitate    225. Management Planning and Control Systems.
                                                                                                                             the effects of greater ease of communication, dereg-
the “learning by doing” aspect of the course, several         (3) Three hours of evening lecture per week. Prereq-
                                                                                                                             ulation and globalized disciplines expected to continue
computer-oriented problem sets and a forecasting pro-         uisites: Completion of all MBA core courses or their
                                                                                                                             to be essential to corporate finance and intermediation,
ject are required.                                            equivalent. Formerly Business Administration E229.
                                                                                                                             e.g., investment analysis, valuation, structured finance/
                                                              Strategic planning, management control systems, bud-
215. Business Strategies for Emerging Markets:                                                                               securitization, and derivative applications. The case
                                                              geting, internal pricing, and related topics concerned
Management, Investment, and Opportunities. (3)                                                                               method is utilized with occasional additional assigned
                                                              with planning and control of complex organizations in-
Three hours of lecture per week. This course helps                                                                           readings and text sources. (F,SP) Staff
                                                              cluding multi-national firms and not-for-profit organi-
students to study the institutions of emerging markets        zations. Designed for students interested in manage-           236D. Portfolio Management. (3) Three hours of lec-
that are relevant for managers, analyze opportunities         ment regardless of major field.                                 ture per week. Prerequisites: 203 or consent of in-
presented by emerging markets, analyze the additional                                                                        structor. This course explores the broad range of port-
ethical challenges and issues of social responsibility        227B. Topics in Taxation. (3) Course may be re-                folio management in practice. The class will examine
common in emerging markets, and learn to minimize             peated for credit. Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-       the assets, strategies, characteristics, operations, and
the risks in doing business in emerging markets. This         requisites: Business Administration E202A and E202B            concerns unique to each type of portfolio. Practitioners
course is a combination of lectures, class participation,     or equivalents. Formerly Business Administration E228.         will present descriptions of their businesses as well as
and cases. (F,SP)                                             This course will cover various topics in personal or cor-      methods and strategies that they employ. (F,SP) Staff
                                                              porate taxation or both. Topics will vary from semester
217. Topics in Economic Analysis and Policy. (.5-             to semester. (F,SP) Staff                                      236E. Mergers and Acquisitions: A Practical
3) Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three                                                                      Primer. (2) Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequi-
hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field         231. Corporate Financial Management. (3) Three                 sites: 203 or consent of instructor. Survey of the day-
of economic analysis and policy. Topics will vary from        hours of evening lecture per week. Prerequisites:              to-day practices and techniques used in change of
year to year and will be announced at the beginning of        Business Administration E230. Formerly Busi-                   control transaction. Topics include valuation, financing,
each semester. (F,SP) Staff                                   ness Administration E234. Financial policies of firms           deal structuring, tax and accounting considerations,
                                                              including asset acquisition and replacement, capital           agreements, closing documents, practices used in
218A. International Finance. (3) Three hours of lec-          structure, dividends, working capital, and mergers. De-        management buyouts, divestitures, hostile takeovers,
ture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration         velopment of theory and application to financial man-           and takeover defenses. Also covers distinctions in
201B. Formerly Business Administration E285. This             agement decisions. (F,SP)                                      technology M&A, detecting corruption in cross border
course introduces students to the institutions and op-                                                                       transaction attempts, and betting on deals through risk
eration of the international macroeconomic environ-           232. Financial Institutions and Markets. (3) Three             arbitrage. Blend of lectures, case studies, and guest
ment; special attention is paid to international financial     hours of evening lecture per week. Prerequisites: Busi-        lectures. (F,SP) Staff
arrangements relevant for managers of multinational           ness Administration E201B and E203 or E230. Formerly
corporations. Topics include: foreign exchange and            Business Administration E232. Structure and operation          236F. Behavioral Finance. (3) Three hours of lecture
capital markets; the balance of payments; open econ-          of the Federal Reserve System commercial bank and              per week. Prerequisites: 203. This course looks at the
omy macroeconomics; exchange rate determination;              non-bank financial institutions. Impact of monetary pol-        influence of decision heuristics and biases on investor
history of the international financial system; arbitrage       icy and of public regulation. Portfolio composition amd        welfare, financial markets, and corporate decisions.
and hedging; international aspects of financial deci-          market behavior of financial intermediaries. Organiza-          Topics include overconfidence, attribution theory, rep-
sions. (F,SP)                                                 tion and functions of money markets. The structure of          resentative heuristic, availability heuristic, anchoring
                                                              yields on financial assets and the influence of financial         and adjustment, prospect theory, “Winners’s Curse,”
218B. Theory and Institutions of International                intermediaries and monetary policy.                            speculative bubbles, IPOs, market efficiency, limits of
Trade. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prereq-                                                                          arbitrage, relative mis-pricing of common stocks, the
uisites: Business Administration E201A. Formerly Busi-        233. Investments. (3) Three hours of lecture and one           tendency to trade in a highly correlated fashion, in-
ness Administration E287. The course focuses on de-           hour of optional discussion per week. Prerequisites:           vestor welfare, and market anomalies. (F,SP) Staff
terminants of global trade flows, patterns of international    203. Formerly Business Administration E233. This course
                                                                                                                             237. Topics in Finance. (.5-3) Course may be re-
competition, and governmental policies affecting inter-       will analyze the role of financial markets and financial in-
                                                                                                                             peated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per
national trade. Topics include: tariff and nontariff bar-     stitutions in allocating capital. The major focus will be on
                                                                                                                             week. Advanced study in the field of Finance. Topics
riers to trade, industrial policies in declining and          debt contracts and securities and on innovations in the
                                                                                                                             will vary from year to year and will be announced at
emerging industries, strategic trade policy, United           bond and money markets. The functions of commercial
                                                                                                                             the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)
States trade law, bilateral and multilateral approaches       banks, investment banks, and other financial interme-
to trade liberalization, and current issues in interna-       diaries will be covered, and aspects of the regulation of      240. Risk Management via Optimization and Sim-
tional trade policy. Yellen                                   these institutions will be examined. (F,SP)                    ulation. (1) Seven hours of lecture for two weeks. Pre-
                                                                                                                                       Business Administration / 159

requisites: 203 and 204, or consent of instructor. Sur-      251. Human Resources Management. (3) One 3-                   promotion policies. Case analyses are heavily used.
vey of the formulation, solution, and interpretation of      hour evening lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business        The course is designed primarily for students who will
mathematical models to assist management of risk.            Administration E205 or consent of instructor. Formerly        take a limited number of advanced marketing courses
Emphasis on applications from diverse businesses and         Business Administration E251. A study of the problems         and wish an integrated approach. (F,SP) Staff
industries, including inventory management, product          and techniques associated with managing the per-
                                                                                                                           263. Information- and Technology-Based Marketing.
distribution, portfolio optimization, portfolio insurance,   sonnel function. Topics include the processes of re-
                                                                                                                           (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:
and yield management. Two types of models are cov-           cruitment, selection, placement, training, and evalua-
                                                                                                                           Business Administration E206. Formerly Business Ad-
ered: optimization and simulation. Associated with           tion of people within organizations. The role of the staff
                                                                                                                           ministration E262B. Information technology has al-
each model type is a piece of software: Excel’s Solver       manager with respect to the planning, design, and al-
                                                                                                                           lowed firms to gather and process large quantities of
for optimization and Excel add-in Crystal Ball for sim-      location of tasks and people is considered, with em-
                                                                                                                           information about consumers’ choices and reactions to
ulation. (F,SP)                                              phasis on the implications of research for management
                                                                                                                           marketing campaigns. However, few firms have the ex-
                                                             problems and policies. (F,SP) Staff
242. Strategic Planning of Production and Opera-                                                                           pertise to intelligently act on such information. This
tions. (3) Three hours of evening lecture per week.          252. Negotiations and Conflict Resolution. (3)                 course addresses this shortcoming by teaching stu-
Prerequisites: Business Administration E240. Formerly        Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Busi-         dents how to use customer information to better mar-
Business Administration E241. Strategic issues in-           ness Administration E205. Formerly Business Ad-               ket to consumers. In addition, the course addresses
volved in planning the production and logistics of a firm     ministration E252. A study of the negotiations process,       how information technology affects marketing strategy.
and models of those functions that are useful for the        including negotiations among buyers and sellers, man-         (F,SP) Staff
firm’s strategic planning. Topics include models of a         agers and subordinates, company units, companies
                                                                                                                           264. High Technology Marketing Management. (3)
firm’s capacity expansion, facility location, and tech-       and organizational agencies, and management and la-
                                                                                                                           Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Busi-
nology selection decisions; learning curve strategies;       bor. Both two-party and multi-party relations are cov-
                                                                                                                           ness Administration E206 or equivalent. Formerly Busi-
and industry cost models.                                    ered. coursework includes reading, lectures, discussion
                                                                                                                           ness Administration E264. High technology refers to
                                                             of case material, and simulations of real negotiations.
244D. Management Information Systems. (3) Three                                                                            that class of products and services which is subject to
                                                             Emphasis on the role of third parties in resolving dis-
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business                                                                         technological change at a pace significantly faster than
                                                             putes. (F,SP) Staff
                                                                                                                           for most goods in the economy. Under such circum-
Administration E204 and familiarity with computer
                                                             254. Power and Politics in Organizations. (2) Two             stances, the marketing task faced by the high tech-
programming. Formerly Business Administration
                                                             hours of lecture per week. This course addresses how          nology firm differs in some ways from the usual. The
E248. The course covers the management and or-
                                                             organizations distribute various resources and how            purpose of this course is to explore these differences.
ganizational issues associated with the implementation
                                                             managers can learn where these resources are con-             (SP) Staff
and growth in organizations of computer-based
                                                             centrated and where they are scarce. Topics include
administrative information systems. A management                                                                           265. Integrated Marketing Communications. (3)
                                                             communication skills, control issues, rewards and
perspective is maintained throughout, and technical is-                                                                    Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Busi-
                                                             penalties, and politics within the organization. (F,SP)
sues introduced are subordinate to the management                                                                          ness Administration E206 or equivalents; E260 is rec-
                                                             Staff
perspective.                                                                                                               ommended. Formerly Business Administration E265.
                                                             255. Creativity in Business. (3) Three hours of lec-          A specialized course in advertising, focusing on man-
246A. Service Strategy. (3) Three hours of lecture per       ture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration         agement and decision-making. Topics include objec-
week. Prerequisites: 204 or Master of Business Ad-           E205 or consent of instructor. Formerly Business Ad-          tive-setting, copy decisions, media decisions, bud-
ministration 204 or consent of instructor. This course       ministration E258. This course examines the concept           geting, and examination of theories, models, and other
is designed to teach general management principles           of creativity, bringing to light its nature in individuals,   research methods appropriate to these decision areas.
involved in the planning, execution, and management          groups, and organizations. The course uses reading            Other topics include social/economic issues of ad-
of service businesses. It covers both strategic and tac-     materials, cases, classroom, and home exercises to            vertising by nonprofit organizations. (F,SP) Staff
tical aspects, including the development of a strategic      help students understand and be able to use creativ-
service vision, building employee loyalty, developing                                                                      266. Channels of Distribution. (3) Three hours of lec-
                                                             ity in their own working lives. (F,SP) Staff
customer loyalty and satisfaction, improving produc-                                                                       ture per week. Formerly Business Administration E266.
tivity and service quality, service innovation, and the      257. Topics in Organizational Behavior and In-                The success of any marketing program often weighs
role of technology in services. Blend of case studies,       dustrial Relations. (.5-3) Course may be repeated for         heavily upon its co-execution by members of the firm’s
group projects, class discussions, and selected read-        credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per week. Ad-      distribution channel. This course seeks to provide an
ings. (F,SP) Staff                                           vanced study in the field of Organizational Behavior           understanding of how the strategic and tactical roles of
                                                             and Industrial Relations. Topics will vary from year to       the channel can be identified and managed. This is ac-
247A. Topics in Manufacturing and Operations. (.5-           year and will be announced at the beginning of each           complished, first, through studying the broad economic
3) Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three      semester. (F,SP)                                              and social forces that govern the channel evolution. It
hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field                                                                      is completed through the examination of tools to select,
of Manufacturing and Operations. Topics will vary from       258A. International Business: Designing Global Or-
                                                                                                                           manage, and motivate channel partners. (F,SP)
year to year and will be announced at the beginning of       ganizations. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-
each semester. (F,SP)                                        requisites: 205. This course is about flexible organi-         266A. Sales Force Management. (1) Eight hours of
                                                             zational designs and adaptive leadership strategies in        lecture for two weeks. The sales force is a key (and
247B. Topics in Information Technology. (.5-3)               global markets. It will be of special interest to students    not inexpensive) component of a firm’s overall mar-
Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three         working in high tech, life sciences and biotechnology,        keting strategy. This class will provide students with a
hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field        telecommunications, management consulting, and                toolbox for handling a variety of sales-force-related is-
of Information Technology. Topics will vary from year        financial services. Topics include new trends in global        sues—both strategic and tactical. The primary focus is
to year and will be announced at the beginning of each       organizational design, leading geo-dispersed teams of         on maximizing sales force productivity. Topics covered
semester. (F,SP)                                             knowledge workers, managing offshore partnerships,            include the selling process, organizational structure,
                                                             integrating acquisitions, and executing change with           sales-force sizing, territory design, compensation, eval-
248A. Supply Chain Management. (3) Three hours               multicultural knowledge workers. (F,SP) Staff                 uation, motivation, and deployment. (F,SP)
of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 204 or Master of
Business Administration 204 or equivalent. Supply            260. Consumer Behavior. (3) Three hours of lecture            267. Topics in Marketing. (.5-3) Course may be re-
chain management concerns the flow of materials and           per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration E206         peated for credit. One-half to three hours of lecture per
information in multistage production and distribution        or equivalent. Formerly Business Administration E260.         week. Advanced study in the field of Marketing. Top-
networks. This course provides knowledge of organi-          Examines concepts and theories from behavioral sci-           ics will vary from year to year and will be announced at
zational models and analytical decision support tools        ence useful for the understanding and prediction of           the beginning of each semester. (F,SP)
necessary to design, implement, and sustain suc-             marketplace behavior and demand analysis. Empha-
                                                                                                                           269. Pricing. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. This
cessful supply chain strategies. Topics include demand       sizes applications to the development of marketing pol-
                                                                                                                           three-module course aims to equip students with
and supply management, inventory management, sup-            icy planning and strategy and to various decision areas
                                                                                                                           proven concepts, techniques, and frameworks for as-
plier-buyer coordination via incentives, vendor man-         within marketing. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                           sessing and formulating pricing strategies. The first
agement, and the role of information technology in           261. Marketing Reserch: Tools and Techniques for              module develops the economic and behavorial foun-
supply chain management. (F,SP) Staff                        Data Collection and Analysis. (3) Three hours of lec-         dations of pricing. The second module discusses sev-
249A. Information Technology Strategy. (3) Three             ture per week. Formerly Business Administration E261.         eral innovative pricing concepts including price cus-
hours of lecture per week. This course focuses on the        Marketing research objectives will be covered and the         tomization, nonlinear pricing, price matching, and
                                                             topics of qualitative research, surveys, experiments,         product line pricing. The third module analyzes the
use of information technology (IT) by traditional firms
                                                             sampling, data analysis, and information system man-          strengths and weaknesses of several Internet-based,
and startups, rather than the details of the technology,
                                                             agement. (F,SP) Staff                                         buyer-determined pricing models. (F,SP) Staff
with the goals of understanding how IT enables new
strategies and how existing strategies adapt to IT in-       262. Brand Management and Strategy. (3) Three                 271. The Interaction of Business and Government.
novations. This course covers IT technologies used           hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Ad-        (3) Three hours of evening lecture per week. Prereq-
throughout the organization, including mobile com-           ministration E206. Formerly Business Administration           uisites: Business Administration E207 or equivalent.
munications, systems for online payment, business-to-        E262A. The focus of this course is on developing stu-         Formerly Business Administration E271. Theory of the
business transactions, customer relationship man-            dent skills to formulate and critique complete market-        mixed economy. Methods of interaction between gov-
agement, and supply chain management. (F,SP) Staff           ing programs including product, price, distribution, and      ernment and business including government pur-


       B prefix=language course for business majors                 R prefix=course satisfies R&C requirement                    *Professor of the Graduate School
       C prefix=cross-listed course                                 AC suffix=course satisfies American Cultures                 †Recipient of Distinguished Teaching Award
       H prefix=honors course                                       requirement
160 / Business Administration
chasing, regulation, resource allocation, economic sta-     high technology industries. It will emphasize the in-        bodiment of effective communication skills. Class read-
bilization, planning and sponsorship of economic de-        teraction between business strategies and the eco-           ings, lectures, and discussions address participants’
velopment. “Inter-penetrated” activities including space,   nomic and political variables that shape the develop-        specific workplace applications. (F,SP)
defense, atomic energy, public utility, and foreign busi-   ment and diffusion of new technologies. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                         291D. Data Visualization for Discovery and Com-
ness operations.
                                                            290I. Managing Innovation and Change. (3) Three              munication. (1) Eight hours of lecture for two weeks.
275. Business Law: Managers and the Legal En-               hours of lecture per week. Formerly Business Ad-             This course exposes the problems of poor data pre-
vironment. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-        ministration E274. This course is designed to introduce      sentation and introduces design practices necessary
requisites: Completion of all core courses or consent       students to the innovation process and its manage-           to communicate quantitative business information
of instructor. A manager must understand the legal en-      ment. It provides an overview of technological change        clearly, efficiently, and powerfully. This course identifies
vironments which impact business and understand             and links it to specific strategic challenges; examines       what to look for in the data and describes the types of
how to work effectively with lawyers. This course ad-       the diverse elements of the innovation process and           graphs and visual analysis techniques most effective
dresses the legal aspects of business relationships and     how they are managed; discusses the uneasy rela-             for spotting what is meaningful and making sense of it.
business agreements. Topics covered include forms of        tionship between technology and the workforce; and           (F,SP)
business organization, duties of officers and directors,     examines challenges of managing innovation globally.
                                                                                                                         291T. Topics In Managerial Communications. (1-3)
intellectual property, antitrust, contracts, employment     (F,SP)
                                                                                                                         Course may be repeated for credit. One to three hours
relationships, criminal law, and debtor-creditor rela-
                                                            290M. Intelligent Manufacturing Systems. (3) Three           of lecture per week. Formerly Business Administration
tionships including bankruptcy. (F,SP) Staff
                                                            hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Graduate           291B. This course will provide the student with spe-
277. Special Topics in Business and Public Policy.          standing. Formerly Business Administration E290B.            cialized knowledge in some area of managerial com-
(1-3) One to three hours of lecture per week. Prereq-       This course will study CAD/CAM, rapid prototyping,           munications. Topics include multimedia business pre-
uisites: Business Administration E207 or equivalent, or     metal products, semiconductors, electronic packaging,        sentations, personal leadership development, diversity
consent of instructor. Formerly Business Administra-        biotechnology, and robotics technologies, and includes       management, and making meetings work. Topics will
tion E278. Topics vary by semester at discretion of in-     a hands-on laboratory using CAD and manufacturing            vary from semester to semester. (F,SP) Staff
structor and by student demand. Topical areas include       techniques. Economic and social drivers, organiza-
                                                                                                                         292A. Strategic Management of Nonprofit Organi-
business and professional ethics and the role of cor-       tional structure, product lifecycle, and future trends are
                                                                                                                         zations. (2,3) Two to three hours of lecture per week.
porate social responsibility in the mixed economy;          also covered. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                         This course prepares students conceptually and prac-
managing the external affairs of the corporation, in-
                                                            290N. Managing the New Product Development                   tically to create, lead, and manage nonprofit organi-
cluding community, government, media and stake-
                                                            Process. (3) Three hours of lecture per week. Pre-           zations. Focuses on the centrality of the mission, gov-
holder relations; technology policy, research and de-
                                                            requisites: Graduate standing. Formerly Business Ad-         erning board leadership, application of strategy and
velopment, and the effects of government regulation of
                                                            ministration E290A. An operationally focused course          strategic planning, and strategic management of issues
business on technological innovation and adoption.
                                                            that aims to develop the interdisciplinary skills required   unique to or characteristic of the sector: performance
(F,SP) Staff
                                                            for successful product development. Through readings,        measurement, program development, financial man-
280. Real Estate and Urban Land Economics. (3)              case studies, guest speakers, applied projects, and          agement, resource development, community relations
Three hours of lecture per week. Formerly Business          student research, students discover the basic tools,         and marketing, human resource management, advo-
Administration E280. Intensive review of literature in      methods, and organizational structures used in new           cacy, and management. (F,SP) Staff
the theory of land utilization, urban growth and real es-   product development management. Course covers
                                                                                                                         292B. Nonprofit Boards. (1) Eight hours of lecture for
tate market behavior; property rights and valuation;        process phases: idea generation, product definition,
                                                                                                                         two weeks. The purpose of this class is to acquaint
residential and non-residential markets; construction,      product development, testing and refinement, manu-
                                                                                                                         Evening & Weekend Master of Business Administra-
debt and equity financing; public controls and policies.     facturing ramp-up, and product launch. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                         tion students, many of whom will be asked to serve on
283. Real Estate Financing. (3) Three hours of lec-         290P. Project Management Case Studies. (1) Two               nonprofit boards throughout their careers, with the non-
ture per week. Prerequisites: Business Administration       hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Graduate           profit sector and the roles and responsibilities of non-
E280; and background in the basics of finance, micro-        standing. Formerly Business Administration 290L. This        profit boards. Students will learn why nonprofit boards
economics, macro-economics, statistics and quanti-          course presents case studies of projects that required       exist, how they are structured, how they differ from cor-
tative analysis. Formerly Business Administration           intervention to avert catastrophic failure. Students will    porate boards, what their legal responsibilities are, how
E283. Students will be introduced to the fundamentals       discuss case studies and review real management prob-        boards and chief executives relate to each other, and
of real estate financial analysis, including elements of     lems of major corporations. They will create strategic       how boards contribute to the effectiveness of nonprofit
mortgage financing and taxation. The course will ap-         plans to alleviate problems and learn how to manage a        organizations. (F,SP)
ply the standard tools of financial analysis to special-     large project to a successful completion. (F,SP) Staff
                                                                                                                         292C. Strategic CSR and Consulting Projects. (1-
ized real estate financing circumstances and real es-
                                                            290Q. Quality Improvement: Strategy, Processes,              3) One to three hours of lecture per week. Discuss the
tate evaluation. (F,SP) Staff
                                                            and Customers. (3) Three hours of lecture per week.          field of strategic CSR through a series of lectures,
284. Seminar in Real Estate Investment Analysis.            Formerly Business Administration E290Q. This course          guest speakers, and projects. This course will exam-
(3) Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites:         is intended to provide a strong introduction to students     ine best practices used by companies to engage in so-
Consent of instructor. Formerly Business Administra-        on contemporary issues concerning product and ser-           cially responsible practices. It will provide students with
tion E284. Analysis of selected problems and special        vice quality. A major premise is that quality competition    a flavor of the complex dilemmas one can face in busi-
studies; cases in residental and non-residental de-         has moved rapidly to the foreground as a major arena         ness in trying to do both “good for society” and “well for
velopment and financing, urban redevelopment, real           for competitive struggles, and firms that fail to recog-      shareholders.” It looks at CSR from a corporate strat-
estate taxation, mortgage market developments, equity       nize its importance and develop effective organiza-          egy perspective, and how it supports core business ob-
investment, valuation, and zoning.                          tional responses will fall by the wayside. (F,SP)            jectives, core competencies, and bottom line profits.
                                                                                                                         (F,SP) Staff
287. Special Topics in Real Estate Economics and            290T. Topics in Management of Technology. (.5-3)
Finance. (1-3) Course may be repeated for credit. One       Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three         292F. Financial Management of Nonprofit Organi-
hour of lecture per week per unit. Prerequisites: Busi-     hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field        zations. (1) Eight hours of lecture for two weeks. Pre-
ness Administration E280 and consent of instructor.         of Management of Technology. Topics will vary from           requisites: 203, financial experience, or equivalent. The
Formerly Business Administration E281. Topics vary          year to year and will be announced at the beginning of       course focuses on financial management issues faced
each semester. Topic areas include advanced tech-           each semester. (F,SP)                                        by board members and senior and executive man-
niques for real estate financial analysis and structuring                                                                 agers in nonprofit organizations. Students learn tools
                                                            291A. Speaking as a Leader. (2) One hour of lecture
and evaluation; the securitization of real estate debt                                                                   and techniques for effective planning and budgeting
                                                            and two hours of discussion per week. Formerly Busi-
and equity; issues in international real estate; cyclical                                                                and how to control, evaluate and revise plans. Use and
                                                            ness Administration E291A. Leaders must be capable
behavior of real estate markets; portfolio theory and                                                                    development of internal and external financial reports
                                                            of inspiring commitment in their constituencies rather
real estate asset allocation. (F,SP) Staff                                                                               are studied with an emphasis on using financial in-
                                                            than merely demanding compliance. This course will
                                                                                                                         formation in decision making. Tools and techniques of
290D. Design as Strategic Management Issue. (2)             teach future leaders the elements that are essential to
                                                                                                                         financial statement analysis, interpretation, and pre-
Two hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Gradu-        inspire such change. The instructor solicits students’
                                                                                                                         sentation are practiced. (F,SP)
ate standing. Formerly Business Administration 290K.        personal convictions, then provides a structure and
This course is a study of product design, facilities de-    method for effectively communicating these beliefs.          292N. Topics in Nonprofit and Public Management.
sign, and corporate identity design. It will cover how      Participants will develop confidence in both the content      (1-3) One to three hours of lecture per week. Formerly
these design strategies are integral to product devel-      of their message and their ability to convey it. (F,SP)      Evening and Weekend Master in Business Adminis-
opment and influence customer satisfaction, quality is-      Staff                                                        tration 292M. Advanced study in the field of nonprofit
sues, manufacturing procedures, and marketing tac-                                                                       and public management. Topics will vary from year to
                                                            291C. Active Communicating. (1) Eight hours of lec-
tics. (F,SP)                                                                                                             year and will be announced at the beginning of each
                                                            ture for two weeks. This course develops the basic
                                                                                                                         semester. (F,SP) Staff
290G. International Trade and Competition in High           building blocks of impactful communication—e.g., con-
Technology. (2) Two hours of lecture per week. Pre-         centration, energy, voice, physical expressiveness,          292R. Nonprofit Marketing and Fundraising. (2)
requisites: Graduate standing. Formerly Business Ad-        spontaneity, listening, awareness, and presence—by           Two hours of lecture per week. Thorough overview of
ministration E290C. This course looks at who is win-        drawing upon expertise from theater arts. Active, par-       fundraising principles as well as experience in all the
ning or losing and why in international competition in      ticipatory exercises allow for the development and em-       major fundraising strategies: direct mail, online, major
                                                                                                                                        Business Administration / 161

gifts, planned giving, capital campaigns, proposal writ-        investing in, and/or leading companies that have both       Administration E202B, E203, E205, E206. Formerly
ing, and corporate giving. The course further distin-           a great set future growth opportunities and a great set     Business Administration E267. Strategic planning the-
guishes what is different about fundraising and mar-            of current problems. This class will use case studies,      ory and methods with an emphasis on customer, com-
keting and looks at how fundraising is a subset of a            practical valuation and other exercises, and the en-        petitor, industry and environmental analysis and its ap-
larger marketing plan. Students learn how to brand an           ergy, enthusiasm, and intellectual capacity of its stu-     plication to strategy development and choice. (F,SP)
organization, make it more visible and turn marketing           dents to create a great learning environment. (F,SP)
                                                                                                                            299O. Organizing for Strategic Advantage. (3)
strategies into fundraising opportunities. (F,SP) Staff         Staff
                                                                                                                            Three hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: Busi-
292T. Topics in Socially Responsible Business. (.5-             295I. Entrepreneurship Workshop for Startups. (2)           ness Administration E205. Formerly Business Ad-
3) Course may be repeated for credit. One-half to three         Two hours of lecture per week. This workshop is in-         ministration E250. Course examines current models of
hours of lecture per week. Advanced study in the field           tended for students who have their own experimental         strategy, structure, process interaction and their his-
of Socially Responsible Business. Topics will vary from         venture project under development. The business             torical foundations. Students will apply current theory
year to year and will be announced at the beginning of          concept may be in the startup mode or further along         to traditional cases and to current examples of orga-
each semester. (F,SP)                                           in its evolution. The pedagogy is one of guided en-         nization adaptation in the business press. In addition,
                                                                trepreneurship where students, often working in teams,      the course will examine in detail emerging patterns of
293. Individually Supervised Study for Graduate
                                                                undertake the real challenges of building a venture.        strategy, structure, and process—the beginnings of
Students. (1-5) Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                Students must be willing to discuss their projects with     what appear to be “new” organizational forms. Finally,
One to five hours of independent study per week. For-
                                                                others in the workshop, as group deliberation of the        comparisons will be drawn between U.S. and foreign
merly Business Administration E293. Individually su-
                                                                entrepreneurial challenges is a key component of the        patterns of adaptation. (F,SP)
pervised study of subjects not available to the student
                                                                class. (F,SP) Staff
in the regular schedule, approved by faculty adviser as
appropriate for the student’s program. (F,SP) Staff             295T. Topics in Entrepreneurship. (.5-3) Course
                                                                may be repeated for credit. One-half to three hours of
295A. Entrepreneurship. (3) Three hours of evening
                                                                lecture per week. Advanced study in the field of en-
                                                                                                                            Executive Master’s in
lecture per week. Prerequisites: Business Adminis-
                                                                trepreneurship. Topics will vary from year to year and      Business Administration
tration E206. Formerly Business Administration E295.
                                                                will be announced at the beginning of each semester.
The development of creative marketing strategies for
                                                                (F,SP) Staff                                                200Q. Decision Models. (1) Five hours of lecture for
new ventures, as well as the resolution of specific mar-
                                                                                                                            three weeks. This core course introduces students to
keting problems in smaller companies which provide              296. Special Topics in Business Administration. (1-
                                                                                                                            quantitative concepts, techniques, and software with
innovative goods and services. Emphasis is on deci-             3) Course may be repeated for credit. One unit credit
                                                                                                                            which all successful managers should be familiar. The
sion making under conditions of weak data, inade-               represents one hour of lecture per week. Prerequisites:
                                                                                                                            objective of this course is to improve managerial de-
quate resources, emerging markets, and rapidly                  Graduate standing. Formerly Business Administration
                                                                                                                            cision making by introducing managers to optimization
changing environments.                                          E296. Advanced study in various fields of business ad-
                                                                                                                            techniques, simulation, and project management.
                                                                ministration. Topics will vary from year to year and will
295B. Venture Capital and Private Equity. (3) Three                                                                         (F,SP) Staff
                                                                be announced at the beginning of each semester.
hours of lecture per week. Prerequisites: 295A and 234
                                                                (F,SP) Staff                                                200S. Data Analysis for Management. (2) Ten hours
recommended. This is an advanced case-based
                                                                                                                            of lecture for three weeks. Formerly Business Ad-
course intended to provide the background, tools, and           298S. Seminar in International Business. (2,3) Four
                                                                                                                            ministration 200S. The objective of this core course is
themes of the venture capital industry. The course is           to five and one-half hours of fieldwork per week for
                                                                                                                            to make students critical consumers of statistical anal-
organized in four modules of the private equity cycle:          eight weeks. This course involves a series of speaker
                                                                                                                            ysis using available software packages. Key concepts
1) fund raising—examines how private equity funds are           and seminar-type classes in preparation for a two-
                                                                                                                            include interpretation of regression analysis, model for-
raised and structured, 2) investing—considers the in-           week study tour of a specific country or region. Par-
                                                                                                                            mation and testing, and diagnostic checking. (F,SP)
teractions between private equity investors and the en-         ticipants will visit companies and organizations and
                                                                                                                            Staff
trepreneurs that they finance, 3) exiting—examines the           meet with top-level management to learn about the op-
process through which private equity investors exit             portunities and challenges of operating in a specific        201A. Managerial Economics. (2) Three hours of lec-
their investments; and 4) new frontiers—reviews many            country or region. Evaluation is based on student pre-      ture for three weeks. This course uses the tools and
of the key ideas developed in the course. (F,SP) Staff          sentations, participation, and a research paper. (F,SP)     concepts of microeconomics to analyze decision prob-
                                                                Staff                                                       lems within a business firm. Particular emphasis is
295D. New