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ST. JOHN’S COLLEGE OF
LIBERAL ARTS AND SCIENCES


SCHOOL OF EDUCATION


THE PETER J. TOBIN
COLLEGE OF BUSINESS


COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND
ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS


COLLEGE OF
PROFESSIONAL STUDIES


QUEENS                        OAKDALE
8000 UTOPIA PARKWAY           500 MONTAUK HIGHWAY
JAMAICA, NY 11439             OAKDALE, NY 11769
(718) 990-6161                (516) 589-0090

STATEN ISLAND                 ROME
GRYMES HILL                   GRADUATE CENTER
300 HOWARD AVENUE             PONTIFICIO ORATORIO DI
STATEN ISLAND, NY 10301       SAN PIETRO
(718) 390-4545                VIA SANTA MARIA
                              MEDIATRICE, 24
MANHATTAN                     00165 ROMA, ITALIA
101 MURRAY STREET             FOR INFORMATION
NEW YORK, NY 10007            (718) 990-6114
(212) 815-9232

                 WWW.STJOHNS.EDU
                                                       1
     COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS

                                                                                                                                      Robert A. Mangione
                                                                                                                    Dean and Clinical Professor of Pharmacy

QUEENS CAMPUS                                            students appreciation of the ever-changing charac-      Specific Entrance
                                                         ter of the health professions, to provide an oppor-
                                                         tunity for broad general education and to inspire       Requirements
Robert A. Mangione, B.S. Phm., M.S., P.D., Ed.D.,        students to pursue graduate study in specialized
Dean                                                     fields of interest.                                     16 High School Units or appropriate score on GED
Joseph M. Brocavich, B.S. Phm., Pharm.D.,                    The College of Pharmacy and Allied Health           English                4
Associate Dean                                           Professions has adopted the following Vision
                                                         Statement: The College of Pharmacy and Allied           History                1
Sr. Laura M. Arvin, O.P., B.A., M.A.,
Assistant Dean                                           Health Professions will be a nationally recognized      Science                1*
                                                         model of distinctiveness for the preparation of
Joseph V. Etzel, B.S. Phm., Pharm. D.,                                                                           Foreign Language       2
                                                         exemplary health care providers dedicated to meet-
Assistant Dean                                           ing the needs of all patients particularly the med-     Mathematics              3
John-Emery Konecsni, B.S., M.A., Ph.D.,                  ically underserved in urban areas, distinguished        Electives                5
Assistant Dean                                           scholars and leading researchers in the pharmaceu-      At least three electives must be from the academic
Janet E. Carl, B.A., M.S., P.D.,                         tical and biomedical sciences.                          grouping
Assistant to the Dean
                                                         The following objectives are emphasized in our vari-        *While the above are the basic admission
Veronica M. Novy, B.S., M.S.,                            ous programs:                                           requirements, it is suggested that
Assistant to the Dean                                                                                            students who intend to matriculate for the
                                                         Pharmacy Program:
Camille C. Pacia, B.A., M.S.,                                                                                    Pharm.D. degree include chemistry, biology and
                                                         Fundamental scientific principles as they apply to
Assistant to the Dean                                                                                            physics in their high school programs.
                                                         therapeutic agents to help students to better
                                                                                                                     Applicants holding a GED are generally not
                                                         understand and predict the nature and biological
                                                                                                                 eligible for admission to the Pharm.D. Program.
                                                         activity of drugs;
Mission Statement                                        Familiarization with the business principles and
                                                         legal requirements of pharmacy                          Admission Requirements
The College of Pharmacy and Allied Health                Opportunity for clinical instruction and experience
Professions commits to academic excellence, schol-       recommending and assessing of rational drug             Candidates for admission to the pharmacy program
arship and service to humanity through the discov-       therapy                                                 must be at least 16 years of age and must be grad-
ery and application of biomedical knowledge.                                                                     uates of a four year secondary school accredited by
    We facilitate and advance scholarship by offer-      Provision of knowledge to meet professional
                                                                                                                 the New York State Education Department. A high
ing innovative programs of study utilizing active        demands for participation of the pharmacist as a
                                                                                                                 school average of 85 and an SAT score of 1100
learning approaches that are student-centered,           vital member of the health care team
                                                                                                                 (minimum 550 math, and 450 verbal) is desired for
outcomes-oriented and that inspire life-long learn-      Medical Technology Program:                             entrance into the Pharm.D. program. No student
ing.                                                                                                             who, because of academic or disciplinary reasons,
    As compassionate health care professionals and       Education of students in clinical laboratory
                                                         sciences                                                has been dismissed from or has been placed on
scientists, we serve humanity through our dedica-                                                                probation in another school is eligible for admis-
tion to excellence in health care and biomedical         Provision of a strong foundation in basic sciences      sion to the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health
research. Building on a commitment to cultural           and practical experience in clinical laboratories       Professions. Completion of the non-professional
diversity and benefiting from our metropolitan                                                                   requirements at any other accredited college or
                                                         Participation in national, state and local
location and strategic alliances with the leading                                                                university does not automatically permit entry to
                                                         professional and health oriented organizations
health care institutions, we strive to serve as effec-                                                           the professional program. Due to the available
tive leaders, good citizens and moral and ethical        Toxicology Program:                                     facilities and faculty, enrollment is limited. Allied
individuals.                                                                                                     health admissions standards are those of the
    We commit ourselves to the discovery, commu-         Provision of fundamental training in toxicology
                                                                                                                 University.
nication and application of biomedical knowledge         Provision of a practical opportunity for entering
as a critical component for the development of           this field
health care professionals and scientists. Through
                                                         Providing prospective employers in the pharmaceu-       Admission to Advanced
innovative basic, social and clinical research initia-
tives, we contribute to scientific knowledge,
                                                         tical, chemical, environmental and health care          Standing
                                                         industries with a pool of trained, knowledgeable
address contemporary health care issues and seek
                                                         personnel                                               A student transferring from another college or uni-
solutions to health care problems.
    Our mission embodies the principles of the                                                                   versity must present the following:
                                                         Pathologist Assistant Program:
University’s mission statement: to provide a quality                                                             1. A statement of honorable withdrawal.
education in an environment that is Catholic, met-       Preparation of professionals to assist in the work of   2. An official transcript of high school and college
ropolitan and Vincentian.                                anatomic pathology                                         records.
                                                         Promotion of professional training, recognition and     3. A marked copy of the catalog of the college or
                                                         competence                                                 university attending showing courses for which
Objectives                                               Provision of an available pool of trained, knowl-          credits are sought.
                                                         edgeable health professionals for a wide variety of        All students must have a minimum overall grade
The College of Pharmacy and Allied Health                research and clinical careers                              point average of 3.0 to be considered for admis-
Professions seeks to prepare students to meet the                                                                   sion.
present and future demands for pharmacists,              Physician Assistant Program:
physician assistants, medical technologists, toxi-                                                               Transfer students must meet University require-
                                                         Preparation with qualified academic and clinical        ments in the areas of Philosophy and Theology.
cologists, cytotechnologists and pathologist assis-      training
tants, to qualify them for their responsibility in                                                                   Candidates for the Medical Technology
matters of public health, to make them conscious         Provision of primary health care services               Program, the Physician Assistant Program, the
of the opportunity to serve their fellow man, to         Provision of trained personnel to practice in a         Toxicology Program, the Cytotechnology Program
emphasize the highly specialized professional serv-      physician’s office, hospital or other medical setting   and the Pathologist Assistant Program must meet
ice rendered to and for members of the other pro-                                                                the University requirements for Admission to
fessions as well as to the public, to instill in the                                                             Advanced Standing. Credit for comparable courses

92
in the pre-professional sequence will be granted.      student should visit with each hospital program         Special Programs
No credit is allowed for professional courses taken    during the first semester at the University and
in other than an affiliated institution.               should become informed about particular require-
    Transfer students into the Physician Assistant     ments.                                                  OPTIONAL PROGRAM
Program are accepted on a space available basis,
                                                                                                               The College cooperates with the Office of Special
by vote of the admissions committee and only after     MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM                              University Programs in offering the Self-Pace
completion of a personal interview.                    The four year program leading to the Bachelor of        Program which allows a student in some majors to
                                                       Science in Medical Technology degree consists of        participate in a program of study offering addi-
                                                       three years of pre-professional and professional        tional academic support that is mutually agreed
Programs of Study                                      study at the University and one calendar year of        upon after testing and counseling. This may
                                                       study at either campus of the St. Vincent Catholic      involve utilizing the summer sessions immediately
The pre-professional years in the following pro-       Medical Centers (Queens or Manhattan) or New            following graduation from high school and subse-
grams are coordinated with those of other depart-      York Methodist Hospital.                                quent summer sessions following completion of
ments of the University. This arrangement gives            A student’s completion of the entire program        the regular academic year. Students must apply for
the student the valuable advantages of a broaden-      leading to the B.S. in Medical Technology depends       admission to the professional programs after com-
ing influence resulting from close contact with stu-   upon the completion of the clinical year at the         pleting the Self-Pace Program.
dents and faculty of several schools in the            hospital. Promotion to the hospital is influenced
University.                                            strongly by the student’s academic performance          CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL
                                                       and admission is competitive. Students should
                                                       consult with the Dean’s office each semester            EDUCATION
Degrees and Majors                                     before entering the junior year.                        The Office of Continuing Professional Education’s
Available                                                                                                      core activities are directed toward providing phar-
                                                       PATHOLOGIST ASSISTANT PROGRAM                           macists and allied health professionals with the
                                                       The four year program leading to a Bachelor of          opportunities to increase their knowledge and
DOCTOR OF PHARMACY PROGRAM                             Science degree with a major in Pathologist              skills with value based programs that contribute to
                                                       Assistant consists of three academic years of colle-    their professional achievement. Seminars cover a
The entry-level Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.)                                                                  wide variety of topics including therapeutics, man-
degree is designed to develop students into com-       giate instruction at the University, followed by one
                                                       calendar year of study at either campus of the St.      aged care, administration and industrial develop-
petent pharmacists who possess the knowledge                                                                   ment, and address topical concerns of the practic-
and skills needed to provide the highest quality of    Vincent Catholic Medical Centers (Queens Region).
                                                                                                               ing pharmacist. Where appropriate, these pro-




                                                                                                                                                                      COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
pharmaceutical care. This curriculum provides stu-         Students are evaluated on their performance in
                                                       the academic program and eligibility for promotion      grams are submitted for approval to the various
dents with a strong foundation in the liberal arts                                                             states requiring continuing education credits for
and sciences that is consistent with a strong aca-     to the clinical portion of the program. Admission
                                                       to the hospital is competitive and is based on          relicensure. A yearly highlight is the Dr. Andrew J.
demic program of study. The program is configured                                                              Bartilucci Pharmacy Congress, which attracts over
as a six-year course of study that admits students     grade point average and successful completion of
                                                       the hospital admission process.                         300 practitioners from all areas of pharmacy prac-
directly into the major without requiring the com-                                                             tice. For more information regarding programs, the
pletion of a pre-pharmacy curriculum. Professional                                                             office may be reached by phone at (718) 990-5796
pharmacy coursework is introduced early in the         TOXICOLOGY PROGRAM
                                                                                                               or e-mail at pharmacyce@stjohns.edu
program to increase the students’ awareness of         Toxicologists work to protect human health and
their chosen profession. The final four years con-     the environment from the adverse effects of chem-
centrate on integrating basic and applied pharma-      icals. Toxicology students take courses in chem-
                                                                                                               Accreditation
ceutical and clinical sciences in both the classroom   istry, biology, physiology, and pharmacology in
                                                                                                               The Doctor of Pharmacy degree program is accred-
and practice settings. The curriculum employs an       addition to diverse courses in toxicology. Students
                                                                                                               ited by the American Council on Pharmaceutical
integrated approach to learning, and stresses the      can participate in on-campus activities such as
                                                                                                               Education. The College also holds membership in
application of knowledge that is patient specific      undergraduate research in a professor’s laboratory
                                                                                                               the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy
and focused.                                           or become involved in the Toxicology Club.
                                                                                                               and the American Society of Allied Health
    Graduates of this program are prepared to               The Toxicology Program is a four-year program
                                                                                                               Professions.
meet the challenges associated with becoming an        providing a minor in chemistry. This major provides
                                                                                                                   The Medical Technology Program is approved by
effective practicing pharmacist and serve as           all of the requirements for admission to medical
                                                                                                               the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical
experts on drug therapy to improve the use of          school. After graduation, students are qualified for
                                                                                                               Laboratory Sciences.
medication for diverse populations.                    jobs in biomedical or analytical laboratories as well
                                                                                                                   The Physician Assistant Professional Program
                                                       as admission to medical school and graduate
                                                                                                               at the affiliated hospitals are accredited by the
PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM                            school.
                                                                                                               Accreditation Review Commission on Education for
The four year program leading to a Bachelor of                                                                 the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA).
Science degree with a major in Physician Assistant     CYTOTECHNOLOGY PROGRAM
consists of two academic years of collegiate           This four-year program leading to the Bachelor of       Attendance
instruction at the University, followed by 24          Science degree with a major in Cytotechnology
months at the St. Vincent Catholic Medical Centers     consists of three academic years of collegiate          Regular and prompt attendance is expected in all
(Staten Island Region at the Bayley Seton Campus       instruction at the University, followed by a calen-     professional and non-professional courses, but is
or the St. Anthony Institute of Nursing and Health     dar year of instruction at the New York Medical         an individual responsibility. Students are responsi-
Professions) or Bronx Lebanon Hospital Physician       College School of Cytotechnology.                       ble for all announced tests and for submitting at
Assistant Program. These accredited programs               Students are evaluated on their performance in      the proper time all assignments given in class.
provide the Physician Assistant Professional           the academic program and eligibility for promotion           If a student in an experiential course has any
Credential concurrently with the conferral of the      to the clinical portion of the program. Admission       unexcused absence in any one module, a failure
B.S. degree from St. John’s University.                to the hospital is competitive and is based on          will result, and the module must be repeated.
    Students are reviewed annually for the purpose     grade point average and successful completion of             Faculty members have discretionary power to
of evaluating performance in the academic pro-         the hospital admission process.                         determine whether a student who missed an
gram and ascertaining eligibility for promotion                                                                announced test is to be given a make-up
into the clinical portion of the program. Promotion                                                            examination.
into the clinical portion requires a 3.0 GPA both                                                                   Final examination make-up examinations are
overall and in mathematics and science and suc-                                                                offered upon the approval of the Dean’s office.
cessfully completing the hospital admission                                                                         Science laboratories are not included under
process.                                                                                                       this general policy. Students are required to attend
    Because each of the affiliated hospitals has                                                               all laboratory sessions unless excused for suitable
slightly different requirements, every first year                                                              reasons.

                                                                                                                                                                93
English as a Second                                      Cytotechnology Program or the third and fourth            Pharmacy Intern Permit
                                                         years of the Physician Assistant Program unless
Language                                                 all prerequisite courses are satisfied and the            Students who progress to the fourth year and who
                                                         grade point average is 3.0 both overall and in            expect to qualify by examination for licensure in
(See ESL under Admissions.)                              math/science.                                             New York State are required to obtain a Pharmacy
                                                              Good academic standing for a student in the          Intern Permit, valid for a period of five years.
                                                         Entry Level Pharm.D. degree is a 2.3 cumulative           Completed applications that have been signed by a
Pass-Fail Option                                         grade point average by the end of the first year.         College administrator may be forwarded by the stu-
                                                              A pharmacy major will be required to success-        dent to the Board of Pharmacy after completion of
This option is open only to Allied Health                fully complete a competency examination no later          the third year of the program. The permit is also
Professions students who have completed the              than the end of the Fall semester of the 5th year of      required of students who participate in the
freshman year and who have a current quality point       the program.                                              advanced experiential rotations at New York State
index of at least 2.0. It is limited to one course per
                                                                                                                   sites.
semester for a four year degree program, the total       Regulations on Discipline
during the three years, including summer sessions,
may not exceed six. It may not be exercised in con-                                                                Admission to the
                                                         New York State law provides for suspension or revo-
nection with major requirements or with courses          cation of a license to practice the healing arts if,      Practice of Pharmacy
being applied to a minor. The quality point index        among other things, an individual is convicted of a
will not be affected, however, a “Pass” will be cred-    crime or is a habitual drinker or has been addicted       The Pharmacy program offered by the College of
ited toward the degree.                                  to, dependent on, or a habitual user of narcotics,        Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions meets the
    Application for the Pass-Fail Option must be         barbiturates, amphetamines, hallucinogens, or             educational requirements for admission to state
made in the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health        other drugs having similar effects. In light of this      licensing examinations. Each state requires, in
Professions Dean’s Office. A student may elect the       statute, any student who, after appropriate proce-        addition to academic work, a period of internship.
Pass-Fail Option at any time during the semester         dures, is found to have violated University regula-       When these and other requirements which have
up to and including the last date designated for         tions and policies relating to drugs may be subject       been established by the State have been met, the
withdrawal from class without academic penalty.          to dismissal from the College or be required to           applicant is admitted to the state licensing exami-
Pharm.D. students do not have the Pass-Fail option       undergo rehabilitation before continuing progress         nation. Successful candidates are granted a license
except in courses already designated as Pass-Fail.       toward a degree.                                          to practice.
                                                                                                                        New York State participates in registration of
                                                         The Dr.Andrew J. Bartilucci                               licenses by endorsement with all states which have
                                                                                                                   full memberships in the National Association of
General Scholastic Programs                              Health Education Resource                                 Boards of Pharmacy.
A student’s program may range from a minimum of          Center (HERC)                                                  For information concerning the admission to
                                                                                                                   the practice of pharmacy, write: 89 Washington
12 to a maximum of 18 hours (or credits) per
                                                         The Dr. Andrew J. Bartilucci Health Education             Avenue, 2nd Floor, Albany, NY 12234.
semester.
    A minimum quality point index of                     Resource Center (HERC) is open weekdays in St.
2.0 must be maintained in both the major field of        Augustine Hall B22. This instructional resource           Registry of Medical
concentration and all courses cumulatively.              center provides educational and technical services        Technologists
    For graduation, 2.0 minimum indices in the           to support the course objectives of the College of
major and in all courses cumulatively are required.      Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions. These             The graduate of the Medical Technology Program
    The entry-level Pharm.D. degree requires an          services include: general references, textbooks,          receives, in addition to a diploma from St. John’s
overall grade point average of 2.3 by the end of the     periodicals, faculty notes, computerized biblio-          University, a Professional Certificate from the hos-
first year which must be maintained throughout           graphic services, video cassettes, slide programs,        pital. The Registry of Medical Technologists of the
the remaining years of the program.                      closed circuit television, photography and comput-        American Society of Clinical Pathologists (ASCP)
    Refer to Promotion Section for Medical               erized slide production. The Center is available for      conducts examinations twice a year for properly
Technology and Physician Assistant Programs.             the use of students, faculty, alumni and practitioners.   qualified candidates. A candidate who successfully
                                                                                                                   passes the Registry examination is “registered”
Advanced Placement/CLEP                                  Special Requirements for                                  and entitled to use the initials “M.T. (ASCP)” after
                                                         Experiential Programs                                     his/her name.
Upperclass students who wish to take CLEP or other                                                                      For further information regarding the Registry,
credit-by-test exams must receive prior approval         Pharmacy students participating in experiential           write to: Registry of Medical Technologists,
from the Office of the Dean if such credit is to be      programs are required to have a medical examina-          American Society of Clinical Pathologists, 2100
applied to the St. John’s degree.                        tion, an immunization series, health insurance,           West Harrison Street, Chicago, IL 60612.
                                                         accident and sickness insurance. Additionally,                 The National Certifying Agency also conducts
Promotion                                                these students must purchase malpractice and/or           examinations twice a year for properly qualified
                                                         liability insurance through the University, and           candidates. A candidate who successfully passes
Recommendations for promotion, promotion on              must complete PHR 5000.                                   the Certifying Examination is “certified” as a clini-
probation, or dismissal for poor scholarship are             No elective or didactic course may be taken           cal laboratory scientist [CLS (NCA)].
made by the Committee on Academic Standing.              concurrently with the advanced experiential                    For further information contact: National
Attendance at a Study Skills Workshop may be a           courses.                                                  Certifying Agency, 2021 L. St. N.W., Suite 400,
condition of probation for freshmen on probation.            In the Medical Technology, Physician Assistant,       Washington, D.C. 20036.
Written appeal for reconsideration must be               Cytotechnology and Pathologist Assistant
addressed to the Committee on Academic Standing.         Programs, students entering the hospitals for the
In addition, a student on probation may be asked         professional years are required by the hospital to        Certification of Physician
to repeat all professional courses with a grade          have a medical examination and to carry adequate          Assistant
below “C” before the student is permitted into the       accident and health insurance for the duration of
next year.                                               their professional studies.                               Successful completion of the professional compo-
    A student may not advance into the senior year           Pharmacy, Medical Technology, Physician               nent of Physician Assistant Education as provided
of the Medical Technology Program below a 2.5            Assistant, Cytotechnology and Pathologist                 above, makes the graduate eligible for admission
cumulative grade point average, Toxicology               Assistant program students must register at the           to the Physician Assistant National Certifying
Program below a 2.0 cumulative grade point aver-         University for each semester that they are at the         Examination as administered by the National
age, and Pathologist Assistant program below a           hospital and pay full tuition. No partial credit is       Commission on Certification of Physician
2.75 cumulative grade point average. Students may        given to anyone not completing off campus experi-         Assistants.
not progress into the fourth year of the                 ences in the allied health programs.
94
Affiliate Clinical Pharmacy                CVS (GREENWICH)                         FRANWIN PHARMACY
                                           Ms. Tina Lum, R.Ph.                     Mr. Joel Sheriff, R.Ph.
Preceptors                                 Ms. Annette Iannucci, R.Ph.             Ms. Janet Borukhov, R.Ph.
                                           CVS/PEOPLE’S DRUG # 1952 (MINEOLA)      Mr. Joseph Gregson, R.Ph.
ANNADALE FAMILY PHARMACY
                                           Ms. Zina Khoudaker, R.Ph.               GENOVESE PHARMACY (MELVILLE)
Ms. Jeneane Chirico, R.Ph
                                           Mr. Frank Nania, R.Ph.                  Mr. Nick Aloi, R.Ph.
Ms. Stefanie Vitale, R.Ph.
                                           CVS/PEOPLE’S DRUGS (NY)                 GENOVESE DRUG STORE (WEST HEMPSTEAD)
AVANTI HEALTH CARE
                                           Mr. Ira Hecht, R.Ph.                    Ms. Chandine Persaid, R.Ph.
Mr. Pietro Piacquadio, R.Ph
                                           CVS (STATEN ISLAND & NJ)                Ms. Mariealena Colucci, R.Ph.
Mr. Richard Tinger, R.Ph.
Mr. Joseph Stanilewicz, RPh.               Mr. Syed Hussain, R.Ph.                 GOOD SMARITAN HOSPITAL
B & E PHARMACY                             DALE DRUGS                              Dr. Amanda Hastings, R.Ph.
Mr. Bruce Snipas, R.Ph.                    Ms. Maria Longo-DeVivo, R.Ph.           GREAT NECK CHEMISTS
BARKER’S PHARMACY & COMPOUNDING            Mr. Bobby DeVivo, R.Ph.                 Mr. Joseph Wing, R.Ph.
                                           DEFRANCO PHARMACY                       Mr. Mark Kassman, R.Ph.
Mr. Ray Gurriere, Jr., R.Ph.
                                                                                   Mr. Frank Longo, R.Ph.
BELLE HARBOR CHEMISTS                      Mr. Anthony DeFranco, R.Ph.
                                           Ms. Kathleen Carroll, R.Ph.             GREATER NEW YORK HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION
Ms. Deana Ferranti, R.Ph.
                                           Mr. James DeFranco, R.Ph.               Dr. Cindy Fong, R.Ph.
Mr. Richard Longo, R.Ph.
                                           DRUGS PLUS                              Mr. Joseph Mislowack, R.Ph.
BETH ISRAEL MEDICAL CENTER-PETRIE CAMPUS                                           Dr. Elizabeth Shlom, R.Ph.
                                           Ms. Carlene Lucarrelli, R.Ph.
Dr. Sharon See, R.Ph.                                                              GREENWICH HOSPITAL
                                           Ms. Maria Commisso, R.Ph.
Dr. Tina Kanmaz, R.Ph.
                                           DUANE READE ELMONT                      Mr. Robert Rosum, R.Ph.
Mr. Anthony D’Alessandro, R.Ph.
Mr. Michael Inzerillo, R.Ph.               Ms. Parastou Nouri, R.Ph.               GUARDIAN CONSULTING SERVICES, INC.
Dr. Deborah Wible, R.Ph.                   Ms. Maria Aparicio, R.Ph.               Dr. Maria Toscano, R. Ph.
BETH ISRAEL MEDICAL CENTER-KINGS HIGHWAY   DUANE READE # 451 (FRANKLIN SQUARE)     Ms. Athanasia Kournpouros -Tsiantsouris, R.Ph.
DIVISION                                                                           Ms. Evridiki (Vicki) Goulimis-Poulos, R.Ph.
                                           Ms. Noelle Ryan-Bloom, R.Ph.
                                                                                   Ms. Kelly Sanfilippo, R.Ph.




                                                                                                                                         COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
Mr. George Ziterell, R.Ph.                 DYKER HEIGHTS PHARMAY                   Ms. Miriam Ellison, R.Ph.
Ms. Janemarie Viscardi, R.Ph.
                                           Mr. John Cordi, R.Ph.                   Mr. William Hallett, R.Ph.
Mrs. Georgia LaFauci, R.Ph.
                                           Mr. Gregg Hinderstein, R.Ph.            Ms. Lisa Peerman-Brandl, R.Ph.
BETH ISRAEL MEDICAL CENTER-NORTH
                                           ECHO DRUGS/SURGICAL SUPPLIES            HACKENSACK UNVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
Ms. Sylvia Thomas, R.Ph.
                                           Mr. Boris Mantell, R.Ph.                Dr. Arpi Kuyumjian, R.Ph.
Mr. Thomas Meere, R.Ph.
                                           Mr. Michael Gleit, R.Ph.                Dr. Keri Bicking, R.Ph.
Ms. Maureen Sullivan, R.Ph.
                                           Mr. Larry Michaels, R.Ph.               Dr. Jennifer Bui, R.Ph.
Ms. Yvonne Laureano, R.Ph.
                                           JACK D. WEILER HOSPITAL OF THE ALBERT   Mr. Nilesh Desai, R.Ph.
Mr. John Sang, R.Ph.
                                           ELINSTEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE           HARRISON CHEMISTS
BONUS DRUGS & SURGICALS
                                           Mr. Royston Browne, R.Ph.               Mr. Larry Consentino, R.Ph.
Mr. Nicholas Simone, R.Ph.
                                           Dr. Angela Cheng, R.Ph.                 HEALTHCARE RESOURCES
BROOKHAVEN MEMORIAL HOSPITAL               Dr. Yvonne Gayle, R.Ph.
                                                                                   Ms. Rita Amigdalos, R.Ph.
Mr. Peter Cerone, R.Ph.                    Mr. James McCarthy, R.Ph.
Dr. Ken Cohen, R.Ph.                       Dr. Frank Aroh, R.Ph.                   HEALTH SMART PHARMACY
THE BURKE REHABILITATION HOSPITAL          ELMHURST HOSPITAL CENTER                Mr. Tullio Bruno, R.Ph.
                                                                                   Mr. Frank Riccardi, R.Ph.
Dr. Thomas Grandville, R.Ph.               Ms. Jia Lau, R.Ph.
                                                                                   Ms. Nancy Bell, R.Ph.
Mr. Anthony Maddalena, R.Ph.               Ms. Chuhyun Myong, R.Ph.
                                                                                   Dr. Michael O’Dowd, R.Ph.
CABRINI MEDICAL CENTER                     Ms. Mirlen Arteaga, R.Ph.
                                           Mr. Mohammad Ghauri, R.Ph.              HILL PHARMACY (65 PLACE)
Dr. Peter Barber, R.Ph.
                                           Ms. Mena Stamatarou, R.Ph.              Mr. Mark Fotakis, R.Ph.
Mr. Anthony Totillo, R.Ph.
                                           Ms. Suk Wong, R.Ph.                     HOLBROOK PHARMACY AND SURGICAL
Mr. David Jow, R.Ph.
                                           Ms. Hee Cho, R.Ph.
CALVARY HOSPITAL                           Mr. Tony Diep, R.Ph.                    Mr. John Zaoutis, R.Ph.
                                           Mr. Naeem Quershi, R.Ph.                Mr. Anthony Catanese, R.ph.
Ms. Debra Laboy, R.Ph.
                                           Mr. Jeh-Hong Lin, R.Ph.                 HOSPITAL FOR SPECIAL SURGERY
CARROLL COURT PHARMACY
                                           Mr. Manish Kaneria, R.Ph.               Mr. Mark Arrington, R.Ph.
Mr. Gerard Chirico, R.Ph.                  Ms. Gaeta Kumar, R.Ph.                  Ms. Tina Yip, R.Ph.
THE CHARLES PHARMACY                       Mr. Henry Lau, R.Ph.                    Mr. Tony Siu, R.Ph.
Mr. Roy Eisner, R.Ph.                      Ms. Kalliopi Toumazou, R.Ph.            Ms. Vanessa Jeffrey, R.Ph.
Ms. Dava Eisner, R.Ph.                     Ms. Faina Iskhakova, R.Ph.
                                                                                   HUNTINGTON HOSPITAL
                                           Ms. Angela Wong, R.Ph.
CLINTON APOTHECARY                                                                 Dr. Anna Dushenkov, R.Ph.
                                           Ms. Josephine Troncoso, R.Ph.
Mr. Nick Niceforo, R.Ph.                                                           Ms. Sheri Bedell, R.Ph.
                                           ELMHURST PHARMACY, INC.                 Mr. Bill Hendricks, R.Ph.
CONEY ISLAND HOSPITAL
                                           Mr. Mohammad Uddin, R.Ph.               Ms. Kristine LaMonica, R.Ph.
Mr. Thomas Scuto, R.Ph.                                                            Ms. Mary Cronin, R.Ph.
Ms. Holly Koffler-Wooley, R.Ph.            FINCH PHARMACY
                                           Mr. Salvatore Scalisi, R.Ph.            Ms. Catherine Kim, R.Ph.
Dr. Michael Thomas, R.Ph.                                                          Mr. Kevin Mahoney, R.Ph.
CVS (BAYSIDE)                              FRANKLI N SQUARE PHARMACY               Mr. Jack Mateyunas, R.Ph.
Ms. Carmen Parraga, R.Ph.                  Mr. Joseph LiPera, R.Ph.                HYLAN MEDICINE CABINET
                                           Mr. Thomas D’Angelo, R.Ph.
CVS PHARMACY (EAST HILLS)                                                          Mr. John Candela, R.Ph.
                                           Mr. Frank Fata, R.Ph.
Mr. Marc Rabbani, R.Ph.                    Mr. Alfred Corrado, R.Ph.               Mr. Lou Magnoti, R.Ph.
Mr. John Pace, R.Ph.
                                                                                                                                    95
JACOBI MEDICAL CENTER                    LONG ISLAND JEWISH HOSPITAL                  NECESSITIES DRUG CENTER
Mr. Brian Dwarka, R.Ph.                  Mr. Billy Kim, R.Ph.                         Mr. Steve Gulotta, R.Ph.
Mr. Brain Connolly, R.Ph.                Mr. James Abberton, R.Ph.                    NEERGAARD"S PHARMACY
Ms. Maureen Zullo, R.Ph.                 Ms. Julieta Castro, R.Ph.
                                                                                      Mr. Robert Krauss, R.Ph.
Ms. Elaine Hassan, R.Ph.                 Mr. Joe Galgano, R.Ph.
                                                                                      Ms. Rosemarie Tomassetti, R.Ph.
Mr. Joseph Alongi, R.Ph.                 Dr. Nicole Maisch, R.Ph.
                                                                                      Mr. Thomas Sutherland, R.Ph.
Ms. Gloria Lee, R.Ph.                    Dr. Lisa Profetta Fernandez, R.Ph.
Mr. Hugh Boothe, R.Ph.                   Ms. Zelmira Beckova, R.Ph.                   NEW ISLAND HOSPITAL
JAMAICA HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER          Ms. Dana Rucco, R.Ph.                        Mr. Gary Canamare, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. Frederick Kohler, R.Ph.                  Dr. Ihab Ibrahim, R.Ph.
Mr. James McHugh, R.Ph.
                                         LONG ISLAND POISON AND DRUG INFORMATION      Ms. Dorothy Lee, R.Ph.
Mr. Wing Choi, R.Ph.
Mr. Philip Hui, R.Ph.                    CENTER                                       NEW LONDON PHARMACY
Ms. Marjorie Noel Alvarez, R.Ph.         Dr. Thomas Caraccio, R.Ph.                   Ms. Abby Mouzakitis, R.Ph.
Ms. Roxanna Loncke, R.Ph.                MALLINCKRODT INC.                            Ms. Madeline Manessis, R.Ph.
Mr. Louis Kaplan, R.Ph.                                                               Ms. Anna Capeleris, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. Vito Deliso, R.Ph.
Ms. Carolina Roca, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. David Blanchard, R.Ph.                   NEW VICTORY PHARMACY
Mr. Gary Gelfand, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. Nick Plumeri, R.Ph.                      Mr. Christos Panopoulos, R.Ph.
Ms. Hena Montalbo, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. Joseph Fery, R.Ph.
Mr. Billy Diep, R.Ph.                                                                 NEW YORK CITY POISON CONTROL CENTER
                                         Mr. John Keenan, R.Ph.
Mr. Nick Pantaleo, R.Ph.                                                              Ms. Mariah Ferullo, R.Ph.
Mr. Michael Derderian, R.Ph.             MANSON PHARMACY                              Mr. Charles Sheu, R.Ph.
Ms. Umezuruike Umenta, R.Ph.             Mr. Hossam Maksoud, R.Ph.                    Ms. Leighia Mandanas, R.Ph.
Mr. Herb Rosenblum, R.Ph.                Ms. Marie Martelly, R.Ph.                    Ms. Susanne Cannet, R.Ph.
Mr. Myth Robinson, R.Ph.                 Ms. Nancy Schaubeck, R.Ph.                   Ms. Dolfina DiMaria, R.Ph.
Mr. Byan Prechtl, R.Ph.                  Ms. Catherine D’Andrea, R.Ph.                Ms. Alma Alejo, R.Ph.
Ms. Eileen Halvatzis, R.Ph.                                                           Ms. Donna Vardakis, R.Ph.
                                         JOHN T. MATHER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL
Mr. Louis Cosenza, r.ph.                                                              Mr. Marc Cadet, R.Ph.
Mr. Frank Tang, R.Ph.                    Ms. Olga Larios, R.Ph.
                                                                                      Dr. MaryAnn Howland, R.Ph.
Mr. Kenneth Connelly,R.Ph.               MAXOR NATIONAL PHARMACY SERVICES CORP.       Mr. George DeAnnuntis, R.Ph.
Mr. Neil Arak, R.Ph.                     Ms. Rochelle Diamond Kuzma, R.Ph.            Mr. Raymond DiMartino, R.Ph.
Mr. Frank Tang, R.Ph.                    Ms. Maria Booker, R.Ph.                      Ms. Susan Fill, R.Ph.
Mr. Raymond Murphy, R.Ph.                Mr. Robert Deckner, R.Ph.                    Ms. Maria Mercurio-Zappala, RPh,MS.
Ms. Eileen Halvatzie, R.Ph.                                                           Ms. Gwen Powell, R.Ph.
                                         MEACHAM PHARMACY
JAYSON DRUGS                                                                          Ms. Donna Raysor, R.Ph.
                                         Ms. Laura Benicasa, R.Ph.
Mr. James Ehrlein ,R.Ph.                                                              Mr. Brad Robinson, R.Ph.
                                         MEDICAL INFORMATION SOURCE
THE JEWISH HOME AND HOSPITAL                                                          THE NEW YORK MEDICAL CENTER OF QUEENS
                                         Dr. Mabel Lam, R.Ph.
Ms. Rosina Stamati, R.Ph.                                                             Mr. Vincent Virone, R.Ph.
                                         Dr. Leora Mejicovsky-Rub, R.Ph.              Mr. Vito Cassata, R.Ph.
KING KULLEN PHARMACY #11                 Dr. Dana Spray, R.Ph.                        Ms. Regina Cregin, R.Ph.
Mr. Gary Corn, R.Ph.                     Dr. Devanshi Patel, R.Ph.                    Ms. Min Than, R.Ph.
Dr. Maria Sulli, R.Ph.                   MERCK-MEDCO                                  Mr. Wing Lun, R.Ph.
KINGS LONG BEACH, INC.                   Ms. Darlene Mednick, R.Ph.                   Ms. Deborah Figueroa, R.Ph.
                                                                                      Mr. Albert Volkl, R.Ph.
Mr. Jay Kirshner, R.Ph.                  MERCY MEDICAL CENTER
                                                                                      Ms. Regina Vayner, R.Ph.
KINGS PHARMACY (MANHATTAN)               Mr. Michael Delio, R.Ph.
                                         Ms. Rana Gabberty, R.Ph.                     NEW YORK METHODIST HOSPITAL
Mr. Jay Krishner, R.Ph.
                                         Ms. Rose Lee, R.Ph.                          Ms. Martha Scotto, R.Ph.
LENOX HILL HOSPITAL                      Ms. Barbara Buffamonte, R.Ph.                Mr. Jonathan Rapp, R.Ph.
Dr. Allan Krasnoff, R.Ph.                Mr. Michael Ficurilli, R.Ph.                 Mr. John Massala, R.Ph.
Ms. Janis Kucich, R.Ph.                  Ms. Marita Russell, R.Ph.                    Mr. Eric Balmir, R.Ph.
Ms. Sinsook Ye, R.Ph.                    Ms. Nancy Kang, R.Ph.                        Mr. Alexander Christianson, R.Ph.
Dr. Alan Caspi, R.Ph.                                                                 NEW YORK PRESBYTERIAN-THE HOSPITAL OF
                                         NASSAU UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER
LIBERTY DRUGS                            Prof. Michael Torre, R.Ph.                   CORNELL
Mr. Simon Lorberg, R.Ph.                 Mr. George Scouras, R.Ph.                    Dr. Caroly Bae, R.Ph.
LONG ISLAND COLLEGE HOSPITAL             Mr. Thomas Carratini, R.Ph.                  Dr. Maryam Behta, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. John Bruno, R.Ph.                        Dr. Enrico Ligniti, R.Ph.
Dr. Yuliya Gilshteyn, R.Ph.
                                         Ms. Diocelina Oliviero, R.Ph.                Dr. Christine Kubin, R.Ph.
Mr. Warren Lakeoff, R.Ph.
                                         Dr. Aju Alexander, R.Ph.                     Ms. Christine Lesch, R.Ph.
LONG ISLAND JEWISH HOSPITAL              Ms. Evon Khalil, R.Ph.                       Dr. Helen Kim, R.Ph.
Mr. George Nathan, R.Ph.                 Dr. Philip McAvoy, R.Ph.                     Dr. Amy-Lynn Dzierba, R.Ph.
Mr. Kenneth Sokol, R.Ph.                                                              Dr. Lauren Robataille, R.Ph.
                                         NATIONAL MEDICAL HEALTH CARD SYSTEMS, INC.
Mr. Greg Scott, R.Ph.                                                                 Dr. Olga Bessmertny, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. Monroe Halpern, R.Ph.                    Dr. Rudina Odeh-Ramadan, R.Ph.
Mr. Neil Scherder, R.Ph.
                                         Dr. Ujwala Shah, R.Ph.
Dr. Jean Pflomm, R.Ph.                                                                NEW YORK PRESBYTERIAN-THE NEW YORK
                                         Ms. Tery Baskin, R.Ph.
Dr. Laura Gianni Augusto, R.Ph.                                                       HOSPITAL OF CORNELL
                                         Ms. Shari Salzman, R.Ph.
Dr. Candace Smith, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. Christian Brickner, R.Ph.                Ms. Jane Chiu, R.Ph.
Ms. Zina Faynblat, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. John Ciufo, R.Ph.                        Ms. Eileen Hunt, R.Ph.
LONG ISLAND JEWISH HOSPITAL SCHNEIDERS   Ms. Roya Songhorian, R.Ph.                   Dr. Rick Fichtl, R.Ph.
CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL                      Ms. Diane Fahey, R.Ph.                       Dr. Elena Mendez-Rico, R.Ph.
Dr. Gladys El-Charr, R.Ph.                                                            Mr. Marc Roth, R.Ph.
                                         NATIONAL PRESCRIPTION ADMINISTRATORS, INC.
                                                                                      Dr. Dawn Stull, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. Ronald Smith, R.Ph.                      Ms. Karol Wollenburg, R.Ph.
                                         Mr. Joe Casey, R.Ph.                         Ms. Beverly Woytowich, R.Ph
96
Ms. Inessa Volonueva, R.Ph.          NYACK HOSPITAL                              RITE-AID EASTCHESTER ROAD
Ms. Milly Fernandez, R.Ph.           Ms. Chitra Gupte, R.Ph.                     Ms. Jennifer Alston-Evans, R.Ph.
Dr. Deborah Epps, R.Ph.              Ms. Corazon Almira, R.Ph.                   RITE-AID GRAND CONCOURSE
Dr. Robyn Rosen, R.Ph.               Mr. Alfred Abadir, R.Ph.
Dr. AnneMarie Greco, R.Ph.                                                       Ms. Kellyanne Eldermire, R.Ph.
                                     OUR LADY OF MERCY HEALTHCARE SYSTEM
Dr. Meredith Aull, R.Ph.                                                         ROCK RIDGE PHARMACY
                                     Mr. James Weiden, R.Ph.
NORTH POINT PHARMACY                 Mr. Sal Locasto, R.Ph.                      Mr. Mathew Kopacki, R.Ph.
Mr. David Shumsey, R.Ph.             Mr. Vincent Wadcum, R.Ph.                   Mr. David Stahlberger, R.Ph.
Mr. Gary Berkowitz, R.Ph.            Ms. Massod Mirza, R.Ph.                     Ms. Lisa Miraglia-Ranoff, R.Ph.
NORTHPORT VA MEDICAL CENTER          Ms. Laura Alfieri, R.Ph.                    ROCKVILLE CENTRE PHARMACY
Mr. Thomas Weiss, R.Ph.              PALISADES MEDICAL CENTER-NEW YORK           Ms. Joanne Czerwonka-Lisa, R.Ph.
Ms. Nancy Martino, R.Ph.             PRESBYTERIAN HEALTHCARE SYSTEM              Mr. Howard Jacobson, R.Ph.
Mr. Gerard Sparcino, R.Ph.           Ms. Anna Kalarynick, R.Ph.                  Mr. Stuart Glass, R.Ph.
Mr. Dennis Dolley, R.Ph.             Ms. Joan Mozeika, R.Ph.                     Mr. Po Chin, R.Ph.
Ms. Jenny Chin, R.Ph.                Mr. Reinaldo Cedeno, R.Ph.                  ROCKWELL PHYSICIAN SUPPLY
Mr. Salvatore Barcia, R.Ph.          Mr. Han Choo, R.Ph.                         Mr. Steven Consentino, R.Ph.
Dr. Robert Ruggiero, R.Ph.           Mr. Bart Solazzo, R.Ph.
Mr. Tazkira Ali, R.Ph.                                                           ROCKY HILL PHARMACY
                                     Mr. Daniel Gherardi, R.Ph.
                                     Mr. Daniel Guma, R.Ph.                      Mr. Michael Randazzo, R.Ph.
NORTH SHORE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL
Mr. Eugene Crimmins, R.Ph.           PARKER JEWISH INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH CARE &   S & M PHARMACY
Ms. Junmi Lee, R.Ph.                 REHABILITATION                              Mr. Pranito Maurizio, R.Ph.
Ms. Elizabeth Mathew, R.Ph.          Ms. Elaine Columbo, R.Ph                    Mr. Stuart Pomper, R.Ph.
Ms. Ellen Giordano, R.Ph.            Mr. Richard Wenzel, R.Ph.                   Mr. Steven Sirochinsky, R.Ph.
Mr. Jacob Eapen, R.Ph.               Ms. Kathy Park, R.Ph.                       SALZMAN CHEMISTS
Mr. Anthony Negri, R.Ph.             Ms. Maribeth Lavin, R.Ph.                   Ms. Gloria Fumo, R.Ph.
Mr. Mohanned Rouf, R.Ph.             Ms. Maria Saulle-Franco, R.Ph.              Mr. Dominick Amendolara, R.Ph.
Mr. Ernesto Avallone, R.Ph.          Dr. Judith Beizer, R.Ph.
Ms. Nadira Ramasre, R.Ph.            Ms. Miriam Ellison, R.Ph.                   SEAPORT CHEMISTS




                                                                                                                            COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
Mr. Leonard Langino, R.Ph.                                                       Ms. Helen Auricchio, R.Ph.
                                     PATHMARK PHARMACY #626 (OZONE PARK)
Mr. Kam Hur, R.Ph.                                                               Mr. Carmine Auricchio, R.Ph.
Ms. Kathleen Higgins, R.Ph.          Ms. Lisa Stanzione, R.Ph.
                                     Ms. Rose Porzio, R.Ph.                      SHORE DRUGS
Ms. Jean Arbouet, R.Ph.
                                                                                 Mr. Larry Leon, R.Ph.
Dr. Andrew Skirvin, R.Ph.            PATHMARK PHARMACY (YONKERS)
                                                                                 Mr. Sy Kirshenbum, R.Ph.
Ms. Lynn Kwok, R.Ph.                 Ms. Jill McArdle, R. Ph.
Ms. Avelina Monzon, R.Ph.                                                        SHORE PHARMACEUTICAL SERVICES, INC.
Ms. Indranie Ramlall, R.Ph.          PEDINOL PHARMACL INC.
                                                                                 Mr. William Pedraita, R.Ph.
Dr. Michelle LaRusso, R.Ph.          Mr. Anthony Buatti, R. Ph.                  Mr. Joseph Magliulo, R.Ph.
Ms. Michelle Lee, R.Ph.              Mr. Richard Strauss, R.Ph.                  Mr. Nicholas Monte, R.Ph.
Mr. James Karafa, R.Ph.              PHELPS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL                    Mr. Keith LaMagna, R.Ph.
Mr. Charlie Lercara, R.Ph.           Mr. John Ascatigno, R.Ph.                   Mr. Ivan Gordon, R.Ph.
Ms. Emily Kao, R.Ph.                 Mr. Fred Perino, R.Ph.                      Ms. Leslie Goldstein, R.Ph.
Ms. Guiselle Gutierrez, R.Ph.
                                     POMARICO’S PHARMACY                         SOUTH NASSAU COMMUNITIES HOPSITAL
Mr. Robert Gekle, R.Ph.
Mr. Kazi Hameed, R.Ph.               Mr. Teddy Pomarico, R.Ph.                   Mr. Theodore Vanikiotis, R.Ph.
Mr. Charles Hickson, R.Ph.           Mr. Brent Pomarico, R.Ph.                   Mr. Markoullis Markoulli, R.Ph.
Ms. Charlene Smalla, R.Ph.                                                       Mr. Edward DeLucie, R.Ph.
                                     QUEENS CHILDREN’S PSYCHIATRIC CENTER        Mr. Carl Zipperlen, R.Ph.
Mr. Jamil Irtaqua, R.Ph.
                                     Ms. Lisa Borbee, R.Ph.                      Ms. Aviva Pincus, R.Ph.
Ms. Joon Sung Rhee, R.Ph.
Mr. Louis Grasso, R.Ph.              QUEENS DISCOUNT                             SOUTH OAKS HOSPITAL/BROADLAWN MANOR
Mr. Henry Wong, R.Ph.                Mr. Chris Reiter, R.Ph.                     NURSING CARE CENTER
Mr. Shakeh Stepanian, R.Ph.          QUEENS HOSPITAL CENTER                      Ms. Magaly Chery, R.Ph.
Mr. Peter Rubertone, R.Ph.                                                       Ms. Christine Mulcair, R.Ph.
Mr. Richard Simone, R.Ph.            Dr. Ebrahim Balbisi, R.Ph.
                                     Ms. Nancy Nguyen, R.Ph.                     Mr. Warren Drezen, R.Ph.
Ms. Colleen Slattery, R.Ph.                                                      Ms. Donna Kesselman, R.Ph.
Mr. George Toscano, R.Ph.            Ms. Maria Szczupak, R.Ph.
                                     Mr. Charles Raulsome, R.Ph.                 Ms. Valerie Muccino, R.Ph.
Mr. Norberto Collado, R.Ph.                                                      Ms. Catherine Galvin, R.Ph.
Ms. Betty Saedi, R.Ph.               Ms. Vera Loewy, R.Ph.
                                     Mr. Richard Arena, R.Ph.                    Ms. Cindy Dubon, R.Ph.
Dr. Seema Syed, R.Ph.                                                            Mr. Eric Steinberg, R.Ph.
Mr. Paul Forgione, R.Ph.             Ms. Sue Wang, R.Ph.
                                                                                 SOUTHSIDE HOSITAL
Mr. Suhail Khan, R.Ph.               R & R PHARMACY
Mr. Albert Baron, R.Ph.              Mr. Ralph Fiandra, R.Ph.                    Mr. Charles Sabatino, R.Ph.
Mr. William Frank, R.Ph.                                                         Mr. Anthony DeMonte, R.Ph.
                                     RAINDEW PHARMACY                            Mr. Wan Lee, R.Ph.
Ms. Mila Lishka, R.Ph.
                                     Mr. George Vlahos, R.Ph.                    Mr. Sergio Martinolich, R.Ph.
NORTH SHORE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL AT
                                     REGION CARE                                 Mr. James Parrott, R.Ph.
GLEN COVE                                                                        Ms. Maria Gould, R.Ph.
Ms. Jeannene Strianse, R.Ph.         Ms. Mary Nogueria, R.Ph.
                                                                                 Ms. Julie Kim, R.Ph.
Mr. Joseph Simoneschi, R.Ph.         Mr. John Farrell, R.Ph.
                                                                                 Ms. Patricia Mungavin, R.Ph.
Mr. Gregory Mack, R.Ph.              Mr. Steve Kurtin, R.Ph.
                                                                                 Ms. Bette Maresco, R.Ph.
Mr. Melvin Kirschenbaum, R.Ph.       Mr. John Cline, R.Ph.
                                                                                 Mr. George Iovino, R.Ph.
Ms. Maria Carmichael, R.Ph.          Ms. Nazila Shenassa, R.Ph.
                                                                                 Mr. Moo Park, R.Ph.
                                     Mr. Dale Peterson, R.Ph.
NORTHVALE PHARMACY                                                               Ms. Rose Esemplare, R.Ph.
                                     Ms. Aniko Costanzo, R.Ph.
Mr. Anthony Bruno, R.Ph.
                                     RITE-AID 86TH STREET
                                     Mr. John Buscini, R.Ph.                                                           97
STATSCRIPT PHARMACY                         UNVERSITY HOSPITAL AT STONYBROOK    Affiliate Faculty at
Mr. Frank Calvo, R.Ph.                      STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK
Mr. Daniel Gannon, R.Ph.                    Mr. George DeCamp, R.Ph.
                                                                                Participating Schools of
STELLA’S PHARMACY                           Ms. Marie Varela, R.Ph.             Medical Technology
                                            Ms. Kaai Lam, R.Ph.
Mr. Michael Palmieri, R.Ph.                 Mr. John Zaoutis, R.Ph.             ST. VINCENT CATHOLIC MEDICAL CENTERS
Mr. Rocco Stella, R.Ph.                     Mr. Scott Weber, R.Ph.              (QUEENS)
ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL                        Mr. Edmund Hayes, R.Ph.             MARY IMMACULATE HOSPITAL
Dr. Carol Liotta-Bono, R.Ph.                Ms. Kathryn Ardizzone, R.Ph.
                                                                                Usha Ruder, M.D., Medical Director
Mr. Joseph D’Antonio, R.Ph.                 Ms. Donna Syms, R.Ph.
                                                                                Ann Paula Zero, B.S. in Med. Tech., M.S., M.T.,
Ms. Mirra Vaysman, R.Ph.                    Ms. Marianne Tan, R.Ph.
                                                                                (ASCP), CLS (NCA), Program Director.
Mr. Steven Cabble, R.Ph.                    VILLAGE PHARMACY
Mr. Martin Guma, R.Ph.                                                          NEW YORK METHODIST HOSPITAL
                                            Ms. Manisha Patel, R.Ph.
Mr. Todd Vahldiek, R.Ph.                                                        Rabia N. Mir, M.D., Chair, Department of Pathology
                                            WALDBAUM’S PHARMACY DOUGLASTON      Larry H. Bernstein, M.D., Clinical Director
ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL (NJ)
                                            Mr. Bruce Greenberg, R.Ph.          Adrienne Arso-Paez, M.S., M.T. (ASCP), Program
Dr. Sal Distefano, R.Ph.                                                        Director
                                            Ms. Jean DiBella, R.Ph.
ST JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL (NY)                   Ms. Susan Ciccolella, R.Ph.         ST. VINCENT CATHOLIC MEDICAL CENTERS
Mr. Emmanuel Bam, R.Ph.                     WALBAUM’S PHARMACY-MASSAPEQUA       (MANHATTAN)
ST. MARY’S HOSPITAL                         Mr. Paul Buonaguro, R.Ph.           John F. Gillooley, M.D., Director of Laboratories
Ms. Sylvia Sanchez, R.Ph.                   Ms. Cheryl Kanto, R.Ph.             Sister Catherine Sherry, M.S., M.T. (ASCP), Assoc.
Mr. Robin Garcia, R.Ph.                     WAYNES PHARMACY                     Director of Laboratories
Ms. Maria Almieda, R.Ph.                                                        Denise Panepinto, B.S.M.T., M.T. (ASCP),
                                            Mr. John Tarkas, R.Ph.              Educational Coordinator
Ms. Elizabeth Almieda, R.Ph.                Mr. Wayne Ulrich, R.Ph.
Mr. Pablo Paneque, R.Ph.
ST. MARY’S HOSPITAL FOR CHILDREN
                                            WESTCHESTER COUNTY MEDICAL CENTER   Affiliate Faculty for Physician
                                            Dr. Frank Palmeiri, R.Ph.           Assistant Program
Mr. Michael McDonough, R.Ph.
Ms. Sooky Cheng, R.Ph.                      WINTHROP UNVERSITY HOSPITAL
Ms. Jen Eng, R.Ph.                          Ms. Patricia Daniels, R.Ph.         ST. VINCENT CATHOLIC MEDICAL CENTERS STATEN
Ms. Hyo Chang, R.Ph.                        Mr. Gregory Morgano, R.Ph.          ISLAND REGION AT THE BAYLEY-SETON CAMPUS
SYNCOR INTERNATIONAL CORP.                  Dr. Damary Castanheira, R.Ph.       Diane Berasto Pane, P.A.-C., M.P.A.,
                                            Mr. Toi Lam, R.Ph.                      Program Director
Mr. Cleto Manoni, R.Ph.                     Ms. Susan Boglia, R.Ph.             Gail Tiburzzi, R.P.A.-C., M.P.A., Assistant Director
Mr. Ernest Runco, R.Ph.                     Mr. Steven Gerson, R.Ph.            Donna Costanzo, R.P.A.-C., Clinical Coordinator
Mr. Thomas Okunewitch, R.Ph.                Mr. Peter Donahue, R.Ph.            Barbara Lopez, R.P.A.-C., Clinical Coordinator
TARGET GREATLAND (FLUSHING/COLLEGE POINT)   Ms. Mein Surjaputra, R.Ph.
Mr. Andre Janiak, R.Ph.                     Dr. Jan Keltz, R.Ph.                BRONX LEBANON HOSPITAL
Mrs. Dorothea Paredes, R.Ph.                Mr. Brain Malone, R.Ph.             Gemina Gates, R.P.A.-C., Program Director
                                            WORLDS’S FAIR PHARMACY              Paul Foster, P.A.-C. Associate Director
THRIFT DRUGS
                                                                                Scridhar Chilimuri, M.D., Medical Director
Mr. Joseph Rubino, R.Ph.                    Mr. Gerald D’Avanzo, R.Ph.          David Lau, P.A.-C., Didactic Year Coordinator
                                            Mr. Charles Catalano, R.Ph.         Emilia Medina-Colon, P.A.-C., Clinical Year
TOWER PHARMACY
Mr. Charles Santamaria, R.Ph.               ZIVE PHARMACY & SURGICALS               Coordinator
Mr. Alan Rattiner, R.Ph.                    Mr. Joel Zive, R.Ph.                ST. VINCENT CATHOLIC MEDICAL CENTERS
                                            Mr. Gerald Zive, R.Ph.              (BROOKLYN-QUEENS REGION AT THE ST. ANTHONY
TOWER DRUGS INC.-NORTH SHORE
                                                                                INSTITUTE OF NURSING AND HEALTH
Mr. Andrew Wallitt, R.Ph.
                                                                                PROFESSIONS)
Ms. Maria Commisso, R.Ph.
Ms. Louisa Lazzinnaro, R.Ph.                                                    Vincent Politi, M.D., Medical Director
                                                                                Niels N. Schmidt, R.P.A., M.B.A., Program Director
TOWN DRUGS (EAST NORTHPORT)                                                     Clara LaBoy, R.P.A.-C., M.S., Academic Coordinator
Mr. Kevin McQuade, R.Ph.                                                        Melanie Ingram, R.P.A.-C., Clinical Coordinator
Mr. Robert Swahn, R.Ph.                                                         Richard Arias, R.P.A.-C., Instructor
TOWN DRUGS (MANHATTAN)                                                          Edward Rampersaud, M.D., Instructor
Mr. Richard Yusuff, R.Ph.                                                       Michael Greening, Ph.D., Instructor
Ms. Sally Landsberg, R.Ph.
TOWN TOTAL HEALTH
                                                                                Affiliate Faculty for
Ms. Nancy Roman, R.Ph.                                                          Pathologist Assistant
Mr. Hani Abouchaer, R.Ph.                                                       Program
Ms. Vanessa Smith, R.Ph.
Mr. Joseph Navarra, R.Ph.                                                       ST. VINCENT CATHOLIC MEDICAL CENTERS
UNITED HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER                                                  (BROOKLYN-QUEENS REGION AT THE ST. ANTHONY
Mr. Shashi Desai, R.Ph.                                                         INSTITUTE OF NURSING AND HEALTH
Mr. Anthony DeLucci, R.Ph.                                                      PROFESSIONS)
Mr. Jay Freidman, R.Ph.                                                         Usha Ruder, M.D., Program Director and Chair,
Ms. Nadia Drake, R.Ph.                                                              Pathology Department
Mr. Jerry Perlmutter, R.Ph.                                                     Corazon Guevarra, Pathologist Assistant




98
Awards and Honors                                     CVS Pharmacy Scholarship—Criteria for selection         Long Island Pharmacist Society, Inc. Award—This
                                                      includes a fourth year student who demonstrates         scholarship is awarded to a fifth year student in
Recipients of honors and awards are determined by     academic excellence and a strong commitment to          the undergraduate program. The candidate must
the faculty and Dean of the College of Pharmacy       community pharmacy practice. An interest in chain       be involved in socio-professional organizations,
and Allied Health Professions.                        pharmacy practice is preferable.                        national, state and local societies. The qualified
                                                                                                              candidate must be in good academic standing and
American Pharmaceutical Association Academy of        Ralph DePalma, Jr. Memorial Scholarship Award—          be member of LIPS. An essay outlining an interest
Students of Pharmacy (APhA-ASP) Mortar and            This award which is sponsored by The Royal              in community pharmacy is required.
Pestle Professionalism Award—This award is pre-       Counties of New York Society of Hospital
sented to a graduating pharmacy student who           Pharmacists was established in memory of Ralph          Long Island Society of Hospital Pharmacists
exhibits the ideals of professionalism and excel-     DePalma. The criteria for selection includes leader-    Award—This award is given to the student who has
lence in patient care, has demonstrated exception-    ship, dedication to all aspects of the practice of      made an outstanding contribution to an institu-
al service and commitment to the profession of        pharmacy, pharmacy organization involvement,            tional clinical pharmacy program. Basis of the
pharmacy and is in good academic standing.            communication skills and the ability to interact in     award is improvement of patient care through
                                                      a positive way with other health care professionals.    patient-oriented pharmacy services.
American Pharmaceutical Association Certificate       This award is given to a graduating senior.
of Recognition—This award is offered by the                                                                   Vincenzo J. Mantia Memorial Scholarship—This
American Pharmaceutical Association to the gradu-     Eli-Lilly Achievement Award—A gold medal is             Scholarship was established through the generosi-
ating Pharmacy student who has rendered out-          awarded by Eli-Lilly and Company to a pharmacy          ty of the Mantia family as a memorial in honor of
standing performance on behalf of the Student         graduate who has displayed superior scholastic          Vincenzo J. Mantia. Mr. Mantia was a graduate of
Chapter of the American Pharmaceutical                and professional achievement, desirable qualities       St. John’s University College of Pharmacy and
Association.                                          of professional leadership and ethical conduct.         Allied Health Professions (Class of 1941) who pro-
                                                                                                              vided outstanding care as a pharmacist to his com-
ASHP Student Leadership Award—The criteria            Facts and Comparisons—Award for Excellence in           munity. The recipient of this $1,000 scholarship
established by The American Society of Health         Clinical Communications—Recipient must be in top        must be a pharmacy major who has completed the
System Pharmacists for this award are: The student    25% of his or her class and have outstanding clini-     first professional year of the pharmacy program
will have demonstrated an interest in institutional   cal communication skills.                               and has demonstrated superior scholastic achieve-
pharmacy practice. Examples include enrollment in                                                             ment, provided outstanding community service
a clinical or hospital pharmacy course or work        Glaxo SmithKline, Patient Care Award (formerly
                                                      Smith Kline Beecham Award)—A plaque is awarded          and has financial need.
experience in an institutional setting. The student
should be involved in professional pharmacy           by Smith Kline Beecham Laboratories to a graduat-       Ralph Martorana Award—Established in memory of




                                                                                                                                                                     COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
organizations, either student groups, state soci-     ing senior for superior achievement in clincial         Ralph Martorana and awarded to the student who
eties, or national associations. The student should   pharmacy. The student must have demonstrated            demonstrates excellence in the Community
have leadership experience within these groups.       superior knowledge in drug use, skill in clinical       Pharmacy Laboratory.
The student shall be capable academically by rank-    techniques and must have contributed significant-
ing in the upper one-half of his or her class and     ly to improved patient care.                            Merck & Co., Inc.—Awards are made to members of
will be an undergraduate student enrolled in the                                                              the graduating class (number dependent upon
                                                      Health Professions Award—Given to the allied            number in class) for excellence in their studies and
College of Pharmacy. Special consideration should     health major who has, in the opinion of both the
be given to students in their next-to-last year of                                                            particular accomplishment in the area of pharma-
                                                      College and the hospital faculty, demonstrated          ceutics and pharmaceutical chemistry.
school.                                               academic excellence, service to college and com-
Auxiliary of the Pharmacists’ Society of the State    munity and future promise of professional leader-       Anthony J. Monte-Bovi Award—Established by the
of New York Scholarship—A fourth year pharmacy        ship.                                                   Alumni Association in memory of Anthony J.
student is selected to receive a monetary scholar-                                                            Monte-Bovi, Professor of Pharmaceutical
                                                      Indo-American Pharmaceutical Society Award—             Chemistry. Awarded to a member of the graduating
ship. The student must enroll in the PSSNY (the       Two monetary scholarships are awarded. The first
Pharmaceutical Society of the State of New York).                                                             class who attains the highest average in pharma-
                                                      award is given to a fourth year student of Indian       ceutical chemistry.
The candidate should have professional/campus         heritage with excellent grades. The second award
community activities. A letter of recommendation      is open to all fourth year students.                    Mylan Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Award—A framed cer-
from a faculty member and current employer must                                                               tificate and copy of the looseleaf edition of Drug
be submitted.                                         JM Long Foundation Scholarship Award—a mone-            Interactions Facts is given to a pharmacy senior
                                                      tary award is presented to a deserving fourth or        who demonstrates high professional motivation
Aventis Scholarship—This scholarship is awarded       fifth year student planning to practice in the retail
to a qualified student with high academic excel-                                                              and the intent to enter practice upon graduation
                                                      community setting.                                      or enter a post-entry level education and/or train-
lence. Evidence of community service and financial
need must be submitted.                               The Bruce Kay Memorial Award of Merit-Sponsored         ing program of an applied nature. The recipient
                                                      by Pfizer—this award is granted to a graduating         must be in the top 20% of the class. An additional
Andrew J. Bartilucci Medical Technology Award—        student from the College of Pharmacy and Allied         criterion may be superior proficiency in the provi-
This award was established in 1990 to honor the       Health Professions. The student will have demon-        sion of drug information services.
Dean of the College of Pharmacy and Allied Health     strated excellence in both didactic and clinical
Professions who founded the medical technology                                                                National Community Pharmacists Association
                                                      course work by maintaining a grade point average        (NCPA) Student Achievement Award (Sponsored by
program. It is given to a graduating medical tech-    of no less than 3.0. A written essay must be sub-
nologist on nomination of the clinical program                                                                Bristol Myers Squibb)—This award is given to a
                                                      mitted for consideration.                               fourth year student in recognition of dedication
directors to a student who demonstrates academic
excellence, college or community service and          The Herb and Patricia Kett Scholarship—Sponsored        and scholastic excellence in the area of community
future promise of professional leadership.            by the National Association of Chain Drug Stores,       pharmacy.
                                                      provides a $500 annual award to a fifth year phar-      New York City Society of Hospital Pharmacists
Andrew J. Bartilucci Scholarship Award—was            macy student. The award is based on scholastic
established by the Alumni Association of the                                                                  Award—A plaque is given to a pharmacy senior in
                                                      achievement and financial need (student must file       New York City whose outstanding activities in the
College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions     an FAF) and is for a student who plans to enter
to honor a great pharmacist, professor, dean,                                                                 area of hospital pharmacy have been demonstrated
                                                      community practice.                                     at a hospital teaching site.
University administrator, advisor and counselor.
The criteria for this award include strong academic   Korean American Pharmaceutical Association              Outstanding Research Performed by a Graduating
performance (the candidate must have a minimum        Award—The criteria for this award include high          Toxicology Major Award—Awarded to a senior toxi-
grade point average of 3.0) and be in the fourth      academic excellence. The student must be of             cology major for commitment to undergraduate
year of the program for consideration. Evidence of    Korean heritage.                                        research.
strong leadership, demonstrated commitment to
the profession of pharmacy, evidence of communi-
ty service and financial need.
                                                                                                                                                               99
Pfizer Physician’s Assistant Achievement Award—A        TEVA-Award—This pharmaceutical organization has        ENTRY LEVEL PHARM. D.
check for $100 is presented to the physician assis-     made available the Outstanding Student Award
tant graduate who has rendered outstanding serv-        Program. This is given to a graduating senior who      PROGRAM
ices to the college.                                    excels in pharmacy. A personalized plaque and          (minimum of 201 semester hours)
                                                        monetary award are provided.
Pfizer U.S. Pharmaceuticals Outstanding Leader                                                                 The faculty expressly reserves the right to make
Award—The qualified candidate should be ranked          Toxicologist Award—An award of $100 and a certifi-     alterations in the curriculum consistent with the
in the top 25% of the class and named on the            cate are presented to an undergraduate toxicology      needs of the profession.
dean’s list for two semesters. Good interpersonal       major for overall excellence in toxicology.
skills and a commitment to professional practice.                                                              FIRST YEAR
Demonstrated record of accomplishment as a stu-         Toxicology Leadership Award—Voted by the toxicol-
dent leader and active participation in professional    ogy faculty to the student who has demonstrated        FALL SEMESTER
organizations.                                          outstanding initiative, leadership and team-building
                                                                                                               ENG 1000C*                              3
                                                        skills while remaining in good academic standing.
                                                                                                               THE 1000C*                              3
Pharmaceutical Society of the State of New York
                                                        Christine Veal Award—This award, in memory of a        CHE 1110, 1111, 1112                    4
Award—The society offers a five-year membership
                                                        physician assistant graduate, is given to a junior,    MTH 1250                                3
to the pharmacy graduate who has demonstrated
                                                        physician assistant major in good academic stand-      DNY 1000C                               3
continued interest in organizational work during
                                                        ing who has an exceptional grade point average         CPP 1101                                1
his or her college years.
                                                        and makes formal application, including an essay,      TOTAL                                  17
Phi Delti Chi Award—In memory of Dr. John L.            to the Physician Assistant Alumni Committee.
Dandreau, founder and first Dean of the College of                                                             SPRING SEMESTER
Pharmacy, and brother Michael Iaropoli recogni-         Walgreen’s Award—Established to give a deserving
tion is given to a pharmacy student who exhibits        student a scholarship that demonstrates an inter-      ENG 1100C*                              3
originality and leadership in extracurricular activi-   est in community pharmacy practice. Criteria for       THE 2400*                               3
ties. A plaque is presented to the recipient.           this award include academic excellence, leadership     CHE 1120,1121,1122                      4
                                                        and good communication skills.                         MTH 1260                                3
Phi Lambda Sigma Leadership Award—This award                                                                   PHI 1000C                               3
is given in recognition of outstanding leadership to    Wallace Laboratories Physician Assistant Award—        PHR 1101                                1
a student member of the society.                        A plaque is presented to a physician assistant
                                                        major for excellence in academics.                     TOTAL                                  17
Physician Assistant Academic Excellence Award—
Highest grade point average in the pre-clinical sci-    Wal-Mart Scholarship Award—A monetary award is         SECOND YEAR
ence program.                                           given to a student who demonstrates academic
                                                        excellence and a strong commitment to community        FALL SEMESTER
Rho Chi Society Research Award—Beta Delta               pharmacy practice.                                     THE 3300*                               3
Chapter of Rho Chi Society offers an award to a                                                                PHI 2240*                               3
member of the graduating class who has demon-           Westchester Society of Health-System                   BIO 1210                                3
strated outstanding research ability in one of the      Pharmacists—A monetary award is given to a quali-      CHE 1130, 1131, 1132                    4
pharmaceutical sciences.                                fied candidate based on criteria established by the    SPE 1015*                               3
                                                        society. This award is open to all fourth and 5th      PAS 2301                                1
Rho Chi Society Scholarship Award—Beta Delta            year students.
Chapter of Rho Chi Society has inscribed on the                                                                TOTAL                                  17
Rho Chi Honor Roll the name of the graduate who
receives the highest average in the professional
                                                        Honor Society                                          SPRING SEMESTER
courses. A plaque is presented to the recipient.                                                               PHI 3000C                               3
                                                        The Beta Delta Chapter of the Rho Chi Society, the
                                                        national pharmaceutical honor society seeking the      PAS 2201                                3
Rite-Aid Award—a monetary award is provided to                                                                 BIO 1220                                3
three students who are currently employed with          advancement of the pharmaceutical sciences
                                                        through encouragement and recognition of high          PHS 2101                                3
this organization. As a pharmacy intern, the quali-                                                            PHS 2201                                4
fied candidates must demonstrate a desire to pur-       scholarship and research was established at St.
                                                        John’s University in 1954. Pharmacy students who       PHS 2301                                1
sue a career in retail/community pharmacy setting.
The candidates must also have excellent communi-        have achieved fourth and fifth year status, who        TOTAL                                  17
cation and leadership skills with a financial need.     have a cumulative quality point index of 3.5 or bet-
                                                        ter and are in the top 20% of the class are eligible   *These courses will be taught both semesters
Roche Pharmacy Communication Award—Awarded              for nomination to membership.
to the student demonstrating effective communi-                                                                THIRD YEAR
cation with prerequisite knowledge in a form which      Scholarships                                           FALL SEMESTER
can be received and used by the patient. In addi-
tion, the student should demonstrate a commit-          The Office of Financial Aid has information regard-    PAS 3101                                4
ment to the profession and an interest in patient       ing scholarships and loan programs.                    PHS 3504                                3
care, along with being congenial and compassion-                                                               [PHS 3505                              2]
ate toward the needs of the patient.                    Leadership Society                                     [PHS 3506                              2]
                                                                                                               PAS 3301                                3
Alfred and Michael Seul Memorial Student Life                                                                  Elective                                2
Award (formerly The Michael Seul Memorial               The Xi Chapter of Phi Lambda Sigma, a pharmacy
                                                        leadership society, seeks to promote the develop-      PAS 3102                                1
Student Life Award.)—This award was renamed in                                                                 PHS 3302                                1
2000 in honor of the father and son. The award is       ment of leadership qualities in pharmacy students.
given to a graduating senior who has been active in     With the fundamental assumption that leaders are       TOTAL                                  18
University or community service.                        made not born, the Society encourages participa-
                                                                                                               SPRING SEMESTER
                                                        tion in all pharmacy activities, provides opportuni-
St. Luke/St. Martin de Porres Award—A plaque is         ties for leadership development, and aids in select-   PAS 3103                                4
presented to a senior who best exemplifies the tra-     ing those who may wish to identify and demon-          PHS 3507                                3
dition of St. Luke and St. Martin in unselfish serv-    strate their leadership abilities. Pharmacy students   [PHS 3508                              2]
ice to those in need of health care service, over       who have achieved fourth or fifth year status, who     [PHS 3509                              2]
and above curriculum requirements.                      have a cumulative quality point index of 2.5 or bet-   PHS 3510                                3
                                                        ter and who have been nominated on the basis of        CPP 3201                                2
                                                        their demonstration of dedication, service and         PAS 3104                                1
                                                        leadership in the advancement of pharmacy are eli-     PHS 3303                                1
100                                                     gible for membership.                                  TOTAL                                  18
FOURTH YEAR                                              SPRING SEMESTER                       CREDITS         SPRING SEMESTER
                                                         CPP 6101                               3              Social Science Elective                3
FALL SEMESTER
                                                         CPP 6102                               3              PHS 3507                               3
[PHR 4105                               4]               CPP 6103                               3              PHS 3510                               3
[PHR 4106                               3]               PHR 6101                               2              PHS 2101                               3
[PHR 4107                               3]               Professional Elective                  3              MFL 1100C or ART 1100C                 3
PAS 4303                                 3               Professional Elective                  3              HIS 1000C                              3
CPP 4301                                 2
PHR 4201                                 1               TOTAL                                 17              TOTAL                                 18
PAS 4304                                 2
TOTAL                                   18                                                                     FOURTH YEAR
SPRING SEMESTER
                                                         MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY                                    FALL SEMESTER
[PHR 4101                               4]               PROGRAM                                               ALH 4141                               6
                                                                                                               ALH 4142                               2
[PHR 5109                               2]               (minimum of 133 semester hours)                       ALH 4143                               2
[PHR 4103                               2]
[PHR 4104                               2]                                                                     ALH 4144                               4
                                                         The medical technology program continues under-
PHR 4108                                 2               going revision. The faculty expressly reserves the    TOTAL                                 14
PAS 4305                                 2               right to make alterations in the curriculum consis-   SPRING SEMESTER
PHR 4202                                 1               tent with the needs of the profession.
CPP 4401                                 1                                                                     ALH 4145                               6
CPP 4402                                 2               FIRST YEAR                                            ALH 4146                               8
                                                                                                               ALH 4147                               2
TOTAL                                   18               FALL SEMESTER                     CREDITS             TOTAL                                 16
                                                         ENG 1000C                              3
FIFTH YEAR                                               MTH 1250                               3
FALL SEMESTER                                            CHE 1110, 1111, 1112                   4
[PHR 5108                                4]              BIO 1210,1211                          4              TOXICOLOGY PROGRAM
                                                         DNY 1000C                              3
[PHR 4102                                2]                                                                    (minimum of 135 semester hours)
[PHR 5110                                2]              TOTAL                                17




                                                                                                                                                                    COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
[PHR 5111                                2]                                                                    The toxicology program continues undergoing revi-
                                                         SPRING SEMESTER
PAS 5202                                  4                                                                    sion. The faculty expressly reserves the right to
PHR 5201                                  1              ENG 1100C                               3             make alterations in the curriculum consistent with
PHS 5301                                  2              MTH 1260                                3             the needs of the profession.
PHR 5000+                                 0              CHE 1220, 1221, 1222                    4
                                                         BIO 1220,1221                           4
TOTAL                                    17              PHI 1000C                               3             FIRST YEAR
[] The blocked courses will be taught sequentially.
                                                         TOTAL                                  17
+Course required for graduation.                                                                               FALL SEMESTER                    CREDITS
SPRING SEMESTER                                                                                                MTH 1220                              4
                                                         SECOND YEAR                                           CHE 1210, 1211, 1212                  5
Module Rotations                         12
                                                         FALL SEMESTER                                         BIO 1210                              3
SIXTH YEAR                                               CHE 1130, 1131, 1132                    4             BIO 1211                              1
                                                         PHY Elective                            3             DNY 1000C                             3
FALL SEMESTER                                            THE 1000C                               3             TOTAL                                16
Module Rotations                        15               PHI 2200/2240/1020                      3
                                                         BIO 2280, 2281                          4             SPRING SEMESTER
There are a total of nine rotations in the entry-level                                                         MTH 1210                               4
Doctor of Pharmacy program. The rotations are            TOTAL                                  17
                                                                                                               CHE 1220, 1221, 1222                   5
divided in four week blocks at three credits each. A     SPRING SEMESTER                                       BIO 1220                               3
total of four rotations are completed in the spring      BIO 3460,3461                           4             BIO 1221                               1
semester of the fifth academic year and five rota-       ALH 2101                                2             ENG 1000C                              3
tions will be completed in the fall semester of sixth    THE 2200-2600                           3             TOTAL                                 16
academic year. Of the nine rotations only the            PHS 2201                                4
externships are required in the 5th academic year.       PHS 2301                                1
The rotations are as follows:                                                                                  SECOND YEAR
                                                         PHI 3000C                               3
                                                                                                               FALL SEMESTER
                                                         TOTAL                                  17
REQUIRED ROTATIONS                                                                                             CHE 2230, 2231, 2232                   5
1. CPP 5401 Institutional Pharmacy Practice                                                                    PHY 1610, 1611, 1612                   4
   Externship
                                                         THIRD YEAR                                            PHS 3302                               1
2. CPP 5402 Ambulatory Pharmacy Practice                 FALL SEMESTER                                         PHS 3504                               3
   Externship                                            CHE 3250,3251                           4             PHI 1000C                              3
3. CPP 5403 Inpatient Clerkship I                        PHS 3504                                3             TOTAL                                 16
4. CPP 5407 Ambulatory Care Clerkship                    PHS 3302                                1
                                                         THE 3100-3600                           3             SPRING SEMESTER
5. CPP 5405 Inpatient Clerkship II                       SPE 1000C                               3             CHE 2240, 2241, 2242                   5
ELECTIVE ROTATIONS                                       MFL 1000C or ART 1000C                  3             PHY 1620, 1621, 1622                   4
                                                                                                               PHS 2403                               3
1. CPP 5404 Elective Clerkship I                         TOTAL                                  17
                                                                                                               PHS 3507                               3
2. CPP 5408 Elective Clerkship II                                                                              THE 1000C                              3
3. CPP 5409 Elective Clerkship III                                                                             TOTAL                                 18
4. CPP 5410 Elective Clerkship IV


                                                                                                                                                             101
THIRD YEAR                                          SECOND YEAR                                         SPRING SEMESTER                   CREDITS
                                                    FALL SEMESTER                       CREDITS         CHE 1120, 1121L, 1122R                 4
FALL SEMESTER
                                                                                                        BIO 1220                               3
CHE 3250, 3251                          4           CHE 1130, 1131, 1132                     4          BIO 1221                               1
PHS 3405                                4           BIO 2280                                 4          ENG 1100C                              3
PHI 2200/2240/1020                      3           PHS 3504                                 3          PHI 1000C                              3
ENG 1100C                               3           PHS 3302                                 1          MTH 1260                               3
HIS 1000C                               3           PHI 2200/2240/1020                       3
                                                    THE 2200-2600                            3          TOTAL                                 17
TOTAL                                  17
                                                    TOTAL                                   18
SPRING SEMESTER                                                                                         SECOND YEAR
PHS 2201                                4           SPRING SEMESTER
                                                                                                        FALL SEMESTER
PHS 2301                                1           PHS 2201                                 4
                                                    PHS 3509                                 2          BIO 2280, 2281                          4
PHS 3406                                4
                                                    PHS 3507                                 3          CHE 1130, 1131L, 1132R                  4
PHS 3509                                2
                                                    PHI 3000C                                3          MFL 1000C or ART 1000C                  3
PHS 3510                                3
                                                    THE 3100-2600                            3          General Electives                       3
THE 2200-2600                           3
                                                    PHS 3510                                 3          THE 1000C                               3
TOTAL                                  17
                                                    TOTAL                                   18          TOTAL                                  17
FOURTH YEAR                                                                                             SPRING SEMESTER
                                                    THIRD YEAR                                          PHS 2101                                3
FALL SEMESTER                                       (42 weeks of didactic education)                    PHS 2201                                4
PHS 4401                                4                                                               PHS 2301                                1
PHS 4404                                4           SUMMER
                                                                                                        MFL 1100C or ART 1100C                  3
Social Science Elective                 3           ALH 4240                                 3          THE 2200-2600                           3
PHS 4302                                1           TOTAL                                    3          PHI 2200/2240/1020                      3
MFL 1000C or ART 1000C                  3
THE 3100-3600                           3           FALL SEMESTER                                       TOTAL                                  17
TOTAL                                  18           ALH 4241                                12
                                                    TOTAL                                   12
                                                                                                        THIRD YEAR
SPRING SEMESTER
                                                                                                        FALL SEMESTER
PHS 4403                                4           SPRING SEMESTER
                                                                                                        PHS 3405                                4
MFL 1100C or ART 1100C                  3           ALH 4242                                15
                                                                                                        BIO 3260, 3261                          4
PHS 4402                                4           TOTAL                                   15          PHI 3000C                               3
PHI 3000C                               3
                                                                                                        SPE 1000C                               3
SPE 1000C                               3
                                                                                                        PHS 3405                                3
TOTAL                                  17           FOURTH YEAR                                         PHS 3302                                1
                                                    (52 weeks of clinical experience)                   TOTAL                                  18
                                                    SUMMER                                              SPRING SEMESTER
PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT                                 ALH 5240                                 6          PHS 3510                                3
PROGRAM                                             TOTAL                                    6          PHS 3507                                3
(minimum of 130 semester hours)                                                                         THE 3100-2600                           3
                                                    FALL SEMESTER                                       BIO 3270, 3271                          4
The faculty expressly reserves the right to make    ALH 5241                                12          HIS 1000C                               3
alterations in the curriculum consistent with the   TOTAL                                   12          TOTAL                                  16
needs of the profession.
                                                    SPRING SEMESTER
                                                                                                        FOURTH YEAR
FIRST YEAR                                          ALH 5242                                12
                                                    TOTAL                                   12          FALL SEMESTER
FALL SEMESTER                     CREDITS                                                               ALH 4341                               15
ENG 1000C                              3
                                                                                                        TOTAL                                  15
MTH 1250                               3
CHE 1110, 1111, 1112                   4            PATHOLOGIST                                         Spring Semester
BIO 1210                               3                                                                ALH 4341                               15
DNY 1000C                              3            ASSISTANT PROGRAM                                   TOTAL                                  15
TOTAL                                 16            (minimum of 132 semester hours)
SPRING SEMESTER                                     The faculty expressly reserves the right to make    CYTOTECHNOLOGY PRO-
ENG 1100C                               3           alterations in the curriculum consistent with the
ALH 1201                                2           needs of the profession.                            GRAM
CHE 1120, 1121, 1122                    4                                                               (minimum of 130 semester hours)
BIO 1220                                3
THE 1000C                               3           FIRST YEAR                                          The faculty expressly reserves the right to make
PHI 1000C                               3           FALL SEMESTER                       CREDITS         alterations in the curriculum consistent with the
TOTAL                                  18                                                               needs of the profession.
                                                    CHE 1110, 1111L, 1112R                   4
                                                    BIO 1210                                 3
                                                    BIO 1211                                 1
                                                                                                        FIRST YEAR
                                                    ENG 1000C                                3          FALL SEMESTER                     CREDITS
                                                    MTH 1250                                 3          ENG 1000C                              3
                                                    DNY 1000C                                3          MTH 1250                               3
                                                    TOTAL                                   17          CHE 1110, 1111, 1112                   4

102
BIO 1210, 1211                         4   Psychology                                             4145 CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY (MED. TECH.)
DNY 1000C                              3   Sociology                                              The theoretical and practical aspects of hematol-
TOTAL                                 17                                                          ogy, proceeding from a study of normal blood con-
                                           Theology                                               stituents and hematopoiesis to disorders of the
SPRING SEMESTER                 CREDITS                                                           blood and bone marrow. Lectures and laboratory.
                                           MINORS APPROVED FOR
ENG 1100C                            3     PHARMACY STUDENTS                                      Credit: 6 semester hours.
MTH 1260                             3                                                            4146 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (MED. TECH.)
CHE 1120, 1121, 1122                 4     Biology
                                                                                                  The chemical analysis of body fluids such as blood,
BIO 1220, 1221                       4     Business                                               urine, spinal fluid. Gas determinations and the
PHI 1000C                            3     Chemistry                                              more important toxicological tests are performed.
TOTAL                               17                                                            Manual methods, instrumentations and quality
                                           Philosophy
                                                                                                  control are included. Credits: 8 semester hours.
SECOND YEAR                                Psychology
                                                                                                  4147 URINALYSIS (MED. TECH.)
                                           Public Administration and Public Service               The methods of collecting, preserving and analyz-
FALL SEMESTER
                                           Sociology                                              ing urine. Includes examination of the physical
CHE 1130, 1131, 1132                   4                                                          and chemical properties; assays for normal and
BIO 2280, 2281                         4   Theology and Religious Studies                         abnormal constituents; kidney function tests; and
THE 1000C                              3                                                          pregnancy test. Credit: 2 semester hours.
MFL 1000C or ART 1000C                 3
                                                                                                  4240 INTRODUCTION TO THE DIDACTIC PHYSICIAN
SPE 1000C                              3   ALLIED HEALTH (ALH)                                    ASSISTANT EXPERIENCE
TOTAL                                 17                                                          This month-long course marks the transition from
SPRING SEMESTER                                                                                   academic to professional studies. Starting with
                                           OBJECTIVES                                             medical terminology and introduction to profes-
PHS 2101                               3   To provide a strong foundation in the basic allied
PHI 2200/2240/1020                     3                                                          sional practice, this course starts the application
                                           health and industrial sciences and the necessary       of basic science skills to the professional body of
MFL 1100C or ART 1100C                 3   tools to work in selected allied health professions
Social Science Elective                3                                                          knowledge. Credit: 3 semester hours. Summer Only.
                                           and various related industrial sciences.
THE 2200-2600                          3                                                          **4241;4242 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE-DIDACTIC
                                           1201 INTRODUCTION TO HEALTH CARE                       (PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT)
TOTAL                                 15




                                                                                                                                                         COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
                                           Problems in the development of comprehensive           The didactic material is presented in 13 phases
                                           health services in the United States; characteris-     during the first 10 months of instruction. They are:
THIRD YEAR                                 tics of a profession; development of modern med-       Introduction, Integumentary System, Medical-
FALL SEMESTER                              ical practice from primitive medicine; medical ter-    Surgical conditions of the Head and Neck, Musculo-
PHS 3504                               3   minology; drug delivery system in the United           Skeletal System, Cardiovascular System, Respira-
PHI 3000C                              3   States; consideration of the many health profes-       tory System, Nervous System, Digestive System,
BIO 2260, 2261                         4   sions that form the health team. Lecture, 2 hours.     Genito-Urinary System, Reproductive System,
THE 3100-3600                          3   Credit: 2 semester hours.                              Endocrine System, Pediatrics and Geriatrics.
HIS 1000C                              3   2101 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY                Credit: 12;15 semester hours. 2 semesters.
PHS 3302                               1   Historical development of the clinical laboratory      **4341 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE (PATHOLOGIST
TOTAL                                 17   sciences profession. Introduction to the types of      ASSISTANT)
                                           tests performed in a clinical laboratory. Lecture, 2   The clinical experience is provided over a 12 month
SPRING SEMESTER                            hours. Credit: 2 semester hours.                       period on a rotational basis. The student is assign-
PHS 3510                               3   4141 CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY (MED. TECH.)                ed to a Pathologist preceptor so that practical
BIO 3270, 3271                         4                                                          instruction may be acquired. Assignments are in
                                           This course covers the pathogenic bacteria, fungi,
BIO 3320, 3321                         4                                                          the areas of Gross Anatomy and Autopsy Techni-
                                           viruses, etc. In addition to theory, students are
PHS 3507                               3                                                          que, Microscopic Anatomy and Histopath-ology
                                           trained in the preparation of media; complete
General Elective                       3                                                          Technique, Bacteriological and Sterile Technique of
                                           identification of organisms from clinical material;
TOTAL                                 17   testing of antibiotic sensitivity; examination of      Biological Material. Credit: 15 semester hours. 2
                                           direct smears; fungus isolation techniques; auto-      semesters.
FOURTH YEAR                                genous vaccine preparation and phage typings.          **4441 PROFESSIONAL DIDACTIC PROGRAM AND
                                           Lectures and laboratory. Credit: 6 semester hours.     CLINICAL ROTATION FOR CYTOTECHNOLOGISTS
(52 weeks of didactic education and
clinical experience)                       4142 CLINICAL SEROLOGY (MED. TECH.)                    This 12 month course includes general studies of
                                           Covers the principles of serology and immunology.      the complete genital tract, respiratory system,
FALL SEMESTER                              Tests performed cover the diagnosis of venereal        body cavity fluids, alimentary tract, urinary tract
ALH 4421                              15   diseases, infectious mononucleosis, febrile states,    and breast. Special cytology includes, but is not
                                           Rickettsial diseases, etc. Principles of complement    limited to, sex chromatincytogenetics, aspiration
SPRING SEMESTER                                                                                   (cysts, tumors, amniocentesis), wound washings,
ALH 4421                              15   fixation, flocculation, precipitation, fluorescent
                                                                                                  imprints-touch preparations and experimental
                                           antibody and T.P.I. are included. Laboratory and
                                                                                                  cytology. Clinical rotations to include: cyto-
                                           lecture. Credit: 2 semester hours.
MINORS AVAILABLE FOR ALLIED HEALTH                                                                preparatory techniques–cell spreads, concentra-
STUDENTS                                   4143 CLINICAL PARASITOLOGY (MED. TECH.)                tion methods filtration, centrifugation, mucolysis,
                                           Lectures and laboratory experiments enable stu-        cell blocks, basic stains, fixation and theory, rou-
(Except Pharmacy Students)                 dents to identity the parasites and vectors which      tine diagnostic staining, special stains, mounting
Business                                   are most important to man. Credit: 2 semester          and quality control. Record keeping focuses on
                                           hours.                                                 reporting, storage, retrieval, statistical analysis,
Chemistry                                                                                         quality control. Medical literature covers journal
                                           4144 CLINICAL IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY
Computer Science                           (MED. TECH.)                                           club, literature retrieval, special projects and
English                                    The theory and practice of blood group systems;        library searches. One grade is given for all 30
                                           abnormal antibody detection; compatibility test-       credits. Credit: 30 semester hours.
Government and Politics
                                           ing; blood procurement; the management of hospi-
History                                    tal blood banks. Credit: 4 semester hours.
Philosophy

     *Elective courses                                                                                                                            103
5240 TRANSITION TO THE CLINICAL PHYSICIAN                4103 DRUGS AND DISEASES OF THE                           4201 PHARMACY PRACTICE LABORATORY III
ASSISTANT EXPERIENCE                                     GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT                                   Prerequisite(s): All required third year coursework.
This three month course provides transition from         Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first three years.   Co-requisite(s): PHR 4101, PHR 4102, PHR 4103,
the previous didactic work to the commencement           This course is designed to instruct the student in       PHR 4104, PAS 4303. This laboratory integrates the
of the year long medical studies in the clinical set-    the area of diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.      didactic coursework of the Drugs and Contracted
ting. On call rotations begin during this semester.      Teaching emphasis is a sequential method of              Disease courses and Extemporaneous Compounding
Credit: 6 semester hours. Summer Only.                   instruction relevant to specific disease states to       courses and provides the student the opportunity
**5241;5242 CLINICAL EXPERIENCE-CLINICAL                 incorporate the areas of pathophysiology, pharma-        to apply data in a simulated pharmacy setting. The
(PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT)                                    cology, medicinal chemistry, therapeutics and self-      student assesses patient findings, evaluates new
The clinical experience is provided over a fourteen      care therapies. This course incorporates interdisci-     prescription orders and considers how these new
month period on a rotational basis. The student is       plinary instruction utilizing faculty from varied        orders impact on current therapy, prepares the new
assigned to various physician preceptors so that         areas of expertise and experience. Lecture, 2 hours.     order and addresses any and all potential problems
practical instruction may be acquired, and the           Credit: 2 semester hours.                                that are identified and dispenses the preparation
opportunity to utilize the didactic information pro-     4104 DRUGS AND DISEASES OF THE SKIN AND                  to the patient. Additionally, students learn to
vided is realized. Assignments are in the areas of       CONNECTIVE TISSUE                                        triage patients and assess the role of over-the-
Medicine, Surgery, Pediatrics, Obstetrics/               Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first three years.   counter medications in light of other patient fac-
Gynecology and Primary Medical Care. Opportunity         This course is designed to instruct the student in       tors. Laboratory, 3 hours. Credit: 1 semester hour.
is provided for the student to participate in elective   the area of skin and connective tissue diseases.         Fee $120.
rotations. Credit: 12 semester hours. 2 semesters.       Teaching emphasis is a sequential method of              4202 PHARMACY PRACTICE LABORATORY IV
                                                         instruction relevant to specific disease states to       Prerequisite(s): All required third year coursework
**One grade is given for all semesters’ credit.          incorporate the areas of pathophysiology, pharma-        and PAS 4303. Co-requisite(s): PHR 4105, PHR
                                                         cology, medicinal chemistry, therapeutics and self-      4106, PHR 4107. This laboratory integrates the
PHARMACY (PHR)                                           care therapies. This course incorporates interdisci-     didactic coursework of the Drugs and Disease
                                                         plinary instruction utilizing faculty from varied        courses and Extemporaneous Compounding courses
                                                         areas of expertise and experience. Lecture, 2            and provides the student the opportunity to apply
1101 ST. JOHN’S UNIVERSITY
                                                         hours. Credit: 2 semester hours.                         data in a simulated pharmacy setting. The student
EXPERIENCE/SHADOWING
                                                         4105 DRUGS AND INFECTIOUS DISEASES                       assesses patient findings, evaluates new prescrip-
Prerequisite(s): CPP 1101. This course is designed                                                                tion orders and considers how these new orders
to allow the student an opportunity to develop an        Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first three years.
                                                                                                                  impact on current therapy, prepares the new order
appreciation for contemporary pharmacy practice          This course is designed to instruct the student in
                                                                                                                  and addresses any and all potential problems that
by observing various pharmacy practitioners in           the area of infectious disease. Teaching emphasis
                                                                                                                  are identified and dispenses the preparation to the
their professional settings. During this shadowing       is a sequential method of instruction relevant to
                                                                                                                  patient. Additionally, students learn to triage
experience, the student gains exposure to relevant       specific disease states to incorporate the areas of
                                                                                                                  patients and assess the role of over-the-counter
ethical and practical issues of pharmacy practice        pathophysiology, medicinal chemistry, pharmacol-
                                                                                                                  medications in light of other patient factors.
and is expected to share observations and experi-        ogy, therapeutics and self-care therapeutics. This
                                                                                                                  Laboratory, 3 hours. Credit: 1 semester hour. Fee
ences with fellow classmates in a formalized set-        course incorporates interdisciplinary instruction
                                                                                                                  $120.
ting at the University on a periodic basis through-      utilizing faculty from varied areas of expertise and
out the semester. In addition, the student is            experience. Lecture, 4 hours. Credit: 4 semester         5000 CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION
expected to develop an appreciation for the mis-         hours.                                                   TECHNIQUES AND FIRST AID
sion of St. John’s University as well as the service                                                              This Standard First Aid course provides the student
                                                         4106 DRUGS AND DISEASES OF THE KIDNEY AND
aspects of the pharmacy profession by participat-                                                                 with the basic principles of cardiopulmonary resus-
                                                         ELECTROLYTE IMBALANCES
ing in a relevant community service project. Given                                                                citation (CPR) and leads to CPR and first aid certifi-
                                                         Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first three years.
on a Pass/Fail basis. Lecture,1 hour. Credit: 1 semes-                                                            cations. Certification must be obtained prior to the
                                                         This course is designed to instruct the student in
ter hour.                                                the area of kidney and electrolyte imbalances.           advanced experiential rotations. Lecture, one 51⁄2
                                                         Teaching emphasis is a sequential method of              hour course. Credit: 0 semester hour.
4101 DRUGS AND DISEASES OF THE
CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM                                    instruction relevant to specific disease states to       5108 DRUGS AND NEOPLASTIC AND ASSOCIATED
Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first three years.   incorporate the areas of pathophysiology, pharma-        DISEASES
This course is designed to instruct the student in       cology, medicinal chemistry, therapeutics and self-      Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first four years.
the area of cardiovascular disease. Teaching             care therapies. This course incorporates interdisci-     This course is designed to instruct the student in
emphasis is a sequential method of instruction rel-      plinary instruction utilizing faculty from varied        the area of neoplastic disorders. Teaching empha-
evant to specific disease states to incorporate the      areas of expertise and experience. Lecture, 3 cred-      sis is a sequential method of instruction relevant
areas of pathophysiology, pharmacology, medicinal        its. Credit: 3 semester hours.                           to specific disease states to incorporate the areas
chemistry, therapeutics and self-care therapies.         4107 DRUGS AND DISEASES OF THE RESPIRATORY               of pathophysiology, pharmacology, medicinal
This course incorporates interdisciplinary instruc-      SYSTEMS                                                  chemistry, therapeutics and self-care therapeutics.
tion utilizing faculty from varied areas of expertise                                                             This course incorporates inter-disciplinary instruc-
                                                         Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first three years.
and experience. Lecture, 4 hours. Credit:                This course is designed to instruct the student in
                                                                                                                  tion utilizing faculty from varied areas of expertise
4 semester hours.                                        the area of respiratory disease. Teaching emphasis       and experience. Lecture, 4 hours. Credit: 4 semester
4102 DRUGS AND DISEASES OF THE ENDOCRINE                 is a sequential method of instruction relevant to        hours.
AND REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEMS                                 specific disease states to incorporate the areas of      5109 DRUGS AND DISEASES OF THE
Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first three years.   pathophysiology, pharmacology, medicinal chem-           HEMATOPOIETIC SYSTEM
This course is designed to instruct the student in       istry, therapeutics and self-care therapies. This        Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first four years.
the area of endocrine and reproductive disorders.        course incorporates interdisciplinary instruction        This course is designed to instruct the student in
Teaching emphasis is a sequential method of              utilizing faculty from varied areas of expertise and     the area of hematopoietic disorders. Teaching
instruction relevant to specific disease states to       experience. Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3 semester         emphasis is a sequential method of instruction rel-
incorporate the areas of pathophysiology, pharma-        hours.                                                   evant to specific disease states to incorporate the
cology, medicinal chemistry, therapeutics and self-      4108 CLINICAL PHARMACOKINETICS                           areas of pathophysiology, pharmacology, medicinal
care therapies. This course incorporates interdisci-     Prerequisite(s): PAS 4304. This course applies phar-     chemistry, therapeutics and self-care therapeutics.
plinary instruction utilizing faculty from varied        macokinetic and biopharmaceutics principles to           This course incorporates inter-disciplinary instruc-
areas of expertise and experience. Lecture, 2            drugs that are therapeutically monitored in clinical     tion utilizing faculty from varied areas of expertise
hours. Credit: 2 semester hours.                         trials. Therapeutic drug monitoring as it relates to     and experience. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2 semester
                                                         the design of optimum drug dosage regimens is            hours.
                                                         examined in this course. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2
                                                         semester hours.
104
5110 DRUGS AND DISEASES OF PSYCHIATRIC                  tions with patients, physicians, nurses, paraprofes-     3952 RESEARCH IN CLINICAL PHARMACY II*
DISORDERS                                               sionals and pharmacists, assistance is given to the      Prerequisite: CPP 3951. Opportunity for students to
Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first four years.   student to develop the professional attitudes and        continue clinical research activities or undertake
This course is designed to instruct the student in      acquire the communication techniques and skills          additional projects. Same requirements as stated
the area of psychiatric disorders. Teaching empha-      which are prerequisites for health practitioners         in CPP 3951 description. Credit: 3 semester hours.
sis is a sequential method of instruction relevant      who wish to apply academic knowledge to practical
                                                                                                                 4301 DRUG INFORMATION AND LABORATORY
to specific disease states to incorporate the areas     situations.
                                                            Utilization of the Pharmacy Practice and             Prerequisite(s): CUS 1108, CPP 3201, PHS 3508,
of pathophysiology, pharmacology, medicinal
                                                        Patient Assessment Laboratories and primary              PHS 3509. The philosophy and fundamentals of
chemistry, therapeutics, and self-care therapeu-
                                                        health care settings, including community pharma-        drug information practice, and the application of
tics. This course incorporates inter-disciplinary
                                                        cies, allows the student to become familiar with         drug information skills in the delivery of pharma-
instruction utilizing faculty from varied areas of
                                                        the legal, administrative and clinical aspects of        ceutical care are discussed. The student acquires
expertise and experience. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit:
                                                        successful pharmacy practice. In addition, other         the basic skills necessary for the provision of drug
2 semester hours.
                                                        clinical training sites are utilized as resources for    information through lectures, homework and labo-
5111 DRUGS AND DISEASES OF NEUROLOGICAL                                                                          ratory project assignments in the areas of drug
                                                        student instruction in therapeutic drug monitor-
DISORDERS                                                                                                        information retrieval, drug literature evaluation
                                                        ing, provision of drug information and patient
Prerequisite(s): All courses in the first four years.                                                            and quality assurance. Lecture, 1 hour; laboratory,
                                                        interviewing and education. These include: Major
This course is designed to instruct the student in                                                               1 hour. Credit: 2 semester hours.
                                                        metropolitan area medical centers, community
the area of neurological disorders. Teaching
                                                        hospitals and clinics and institutions emphasizing       4401 PHARMACY PRACTICE EXTERNSHIP
emphasis is a sequential method of instruction rel-
                                                        the care of specific patient populations (e.g., pedi-    (PHARM. D. ONLY)
evant to specific disease states to incorporate the
                                                        atric, psychiatric, geriatric care).                     Prerequisites: CPP 4301, CPP 3201, PHS 3508, PHS
areas of pathophysiology, pharmacology, medici-
nal chemistry, therapeutics and self-care thera-        1101 INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACY PRACTICE                   3509, PAS 4303. This course is an experiential
peutics. This course incorporates inter-disciplinary    This course is designed to provide the student with      training course that exposes the student to all
instruction utilizing faculty from varied areas of      an overview of the pharmacy profession and con-          aspects of traditional pharmacy practice, both in
expertise and experience. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit:     temporary practice issue. Focus is drawn to analy-       the ambulatory as well as the institutional setting.
2 semester hours.                                       sis of the attributes of the pharmacy profession,        Under the direct guidance of an approved precep-
                                                        expectations and realities of a pharmacy student         tor, the student evaluates, compounds or prepares
5201 BIOMEDICAL LABORATORY IV (FOR                                                                               and dispenses prescriptions to select patients or
                                                        and pharmacist, and the concept of pharmaceuti-
PHARMACY MAJORS ONLY)                                                                                            their designees. He/she also updates patient med-
                                                        cal care. Also, emerging and unique roles of the
Prerequisite(s):PHS 2301, PHS 3302, PHS 3303,                                                                    ication profiles, participates in drug use




                                                                                                                                                                        COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
                                                        pharmacist on the health care team is discussed.
BIO 1210, BIO 1220, PHS 3504, PHS 3507, PHS                                                                      reviews/evaluations, evaluates the patient’s over-
                                                        Given on a Pass/Fail basis. Lecture, 1 hour. Credit: 1
3508, PHS 3509. Co-requisite(s): PHR 4101, PHR                                                                   all medication profile and, where appropriate,
4102, PHR 4103 and PHR 4104. Demonstration and          semester hour.
                                                                                                                 counsels patients or their designees about adverse
experimentation of basic principles of medicinal        2101 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY                                 reactions, drug interactions and medication com-
chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology and biotech-        Self-study programmed learning course utilizing a        pliance. Students are also exposed to the adminis-
nology. Laboratory, 3 hours. Credit: 1 semester         text. Only open to students in the College of            trative, financial and clinical activities that the
hour. Fee $120.                                         Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions and only          pharmacist routinely undertakes in the appropri-
6101 NUTRACEUTICS                                       given on a Pass/Fail basis. Credit: 1 semester hour.     ate provision of pharmaceutical care. Externship,
Prerequisite(s): All required courses through the       CPP 3153 INTRODUCTION TO ALTERNATIVE                     30 hours. Credit: 1 semester hour.
fifth year. This course is designed to acquaint the     MEDICINE                                                 4402 LITERATURE EVALUATION AND RESEARCH
student with the basic issues pertaining to the         Prerequisites: CPP 1101, PAS 2301. This course is        DESIGN (PHARM. D. ONLY)
development, modes of administration, efficacy          intended to provide an introduction to the origin,
                                                                                                                 Prerequisite: CPP 4301. Literature evaluation and
and marketing of nutraceuticals, that is foods or       basic principles, indications and philosophy of
                                                                                                                 research design provide the student with a basic
parts of foods and chemical components of foods         selected alternative medicine modalities. In addi-
                                                                                                                 understanding of appropriate research design and
which provide medical benefits including the pre-       tion, it provides an overview of regulatory/legal
                                                                                                                 methodology, biostatistics and reporting of
vention and/or treatment disease. In addition, the      issues, how to obtain reliable information on alter-
                                                                                                                 results. The objective of this course is to provide
role of vitamins, minerals and other dietary sup-       native practices and review the educational
                                                                                                                 the student with the skills and knowledge base to
plements is discussed in terms of their role in con-    requirements of practitioners involved in these
                                                                                                                 critically evaluate the primary literature and
tributing to or maintaining health. The role and        practices. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2 semester hours.   understand the practical implications of such liter-
status of herbal products, homeopathy and natur-        3201 INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACEUTICAL CARE                 ature. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2 semester hours.
opathy as alternative therapies to mainstream           Prerequisite(s): PHS 2101, PAS 3301,
medicine are also covered. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit:                                                             5401 INSTITUTIONAL PHARMACY PRACTICE
                                                        Corequisite(s): PHS 3510. This course is designed        EXTERNSHIP
2 semester hours.                                       to introduce the student to the concept of pharma-       Prerequisites: All required courses through the fall
                                                        ceutical care. Pharmaceutical care embraces the          of fifth year and successful completion of the com-
                                                        concept of pharmacist-managed/patient-oriented           prehensive examination. This course is a module
CLINICAL PHARMACY                                       pharmacy services directed at providing effective,       rotation in which the student participates in the
PRACTICE (CPP)                                          safe and cost effective drug therapy via outcomes        provision of pharmaceutical services in an institu-
                                                        monitoring and assessment. Selected disease
Judith L. Beizer, Pharm.D., Chair                       states are discussed with emphasis on pathophysi-
                                                                                                                 tional setting. Under the supervision of qualified
                                                                                                                 preceptors, the student is integrated into the pro-
                                                        ology and rational therapy and the development of        vision of pharmaceutical care and participates in
                                                        an appropriate pharmacy care plan. Lecture, 2            the various functions of an institutional pharmacy
OBJECTIVES                                              hours. Credit: 2 semester hours.                         department. Such activities include obtaining and
The department seeks to provide students with the       3951 RESEARCH IN CLINICAL PHARMACY I*                    recording relevant patient specific information,
opportunity to acquire the knowledge, develop the
                                                        Opportunity for students to participate in ongoing       interpreting and recording prescription orders,
attitudes and master the skills required for con-
                                                        clinical research studies under the direction of         preparing prescription products for administration
temporary clinical pharmacy practice.
                                                        clinical faculty. Permission for student participa-      to patients, discharge patient education and med-
    Lectures, utilization of the multi-media pro-
                                                        tion must be obtained from a clinical faculty mem-       ication counseling, and adverse drug reaction
grams in the Resource Center, and individual and
                                                        ber prior to course registration. A minimum of           assessment and reporting. In addition, the student
group conferences with faculty and preceptors give
                                                        three hours per week is expected of the student          is exposed to various administrative issues with
the student the opportunity to acquire the knowl-
                                                        relevant to clinical research participation.             regards to inpatient pharmacy services including
edge base required to be a drug advisor on the
                                                        Students must be in compliance with college poli-        third-party payment billing, formulary manage-
health care team.
                                                        cies for placement in a clinical site (health insur-     ment, quality assurance assessments, and invento-
    By participation in health care settings
                                                        ance, physical examination, malpractice insur-           ry control. Externship 160 hours. Credit: 3 semester
throughout the curriculum and through interac-
                                                        ance). Credit: 3 semester hours.                         hours.
                                                                                                                                                                 105
5402 AMBULATORY PHARMACY PRACTICE                       5407 AMBULATORY CARE CLERKSHIP                           6103 PHARMACODYNAMICS AND ADVANCED
EXTERNSHIP                                              Prerequisites: All required courses through the fall     PHARMACOKINETICS
Prerequisites: All required courses through the fall    of fifth year and successful completion of the com-      Prerequisites: PAS 4304, PHR 4201. This course is
of fifth year and successful completion of the com-     prehensive examination. This course is an experi-        designed to provide advanced study of prevailing
prehensive examination. This is an experiential         ential rotation that is intended to expose the stu-      topics in the areas of applied clinical pharmacoki-
training course that exposes the student to all         dent to various aspects of clinical pharmacy prac-       netics, pharmacodynamics, and include some
aspects of pharmacy practice in the ambulatory          tice in the inpatient setting. Under the direct guid-    aspects of special drug delivery systems. The prin-
setting. Under the direct guidance of an approved       ance of an approved preceptor, the student func-         ciples of pharmacodynamics are explored utilizing
preceptor, the student functions as a primary           tions as an integral member of the health-care           contemporary examples of issues that are clinically
health practitioner who will evaluates medication       team by providing pharmaceutical services to             relevant. Application of advanced pharmacokinetic
orders, prepares and dispenses medications, and         ambulatory patients in accordance with the con-          principles are covered including examples of drugs
counsels patients regarding their drug therapy. In      cept of total patient care. The clinical activities      that exhibit non-linear pharmacokinetics.
addition, students perform other functions              emphasize the development of the pharmacist-             Principles of drug removal by extra-corporeal
required of pharmacists in the ambulatory setting       patient relationship and include various aspects of      means including physio-chemical properties are
including maintaining patient profiles, third-party     preventative medicine, patient education and out-        evaluated. External factors that may impact the
insurance billing, and inventory control.               comes assessment. Clerkship, 160 hours. Credit: 3        removal of drug such as types of hemodialysis fil-
Externship, 160 hours. Credit: 3 semester hours.        semester hours.                                          ters, blood flow rate on the machines and other
                                                                                                                 contemporary issues are explored. Students would
5403 INPATIENT CLERKSHIP I                              5408 ELECTIVE II CLERKSHIP
                                                                                                                 be expected to be able to adjust or correct for
Prerequisites: All required courses through the fall    Prerequisites: All required courses through the fall     alterations in these variances in pharmacokinetic
of fifth year and successful completion of the com-     of fifth year and successful completion of the com-      drug predictions. Contemporary computer clinical
prehensive examination. This course is an experi-       prehensive examination. This rotation introduces         pharmacokinetic applications will be evaluated.
ential rotation in an approved institution that is      the student to a specialized area of pharmacy prac-      Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3 semester hours.
intended to expose the student to various aspects       tice. This area may be selected according to the
of clinical pharmacy practice in the inpatient set-     student’s interest or an area of medicine in need of
ting. Under the direct guidance of an approved pre-     further emphasis. This rotation may involve mana-
ceptor, the student functions as an integral part of    gerial aspects of pharmacy practice or research          PHARMACEUTICAL
the health-care team by performing numerous             pertaining to pharmacy practice. Clerkship, 160          SCIENCES (PHS)
activities in accordance with the concept of total      hours. Credit: 3 semester hours.
patient care. The clinical site activities include      5409 ELECTIVE III CLERKSHIP
                                                                                                                 Louis D.Trombetta,
work rounds, obtaining patient drug histories, dis-     Prerequisites: All required courses through the fall     Ph.D., Chair
charge patient education and medication counsel-        of fifth year and successful completion of the com-
ing, and review of patient case studies with empha-     prehensive examination. This rotation introduces
sis on rational drug therapy. Conferences are           the student to a specialized area of pharmacy prac-      OBJECTIVES
scheduled at the institution to discuss patient care    tice. This area may be selected according to the         The Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences is com-
activities and effective patient management.            student’s interest or an area of medicine in need of     mitted to providing a solid background in the bio-
Clerkship, 160 hours. Credit: 3 semester hours.         further emphasis. This rotation may involve mana-        medical sciences to allow students in pharmacy and
5404 ELECTIVE I CLERKSHIP                               gerial aspects of pharmacy practice or research          allied health programs to acquire critical learning
Prerequisites: All required courses through the fall    pertaining to pharmacy practice. Clerkship, 160          skills and to develop successful careers rendering
of fifth year and successful completion of the com-     hours. Credit: 3 semester hours.                         health service to the public in industrial, academic
prehensive examination. This rotation introduces        5410 ELECTIVE IV CLERKSHIP                               and clinical settings. The department provides stu-
the student to a specialized area of pharmacy prac-                                                              dents with the fundamental knowledge base that
                                                        Prerequisites: All required courses through the fall     enables them to interpret and remain current with
tice. This area may be selected according to the        of fifth year and successful completion of the com-
student’s interest or an area of medicine in need of                                                             the scientific literature in clinical and basic
                                                        prehensive examination. This rotation introduces         research. Students are prepared to explain the
further emphasis. This rotation may involve direct      the studetn to a specialized area of pharmacy prac-
interaction with patients, managerial aspects of                                                                 action of drugs in current use and to understand
                                                        tice. This area may be selected according to the         the manner in which these drugs are employed in
pharmacy practice or research pertaining to phar-       student’s interest or an area of medicine in need of
macy practice. Clerkship, 160 hours. Credit: 3 semes-                                                            clinical and basic science settings. Students are
                                                        further emphasis. Clerkship, 160 hours. Credit: 3        expected to acquire the necessary critical skills and
ter hours.                                              semester hours.                                          background in chemistry, physiology, toxicology
5405 INPATIENT CLERKSHIP II                             6101 CASE STUDIES IN DRUGS AND DISEASES                  and pharmacology that are essential to under-
Prerequisites: All required courses through the fall    ISSUES IN PHARMACEUTICAL CARE                            standing the nature, composition, standardization
of fifth year and successful completion of the com-
                                                        Prerequisites: All required courses through the fifth    and evaluation of natural and synthetic substances
prehensive examination. This course is an experi-                                                                used in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of
                                                        year. This course is a patient case-based interactive
ential rotation in an approved institution that is                                                               disease.
                                                        learning experience designed to strengthen the
intended to expose the student to various aspects
                                                        student’s ability to provide pharmaceutical care.
of clinical pharmacy practice in the inpatient set-
                                                        The cases discussed cover particular therapeutic
ting. This rotation further stresses the develop-                                                                1101 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN ANATOMY AND
                                                        dilemmas or challenges and reflect current treat-
ment of clinical skills that were introduced in the                                                              PHYSIOLOGY I (FOR NURSING STUDENTS)
                                                        ment guidelines. Emphasis is placed on patient
Inpatient Clerkship I rotation. Under the direct                                                                 Detailed study of the mechanisms whereby the
                                                        assessment and development of a pharmaceutical
guidance of an approved preceptor, the student                                                                   human body maintains homeostasis in the major
functions as an integral part of the health-care        care plan. Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3 semester hours.
                                                                                                                 functional systems of the body. Emphasis is placed
team by performing numerous activities in accor-        6102 PREVENTION AND MANAGEMENT OF DRUG                   on the clinical physiology and anatomical relation-
dance with the concept of pharmaceutical care. The      INDUCED DISEASES                                         ships of the renal, nervous, respiratory and cardio-
clinical site activities include work rounds, obtain-   Prerequisites: All required courses through the fifth    vascular systems, to provide a foundation for the
ing patient drug histories, discharge patient edu-      year. A general understanding of adverse drug            study of pharmacology. Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3
cation and medication counseling and review of          events including monitoring, evaluating, prevent-
                                                                                                                 semester hours.
patient case studies with emphasis on rational          ing and managing these events provides a basis for
drug therapy. Conferences are scheduled at the          organ system specific drug induced disease issues.
institution to discuss patient care activities and      Drug activity effecting untoward biochemical enzy-
effective patient management. Clerkship, 160            matic changes related to cellular, organ and system
hours. Credit: 3 semester hours.                        functions are explored. Topics to be emphasized
                                                        include blood dyscrasias, neurologic dysfunction,
                                                        as well as undesirable drug effects on the gastroin-
                                                        testinal, hepatic, renal, dermal and other systems.
106                                                     Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3 semester hours.
1102 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN ANATOMY AND                    3103 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY                       3505 CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY
PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY I (FOR NURSING                      (FOR ALLIED HEALTH STUDENTS)                            Prerequisites: BIO 1210, BIO 1220, PHS 2201, PHS
STUDENTS)                                                 Prerequisite: CHE 2240, 2241. Detailed study of the     2101. A study of the lymphatic system, immune
Corequisite: PHS 1101. Demonstration and study of         mechanisms whereby the human body maintains             response and immunity in humans. Principles of
major functional systems of the body. Laboratory, 3       homeostasis in the major functional systems of the      antibody-antigen relationship are discussed.
hours. Laboratory fee $120. Credit: 1 semester hour.      body. Emphasis is placed on the clinical physiology     Special emphasis is placed on molecular biology of
                                                          and anatomical relationships of the renal, nervous,     the immune response, genes controlling antibody
1103 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN ANATOMY AND
                                                          respiratory and cardiovascular systems, to provide      synthesis, its development, function and
PHYSIOLOGY II (FOR NURSING STUDENTS)
                                                          a foundation for the study of pharmacology.             immunopathology are discussed. Methods of
Corequisite: PHS 1104. A study of the structure and       Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3 semester hours.             detection of immunogenic molecules and
function of the major body systems: nervous,                                                                      immunotherapy are also discussed. Lecture, 2
endocrine, urinary, body fluids and electrolytes,         3104 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
                                                          LABORATORY I (FOR ALLIED HEALTH STUDENTS)               hours. Credit: 2 semester hours.
reproductive system. Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3
semester hours.                                           Corequisite: PHS 3105. Demonstration and study of       3506 INTRODUCTION TO INFECTIOUS DISEASES
                                                          major functional systems of the body. Laboratory, 3     Prerequisites: BIO 1210, BIO 1220, PHS 2201, PHS
1104 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN ANATOMY AND
PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY II (FOR NURSING                     hours. Laboratory fee $120. Credit: 1 semester hour.    2101. A study of the general microbial concepts,
                                                          3105 HUMAN ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II                    principles of infectious disease and host parasite
STUDENTS)
                                                          (FOR ALLIED HEALTH STUDENTS)                            relationships. Special emphasis is placed on patho-
Corequisite: PHS 1103. Demonstration and study of                                                                 genic microorganisms of man, inflammatory
major functional systems of the body. Laboratory, 3       Corequisite: PHS 3104. A study of the structure and     responses to infectious agents and clinical aspects
hours. Laboratory fee $120. Credit: 1 semester hour.      function of the major body systems: nervous,            of infections. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2 semester
                                                          endocrine, urinary, body fluids and electrolytes,       hours.
2101 PUBLIC HEALTH FOR THE PHARM.D.                       reproductive system. Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3
Prerequisites: BIO 1210. Co-requisite(s): BIO 1220.       semester hours.                                         3508 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICINAL CHEMISTRY
All aspects of public health including organizations,                                                             Prerequisites: PHS 2201, PHS 2301, PHS 3302. This
administration, environmental social health prob-         3106 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN ANATOMY AND                  course introduces the student to the scientific
lems are discussed. The study of epidemiology and         PHYSIOLOGY LABORATORY II (FOR ALLIED                    principles which are fundamental to medicinal
                                                          HEALTH STUDENTS)
disease control is emphasized. Lecture, 3 hours.                                                                  chemistry and foundational to the integration of
Credit: 3 semester hours.                                 Corequisite: PHS 3105. Demonstration and study of       this basic pharmaceutical science into therapeu-
                                                          major functional systems of the body. Laboratory, 3     tics. Specifically the course introduces the student
2201 BIOPHARMACEUTICAL                                    hours. Laboratory fee $120. Credit: 1 semester hour.    to the various drug categories with particular




                                                                                                                                                                          COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
CHEMISTRY/BIOTECHNOLOGY
                                                          3302 BIOMEDICAL LABORATORY II                           emphasis on chemical nomenclature, physico-
Prerequisites: CHE 1110,1111,1112, CHE 1120, 1121,                                                                chemical properties and chemical aspects of the
                                                          (FOR PHARMACY STUDENTS)
1122, CHE 1130, 1131, 1133, BIO 1210, Co-requi-
                                                          Prerequisite(s): PHS 2301. Co-requisite(s): PHS         dynamics of drug action. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2
site(s): BIO 1220, PHS 2301. The course is an inter-
mediate level undergraduate biochemistry and              3504, PHS 3506. Demonstration and experimenta-          semester hours.
molecular biology lecture course. The chemistry of        tion of basic principles of human anatomy and           3509 INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY
macromolecules, i.e., proteins, lipids assemblies,        physiology, microbiology, immunology and                Prerequisites: PHS 2201, PHS 3504, PHS 2301, PHS
nucleic acids, polysaccharides and enzymology, an         biotechnology. Laboratory, 3 hours. Credit: 1
                                                                                                                  3302. Co-requisite(s):PHS 3507, PHS 3303. This
introduction to metabolic pathways and energy uti-        semester hour. $120 fee.
                                                                                                                  course introduces the student to the scientific
lization in cells is the bulk of the material. In addi-   3303 BIOMEDICAL LABORATORY III                          principles which are fundamental to pharmacology
tion, the fundamental biochemical notions of              (FOR PHARMACY STUDENTS)                                 and foundational to the integration of this basic
nucleic acid metabolism, including DNA replication        Prerequisites: PHS 2301, PHS 3302.                      pharmaceutical science into therapeutics.
and repair mechanisms, RNA, and protein synthesis         Corequisites: PHS 3504, PHS 3506. Demonstration         Specifically the course introduces the student to
is covered. Vitamins and trace metals are discussed       and experimentation of basic principles of medici-      the various drug categories and their mechanism
from the standpoint of their role in enzymatic reac-      nal chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology and             of action including receptor interactions and the
tions and metabolic sequences, and where possible         biotechnology. Laboratory, 3 hours. $120 fee.           dynamics of drug action. Lecture 2 hours. Credit: 2
related to health consequences. Lecture, 4 hours.         Credit:1 semester hour.                                 semester hours.
Credit: 4 semester hours.
                                                          3405; 3406 PRINCIPLES OF TOXICOLOGY I; II               3510 GENERAL PATHOLOGY AND CLINICAL
2301 BIOMEDICAL LABORATORY I                              (FORMERLY 2401, 2402)                                   LABORATORY DATA
Prerequisites: CHE 1110, 1111, 1112, CHE 1120,            An introduction to toxicology with emphasis on          Prerequisites: PHS 3504, PHS 2101, PHS 3505, PHS
1121, 1122, CHE 1130, 1131, 1132 BIO 1210.                material involved as well as systems affected. A        3506, PHS 3302. Co-requisite(s): PHS 3507, PHS
Co-requisite(s): PHS 2201, BIO 1221. Demonstration        discussion of the classifications of poisons and the    3303. A detailed study of the basic principles
and experimentation of basic principles of pharma-        preventive aspects. Lecture, 4 hours. Credit: 4         involving the mechanisms of disease are discussed.
ceutical biochemistry and biotechnology.                  semester hours.                                         Special emphasis is placed on degeneration,
Laboratory, 3 hours, Credit: 1 semester hour. $120                                                                inflammation and repair, disturbances in hemody-
fee.                                                      3504 APPLIED HUMAN ANATOMY AND
                                                                                                                  namics, developmental defects and neoplasia.
                                                          PHYSIOLOGY I
2403 CURRENT ISSUES IN TOXICOLOGY                                                                                 Clinical correlates are covered with respect to labo-
                                                          Prerequisites: BIO 1210, BIO 1220, PHS 2201. Co-        ratory data. Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3 semester
Toxicology is the science concerned with under-           requisite(s): PAS 3302. A study of the structure
standing the nature of toxic chemicals and how                                                                    hours.
                                                          and function of the major body systems, molecular
they interact with living organisms. Public issues        aspects of cell biology, cell physiology, cell struc-   3951;3952 RESEARCH IN PHARMACEUTICAL
and controversies where toxic chemicals are               ture and organization, tissues, integumentary,          SCIENCES I; II*
involved are studied with respect to the social,          musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, lymphatic,             An elective course designed to familiarize the stu-
political and scientific values that impinge on their     respiratory and digestive systems. Lecture, 3 hours.    dent with opportunities for research in the various
resolution. Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3 semester                                                                  disciplines found in the Department. It involves
                                                          Credit: 3 semester hours.
hours.                                                                                                            conducting an actual research project under the
                                                                                                                  guidance of a faculty member in the student’s cho-
                                                                                                                  sen area. Laboratory fee, $120. Credit: 3 semester
                                                                                                                  hours.




    *Elective courses                                                                                                                                              107
4401 ANALYTICAL TOXICOLOGY                             5301 TOXICOLOGY AND DRUGS OF ABUSE                       3101 PHARMACEUTICS I FOR THE PHARM. D.
Prerequisites: Che 3250, 3251, PHS 3405, PHS           Prerequisite(s): All required courses in the first       Prerequisites: MTH 1250, MTH 1260, CHE 1110,
3406. Various methods of specimen and sample           four years. Students are instructed in the princi-       1111, 1112, CHE 1120, 1121, 1122, CHE 1130, 1131,
preparation and extractions are considered.            ples of toxicology with an emphasis placed on clini-     1132, BIO 1210, BIO 1220. Co-requisite(s): PAS
Chemical instrumental techniques are applied to        cal toxicology and the management of the drug            3102. Pharmaceutics is the applied science and
solve problems confronting the analytical toxicolo-    overdose victim and the adverse effects caused by        technology of pharmacy and is based upon the
gist. Various chromatographic, spectroscopic and       drugs of abuse. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2 semester     physical, chemical and biological principles used in
immunological assays are considered as methods of      hours.                                                   the preparation, preservation and utilization of
screening, identifying and quantitating toxic sub-                                                              drug products and/or pharmaceutical dosage
stances. Methods of preparation and analysis are                                                                forms. This semester concentrates on the specific
critically analyzed as to strengths and weaknesses.    PHARMACY AND                                             physical, chemical and biological principles that
Interpretation of the toxicological findings is                                                                 govern homogeneous liquid dosage forms. The
undertaken. Lecture, 4 hours. Credit: 4 semester
                                                       ADMINISTRATIVE SCI-                                      course integrates fundamentals and theory with
hours.                                                 ENCES (PAS)                                              the pharmaceutical dosage forms to which they
                                                                                                                best apply. This course also delineates methods
4402 ADVANCED TOXICOLOGICAL METHODS                    Somnath Pal, Ph.D., Chair                                and procedures essential to solving the mathemati-
Prerequisites: PHS 3405, PHS 4301, MTH 1210, MTH
                                                                                                                cal problems typically associated with pharmacy
1220. This course is an advanced level course deal-
                                                                                                                practice. Lecture, 4 hours. Credit: 4 semester hours.
ing with the various methods, procedures and           OBJECTIVES
advance concepts essential to the science, practice    The Department seeks to provide students with the        3102 PHARMACY PRACTICE LABORATORY I
and “state of the art” of modern toxicology.           opportunity to acquire the knowledge, develop the        Corequisite: PAS 3101. This laboratory course
Critical thinking skill development and data inter-    attitudes and master the skills required for con-        enables the student to correlate the principles and
pretation issues are incorporated from such per-       temporary pharmacy practice.                             theory with experimental observation of homoge-
spectives as risk assessment and management of             Lectures, utilization of the multi-media pro-        neous systems and affords the opportunity to
toxic chemicals, experimental design and statisti-     grams in the Resource Center and individual and          become familiar with the apparatus and techniques
cal management of toxicologic studies and evalua-      group conferences with faculty give the student a        of measurement. Upon completion of the laborato-
tions, regulatory management of environmental          knowledge of the principles and processes in the         ry course, the student should be able to apply the
and industrial chemical exposures, clinical man-       manufacture, stabilization, preservation, storage        important principles of pharmaceutical science and
agement of drug therapy and chemical/drug poi-         and dispensing of both official and non-official         technology and to use the techniques in the prepa-
soning, and forensic detection and characteriza-       dosage forms.                                            ration of stable homogeneous liquid dosage forms.
tion of chemical and drug exposure and poisoning.          Classroom and conference discussions give the        Laboratory, 3 hours. Credit: 1 semester hour. $120
This course is complementary to PHS 4403               student an opportunity to develop creative talents       fee.
(Toxicology Colloquium.) Lecture, 4 hours. Credit: 4   in compounding and formulating dosage forms.             3103 PHARMACEUTICS II FOR THE PHARM. D
semesters hours.
                                                                                                                Prerequisites: PAS 3101, PAS 3102. Corequisite:
4403 TOXICOLOGY COLLOQUIUM                             2201 INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOECONOMICS                   PAS 3104. Pharmaceutics is the applied science and
(FORMERLY PHS 3403)                                    Prerequisites: MTH 1250, MTH 1260, PAS 2301. This        technology of pharmacy and is based upon the
This course offers an extensive exposure to the        course is designed to provide the student with           physical, chemical and biological principles used in
various theoretical areas of toxicology, including:    introductory concepts of pharmacoeconomics as it         the preparation, preservation and utilization of
analytical (forensic/clinical), pharmaceutical (pre-   relates to patient care. Overview of economic prin-      drug products and/or pharmaceutical dosage
clinical) and environmental subdisciplines, accom-     ciples, which may enhance the understanding of           forms. This semester concentrates on the specific
plished through a series of guest lectures, field      the theory underlying pharmacoeconomic analysis,         physical, chemical and biological principles that
trips, didactic presentations and student presenta-    is integrated in this course. A special emphasis is      govern heterogeneous fluid, semi-solid and solid
tion in seminar format. The student is also pre-       also placed on applying the economic evaluation          systems. The course integrates fundamentals and
pared for the process of identifying a research        and quality of life concept to improve the alloca-       theory with the pharmaceutical dosage forms to
question of toxicological interest, research design    tion of limited health care resources. Lecture, 2        which they best apply. Students are also intro-
and the handling of research data. Lecture, 4 hours.   hours. Credit: 3 semester hours.                         duced to the concepts of degradation of pharma-
Credit: 4 semester hours.                                                                                       ceutical products, pathways of degradation, factors
                                                       2301 SOCIAL ASPECTS OF PHARMACY PRACTICE
PHS 4404 PHARMACOLOGIC TOXICOLOGY                                                                               affecting drug stability and approaches to maxi-
                                                       Prerequisites: PHR 1101. This course is designed to
Prerequisites: PHS 3509, 3405, 2201.                                                                            mize stability of a product. Lecture, 4 hours. Credit:
                                                       introduce the student to the social aspects of phar-
Corequisites: PHS 4401, PHR 4304.                      macy practice. Important areas to be discussed           4 semester hours.
Agents affecting the autonomic, central nervous,       include the pharmacy as a profession, professional-      3104 PHARMACY PRACTICE LABORATORY II
cardiovascular, renal and endocrine systems, as        ization of the student, and the image of pharmacist      Prerequisites: PAS 3101, PAS 3102.
well as antiinfective/antineoplastic agents are        held by patients. The role of the pharmacist in vari-    Corequisite: PAS 3103. This laboratory enables the
examined therapeutically and toxicologically.          ous practice settings as related to patient care and     student to correlate the principles and theory with
Lecture, 4 hours. Credit: 4 semester hours.            interaction with other health care professionals is      experimental observation of heterogeneous sys-
                                                       explored. An overview of how the pharmacist plays        tems. Upon completion of the laboratory course,
PHS 4405 PHARMACOLOGIC TOXICOLOGY
                                                       a key element in drug therapy, drug product selec-       the student should be able to apply the important
LABORATORY
                                                       tion and therapeutic interchange is also discussed.      physicochemical principles of pharmaceutical sci-
Prerequisite: PHS 3509. This laboratory will provide   Special emphasis is also placed on understanding         ence and technology and to use the apparatus and
the student with opportunity to experience the         the social aspects of drug use in today’s society        techniques in the preparation of stable heteroge-
effects of drugs and other toxic substances on liv-    and the importance of providing pharmaceutical           neous dosage forms. Laboratory, 3 hours. Credit: 1
ing systems, in coordination with the course on        care to the patient. Lecture, 1 hour. Credit: 1 semes-   semester hour.
Pharmaco-Toxicology. In addition to the analytical
                                                       ter hour.                                                3151 CALCULATIONS IN PHARMACY PRACTICE
determination of basic properties of chemical sub-
stances, the student will perform gross screening                                                               Corequisites: PAS 3101, 3102. This course deals with
protocols for biologic activity, evaluate the time                                                              pharmaceutical calculations involved in fabrica-
course of pharmacologic/toxicologic action for                                                                  tion, dispensing, and delivery of pharmaceutical
selected substances, and perform dose-response                                                                  products. The scope includes determination of flow
characterizations for selected drug/drug interac-                                                               rates of liquids in continuous intravenous infu-
tions. Finally the student will utilize in-vitro                                                                sions, HLB, Osmolality, Millequivalents, and
assessment methodologies to characterize the                                                                    Allegation methods for mixtures consisting of more
toxic potential of various chemical substances.                                                                 than two components. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2
Laboratory, 3 hours. Credit: 1 semester hour.                                                                   semester hours.
Laboratory fee $120.
108
3152 INTRODUCTION TO PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT               4303 EXTEMPORANEOUS COMPOUNDING                         ELECTIVE COURSES
Corequisites: PAS 3101, 3102. This course deals        Prerequisites: PAS 3101, PAS 3103, PAS 3102, PAS        Professional elective courses are made available by
with considerations involved in product develop-       3104. Corequisite(s): PHR 4201. Extemporaneous          several departments of the College of Pharmacy
ment and formulation of a dosage form. The             compounding is the preparation of a medication          and Allied Health Professions.
processes and technology used in fabrication of a      for an individual patient following receipt of a             Non-professional electives may be selected
pharmaceutical product as discussed. The scope         legal order (prescription) from a prescriber. The       from the courses offered by other departments of
includes the influence of physico-chemical proper-     course is structured to provide the students train-     the University, with the approval of the appropri-
ties of the drug, theory, and practical aspects of     ing and expertise to ascertain the quality, safety,     ate Dean.
mechanisms used in the preparation of these deliv-     and technique required to compound and dispense              Those contemplating medical, dental, law or
ery systems. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2 semester      the prescription in community and institutional         graduate study after graduation are advised to
hours.                                                 pharmacy practice. Lecture, 3 hours. Credit: 3          consult the appropriate school bulletin, since spe-
3301 PHARMACY AND THE U.S. HEALTH CARE                 semester hours.                                         cific courses may be required for admission.
ENVIRONMENT                                            4304 BIOPHARMACEUTICS FOR THE PHARM. D.                 Elective credits may be utilized to satisfy these
Prerequisite: PAS 2201. This course is designed to     Prerequisites: PAS 3101, PAS 3103.                      requirements.
introduce the students to the U.S. health care         Biopharmaceutics is the study of the factors influ-          Courses selected as electives must be approved
delivery system and explore the social, political,     encing the bioavailability of a drug in man and ani-    in advance by the Dean of the College of Pharmacy
and economic factors which influence the flow of       mals and the use of this information to optimize        and Allied Health Professions.
pharmaceutical products and services within the        pharmacological or therapeutic activity of drug
system. Special emphasis is placed on the role and     products in clinical application. This course
function of pharmacy in the new paradigm of ever-      includes study of a) biological and physicochemical     Faculty, College of
changing health care. An overview of the current       factors of the body, drugs and drug dosage forms        Pharmacy and Allied Health
structure and financing is provided. Focus is given    which may influence availability and disposition as
to the public and private sectors of health care,      well as pharmacological and toxicological respons-      Professions
the major players, the pharmaceutical industry,        es of drugs, and b) mathematical models to assess
third party plans, and managed care. In addition,      drug absorption, distribution and elimination           Robert A. Mangione, Dean and Clinical Professor
the role of the pharmacist in health promotion and     processes. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2 semester         of Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., M.S., P.D.,
disease prevention is emphasized. Lecture, 3 hours.    hours.                                                  Ed.D., St. John’s University
Credit: 3 semester hours.                              4305 PHARMACY LAW                                       Madhu Agrawal, Associate Professor of Pharmacy
3354 CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN HOSPITAL                   Prerequisites: PHI 1110, PHI 2300, PHI 2240. The        and Administative Sciences, B.S. Phm., Bombay




                                                                                                                                                                       COLLEGE OF PHARMACY AND ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONS
PHARMACY                                               purpose of this course is to provide the students       University; M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D.,
                                                                                                               Michigan State University
Prerequisite: PAS 2301. This course is explores hos-   with an understanding of the legal basis of phar-
pital pharmacy history and theory techniques, and      maceutical care. As professional persons empow-         Emily M. Arweiler, Assistant Clinical Professor of
administrative procedures. It acquaints the stu-       ered by state licensure to protect patients from        Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., Pharm.D., St.
dent with the pharmacy as a hospital department        risks, students learn about the responsibilities of     John’s University
and the pharmacist’s role within the institution       pharmacists under the law and the limits of their       Charles R. Ashby, Professor of Pharmaceutical
and the health care system. Lecture, 2 hours.          responsibilities. The pharmacist’s role in prevent-     Sciences, B.A., Ph.D., University of Louisville
Credit: 2 semester hours.                              ing liability by reducing drug-related morbidity is
                                                                                                               Ebrahim Balbisi, Assistant Clinical Professor of
                                                       covered. Principles of criminal and civil liability,
3355 ENVIRONMENT OF PHARMACEUTICAL                                                                             Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S., Phm., St. John’s
MARKETING                                              and business and contract law, where applicable to
                                                                                                               University; Pharm.D., Nova Southeastern
                                                       pharmacy practice, are included. Specific attention
Prerequisite: PAS 2201, 2301. This course is                                                                   University
                                                       is given to rules of professional conduct as defined
designed to provide the student with a lucid and                                                               Frank Barile, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical
                                                       by the New York State Board of Pharmacy. Lecture,
thorough overview of marketing in the pharmaceu-                                                               Sciences, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., St. John’s University
                                                       2 hours. Credit: 2 semester hours.
tical industry. It will cover important topics like
the environment of pharmaceutical marketing, the       5202 PHARMACY MANAGEMENT AND ADVANCED                   Michael Barletta, Professor of Pharmaceutical
institutions that comprise the industry, market        PHARMACOECONOMICS                                       Sciences, B.S. Phm., M.S., St. John’s University;
and market research, secondary data from com-          Prerequisites: PAS 2201, PAS 3301, PAS 4305. This       Ph.D., New York Medical College
mercial suppliers, strategic development, and cor-     course provides the student with a broad informa-       Andrew J. Bartilucci, Dean Emeritus and Executive
porate and competitive analysis, at the macro and      tion base essential to successful pharmacy man-         Vice President Emeritus, B.S. Phm., St. John’s
micro levels. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2 semester     agement and efficient resource allocation in            University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D.,
hours.                                                 various professional practice settings. Students        University of Maryland
                                                       learn to apply management principles; planning,         Nesrine Z. Baturay, Associate Professor of
3356 QUALITY ISSUES IN MANAGED CARE                    organizing, directing and controlling; in operating
PHARMACY                                                                                                       Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.A., Douglass College;
                                                       a pharmacy and to use economic appraisals to            M.S., Seton Hall University; Ph.D., New York
Prerequisite: PAS 2301. Corequisite: PAS 2301. This    manage limited pharmacy resources. The course
course is designed to provide the student with an                                                              University
                                                       prepares pharmacy students to address change,
overview of the issues related to the medication       increase competitiveness and optimize patient’s         Judith L. Beizer, Clinical Professor of Clinical
use process within the managed care setting. The       services. Lecture, 4 hours. Credit: 4 semester hours.   Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., St. Louis College of
course emphasizes the provision of pharmacy ben-                                                               Pharmacy; Pharm. D., University of Tennessee
efit management services and its impact onthe                                                                  Blasé C. Billack, Associate Professor of
inputs, outputs, processes and participants of an                                                              Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.S., University of
ideal drug therapy system. The major goal of this                                                              Richmond; Ph.D., St. John’s University
course is to familiarize students with newer
methodologies used to provide high quality phar-                                                               Joseph M. Brocavich, Associate Dean and
macy services while controlling pharmacy costs in                                                              Associate Clinical Professor of Clinical Pharmacy
a managed care setting. Lecture, 2 hours. Credit: 2                                                            Practice, B.S. Phm., Philadelphia College of
                                                                                                               Pharmacy and Science; Pharm.D., Duquesne
semester hours.
                                                                                                               University
                                                                                                               Jerome Cantor, Associate Professor of
                                                                                                               Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.A., Columbia University;
                                                                                                               M.D., University of Pennsylvania
                                                                                                               Joanne M. Carroll, Associate Professor of
                                                                                                               Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.S., Molloy College;
                                                                                                               M.A., CUNY, Hunter College; Ph.D. CUNY
                                                                                                                                                                109
Damary Castanheira, Assistant Clinical Professor of     Senshang Lin, Associate Professor of Pharmacy and      Emilio Squillante, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy
Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., Pharm.D.,        Administrative Sciences, B.S. Phm., Taipei Medical     and Administrative Sciences, B.S. Phm., M.S., Ph.D.,
St. John’s University                                   College, Ph.D. Temple University                       University of Rhode Island
Joseph M. Cerreta, Associate Professor of               Martha L. Mackey, Associate Professor of Pharmacy      Ralph A. Stephani, Professor of Pharmaceutical
Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Fordham     and Administrative Sciences, B.A., M.A., J.D., St.     Sciences, B.S., Holy Cross College; Ph.D., SUNY,
University                                              John’s University                                      Buffalo
Peter Colaninno, Adjunct Assistant Professor of         Parshotam L. Madan, Professor of Pharmacy and          Maria Sulli, Assistant Clinical Professor of Clinical
Allied Health, B.S. M.T., M.S., St. John’s University   Administrative Sciences, B.S. Phm., Birla College,     Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., Pharm. D., St. John’s
John Conry, Assistant Clinical Professor of Clinical    India; M.S., Ph.D., University of Georgia              University
Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., Pharm. D., St. John’s     Nicole M. Maisch, Assistant Clinical Professor of      Michael S. Torre, Clinical Professor of Clinical
University                                              Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., Pharm.D.,       Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., M.S., St. John’s
                                                        Albany College of Pharmacy                             University
Henry Eisen, Professor Emeritus, B.S. Phm., St.
John’s University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D.,     Brian Malone, Adjunct Assistant Clinical Professor     Louis Trombetta, Professor of Pharmaceutical
University of Connecticut                               of Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., M.S.,        Sciences, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Fordham University
Gladys M. El-Chaar, Associate Clinical Professor of     St. John’s University                                  Heidi Wehring, Assistant Clinical Professor of
Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.A., East Stroudsberg      Frank Nania, Adjunct Clinical Instructor of Clinical   Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S., Pharm.D.,
University; B.S. Phm., St. John’s University;           Pharmacy Practice, B. S. Phm., St. John’s University   University of Iowa
Pharm.D., Medical University of South Carolina          Rajesh Nayak, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and      Karl Williams, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and
Joseph V. Etzel, Assistant Dean, Associate Clinical     Administrative Sciences, B.S. Phm., M.S. Phm.          Administrative Sciences, B.S. Phm., SUNY, Buffalo;
Professor of Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm.,     Mangalore University, Ph.D. University of Florida      M.S., University of Rochester; J.D., University of
Pharm. D., St. John’s University                        Judith A. O’Brien, Adjunct Associate Professor of      Kentucky
Sue M. Ford, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical      Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.S., LeMoyne College;        Kenneth Wu, Associate Professor of Pharmacy and
Sciences, B.S., Cornell University; M.S., Ph.D.,        M.S., St. John’s University                            Administrative Sciences, B.S., Taipei Medical College;
Michigan State University                                                                                      M.B.A., Ph.D., University of Minnesota
                                                        Raymond S. Ochs, Professor of Pharmaceutical
Gerard Frunzi, Adjunct Associate Professor of           Sciences, B.S., Purdue University; Ph.D., Indiana      John N.D. Wurpel, Associate Professor of
Pharmacy and Administrative Sciences, B.S., M.S.,       University                                             Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.S., Belmont Abbey
Ph.D., St. John’s University                                                                                   College; M.S. Fairleigh Dickinson University; Ph.D.,
                                                        Somnath Pal, Professor of Pharmacy and
                                                                                                               Pennsylvania State University
Laura M. Gianni Augusto, Assistant Clinical             Administrative Sciences, B.S. Phm., M.S., Jadavpur
Professor of Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S.Phm.,      University; M.B.A., Calcutta University; Ph.D.,        Byron C. Yoburn, Professor of Pharmaceutical
Pharm. D., St. John’s University                        University of Iowa                                     Sciences, B.A., Boston University; M.A., Hollins
                                                                                                               College; Ph.D., Northeastern University
Marc Gillespie, Assistant Professor of                  Nicholas Pantaleo, Adjunct Associate Professor of
Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.A., University of            Pharmacy and Administrative Sciences, B.S., Phm.,      S. William Zito, Professor of Pharmaceutical
Vermont, Ph.D., University of Utah                      M.S., St. John’s University                            Sciences, B.S. Phm., St. John’s University; Ph.D.,
                                                                                                               University of Connecticut
Regina Ginzurg, Assistant Clinical Professor of         Mohammed A. Rahman, Assistant Professor of
Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., Pharm.D., St.    Pharmacy and Administrative Sciences, B.S. Phm.        George L. Zitterell, Adjunct Assistant Clinical
John’s University                                       Kakatiya University, M.B.A. Northeast Louisiana        Professor of Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm.,
                                                        University, Ph.D. University of Louisiana              M.S. Pharmacology, M.B.A., St. John’s University
Mary Ann Howland, Clinical Professor of Clinical
Pharmacy Practice, B.S., Wake Forest University;        Bhagwan D. Rohera, Professor of Pharmacy and
B.S. Phm., Rutgers University; Pharm.D.,                Administrative Sciences, B.S. Phm., M.S., Sagar
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science            University; Ph.D., University of Basel, Switzerland
Eric Jones, Assistant Clinical Professor of Clinical    Joseph Salerno, Adjunct Clinical Instructor of
Pharmacy Practice, Pharm.D., Northeastern               Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B. S. Phm., St. John’s
University                                              University; M.S., Brooklyn College of Pharmacy
Amrit Lal Kapoor, Professor of Pharmaceutical           Joseph Sarra, Adjunct Assistant Professor of
Sciences, B.S. Phm., M.S., Punjab University, India;    Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.S., M.S. Long Island
Dr.Sc.Nat., Eidgenossische Technische                   University Arnold and Marie Schwartz College of
Hoschschule, Zurich, Switzerland                        Pharmacy, Ph.D., St. John’s University
Kwon H. Kim, Associate Professor of Pharmacy and        Francis A.X. Schanne, Associate Professor of
Administrative Sciences, B.S. Phm., Chung Ang           Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.A., La Salle College;
University; M.S., Ph.D., St. John’s University          Ph.D., Temple University
Vijaya L. Korlipara, Associate Professor of             Niels Schmidt, Adjunct Assistant Professor, B.S., NY
Pharmaceutical Sciences, B.S. Phm., Banaras Hindu       Institute of Technology, M.B.A., St. John’s
University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota              University
Chul-Hoon Kwon, Professor of Pharmaceutical             Sharon See, Assistant Clinical Professor of
Sciences, B.S., Phm., Howard University; Ph.D.,         Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B. S. Phm., Pharm. D.,
University of Minnesota                                 Rutgers University
Sum Lam, Assistant Clinical Professor of Clinical       Jun Shao, Assistant Professor of Pharmacy and
Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., Pharm.D., University      Administrative Sciences, B.S. Phm. Zhijiang
of Connecticut                                          University, M.S. China Pharmaceutical University,
Cesar A. Lau-Cam, Professor of Pharmaceutical           Ph.D. West Virginia University
Sciences, B.S. Phm., University of San Marcos, Peru;    J. Andrew Skirvin, Associate Clinical Professor of
M.S., Ph.D., University of Rhode Island                 Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S. Phm., Oregon State
Yunbo Li, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical         University; Pharm.D., University of Texas
Sciences, M.S., Shandong Academy of Medical             Candace J. Smith, Associate Clinical Professor of
Sciences, M.D., Shandong Medical University,            Clinical Pharmacy Practice, B.S., San Jose State
Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene       University; B.S. Phm., Pharm.D., St. John’s
and Public Health                                       University

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