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					Students who
complete this
program of
studies will be                                                                                   UA/
able to:          (fill in Program SLOs below):                 PC   I/TL ML   SI       EC   CC   H

                  Apply the scientific method. (MAPPING: SI2)                       2

                  Demonstrate spatial literacy. (MAPPING: PC) X
                  Analyze spatial information and patterns.
                  (MAPPING: SI)                                                X

                  Evaluate relationships between humans and
                  the environment. (MAPPING: SI; CC)                           X             X

                  Employ geoscience technology for spatial
                  data management. (MAPPING: IT)                     X




                                                                                                        AH1
AH2



AH3



AH4

Code


IT1




IT2



IT3




Code
CC1



CC2



CC3




CC4
Code

EC1




EC2




EC3




EC4

EC5
Code

ML1
ML2




ML3
Code
SI1




SI2




SI3




SI4



SI5
       Scroll down for codes




Code   Productive Citizenry
PC1    Identify and analyze
       ethical problems or
       dilemmas as well as
       identify and describe
       those involved.
PC2    Demonstrate academic
       integrity.
PC3    Comprehend and apply
       the rights,
       responsibilities, and
       privileges required of an
       informed citizen in a
       democratic society.
PC4    Demonstrate an
       understanding of civic,
       social, and
       environmental issues.
PC5    Analyze, apply, and
       practice healthy lifestyle
       choices.
PC6    Apply principles of
       personal financial
       planning and
       management.

Code   Understanding of the
       Arts and Humanities
AH1    Analyze and evaluate
       music as well as the
       visual and performing
       arts.
AH2    Demonstrate basic
       knowledge of the arts,
       literature, history, and
       philosophy.
AH3    Utilize knowledge of
       history and philosophy
       in decision-making.

AH4    Develop creative
       expression.
Code   Informational and
       Technological Literacy

IT1    Utilize basic computer
       applications effectively
       when performing tasks
       that necessitate
       computer use.

IT2    Conduct research,
       critically assess, utilize,
       and cite information.

IT3    Synthesize, integrate,
       and contextualize
       multiple outside sources
       with individual voice,
       analysis, or position.

Code   Cultural Competence
CC1    Demonstrate knowledge
       of one’s own culture as
       well as others.

CC2    Demonstrate the ability
       to interact effectively
       within and across
       cultures.
CC3    Analyze and describe
       the impact religion,
       mass media, politics,
       economics, technology,
       environment, and
       history has on society.


       Demonstrate the ability
       to communicate
       effectively in a language
       other than one’s own.


CC4
Code   Effective
       Communication
EC1    Apply oral
       communication skills in
       order to maintain
       relationships, articulate
       perspectives, and solve
       problems within
       interpersonal, small
       group, and public
       contexts.

       Apply listening skills in
       order to understand,
       analyze, and evaluate
       messages and to
       empathize with and
       support others.

EC2    Read critically and
       analytically, identifying
       central arguments and
       lines of reasoning in a
       number of different
       kinds of texts.

EC3    Demonstrate autonomy
       as writers by making
       effective rhetorical
       choices regarding point
       of view, tone, and voice
       in relation to audience
       and purpose.

       Use logical, ethical, and
       emotional appeals,
       avoiding logical
       fallacies in thought and
       language and utilizing a
       variety of rhetorical
       strategies.

EC4

EC5
Code   Mathematical Literacy

ML1    Apply mathematical
       principles to solve
       problems effectively in
       science, business, and
       everyday life.
ML2    Demonstrate a sense of
       number to make
       informed decisions,
       estimate orders of
       magnitude, read a chart
       or a graph, and follow
       an argument based on
       numerical evidence.

       Apply statistical
       numeracy by making
       sensible estimates, use a
       commonsense approach
       when using data to
       support an argument,
       and judiciously apply
       averages and
       percentages.

ML3
Code   Scientific Inquiry
SI1    Analyze and apply the
       principles of the social,
       behavioral, physical,
       and natural sciences.

SI2    Apply scientific
       methods of inquiry and
       analysis through critical
       reading, research, and
       experimentation.

SI3    Employ quantitative
       reasoning to solve
       problems and justify
       conclusions with
       reasoned and
       scientifically sound
       argument.
       Distinguish between
       unverifiable beliefs and
       the knowledge gained
       through the objectivity
       of science.
SI4    Correctly analyze and
       assess cause and effect
       relationships in natural
       phenomena.
SI5
COURSE # SLO

                 Design and implement a research project to effectively evaluate a problem
GEOG 104       1 using a geographic information system

               2 Develop ability to collect, manipulate, classify, and interpret spatial data

                 Demonstrate ability to apply appropriate application of GIS operations to
               3 analyze data and explain the various methods for effectively presenting results
                 Utilize global positioning systems in combination with GIS to collect, import,
               4 and display/store spatial information

                 Development of Spatial Literacy through the use of computers, mathematical
               5 algorithms, and spatial statistics to analyze geospatial problems



                 Within the context of world regions, students be able to describe and explain
                 current socio-economic, cultural, and political issues resulting from the
                 important yet interactive and opposing forces of homogenization and
                 diversification (e.g., market vs. socialist economic systems in China; the rise of
                 Islamic extremism; supranationalism and devolution in Europe; uneven
GEOG 106       1 economic development in Southeast Asia; etc.).



                 Students should be able to memorize, apply, and explain the rationale behind
                 classification systems developed for recognizing, explaining, and predicting
                 relationships, patterns, and trends in Earth Systems (e.g., classification of
                 rocks; classification of thermal vs. dynamic weather systems; forms of energy,
                 especially associated with the energy transformations produced by
                 atmospheric, hydrospheric, biospheric, and lithospheric processes;
                 classification of climates in terms of the availability of the inputs to
                 photosynthesis; classification of biomes; classification of erosional vs.
GEOG 120       1 depositional environments; etc. )

                 Students should be able to describe, apply, and explain the evidence behind
                 the foundational scientific models commonly used to explain and predict
                 relationships, patterns, and trends within Earth Systems (e.g., Copernican
                 Model describing Earth-Sun relationships; Kinetic Theory, such as applied to
                 systems powered by differential heating; Dynamics, such as applied to the
                 general circulation of the atmosphere; Thermodynamics, including the unique
                 role of water within the Earth’s Global Energy Budget, or the production of
                 equilibrium landforms by the agents of gradation; Wave Cyclone theory; Plate
               2 Tectonic theory; etc. ).
             Students should be able to explain the step-by-step causes and outcomes of
             thermal circulation within the Earth System, including across various spatial
             and temporal scales (e.g., Sea Breezes vs. Monsoonal Wind Systems vs. Hadley
           3 Cells; Plate Tectonics; etc. ).



             Students should be able to discuss the unique characteristics and importance
             of water within the Earth System (e.g., high capacity to store heat energy per
             change in temperature; high latent heat associated with phase changes;
             radiative properties relative to infrared radiation and greenhouse warming;
             energy source behind convective weather systems; systematic distribution of
             the mechanisms by which precipitation is produced; biome variation as an
             evolutionary response to the distribution of water resources; significance of
             evapotranspiration by plants to Earth’s energy budget; role of water as a flux
             in producing magmas at subduction zones; role of water in producing clays
             and free ions through chemical weathering; gradational work performed by
             streams, waves, and glaciers producing erosional vs. depositional landforms;
           4 etc. ).



             Develop observational skills related to “reading the landscape” (e.g., relating
             changes in solar declination to seasonal variation; relating changes in
             longitude to differences in time keeping; relating real-time weather
             observations to synoptic-scale weather maps; developing and using
             morphologic classification systems (e.g., mafic vs. felsic igneous rock
             classification; the biologic taxonomy; etc.); development of hypotheses
             derived from observation-based rationales; relating stream offsets, sagponds,
             and pressure ridges, as found on topographic maps, to lateral-fault location,
GEOG 121   1 and direction and rate of displacement; etc.).

             Develop the ability to recognize and name the individual components of the
             physical environment, and of interrelationships between and spatial patterns
             produced by these individual components (e.g., recognition of dominant plant
             species within Coastal Sage Scrub biome; recognition of species variation by
             habitat (e.g., north vs. south facing slopes) within a biome; recognition of
             typical San Diego weather features and patterns (e.g., inversions, sea-breezes,
             downslope adiabatics, synoptic-scale Highs vs. synoptic-scale Lows vs.
           2 mesoscale Lows); etc.).
             Develop technical skills and experience utilizing the tools of Physical
             Geography to collect data ( e.g., spherical grid systems; compasses and
             clinometers; GPS receivers; infrared guns; psychrometers and psychrometric
             tables; wading rods, pygmy meters, tag lines, shovels, and velocity-discharge
           3 ratings; etc.).
             Develop technical skills used to analyze and interpret the data of Physical
             Geography (e.g., usage of the analemma, topographic maps, synoptic-scale
             weather maps, seismographs, hydrographs, etc.; application of conversion
           4 factors, trig functions, graphing, isoline mapping, topographic profiling, etc.).

             To illustrate the scientific method (e.g., hypothesis testing using the age of
             Hawaiian Island basalts relative to their distribution to predict direction and
             rate of plate motion; hypothesis testing using the temperature response of
             sand vs. water relative to radiation inputs to explain continentality; hypothesis
             testing of the temperature response of dark vs. light colored material relative
             to radiation inputs to account for natural selection of leaf structures present
           5 on Encelia farinosa vs. E. californica; etc.).



             Students should be able to memorize, apply, and explain the rationale behind
             classification systems developed for recognizing, explaining, and predicting
             relationships, patterns, and trends in Cultural Systems (e.g., the demographic
             transition; classification of languages; classification of religious systems;
             human development index; genetic classification system of boundaries; state
GEOG 130   1 territorial morphology; etc.)


             Students should be able to memorize, apply, and explain the rationale behind
             classification systems developed for recognizing, explaining, and predicting
             relationships, patterns, and trends within the Atmospheric System (e.g.,
             classification of atmospheric layering; classification of thermal vs. dynamic weather
             systems; classification of stable vs. unstable vs. conditionally unstable tropospheric
             conditions; classification of cloud types as an indicator of tropospheric stability;
             classification of diabatic vs. adiabatic work processes; classification of mesoscale vs.
             synoptic scale vs. continental scale vs. global scale atmospheric motions; classification
GEOG 140   1 of zonal vs. meridional Jet Stream patterns; etc. ).


             Students should be able to describe, apply, and explain the evidence behind
             the foundational scientific models commonly used to explain and predict
             relationships, patterns, and trends within the Atmospheric System (e.g.,
             Synoptic scale weather maps, including the analyzed version of surface isobar maps
             and upper-level height-contour maps; Kinetic Theory including the Equation of State
             and the Hydrostatic Equation, such as applied to systems powered by differential
             heating; Thermodynamics, including the unique role of water-vapor within the
             atmospheric system especially in terms of the energy transformations associated with
             phase changes; Dynamics, such as applied to the general circulation of the
             atmosphere, and to meridional Jet Stream patterns that produce zones of upper-level
             divergence vs. convergence; Wave Cyclone Theory resulting from Jet Stream dynamics
             and producing the traveling Cold Core Lows and associated frontal dynamics so
           2 common to winter across the United States (i.e., Midlatitude Cyclogenesis); etc. ).
             Students should be able to explain the step-by-step causes and outcomes of
             thermal circulation within the Atmospheric System, including across various
             spatial and temporal scales (e.g., Sea Breezes vs. Monsoonal Wind Systems vs.
             Hadley Cells; production of Warm Core Lows such as stationary Desert Thermal Lows
           3 vs. traveling Tropical Cyclones (e.g., Hurricanes); etc. ).

             Students should be able to discuss the unique characteristics and importance
             of water especially in the vapor phase within the Atmospheric System (e.g.,
             high capacity to store heat energy per change in temperature; high latent heat
             associated with phase changes; radiative properties relative to infrared radiation and
             greenhouse warming; energy source behind convective weather systems; basic
             measures of humidity (e.g., specific humidity vs. saturation specific humidity vs.
             relative humidity); systematic distribution of the mechanisms by which precipitation is
           4 produced; effect on atmospheric instability; etc. ).



GEOG 150   1 **CROSS-LISTED: SEE GEOL 150****

             Students should be able to describe and explain California’s location relative
             to the tectonic system, and thus why it’s a) so seismically active and b)
GEOG 170   1 topographically diverse.
             Students should be able to describe and explain California’s location relative
             to the general circulation of the atmosphere, summer vs. winter, and all that
           2 implies
             Students should be able to describe the evolutionary response to climatic
             variation within the state, in association with its topography, resulting in its
           3 spectacular diversity of ecosystems

             Students should be able to describe the natural distribution of water
             resources in the state relative to human development and demographic
             trends, and thus be able to explain the logistical, political, and ecological
           4 implications that result. Likewise, the situation for the entire arid West
             Students should be able to name California’s major sub-regions, and describe
           5 and explain the site, situation, and economic base of each
             Students should be able to describe the unique demographic diversity of
             California, both in terms of the innovative strength it brings and challenges it
           6 presents

             Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
GEOG 172   1 components within the designated field area

             Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
GEOG 173   1 components within the designated field area

             Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
GEOG 174   1 components within the designated field area
            Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
GEOG 175   1 components within the designated field area.

            Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
GEOG 176   1 components within the designated field area

            Students will be able to identify, examine, and assess geographic
GEOG 199   1 component(s) in a study of individualized content



             A: Students will be able to define and analyze geographic components of the
GEOG 299   1 discipline within a specialized topic in geography.
             B: Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
           2 components within a specialized topic in geography.
                                                                                                      Research        Portfol
COURSE #   SLO                                                                                        Proj     Exam   io



                 Design and implement a research project to effectively evaluate a problem
GEOG 104 1       using a geographic information system                                                x

           2     Develop ability to collect, manipulate, classify, and interpret spatial data         x
                 Demonstrate ability to apply appropriate application of GIS operations to
                 analyze data and explain the various methods for effectively presenting
           3     results                                                                              x
                 Utilize global positioning systems in combination with GIS to collect, import,
           4     and display/store spatial information                                                x

                 Development of Spatial Literacy through the use of computers, mathematical
           5     algorithms, and spatial statistics to analyze geospatial problems          x


                 Within the context of world regions, students be able to describe and explain
                 current socio-economic, cultural, and political issues resulting from the
                 important yet interactive and opposing forces of homogenization and
                 diversification (e.g., market vs. socialist economic systems in China; the rise of
                 Islamic extremism; supranationalism and devolution in Europe; uneven
GEOG 106 1       economic development in Southeast Asia; etc.).


                 Students should be able to memorize, apply, and explain the rationale behind
                 classification systems developed for recognizing, explaining, and predicting
                 relationships, patterns, and trends in Earth Systems (e.g., classification of
                 rocks; classification of thermal vs. dynamic weather systems; forms of energy,
                 especially associated with the energy transformations produced by
                 atmospheric, hydrospheric, biospheric, and lithospheric processes;
                 classification of climates in terms of the availability of the inputs to
                 photosynthesis; classification of biomes; classification of erosional vs.
GEOG 120 1       depositional environments; etc. )                                                            x

                 Students should be able to describe, apply, and explain the evidence behind
                 the foundational scientific models commonly used to explain and predict
                 relationships, patterns, and trends within Earth Systems (e.g., Copernican
                 Model describing Earth-Sun relationships; Kinetic Theory, such as applied to
                 systems powered by differential heating; Dynamics, such as applied to the
                 general circulation of the atmosphere; Thermodynamics, including the unique
                 role of water within the Earth’s Global Energy Budget, or the production of
                 equilibrium landforms by the agents of gradation; Wave Cyclone theory;
           2     Plate Tectonic theory; etc. ).                                                               x
             Students should be able to explain the step-by-step causes and outcomes of
             thermal circulation within the Earth System, including across various spatial
             and temporal scales (e.g., Sea Breezes vs. Monsoonal Wind Systems vs.
         3   Hadley Cells; Plate Tectonics; etc. ).                                            x


             Students should be able to discuss the unique characteristics and importance
             of water within the Earth System (e.g., high capacity to store heat energy per
             change in temperature; high latent heat associated with phase changes;
             radiative properties relative to infrared radiation and greenhouse warming;
             energy source behind convective weather systems; systematic distribution of
             the mechanisms by which precipitation is produced; biome variation as an
             evolutionary response to the distribution of water resources; significance of
             evapotranspiration by plants to Earth’s energy budget; role of water as a flux
             in producing magmas at subduction zones; role of water in producing clays
             and free ions through chemical weathering; gradational work performed by
             streams, waves, and glaciers producing erosional vs. depositional landforms;
         4   etc. ).                                                                           x


             Develop observational skills related to “reading the landscape” (e.g., relating
             changes in solar declination to seasonal variation; relating changes in
             longitude to differences in time keeping; relating real-time weather
             observations to synoptic-scale weather maps; developing and using
             morphologic classification systems (e.g., mafic vs. felsic igneous rock
             classification; the biologic taxonomy; etc.); development of hypotheses
             derived from observation-based rationales; relating stream offsets, sagponds,
             and pressure ridges, as found on topographic maps, to lateral-fault location,
GEOG 121 1   and direction and rate of displacement; etc.).                                    x

             Develop the ability to recognize and name the individual components of the
             physical environment, and of interrelationships between and spatial patterns
             produced by these individual components (e.g., recognition of dominant plant
             species within Coastal Sage Scrub biome; recognition of species variation by
             habitat (e.g., north vs. south facing slopes) within a biome; recognition of
             typical San Diego weather features and patterns (e.g., inversions, sea-breezes,
             downslope adiabatics, synoptic-scale Highs vs. synoptic-scale Lows vs.
         2   mesoscale Lows); etc.).                                                           x
             Develop technical skills and experience utilizing the tools of Physical
             Geography to collect data ( e.g., spherical grid systems; compasses and
             clinometers; GPS receivers; infrared guns; psychrometers and psychrometric
             tables; wading rods, pygmy meters, tag lines, shovels, and velocity-discharge
         3   ratings; etc.).                                                                   x
             Develop technical skills used to analyze and interpret the data of Physical
             Geography (e.g., usage of the analemma, topographic maps, synoptic-scale
             weather maps, seismographs, hydrographs, etc.; application of conversion
         4   factors, trig functions, graphing, isoline mapping, topographic profiling, etc.).           x

             To illustrate the scientific method (e.g., hypothesis testing using the age of
             Hawaiian Island basalts relative to their distribution to predict direction and
             rate of plate motion; hypothesis testing using the temperature response of
             sand vs. water relative to radiation inputs to explain continentality;
             hypothesis testing of the temperature response of dark vs. light colored
             material relative to radiation inputs to account for natural selection of leaf
         5   structures present on Encelia farinosa vs. E. californica; etc.).                           x


             Students should be able to memorize, apply, and explain the rationale behind
             classification systems developed for recognizing, explaining, and predicting
             relationships, patterns, and trends in Cultural Systems (e.g., the demographic
             transition; classification of languages; classification of religious systems;
             human development index; genetic classification system of boundaries; state
GEOG 130 1   territorial morphology; etc.)


             Students should be able to memorize, apply, and explain the rationale behind
             classification systems developed for recognizing, explaining, and predicting
             relationships, patterns, and trends within the Atmospheric System (e.g.,
             classification of atmospheric layering; classification of thermal vs. dynamic weather
             systems; classification of stable vs. unstable vs. conditionally unstable tropospheric
             conditions; classification of cloud types as an indicator of tropospheric stability;
             classification of diabatic vs. adiabatic work processes; classification of mesoscale vs.
             synoptic scale vs. continental scale vs. global scale atmospheric motions; classification
GEOG 140 1   of zonal vs. meridional Jet Stream patterns; etc. ).                                        x


             Students should be able to describe, apply, and explain the evidence behind
             the foundational scientific models commonly used to explain and predict
             relationships, patterns, and trends within the Atmospheric System (e.g.,
             Synoptic scale weather maps, including the analyzed version of surface isobar maps
             and upper-level height-contour maps; Kinetic Theory including the Equation of State
             and the Hydrostatic Equation, such as applied to systems powered by differential
             heating; Thermodynamics, including the unique role of water-vapor within the
             atmospheric system especially in terms of the energy transformations associated with
             phase changes; Dynamics, such as applied to the general circulation of the
             atmosphere, and to meridional Jet Stream patterns that produce zones of upper-level
             divergence vs. convergence; Wave Cyclone Theory resulting from Jet Stream dynamics
             and producing the traveling Cold Core Lows and associated frontal dynamics so
         2   common to winter across the United States (i.e., Midlatitude Cyclogenesis); etc. ).         x
             Students should be able to explain the step-by-step causes and outcomes of
             thermal circulation within the Atmospheric System, including across various
             spatial and temporal scales (e.g., Sea Breezes vs. Monsoonal Wind Systems vs.
             Hadley Cells; production of Warm Core Lows such as stationary Desert Thermal Lows
         3   vs. traveling Tropical Cyclones (e.g., Hurricanes); etc. ).                                   x

             Students should be able to discuss the unique characteristics and importance
             of water especially in the vapor phase within the Atmospheric System (e.g.,
             high capacity to store heat energy per change in temperature; high latent heat
             associated with phase changes; radiative properties relative to infrared radiation and
             greenhouse warming; energy source behind convective weather systems; basic
             measures of humidity (e.g., specific humidity vs. saturation specific humidity vs.
             relative humidity); systematic distribution of the mechanisms by which precipitation is
         4   produced; effect on atmospheric instability; etc. ).                                          x


GEOG 150 1   **CROSS-LISTED: SEE GEOL 150****

             Students should be able to describe and explain California’s location relative
             to the tectonic system, and thus why it’s a) so seismically active and b)
GEOG 170 1   topographically diverse.
             Students should be able to describe and explain California’s location relative
             to the general circulation of the atmosphere, summer vs. winter, and all that
         2   implies
             Students should be able to describe the evolutionary response to climatic
             variation within the state, in association with its topography, resulting in its
         3   spectacular diversity of ecosystems

             Students should be able to describe the natural distribution of water
             resources in the state relative to human development and demographic
             trends, and thus be able to explain the logistical, political, and ecological
         4   implications that result. Likewise, the situation for the entire arid West
             Students should be able to name California’s major sub-regions, and describe
         5   and explain the site, situation, and economic base of each
             Students should be able to describe the unique demographic diversity of
             California, both in terms of the innovative strength it brings and challenges it
         6   presents

             Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
GEOG 172 1   components within the designated field area                                               x   x   x

             Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
GEOG 173 1   components within the designated field area                                               x   x   x

             Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
GEOG 174 1   components within the designated field area                                               x   x   x
             Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
GEOG 175 1   components within the designated field area.                                  x   x   x

             Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
GEOG 176 1   components within the designated field area                                   x   x   x

             Students will be able to identify, examine, and assess geographic
GEOG 199 1   component(s) in a study of individualized content                             x   x   x


             A: Students will be able to define and analyze geographic components of the
GEOG 299 1   discipline within a specialized topic in geography.                           x   x   x
             B: Students will be able to define, analyze, and synthesize geographic
         2   components within a specialized topic in geography.                           x   x   x
       Lab
       Questi
Quiz   ons    Essays




x
x




x




x
    x




    x




x
x


x


x




x

x


x


    x


    x


    x
x


x


x




x

x
                                                                           Spring   Fall   Spring   Fall   Spring   Fall   Spring   Fall   Spring
COURSE #   SLO                                                             2009     2009   2010     2010   2011     2011   2012     2012   2013



               Design and implement a research project to
GEOG           effectively evaluate a problem using a geographic
104          1 information system                                                                          x
               Develop ability to collect, manipulate, classify, and
             2 interpret spatial data                                                                      x

               Demonstrate ability to apply appropriate application
               of GIS operations to analyze data and explain the
             3 various methods for effectively presenting results                                          x
               Utilize global positioning systems in combination with
               GIS to collect, import, and display/store spatial
             4 information                                                                                 x

               Development of Spatial Literacy through the use of
               computers, mathematical algorithms, and spatial
             5 statistics to analyze geospatial problems                                                   x


               Within the context of world regions, students be able
               to describe and explain current socio-economic,
               cultural, and political issues resulting from the
               important yet interactive and opposing forces of
               homogenization and diversification (e.g., market vs.
               socialist economic systems in China; the rise of Islamic
               extremism; supranationalism and devolution in
GEOG           Europe; uneven economic development in Southeast
106          1 Asia; etc.).                                                                         x




               Students should be able to memorize, apply, and
               explain the rationale behind classification systems
               developed for recognizing, explaining, and predicting
               relationships, patterns, and trends in Earth Systems
               (e.g., classification of rocks; classification of thermal
               vs. dynamic weather systems; forms of energy,
               especially associated with the energy transformations
               produced by atmospheric, hydrospheric, biospheric,
               and lithospheric processes; classification of climates
               in terms of the availability of the inputs to
GEOG           photosynthesis; classification of biomes; classification
120          1 of erosional vs. depositional environments; etc. )                   ASP
  Students should be able to describe, apply, and
  explain the evidence behind the foundational
  scientific models commonly used to explain and
  predict relationships, patterns, and trends within
  Earth Systems (e.g., Copernican Model describing
  Earth-Sun relationships; Kinetic Theory, such as
  applied to systems powered by differential heating;
  Dynamics, such as applied to the general circulation
  of the atmosphere; Thermodynamics, including the
  unique role of water within the Earth’s Global Energy
  Budget, or the production of equilibrium landforms by
  the agents of gradation; Wave Cyclone theory; Plate
2 Tectonic theory; etc. ).                                  ASP

  Students should be able to explain the step-by-step
  causes and outcomes of thermal circulation within
  the Earth System, including across various spatial and
  temporal scales (e.g., Sea Breezes vs. Monsoonal
3 Wind Systems vs. Hadley Cells; Plate Tectonics; etc. ).   ASP


  Students should be able to discuss the unique
  characteristics and importance of water within the
  Earth System (e.g., high capacity to store heat energy
  per change in temperature; high latent heat
  associated with phase changes; radiative properties
  relative to infrared radiation and greenhouse
  warming; energy source behind convective weather
  systems; systematic distribution of the mechanisms
  by which precipitation is produced; biome variation as
  an evolutionary response to the distribution of water
  resources; significance of evapotranspiration by
  plants to Earth’s energy budget; role of water as a
  flux in producing magmas at subduction zones; role of
  water in producing clays and free ions through
  chemical weathering; gradational work performed by
  streams, waves, and glaciers producing erosional vs.
4 depositional landforms; etc. ).                           ASP
         Develop observational skills related to “reading the
         landscape” (e.g., relating changes in solar declination
         to seasonal variation; relating changes in longitude to
         differences in time keeping; relating real-time
         weather observations to synoptic-scale weather
         maps; developing and using morphologic classification
         systems (e.g., mafic vs. felsic igneous rock
         classification; the biologic taxonomy; etc.);
         development of hypotheses derived from observation-
         based rationales; relating stream offsets, sagponds,
         and pressure ridges, as found on topographic maps,
GEOG     to lateral-fault location, and direction and rate of
121    1 displacement; etc.).                                      x

         Develop the ability to recognize and name the
         individual components of the physical environment,
         and of interrelationships between and spatial
         patterns produced by these individual components
         (e.g., recognition of dominant plant species within
         Coastal Sage Scrub biome; recognition of species
         variation by habitat (e.g., north vs. south facing
         slopes) within a biome; recognition of typical San
         Diego weather features and patterns (e.g., inversions,
         sea-breezes, downslope adiabatics, synoptic-scale
         Highs vs. synoptic-scale Lows vs. mesoscale Lows);
       2 etc.).                                                    x


         Develop technical skills and experience utilizing the
         tools of Physical Geography to collect data ( e.g.,
         spherical grid systems; compasses and clinometers;
         GPS receivers; infrared guns; psychrometers and
         psychrometric tables; wading rods, pygmy meters, tag
       3 lines, shovels, and velocity-discharge ratings; etc.).    x

         Develop technical skills used to analyze and interpret
         the data of Physical Geography (e.g., usage of the
         analemma, topographic maps, synoptic-scale weather
         maps, seismographs, hydrographs, etc.; application of
         conversion factors, trig functions, graphing, isoline
       4 mapping, topographic profiling, etc.).                    x
         To illustrate the scientific method (e.g., hypothesis
         testing using the age of Hawaiian Island basalts
         relative to their distribution to predict direction and
         rate of plate motion; hypothesis testing using the
         temperature response of sand vs. water relative to
         radiation inputs to explain continentality; hypothesis
         testing of the temperature response of dark vs. light
         colored material relative to radiation inputs to
         account for natural selection of leaf structures
       5 present on Encelia farinosa vs. E. californica; etc.).          x




         Students should be able to memorize, apply, and
         explain the rationale behind classification systems
         developed for recognizing, explaining, and predicting
         relationships, patterns, and trends in Cultural Systems
         (e.g., the demographic transition; classification of
         languages; classification of religious systems; human
GEOG     development index; genetic classification system of
130    1 boundaries; state territorial morphology; etc.)                     x

         Students should be able to memorize, apply, and
         explain the rationale behind classification systems
         developed for recognizing, explaining, and predicting
         relationships, patterns, and trends within the
         Atmospheric System (e.g., classification of atmospheric
         layering; classification of thermal vs. dynamic weather
         systems; classification of stable vs. unstable vs.
         conditionally unstable tropospheric conditions;
         classification of cloud types as an indicator of tropospheric
         stability; classification of diabatic vs. adiabatic work
         processes; classification of mesoscale vs. synoptic scale vs.
         continental scale vs. global scale atmospheric motions;
GEOG     classification of zonal vs. meridional Jet Stream patterns;
140    1 etc. ).                                                                 x
         Students should be able to describe, apply, and
         explain the evidence behind the foundational
         scientific models commonly used to explain and
         predict relationships, patterns, and trends within the
         Atmospheric System (e.g., Synoptic scale weather maps,
         including the analyzed version of surface isobar maps and
         upper-level height-contour maps; Kinetic Theory including
         the Equation of State and the Hydrostatic Equation, such as
         applied to systems powered by differential heating;
         Thermodynamics, including the unique role of water-vapor
         within the atmospheric system especially in terms of the
         energy transformations associated with phase changes;
         Dynamics, such as applied to the general circulation of the
         atmosphere, and to meridional Jet Stream patterns that
         produce zones of upper-level divergence vs. convergence;
         Wave Cyclone Theory resulting from Jet Stream dynamics
         and producing the traveling Cold Core Lows and associated
         frontal dynamics so common to winter across the United
       2 States (i.e., Midlatitude Cyclogenesis); etc. ).               x

         Students should be able to explain the step-by-step
         causes and outcomes of thermal circulation within
         the Atmospheric System, including across various
         spatial and temporal scales (e.g., Sea Breezes vs.
         Monsoonal Wind Systems vs. Hadley Cells; production of
         Warm Core Lows such as stationary Desert Thermal Lows
       3 vs. traveling Tropical Cyclones (e.g., Hurricanes); etc. ).    x

         Students should be able to discuss the unique
         characteristics and importance of water especially in
         the vapor phase within the Atmospheric System (e.g.,
         high capacity to store heat energy per change in
         temperature; high latent heat associated with phase
         changes; radiative properties relative to infrared radiation
         and greenhouse warming; energy source behind convective
         weather systems; basic measures of humidity (e.g., specific
         humidity vs. saturation specific humidity vs. relative
         humidity); systematic distribution of the mechanisms by
         which precipitation is produced; effect on atmospheric
       4 instability; etc. ).                                           x

GEOG
150    1 **CROSS-LISTED: SEE GEOL 150****



         Students should be able to describe and explain
         California’s location relative to the tectonic system,
GEOG     and thus why it’s a) so seismically active and b)
170    1 topographically diverse.                                           x
         Students should be able to describe and explain
         California’s location relative to the general circulation
         of the atmosphere, summer vs. winter, and all that
       2 implies                                                     x

         Students should be able to describe the evolutionary
         response to climatic variation within the state, in
         association with its topography, resulting in its
       3 spectacular diversity of ecosystems                         x

         Students should be able to describe the natural
         distribution of water resources in the state relative to
         human development and demographic trends, and
         thus be able to explain the logistical, political, and
         ecological implications that result. Likewise, the
       4 situation for the entire arid West                          x
         Students should be able to name California’s major
         sub-regions, and describe and explain the site,
       5 situation, and economic base of each                        x
         Students should be able to describe the unique
         demographic diversity of California, both in terms of
         the innovative strength it brings and challenges it
       6 presents                                                    x

         Students will be able to define, analyze, and
GEOG     synthesize geographic components within the
172    1 designated field area

         Students will be able to define, analyze, and
GEOG     synthesize geographic components within the
173    1 designated field area

         Students will be able to define, analyze, and
GEOG     synthesize geographic components within the
174    1 designated field area

         Students will be able to define, analyze, and
GEOG     synthesize geographic components within the
175    1 designated field area.

         Students will be able to define, analyze, and
GEOG     synthesize geographic components within the
176    1 designated field area

         Students will be able to identify, examine, and assess
GEOG     geographic component(s) in a study of individualized
199    1 content
         A: Students will be able to define and analyze
GEOG     geographic components of the discipline within a
299    1 specialized topic in geography.
         B: Students will be able to define, analyze, and
         synthesize geographic components within a
       2 specialized topic in geography.
Fall   Spring   Fall   Spring   Fall   Spring
2013   2014     2014   2015     2015   2016




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posted:10/15/2011
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