CPC Plan - Marshfield

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					               TOWN OF MARSHFIELD
   C O M M U N I T Y P R E S E RVAT I O N C O M M I T T E E




       C O MMU N I T Y
PRE SE RVAT IO N PRO G R AM
          FY 2 002
                     SPRING 2002




                       FINAL


                            Revision 4
                TOWN OF MARSHFIELD C OMMUNITY PRESERVATIO N PROGRAM FOR FY02
                                          FINAL



                                                             I
                                          INTRODUCTION

      A B R I E F I N T R O D U C T I O N TO T H E C O M M U N I T Y P R E S E RVAT I O N A C T I N M A R S H F I E L D



The Community Preservation Act (the ―CPA‖, MGL 44B) allows any city or town in the Commonwealth of
Massachusetts to adopt a property tax surcharge with revenues from this surcharge (and state matching funds)
devoted to open space, historic preservation, community housing, and land for recreational use. Marshfield
adopted the CPA, at the Town Election in the spring of 2001. The surcharge went into effect with the start of
Fiscal Year 2002 on July 1, 2001.

Consistent with the terms of the CPA and with a bylaw adopted at Marshfield’s 2001 Annual Town Meeting, the
Community Preservation Committee was formed to study and recommend how Marshfield’s CPA revenues
should be spent. The committee, includes four at-large members appointed by the Selectmen and representatives
from the Town’s Conservation Commission, Historic Commission, Housing Authority, Planning Board and
Recreation Commission.

After a study of the Town’s community preservation needs, possibilities, and resources (including interviews
with interested citizens, committees, and officials), the Community Preservation Committee has prepared this
Community Preservation Program for Fiscal Year 2003. This document includes a description of the Town’s
community preservation needs and goals, specific proposals for how CPA funds might be used to address those
needs, criteria for evaluating these proposals, and a prioritized list of the proposals.




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                  M A R S H F I E L D ’ S C O M M I T M E N T TO C O M M U N I T Y P R E S E RVAT I O N



For years, Marshfield residents have expressed a strong interest in preserving our small town residential
character.
It should be no surprise, then, that Marshfield residents moved decisively to adopt the Community Preservation
Act. The members of the Community Preservation Committee are pleased to help the town carry out its long-
standing intent of acting to preserve our small town character. The projects and priorities described in this
document reflect our best understanding for how to do so. We are heartened by the town’s support for
community preservation and welcome input citizen on this topic.


―Marshfield is and will continue to be a residential community, that is, our primary purpose as a community with
the broader context of our region, is to provide a wonderful place for people to grow up, to go to school, to raise
families, to recreate and retire. While we have many businesses and we will continue to encourage their health,
those businesses will be primarily oriented toward meeting the needs of the residents of Marshfield, rather than
the needs of the of the broader region. We are not and shall not become a regional shopping office or
manufacturing destination. We are a community of homes.

There are several qualities that distinguish us from other residential communities. These qualities must be
protected if we are to maintain and enhance our community character. Those qualities are the coast, our
historic structures, our rural roads, our villages and our open lands. If any of those qualities are compromised,
essential ingredients of Marshfield’s character will be lost. Each must be given attention and stewardship”
                                                                           The Vision Statement for Marshfield
                                                               Marshfield Comprehensive Plan December 1997

“The Townscape Plan is designed to identify the most important aspects of Marshfield that must be managed in
order to protect and enhance community character, and to lay out a set of actions to create that future….

Marshfield residents have a tendency to think of the Town as a collection of Villages. This Plan (the
Comprehensive Plan) argues , however, that important actions and investments of a townwide concern are
needed to involve the public, manage the details of future development and take advantage of character
protection opportunities while they still exist. Thus the emphasis on a landscape congress, open land
acquisition, aesthetics, the Downtown and Enterprise Drive.

Assertively pursuing a protection and management plan for these qualities will ensure that Marshfield’s
townscape – its character, its views, its natural qualities and the ways those elements influence daily life for
residents – will be exceptional forever. Without these actions, Marshfield will remain an appealing community,
but a community that never achieved its full potential and which missed important opportunities in this final
phase of its development as a town.”
                                                                                Conclusion-Integrated Strategy
                                                              Marshfield Comprehensive Plan December 1997




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II
GOALS AND NEEDS

ASSESSMENT PROCESS


As noted above, funds collected under the Community Preservation Act can only be spent on the following
community preservation objectives: open space, historic preservation, community housing, and land for
recreational use. In addition, at least 10% of the funds received in any fiscal year must be spent or set aside for
each of the first three of those areas (open space, historic preservation, community housing). The remaining 70%
of each year's funds can be spent in any of the four areas, as determined by the needs of the community.
However, these funds cannot be spent on maintenance or used to supplant funds being used for existing
community preservation purposes. In addition, up to 5% of annual Community Preservation revenues can be
spent on administrative and operating expenses of the Community Preservation Committee.

In order to translate the town's vision statement into specifics and determine which projects should be funded, the
Community Preservation Committee will gather information and ideas from people and committees that are
knowledgeable about each of the community preservation areas. For instance, we will consult with members of
the Planning Board, the Historic Commission, the Conservation Commission, the Recreation Commission, and
the Marshfield Housing Authority. In addition, other interested groups and individuals will be consulted.

Based on the information gathered from these sources, we have developed an assessment of Marshfield's goals
and needs in each of the community preservation areas and a list of proposed projects in each of these areas.
Some of these projects are ready for immediate action; others will acted on in the future. This allows the
Community Preservation Committee and the town to plan for the future.




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                                                 O P E N S PA C E


Open Space Resources

Marshfield enjoys a variety of Open Space resources distributed throughout town. This includes Town-owned
properties such as CornHill Lane, Mounces Meadow and Blueberry Island, Ferry Hill Thicket, Carolina Hill,
Daniel Websters Wilderness, Cherry Hill and a variety of smaller conservation areas. Marshfield also enjoys
properties protected by Massachusetts Audubon, The Trustees of Reservations, The Wildlands Trust of
Southeastern Massachusetts and the National Forestry Foundation. There exist many other open spaces in
Marshfield, however, most of these spaces are not protected in any permanent manner and may fall victim to
development pressures at any time.

Open Space Goals
Open Space resources are highly valued by Marshfield residents, as noted in the Vision Statement above.
Marshfield first had an Open Space and Recreation Master Plan in 1972. The plan was most recently updated for
the fourth time with new input from Town residents in the 1995 Open Space and Recreation Plan, which was
then submitted to the Commonwealth's Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. The following are excerpts
from that Plan:

―The goals and objectives depicted in the Open Space Plan have been derived from 25 years of goal setting and
local acquisition work. The Department of Public Works and its Water Division plus the Planning Board,
Advisory Board, Recreation Commission and Conservation Commission have involved themselves and the
citizenry in the process of establishing long range plans for the community.‖
                                                                           Marshfield Conservation/Recreation
                                                                                        Open Space Plan 1995

In addition to public acquisition, a number of private organizations have acquired through the years over 1,000
acres of open space. That area, when added to the lands protected by the town, amount to over 3,500 acres of
protected open space in Marshfield. In 1995, an additional 395 acres were identified as part of that plan's goals.
The 1995 goal has yet to be reached. The passage of the Community Preservation Act should help the Town of
Marshfield to continue to work toward these goals.


Land Acquisition Strategy:

Due to the development pressures in Marshfield, acquiring land for Open Space is an important and ongoing
issue for the Town. Many parcels have generously been donated to the Town for use as Open Space and
Conservation land. Others have been purchased by the Town. In recent years, the Town Meeting has set aside
funds for acquiring Open Space and Conservation land.

Property values in Marshfield have risen substantially in recent years. This makes land acquisition for
Open Space more difficult but even more urgent. If we want to preserve the walking trails, scenic
vistas, and wildlife that many residents enjoy, we must act quickly before property values rise even
further. We hope that the Community Preservation Act can help Marshfield act on this Town-wide
priority before it's too late, taking advantage of state matching funds and issuing bonds if necessary.
The Community Preservation Committee will review proposals submitted to it or which may be
developed by its members and will prioritize the possible acquisition of these parcels based on their
size, character, value, habitat value and location relative to other open spaces in the neighborhood.
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                                          H I S T O R I C P R E S E RVAT I O N


Historical Preservation Resources

        Town Owned: (Historical Commission):
         Daniel Webster Estate1
         Daniel Webster Law Office2
         Concord Coach
         Training Green
         Original Winslow Site
         Pilgrim Trail (In Part)
         Blacksmith Shop

        Privately Owned: Historic Winslow House Association
         Isaac Winslow House.
         Daniel Webster's Phaeton (a carriage)

        Privately Owned: Marshfield Historical Society
         Winslow Schoolhouse Hatch Mill
         Marcia Thomas House Brougham (A carriage)

The Massachusetts Historical Commission (MHC) requires each community to survey its major historic
properties: houses, other structures, shops/stores, mills railroad stations, schools, etc. The surveys are entered in
the records of the MHC and become part of the historical inventory of the Commonwealth. No structure can be
considered for National Register listing unless it has been surveyed. The survey also identifies potential historic
districts.

Marshfield Surveyed Structures: -Approx. 300
On file in Marshfield Historical Commission Office, Town Hall

Surveyed Structures on State Register /Preservation Restrictions: 4
   1. Daniel Webster Estate
   2. Marcia Thomas House
   3. Anthony Thomas House
   4. Kenelm Winslow House

MHC identified potential Historic Districts
  1. Training Green Area
  2. Main St. Marshfield Fair Area
  3. Brant Rock (Abington Village)
  4. Green Harbor Village (Marginal St)
  5. Webster Estate/Winslow House Historical Complex
  6. Marshfield Hills Village
  7. Union St. North Marshfield

1   National Register Listed

2   National Historic Landmark



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Archaeological Resources

Marshfield has many archaeological sites, most of which are endangered. The MHC has a listing of all the
identified sites in the Town. State law prevents definitive disclosure of known or potential sites. Surveys of
archaeological sites can only be made by state approved archeologists who have received permits by the MHC.

   Town-owned sites:
    Daniel Webster Estate -Training Green
    Original Winslow Site -Pilgrim Trail (in part)
    Training Green
    Pilgrim Trail (in part)

   Endangered Archaeological Areas
   Duxbury Marsh (Carsewell St. Green Harbor area). A major find was made in this area two years ago and
   was immediately placed on the National Register by the MHC's Preservation Officer.

      Peregrine White Farm: High potential for development and destruction
      Duck Hill
      Gov. Winslow School area
      Pilgrim Trail (certain parts)
      Grandview Ave. area
      North River (all parcels that border it)
      Old Canal area, Green Harbor

   Blackman's Point
   This area has been a known archaeological site since the 1860s when surveys were made and the artifacts
   placed at the Peabody Museum at Harvard. The trailer park that has existed on this site for over sixty years
   has made no known detrimental impact on the remaining archaeology. This is a known Native American site
   and is the last undeveloped land remaining in Town that is on the ocean. It escaped a development attempt
   once, but the potential for destruction is ever present. This is also a major historical site. It is the site of the
   world's first voice transatlantic radio broadcast, which was transmitted from Blackman's Point on Christmas
   Eve, 1906 by Prof. Reginald Fessenden. Prof. Fessenden is the father of voice radio (not to be confused with
   Marconi, who invented wireless telegraphy, not voice radio). The Marshfield Historical Commission is
   working to place the site on the National Register in time for the 100th anniversary of the broadcast in 2006.




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Historic Preservation Goals

1. Preservation and enhancement of town-owned properties of historical, cultural and archaeological
   significance.

2. Acquisition of threatened properties of particular historical and/or archaeological significance, subject to
   Town Meeting approval.

3. Production of an overlay map for the Historical and Conservation Commissions, Planning Board and
   Board of Appeals to identify the following resources:

        A. Sites now on the State Survey and those needing to be surveyed

        B. Sites with known or potential archaeological significance

        C. Endangered historical and archaeological sites

        D. Potential Historic Districts


NOTE: A map that will enable boards to immediately identify endangered areas when they receive plans for
proposed developments will be very helpful. Many places have been lost due to the lack of such a map.




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                                           COMMUNITY HOUSING


Community Housing Resources

At present, 3.8% of Marshfiel d’s housing units are classified as affordable ―subsidized
housing‖ by the state’s Depart ment of Housing and Community Development (for the
purposes of Chapter 40B).

Several Ch.40B developments recently have been proposed to the Town by private developers. While it is
difficult to know how many of these will actually receive permitting, we estimate that these proposals may add
as many as 199 units that will count as affordable ―subsidized housing‖.


The Community Preservation Committee is planning to make significant recommendations that will support
future community housing needs. The complexity of this program requires thoughtful consideration of the many
options available to the Town of Marshfield. For FY 2003 we recommend that we set aside the minimum
required by law(10%), which will allow us to develop a comprehensive approach. The Marshfield Housing
Authority will play a significant role in developing a complete program to address this concern. We
acknowledge that funding of the housing needs of our town is a complex issue that needs more time and
attention. Over the next year, now that funds are available, we will address these pressing needs with practical
and fundable solutions.

The Community Preservation Committee intends to give particular attention to the underserved needs of certain
Marshfield residents. Currently there is no assistance available to those individuals and families who can afford
a monthly payment but not the down payment needed to purchase a home. Community Preservation Funds
could be used to assist Marshfield residents with down payment funding. If residency and income requirements
were met, then funding could be made available to assist Marshfield citizens to purchase their first home in town.

The Community Preservation Committee seeks to develop a plan that will help our relatives, our teachers, our
police, fire fighters and others who in many cases are struggling with high rent payments, apply money towards
down payments that will allow them to become home owners in our town. Our plan will include restrictions that
will ensure that homes purchased with our funds will remain affordable. The plan will also include measures
that seek to encourage local banks and realtors to partner with us in achieving our goals. The plan will attempt to
ensure that our children, our parents, our teachers, police and firefighters can all live in our town. The
Community Preservation Act can be an effective tool in assisting Marshfield meet its housing objectives. The
state has mandated that 10% of our housing stock be affordable. Presently Marshfield has 390+ affordable
homes; our goal (as required by the state) is over 1,000 affordable units. By developing an effective community
housing plan, Marshfield is also developing an effective shield against anti zoning 40B projects. The
Community Preservation Act therefore can serve as a highly effective tool in: (1) providing housing for our
community needs and (2) stopping developers from circumventing our zoning laws.




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Community Housing Goals

Goal 1: Meet local housing needs across the full range of incomes, while promoting diversity and the stability of
        individuals and families living in Marshfield.

        Marshfield residents have long indicated their support for diversity in economic status, age, religion, race
        and ethnicity. The preservation and creation of community housing is a proven method for promoting
        diversity, allowing individuals and families with more limited means to afford to live in town. The town
        will utilize Community Preservation funds to offer current and future residents a wide range of housing
        options, including mixed-use housing, senior residential developments, supportive housing alternatives,
        live-work spaces, and artist workspaces.

Goal 2: Ensure that new community housing is harmonious with the existing community.

        Developments will incorporate a number of characteristics designed to maintain a low to medium
        density with locations scattered throughout the town while conserving the natural landscape.

Goal 3: Meet the 10% State standard for community housing.

        In order to ensure that future community housing development is consistent with the needs and character
        of the town, Marshfield must meet and the state’s 10% community housing standard. Until that
        milestone is achieved, the town will be considered deficient in this area and will continue to be
        vulnerable to Ch. 40B applications.

Goal 4: Leverage other public and private resources to the greatest extent possible.

        Marshfield does not receive federal or state funding for community housing on an entitlement basis. We
        need to be creative in leveraging public and private resources to make community housing development
        possible. Creativity will be demonstrated by combining Community Preservation funds with the various
        private, state, and federal resources that are available on a non-entitlement ―competitive‖ basis. This
        will include Federal Home Loan Bank funds, State HOME funds, Housing Stabilization funds, and
        Housing Innovations funds, and Federal Low Income Housing Tax credits.

     The Community Housing Plan currently being developed by the Marshfield Housing Authority will provide
for the creation of community housing units in Marshfield, consistent with the goals outlined above.




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                                       L A N D F O R R E C R E AT I O N A L U S E


    Funding through the Community Preservation Act is limited to the ―acquisition, preservation, and creation of
land for recreational use.‖ Acquisition is defined as obtaining by gift, purchase, rental, lease, etc. Preservation is
defined as protection from injury, harm, or destruction. In addition, the land cannot be used for ―a stadium,
gymnasium, or similar structure.‖ It can be used for ―community gardens, trails, and noncommercial youth and
adult sports‖ and use as a ―park, playground, or athletic field.‖

    Recreational Use Land Resources. Marshfield residents enjoy a variety of land resources that support
recreational activities. Playing fields support organized sports such as soccer, baseball, and football. The new
Senior Center will house many activities for seniors. Conservation land and trails around town provide
opportunities for hiking, biking, walking, and many other activities. The Marshfield schools put on shows and
host other activities. Land owned by private entities provides many other opportunities.

    Recreational Use Land Goals. Most of the goals listed in the Open Space section above apply here, but will
not be reproduced here to save space. In addition, the Marshfield Recreation Commission has identified the
following long-term goals, many of which pertain to this area:

The Recreation Department “anticipates continued active use of recreation, school, and other facilities to meet
the growing recreation demands with an eye to preventing overuse of any facility by the growth of new and
expanded facilities”

                                                                                     Marshfield Conservation/Recreation
                                                                                                       Open Space Plan
                                                                                                                  1995




                                         A D M I N I S T R AT I V E E XP E N S E S


    The Community Preservation Act allows for up to 5% of annual Community Preservation revenues to be
spent on administrative and operating expenses of the Community Preservation Committee. The Committee
seeks to keep these costs to a minimum, but we recognize that community involvement and input is key to the
success of the Community Preservation Act. We must have the resources necessary to share information with
and gather input from the community.

    Therefore, the Community Preservation Committee has requested that an amount of $25,500 be set aside for
administrative costs in FY03. These funds would be spent on town-wide communication, such as a committee
web site, mailings, and legal notices. We also will need legal assistance in examining land titles and agreements.
Furthermore, we will need basic office equipment and staff to take minutes of meetings. Finally, it should be
noted that this year's expenditures generally can be categorized as follows: (1) initial start-up costs such as office
equipment and website development (note that the web site we envision will allow the public not only to obtain
information about the CPA but also allow them to apply for CPA funds over the internet; It is also our intention
that other town boards will be able to take advantage of this resource). (2) certain funds such as legal fees, may
or may not need to be used during FY 03. The funds, however, need to be authorized in order to complete
projects that may come forth during the year.



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Committee Administration – Funds Recommended for FY03: $42,000
    Purpose: Administrative costs
       Office Equipment     $5,000   (one time needed expenditure)
       Legal Notices        $1,000   (required for annual CPA plan meeting)
       Staff                $1,500   (primarily to take minutes at monthly meetings)
       RE Appraisals        $3,000   (will be needed to verify cost of projects)
       Miscellaneous        $1,000   (for unknown and unanticipated expenses)
       Legal Fees           $5,000   (to negotiate land contracts and title examinations)
       Project Review       $1,500   (to ensure project quality)
       Public Outreach      $7,500   (signs, maps, website development)

              TOTAL       $25,500




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    III

                                SELECTION CRITERIA
The Community Preservation Committee requires that all proposed projects be eligible for CPA funding
according to the requirements described in the state's CPA statute.

Projects will be evaluated according to the following criteria:

       Consistency with Marshfield's Master Plan, Open Space and Recreation Plan, and other planning
        documents that have received wide input and scrutiny.
       Feasibility
       Urgency
       Affordablity
       Serving a currently under-served population
       Serving multiple needs and populations
       Consistency with recent town meeting actions
       Preservation of currently-owned town assets
       Acquisition of threatened resources
       Multiple sources of funding
       Use of local contractors where possible

The Town Meeting will have the ultimate say, as the law requires Town Meeting approval for all Community
Preservation Committee funding recommendations.




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   IV

               P R E L I M I N A R Y R E C O M M E N D AT I O N S
The Community Preservation Committee has approved the following recommendations for FY03 expenditures:


       To recommend that the town reserve $183,000 from FY2002 Community Preservation Fund revenues
        for use on Historic Preservation—Daniel Webster Homestead
       To recommend that the town reserve $29,199 from FY2002 Community Preservation Fund revenues for
        use on Historic Preservation—Clift Rogers Library
       To recommend that the town reserve $30,000 from FY2002 Community Preservation Fund revenues for
        use on Historic Preservation—improvements to Town Training Green
       To recommend that the town reserve $26,850 from FY2002 Community Preservation Fund revenues for
        use on recreation projects---Skate Park Landscaping
       To recommend that the town appropriate $25,500 from FY2002 Community Preservation Fund revenues
        for administrative costs.
       To recommend that the town appropriate $54,650 (10% of the committed revenues) from FY2002
        Community Preservation Fund revenues to be set aside for future Open Space Needs.
       To recommend that the town appropriate $54,650 (10% of the committed revenues) from FY2002
        Community Preservation Fund revenues to be set aside for future Community Housing Needs..

These recommendations will be included on the warrant for the Spring 2002 Annual Town Meeting.

Any Community Preservation Fund revenues not appropriated or reserved at the 2002 Annual Town Meeting
will remain in the Community Preservation Fund and may be appropriated or reserved in the future.




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    V

           S O L I C I T AT I O N O F P R O J E C T P R O P O S A L S
The Community Preservation Committee welcomes new project proposals that may contribute to community
preservation in Marshfield. Please submit such proposals to the Committee using the form and guidelines on the
next two pages.




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          PROJECT SUBMISSION SHEET
              FISCAL YEAR 2003
                           Community Preservation Committee
Submitter:                                       Submission Date:

Submitter’s address and phone number.            Purpose: (please select all that apply)
                                                         Open Space
                                                         Community Housing
                                                         Historic Preservation
Town committee or board (if applicable)
                                                         Recreation
Project Name:

Project Description:




How does this project help preserve Marshfield’s character?




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Project Budget:




Attach cost estimates for construction projects.

For Acquisition projects attach appraisals and agreements, if available. Please set forth name of present
owner and attach copy of deed into present owner. In addition to property address please provide
Marshfield assessors office identification (Map, Block and Lot number).




If project is expected to continue over more than one year or if Bonding the project is anticipated
detail the cost of project on the following chart (explanation may be attached on a separate sheet.

                                                                             Other Funding
Fiscal Year              Total Cost                CPC Funds Requested       Sources
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
Total




For Community Preservation Committee Use
Received on:                     Associated Town Committee:

Reviewed on:                          Determination:




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                                   Guidelines for Submission

    1) Each project request must be submitted on the Community Preservation Committee Project
       Submission Sheet (this form).

    2) Requests must include the need for the item and be documented with appropriate support
       information.

    3) Obtain quotes for construction project costs whenever possible. If not, cost estimates may be
       used, provided the basis of the estimate is fully explained. Independent appraisals are encouraged
       wherever appropriate.

    4) Requests for funding may be for up to a 5 year period.
    5) If request is part of a longer-term project, include the total project cost.

    6) For Departments or Committees that have multiple project requests, prioritize projects.

    7) Requests should be received by March 14, 2002 to be considered for recommendation at the April
       2002 Annual Town Meeting.


Please keep in mind there are legal limitations on what CPA funds can be used for.
A Community Preservation Act - Question and Answers page can be found at:
                http://www.state.ma.us/envir/cpaqa.htm

If you are in doubt about your project's eligibility, please submit it so we have the opportunity to review
it.

Thank you for your input.

            Community Preservation Committee
            Marshfield, MA




Please submit your form to:


                              Community Preservation Committee
                              c/o Town Administrator’s Office
                              10 Snow Road
                              Marshfield, MA 02050




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