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CRIM1011 Introduction to Criminal Justice

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					School of Social Sciences and International Studies
        Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences




          CRIM1011
Introduction to Criminal Justice




               Semester 2, 2011




CRIM1011 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMESTER 2 2011
1. LOCATION
                        Faculty of Arts and Social Science
                        School of Social Science and International Studies
Faculty


                        CRIM1011
School or department

                        Introduction to Criminal Justice
Course Code

                        Semester 2 2011
Course Name
Session

2. TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                                    2
                                                                                 Page

                                                                                  3-4
Staff contact details

                                                                                    4
Course details

                                                                                  4-6
Rationale for the inclusion of the content and teaching approach

                                                                                    6
Teaching strategies

                                                                                  6-9
Course schedule

                                                                                 9-11
Resources for students

                                                                                   11
Assessments

                                                                                11-13
Course evaluation and development
Course policies

3. STAFF CONTACT DETAILS

Name                          Dr Sanja Milivojevic (Lecturer)
           COURSE CONVENOR (contact for general inquires about course content)

Phone                         9385 2312
Office                        Room G44, Morven Brown Building
Email address                 s.milivojevic@unsw.edu.au
Contact time and availability Monday 10 am- 12pm or by appointment
        HEAD TUTOR (contact for general inquiries about administrative matters and

Name TBA
                                       assessment)

Phone
Office location
Email address
Contact time and availability

Name                          Ms Amanda Wilson
                  TUTORS (first contact, all inquiries regarding tutorials)

Phone/Email                   wilsonamw@gmail.com

Name                           Dr Christine Jennett
Email                          cjennett@ozemail.com.au

Name                           Mr Heusen Mak
Email                          heusenm@gmail.com

Name                           Ms Kristin Moore
Phone/email                    kristin.moore@unsw.edu.au


                                           2
4. COURSE DETAILS

Credit Points         6 units of credit
                      This is a first year course in the Bachelor of Social Science in
Summary of the Course Criminology degree at UNSW and a gateway course for the
                      Criminology Major in the Bachelor of Arts. It is the second
                      subject in a series of core criminology courses related to
                      criminal justice issues.
Aims of the Course    1. To introduce students to the major institutions and
                           processes of the criminal justice system
                      2 To provide a foundation for further criminological study on
                           the prevention and control of crime
                      3. To provide a critical overview of contemporary debates
                           about criminal justice
Student Learning      At the completion of this course, a student should be able to:
Outcomes
                      1. Articulate the aims of the criminal justice system
                      2. Identify the key elements of the criminal justice system
                      3. Understand different conceptions of justice and be able to
                           apply them to questions about the criminal justice system
                      4. Analyse the impact of criminal justice practices on specific
                           groups in society
                      5. Interpret criminological research about the criminal justice
                           process
                      6. Identify problems and debates about the criminal justice
                           system
                      7. Assess contemporary developments in criminal justice in
                           the context of these debates
                      8. Develop communication and reasoning abilities through
                           participation in class debates and on-line discussions
                      9. Develop empirical research and analysis skills through
                           observation and interpretation of local court proceedings
                      10. Develop critical analytical and writing skills through
                           examination of contemporary criminal justice debates in an
                           essay assignment
Criminology Graduate 1. An understanding of the key concepts and theoretical
Attributes                 approaches which have been developed in relation to
                           criminalization, criminal justice, penal practice, crime
                           control and policing.
                      2. A critical awareness of the main agents and institutions
                           which respond to crime and deviance.
                      3. An understanding of the dimensions of social divisions and
                           social diversity including an ability to understand and
                           demonstrate the relationship of social class, gender, age,
                           race and ethnicity, disabilities, health and other salient
                           aspects of diversity in relation to offending, crime control,
                           policing, criminal justice and penal systems.
                      4. The capacity to engage critically with fundamental

            CRIM1011 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMESTER 2 2011
                             questions about ethics, justice and human rights including
                             an understanding of the human rights principles which are
                             applicable to different stages of the criminal justice process,
                             policing and penal practice.
                             An ability to understand and conduct social and
                             criminological research.
                        5.

                             Skills in oral and written communication including an ability
                             to take part in and evaluate open minded discussion and
                        6.

                             debate, and an ability to target information to different
                             audiences using a different range of media and text types.
                             The skills of critical, creative and imaginative thinking
                             concerning society and its institutions including the ability
                        7.

                             to use these skills to problem solve.

5. RATIONALE FOR THE INCLUSION OF CONTENT AND TEACHING APPROACH

We have chosen the content of this course with the intention of providing a brief but
thought-provoking introduction to the component parts of the criminal justice system
(police, courts, prisons and alternative justice mechanisms) accompanied by a discussion
of the key issues that arise in relation to its operation (effectiveness and non-
discrimination in practice, and alignment with underlying philosophies of justice). We will
present the material as a series of separate weekly topics, each addressing a different
branch of the criminal justice system and/or an important criminal justice issue.

Where possible, lecturers will identify each week, more specialized elective courses that
expand the knowledge area being covered in that lecture which may be available to
students intending to continue their studies in criminology. Continuity will be provided
across the weekly topics by repeated reference to the underlying principles of justice,
effectiveness, non-discrimination, and by explicit discussion of the practical linkages
between different branches of the criminal justice system.

6. TEACHING STRATEGIES

We have a 2-hour repeat lecture each week from weeks 1-12. Most of the lectures will be
Lectures

delivered by Dr Sanja Milivojevic. In CRIM1011 lectures are an integral part of the course
and student experience. We will make lectures as interesting, challenging, and innovative
as we can and invite you to participate actively in order to create a stimulating and
supportive learning environment. We have found that good lecture environments are
created where students attend classes regularly, complete the weekly readings before the
class and are prepared to engage with the material and think creatively during the lecture
time. Students will have opportunities to participate actively in lectures through
experiential exercises, work with film and other audio-visual images. Guest lectures will be
incorporated wherever possible to enable students to benefit from a wide range of
professional and academic experience.
Lectures will be recorded in i-lecture/Lectopia but will only be made available on request
to the Course Convenor where there is a good reason for missing the class, for example due
to illness. Powerpoint outlines for lectures will generally be made available a day before
the lecture is scheduled. These are for note taking purposes and are a basic representation
of lecture content only. The lecture will contain extra information and audio-visual

                                             4
material, or may have a guest speaker presenting material which is not available on
Powerpoint.


We take the view that the classroom is a creative space and that knowledge is not ‘given’
Tutorials

but created in the learning space. The success of this process depends upon the discussion
established between all participants (students and teachers). Tutorials will typically
consist of a discussion of the lecture, weekly readings, as well as key concepts and practical
issues relating to the lecture topics. Discussions will take place in large and small groups
and on an individual basis. The tutorials might also include practical skills, problem solving
exercises, and activities related to audio visual materials. It is your tutor’s role to guide you
through the discussion not to provide you with ‘answers’. Tutorials are a collective
responsibility: you are expected to participate in formulating questions and responses and
to prepare for classes by completing weekly readings beforehand.

There will be workshops held from Weeks 2-13. You are required to attend one 1 hour
tutorial per week.
       Monday 1 - 2 PM               (Law 162)
       Monday 1 – 2 PM               (Law 301)
   •


       Monday 4 – 5 PM               (Elec.Eng. 218)
   •


       Tuesday 12 – 1 PM             (Quad 1046)
   •


       Tuesday 12 – 1 PM             (Quad G046)
   •


       Tuesday 1 – 2 PM              (Law 162)
   •


       Tuesday 1 – 2 PM              (Law 163)
   •


       Tuesday 2 – 3 PM              (Morv. Br. G3)
   •


       Tuesday 3 – 4 PM              (Gold G05)
   •


       Tuesday 4 – 5 PM              (Law 301)
   •


       Tuesday 4 – 5 PM              (Law 202)
   •


       Thursday 11 AM – 12 PM        (MechEng 202)
   •


       Thursday 12 – 1 PM            (MechEng 202)
   •


       Thursday 1 – 2 PM             (MechEng 202)
   •


       Friday 12 – 1 PM              (ASBus 107)
   •


       Friday 1 – 2 PM               (ASBus 118)
   •


       Friday 2 – 3 PM               (ASBus 107)
   •


       Friday 3 – 4 PM               (ASBus 114)
   •
   •

Online learning

We will be using ‘Moodle’ to support the learning and teaching activities of this course.
UNSW is piloting Moodle and we have chosen to take part in the pilot because we believe it
to be a relatively intuitive, well structured and user-friendly system. We will collect
feedback on this at the end of semester.


             CRIM1011 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMESTER 2 2011
https://moodle2.telt.unsw.edu.au/login/index.php

Extra advice

If you have a general question about the course and lectures, contact Dr Sanja Milivojevic
as the Course Coordinator. For everything else contact Head tutor or your tutor - contact
details and consultation times for tutors are at the beginning of this outline and will be
posted on Moodle. Email and relevant Moodle functionalities are considered official means
of communication between staff and students. Teaching staff will communicate with
students through their UNSW email address. It is the students’ responsibility to check their
UNSW email regularly.

7. COURSE SCHEDULE

Week/          Topic                                                 Lecturer
Beginning
1/18 July      Introducing and studying the Criminal Justice         Dr Sanja Milivojevic
               System
2/25 July      Policing and Society                                  Dr Alyce McGovern
3/1 Aug        Courts and sentencing                                 Dr Sanja Milivojevic
4/8 Aug        Prisons and rehabilitation                            Dr Sanja Milivojevic
5/5 Aug        Alternatives to prison: community corrections         Dr Sanja Milivojevic
6/22 Aug       Alternative Justice                                   Dr Jane Bolitho
7/29 Aug       Juvenile Justice                                      Dr Sanja Milivojevic
8/12 Sept      Criminal Justice and Human Rights                     Dr Sanja Milivojevic
9/19 Sept      Crime Prevention and Community Safety                 Mr Phillip Birch
10/26 Sept     Understanding Intersectionality in Criminal Justice   Dr Sanja Milivojevic
11/3 Oct       Looking at mental health and/or cognitive             Dr Sanja Milivojevic
               disabilities & the criminal justice system
12/10 Oct      Criminological research and social policy             Dr Sanja Milivojevic
13/17 Oct      No lectures, last tutorial                            Dr Sanja Milivojevic

8. RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS
You will need to buy the following textbook for the course. This is available for purchase
from the UNSW bookshop (http://www.bookshop.unsw.edu.au). A copy has also been
placed on special reserve in the library. This is the same textbook as for CRIM1010 so
many of you will already have this.

White, R and Perrone, S (2010) Crime, Criminality and Criminal Justice, Oxford
University Press.


Goldsmith, A, Israel, M and Daly, K (2006) Crime and Justice: A Guide to Criminology 3rd
Other useful texts include the following:

Edition, Law Book Co.

Findlay, M, Odgers, S, and Yeo, S (2005) (3rd ed) Australian Criminal Justice, Oxford
University Press

McLaughlin, E and Muncie, J (2006) The Sage Dictionary of Criminology, Sage

                                              6
Using the Library

It is crucial for this course that all students are able to access readings either electronically
through the Library catalogue or in hard copy from the Reserve collection and library
shelves. It is compulsory for every undergraduate student at UNSW to complete the
“ELISE” online tutorial program that introduces basic library and study skills. Students
new to the university must complete this course. For details of requirements and the
course see http://elise.library.unsw.edu.au/home/welcome.html

A number of recommended readings are held in the My Course (Course Reserve) in the
library. Scanned materials are accessible via links from the MyCourse Reserve list for this
course.

The subject guide for criminal justice and criminology can be found at Moodle and School
website. The subject guide provides access to a wealth of online resources, and other
information and research materials. Note that the texts recommended in the subject guide
are only a selection of general criminological reference material. You will need to access
more specific books and articles to complete your research for the essay assignment.


Useful websites for information about crime and criminal justice research and policies:
Other Online sources


Australian Institute of Criminology http://www.aic.gov.au/
NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research
http://www.agd.nsw.gov.au/lawlink/bocsar/ll_bocsar.nsf/pages/bocsar_index
NSW Crime Prevention Division
http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lawlink/cpd/ll_cpd.nsf/pages/CPD_index
NSW Local Courts
http://www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/lawlink/local_courts/ll_localcourts.nsf/pages/lc_index
Human Rights Commission http://www.humanrights.gov.au

Weekly Reading Guide
Week and Topic
1. Introducing and Studying     Textbook pp 277-285 Institutions of Criminal Justice
                                Essential Readings

the Criminal Justice System
                                Hudson, B. (2003) ‘Justice in the liberal tradition’, Chapter
                                1 in Justice in the Risk Society, Sage Publications. (Available
                                via Library)
2. Policing and Society         Textbook Chapter 14 Police Roles & Techniques &
                                Chapter 15 Different Policing for Different People

                                Dixon D. (2005) ‘Why don’t the police stop crime?’ The
                                Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology Volume
                                38 Number 1 pp.4–24 (Available via Library)
3. Courts and sentencing        Textbook Chapter 18 Courts and Court Processes and
                                Chapter 20 Judicial Decisions and Sentencing

                                Roach K. (1999) ‘Four models of the Criminal Process’: The
                                Journal of Criminal Law and Criminal Policy Vol. 89 No.2 pp.

             CRIM1011 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMESTER 2 2011
                              pp. 671-716 (Available via Library)
4. Prisons and rehabilitation Textbook Chapters 21 Punishment and Penalty and
                              Chapter 22 Incarceration and Prisonisation

                             Pratt J. (2008) ‘Scandinavian Exceptionalism in an Era of
                             Penal Excess Part1: The Nature and Roots of Scandinavian
                             Exceptionalism’ British Journal of Criminology 48, 119-137
                             (Available via Library)
5. Managing offenders in the Textbook Chapter 23 Community Corrections
community
                             Peacock M. (2008) ‘A Third Space between the Prison and
                             the Community: Post Release Programs and Re-integration’
                             Current Issues in Criminal Justice 20:2 pp.307- 312
                             (Available via Library)

                             NSW Standing Committee on Law and Justice (2006)

                             areas and disadvantaged populations New South Wales.
                             Community based sentencing options for rural and remote

                             Parliament. Legislative Council Download final report
6. Alternative Justice       Textbook Chapter 19 Access and Alternatives to Justice.
                             Plus the following very short articles:


                             http://www.aic.gov.au/documents/5/3/D/%7B53D95879-
                             Restorative Justice

                             0B21-40BC-B716-3DACF695FA3B%7Dti186.pdf
                             Trends and Issues in Crime and Criminal Justice, Paper 186,
                             Restorative justice and conferencing in Australia, Daly, K
                             and Hayes, H., 2001.


                             http://www.aic.gov.au/documents/F/5/C/%7BF5C913B2-
                             Therapeutic jurisprudence / drug courts

                             AD10-45AE-899D-6BB4524A0625%7Dcrm023.pdf
                             Crime reduction matters: Number 23 Australian
                             approaches to drug-crime diversion, 2004, AIC.


                             http://www.aic.gov.au/documents/2/D/1/%7B2D133201-
                             Indigenous Policing

                             3CDD-4128-9898-80CADE19567D%7Dcrm026.pdf Crime
                             reduction matters: Number 26 Night Patrols, 2004, AIC.
8. Juvenile Justice          Cunneen C and White R. 2002 Chapter 4 ‘The Institutions
                             of Juvenile Justice’ Juvenile Justice: Youth and Crime in
                             Australia Melbourne Oxford University Press pp.96 – 125

                             Taylor, N. (2009) Juveniles in Detention in Australia: 1991-
                             2007, AIC Monitoring Reports
                             http://www.aic.gov.au/documents/7/8/8/%7B788D534A-
                             4DAF-4ABC-8A31-A2D364C5BAD7%7Dmr05.pdf
9. Criminal Justice and      Charlesworth, H. (2002) Writing in Rights: Australia and
Human Rights                 the Protection of Human Rights, Ch 2 ‘The international



                                           8
                              human rights system’ (Available via Library)

                              Crawshaw et al (1998) Human Rights and Policing:

                              Chapter 2 ‘Human Rights and Policing’. (Available via
                              Standards for Good Behaviour and a Strategy for Change,

                              Library)

                              Lynch, P. (2006) ‘Human Rights and Social Policy: Applying
                              a Human Rights Approach to Prisoners and the Right to
                              Vote’, Just Policy, No 41, p16-24 (Available via Library)
10. Crime Prevention and      Textbook Chapter 25 Crime Prevention
Community Safety
                              Cherney, A. (2006) ‘Problem Solving for Crime
                              Prevention’, AIC Trends and Issues No. 314
                              http://www.aic.gov.au/documents/6/8/4/%7B684EE0E3-
                              9776-4DD3-ABE6-737B54850DB5%7Dtandi314.pdf
11. Intersectionality –       Findlay, M., Odgers, S., and Yeo, S. (2005) Chapter 10 ‘And
Exploring race, class, gender Justice for All’ in Australian Criminal Justice 3rd Edition,
and disability in criminal    Oxford, Oxford University Press, (Available via Library)
justice
                              Experiences of Child Sexual Assault Complainants in the

                              http://www.aic.gov.au/documents/1/8/F/%7B18FF5A71-2773-
                              Criminal Justice System

                              4BC8-BC93-933DD57A5BDD%7Dti250.pdf


                              http://www.aic.gov.au/documents/5/1/B/%7B51BF326A-
                              Women Prisoners and Correctional Programs

                              FC45-4F20-87A4-CE3379C4A762%7Dti194.pdf

                              Young Indigenous Males, Custody and the Rites of

                              http://www.aic.gov.au/documents/E/0/3/%7BE0349D8E-
                              Passage

                              591A-4FB6-ABA4-81A5C0D72FE8%7Dti204.pdf

                              Intellectual Disability Rights Service (2008) Enabling
                              Justice A Report on Problems and Solutions in Relation to
                              Diversion of Alleged Offenders with Intellectual Disability

                              http://www.idrs.org.au/pdf/enabling_justice.pdf
                              from the New South Wales Local Courts System

12. Criminological research   Knepper, P. (2007) Criminology and Social Policy, Ch 9 ‘The
and social policy             criminalisation of social policy’ (Available via Library)

9. ASSESSMENT

Final grades in this course will be based on 3 compulsory assessment tasks. You must
make a reasonable attempt at all assessment tasks in order to get a final grade in this
course.

Assessment      Length         Weight     Learning outcomes Graduate           Due date
task                                      assessed          attributes
                                                            assessed

             CRIM1011 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMESTER 2 2011
Court           1000 words       30%        1,2,3,4,6,9             1,2,3,4,6     Week 4,
Observation                                                                       Friday 12 Aug
                                                                                  4 PM
Quiz                             30%        1,2,3,4,6               1,2,3,4       Week 7, Friday
                                                                                  2 Sept 4 PM
Major essay     2000 words       40%        3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10        1,3,4,5,6,7   Week 12, Friday
                                                                                  14 Oct 4pm


This assignment provides you with the opportunity to engage in empirical research. You
Assignment 1: Court Observation (1500 words)

will be required to attend a local court and make systematic observations about the
operation of the court, key players and the administration of justice. You will be assessed
on your ability to organise and engage in fieldwork, observe and record detailed research
notes, demonstrate an understanding of the operation of the court and present you
research findings in a clear, accessible and coherent form. You will also have an
opportunity to incorporate your observations into the second assignment. You will receive
individual feedback on this assignment by the 6th week of lectures.


You will use your readings and lecture notes in order to complete a quiz that will be set up
Assignment 2: Quiz

for you either on Moodle or hard copy.


You will use your observations from assignment 1, readings throughout the course and
Assessment Three: Major Essay (2000 words)

library research to explore in more depth some key issues of justice presented in the
lectures. This assignment provides you with an opportunity to develop and demonstrate
your capacity to research a set topic and present a well structured and clearly argued
response.

More details about the requirements and modes of assessment for each of the assignments,
including tips for successful completion, will be provided via Moodle as the course
progresses.


Assignments are to be submitted to the School Office, located on the Ground Floor of the
Assignment Submission

Morven Brown Building, usually by being placed in submission box with the
appropriate course code. There will be a separate box for late submissions. Only late
submissions will be stamped by the School Office with the receipt date.
Students are also required to submit an electronic copy of the assignment on the
following email COURSE CODE/COURSE NUMBER@unsw.edu.au
BOTH HARD COPY AND ELECTRONIC COPY OF YOUR ASSIGNMENT MUST BE
SUBMITTED BY 4PM ON THE DUE DATE TO AVOID A LATE PENALTY.
It is the student's responsibility to keep a copy of their work in case of loss of an
assignment.
All assignments must be submitted with an Assignment Declaration form signed by the
student (required for all assignments). These are available from outside the School
Office, above the assignment submission boxes.
Normally assignments are returned in tutorials. For assignments with due dates from

                                               10
Week 10 onwards, students may request for the marked assignment to be returned to
them by attaching a self addressed stamped envelop to their assignment. Assignments
without a return envelop will be kept by the course coordinator.

10. COURSE EVALUATION AND DEVELOPMENT


This course will be evaluated at the end of the session via the university’s CATEI system
for student feedback. All students are encouraged to complete this questionnaire so that
continual improvements can be made to the course content and approach. The Moodle
discussion boards will also provide spaces for student discussion and feedback which
will help university staff to identify aspects of the course needing further clarification or
a change in teaching approach. Following evaluation of this course in 2010 course
improvements were been to further match content from lectures to tutorials.

                                    COURSE POLICIES

11. STUDENT CONDUCT AND INTEGRITY IN ACADEMIC WORK


UNSW has a Student Conduct Policy (2009) that “provides a framework for the standard of
conduct expected of students of the University with respect to their academic and personal
conduct. It outlines the primary obligations of students, and directs staff and students to
the code and procedures which specify student obligations and University responsibilities.
This policy promotes integrity and ethical behaviour and guides students’ dealings with
fellow students, staff, the University, and the national and international community.”
(UNSW Student Conduct Policy, page 1).

All students must read this policy at:

http://www.gs.unsw.edu.au/policy/documents/studentconductpolicy.pdf

A related document is the UNSW Student Misconduct Procedures (2009):

http://www.gs.unsw.edu.au/policy/documents/studentmisconductprocedures.pdf

Integrity in academic work is one of the main expectations of all students and staff. It is the
student’s responsibility to understand and achieve this. There are several resources to
help you:

       The Student Conduct Policy and the Student Misconduct Procedures.
       The Learning Centre is the central UNSW resource on academic integrity and
   •

       understanding and avoiding plagiarism (http://www.lc.unsw.edu.au/plagiarism/).
   •

       The Elise Study Skills tutorial which familiarizes students with academic writing,
       research and using information responsibly is mandatory for all commencing
   •

       undergraduate students and the quiz must be completed by the end of Week 5 of
       their first semester at UNSW. All postgraduate coursework students are encouraged
       to take the tutorial (http://elise.library.unsw.edu.au/home/welcome.html)
   •   Information provided in class.



             CRIM1011 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMESTER 2 2011
Plagiarism is a form of cheating which constitutes student academic misconduct. Repeated
or serious plagiarism often results in penalties to grades, suspension or exclusion from the
University. This and other types of academic misconduct must be avoided. These are
outlined in the Student Conduct Policy and the Student Misconduct Procedures. A new
policy document, Student Academic Integrity & Managing Plagiarism: Guidelines for Staff
will soon be released; and a leaflet for students will be distributed during the semester.

12. CLASS ATTENDANCE AND COMMUNICATION
Students are expected to attend all tutorials/seminars. A satisfactory attendance record of
at least 80% of scheduled classes must be met to pass the course. Tutors will keep
attendance records for their classes. Students are expected to be punctual; lateness of
more than 15 minutes will be considered absence, and students must attend the whole
duration of the tutorial to be considered present.
Email and relevant Moodle functionalities are considered official means of communication
between staff and students. Teaching staff will communicate with students through their
UNSW email address. It is the students’ responsibility to check their UNSW email regularly.

13. EXTENSION FOR SUBMISSION OF WORK
All assignments must be submitted by the due date unless an extension of time has been
granted. The penalty for late submission without permission is 3% (of the perfect mark,
that is /100) per day late, including weekends. This means if an assignment is allocated a
mark of 70% and is 1 day late the mark given will be 67%. Late work will not be accepted
once the marked assignments have been returned or after two weeks past the due date,
whichever is earliest, whether an extension has been granted or not.

14. SPECIAL CONSIDERATION
The UNSW Special Consideration–Illness and Misadventure Policy (2008) that states “The
purpose of special Consideration is to enable the University to assess and address the
impact on students of short term events, beyond the control of the student, that affect
performance in a specific assessment task or tasks.”

Details of the policy and procedures on Special Consideration can be found at:

http://www.gs.unsw.edu.au/policy/documents/specialconsiderationpolicy.pdf

“Students with a disability, and those with ongoing medical conditions, who require
consideration of their circumstances and support, are advised to register with the Equity
and Diversity Unit. Registration is advisable but not obligatory.” (Special Consideration
Policy, page 1)

All applications for special consideration are lodged with the UNSW Student Central.
Please read the policy to understand when such application is warranted, and about the
possible outcomes of an application.

15. REVIEW OF RESULTS


Where a student believes the mark awarded for an assignment or any assessable task
does not adequately reflect the quality of the assignment, the student may request a
review of the mark.
                                            12
Please read the University policy on Review of Results for additional information:
https://my.unsw.edu.au/student/academiclife/assessment/ReviewofResults.pdf

16. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY


UNSW has an Occupational Health and Safety Policy (2010) that staff and students are
expected to comply with. Please refer for details to:
http://www.gs.unsw.edu.au/policy/documents/ohspolicy.pdf

17. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES

The Learning Centre is available for individual consultation and workshops on academic
skills. Find out more at

http://www.lc.unsw.edu.au/

Student equity and diversity and disabilities issues are addressed and supported via the
Student Equity and Disabilities Unit. Find out more at www.studentequity.unsw.edu.au/

                           **** END OF COURSE OUTLINE ****




            CRIM1011 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINAL JUSTICE SEMESTER 2 2011

				
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