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					Pacifica College

    Catalog

  2010-2011
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Message from the Dean

General Information

 • Statement of Mission and Objectives
 • College Objectives
 • Accreditation
 • State Approval
 • Campus

Programs of Study

 • Philosophical Foundation for All Programs
 • Degrees and Certificates
 *Associates Degree Courses
 • Bachelor’s Degree Courses
 • Certificate Programs
 • Master’s Degree Courses
 • Intensive English Program

Admissions Information

 • Bachelor’s Degrees and Certificate Programs
 • Master’s Degree
 • Intensive English Program
 • International Students

Academic Information

 • Unit of Credit
 • Academic Calendar
 • Enrollment Status
 • Credit for Experiential Learning
 • Transfer of Credit
 • Scholastic Regulations
 • Academic Honors
 • Grading System
 • Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress
 • Maximum Time in Which to Complete
 • Appeal of Grades
 • Reinstatement
 • Graduation Requirement
 • Leave of Absence




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Financial Information

 • Tuition and Fees
 • Refund Policy
 • Policy on Cancellation
 • Withdrawal Date
 • Student Tuition Recovery fund

Student Information

 • Academic Advising
 • Faculty
 • Orientation
 • Housing
 • Student Handbook
 • Student Records
 • Academic Warning
 • Student Conduct
 • Campus Security
 • Harassment–Free Environment
 • Student Freedom of Expression
 • Nondiscrimination
 • Student Grievance Policy
 • Library

College Courses

 • Sports Management
 • Sports Training and Fitness
 • Sports Health
 • Sports Marketing
 • Sports Coaching
 • Recreation Management
 • Sports and Special Education
 • Sports Psychology
 * Athletic Training
 • General Education
 • Core Courses
 • PE Activity Classes
 • Master of Business Administration-Sports Business

Appendix

     Transfer Credit Form
     Enrollment Agreement
     Academic Scholarship Application
     Athletic Scholarship Application
     Leadership of Tomorrow Scholarship
     College Employment Services
     Tuition Deferment Contract
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   Loan Master Promissory Note
   Internship Application
   Disability Identification Form
   Degree Program Transfer Form
   Intent to Graduate Form




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MESSAGE FROM THE DEAN

Dear Prospective Student:

I would like to introduce you to Pacifica College. The Pacifica College (PC) is a new, independent institution providing
education in the discipline of Sports Education. Course work is available for students who wish to concentrate in: Sports
Management, Sports Medicine, Personal Training and Sports Psychology to name only a few. As a growing college we
are adding new areas of education on a continuing basis.

Your academic instruction in Sports Education will be provided by academicians and working professionals in the sports
world. Whether you are an on campus student or an online student they are dedicated to serving those who share their
passion about a career in sports. Our faculty will provide you with personal attention and assistance in attaining your
professional development objectives. When your education ends at Pacifica College you will be prepared to succeed in the
competitive world of the business of sports.

Many of our students are athletes and are involved in one of our many sports. Our offerings of basketball, rugby, lacrosse,
softball and volleyball are only a few of the sports that are either being played or are in the developmental stages. We are
dedicated to keeping the balance of men's and women's sports. Our coaches are not only involved in what is going on
within the game but are teachers/instructors that are educating future coaches and coaching staff. Teaching not only the
X's and O's but what is important in making a coach.

Your experience is not limited to the classroom and the sports field. You will be exposed to varied interests. Riverside is
located in Southern California near the city of Los Angeles. Beaches are less than an hour drive where you can enjoy
swimming, surfing and scuba diving. In the winter the ski slopes and quaint ski villages are only 30 minutes away.
Entertainment abounds in Southern California. There is the rush of excitement that surrounds Hollywood or the
amusement parks of Disneyland, Knott’s Berry Farms, Universal, Sea World and Six Flags. Museums, observatories and
live theater helps to round your experience. The Lakers and Dodgers are known as some of the best franchises in their
respective leagues. Los Angeles city proper, has won 21 championships. The metropolitan area, which includes the
Anaheim Ducks and the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, increases the championship total to 23. In some cases USC and
UCLA are included, mostly the USC Football team and the UCLA Basketball team, which significantly adds to the
number of championships Los Angeles has won.

If I can serve you in preparing for this educational opportunity and to embark on a sports-industry career, feel free to
contact me personally at PC. I am looking forward to getting to know you.

Dean William E Myers
Dean of Academia
Pacifica College




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STATEMENT OF MISSION AND OBJECTIVES

Pacifica College values the lessons that have long been taught by athletic participation: the pursuit of excellence through
personal development and teamwork; ethical and responsible behavior on the field and off; adherence to the spirit of rules
as well as to the letter; leadership and strength of character; and sportsmanship---including respect for one’s opponents,
acceptance of victory with humility, acknowledgement of defeat with grace, and respect for the value of cross-cultural
understanding and acceptance. In teaching these lessons to its students, PC instills habits that will lead students to better
and healthier lives. While winning is not an end in itself, we believe that the efforts by our athletes to be their best will
lead them to succeed.

In the academic classroom PC expresses the same values and provides a liberal education as a philosophy of education
that empowers individuals with broad knowledge and transferable skills, and a strong sense of value, ethics, and civic
engagement. Characterized by challenging encounters with important issues, and more a way of studying than a specific
course or field of study

COLLEGE OBJECTIVES

       To emphasize the theoretical and practical applications of the discipline of Sports Education
       To prepare students to become conversant in course content material and hone skills through appropriate learning
        activities
       To provide diverse and global education and instruction for those who are passionate about a career in sports
       To provide a solid academic background for those who want to participate in the competitive world of the
        business of sports
       To teach students to value life-long learning as essential to their personal growth and develop a philosophy of life
        that helps to nurture the spirit and concern for the community and environment

CAMPUS

Pacifica College is located in the city of Riverside, California. Several locations house our classrooms, administrative
office and sports facilities. Dormitories are available.

PHILOSOPHICAL FOUNDATION FOR ALL PROGRAMS

The first year is always the most important year of a student’s academic career. For many it is the make it or break it year.
Many students question why they are in college or can they make it through their college years? They see many of the
classes they are taking as an extension of high school. Wondering when they may take classes that mean something to
them and to their career. Pacifica College recognizes this and has developed a program that will help the students. The
first year (except for Associate Degree programs) are geared toward the certificate classes. Classes that mean something to
the student and based on the reason they selected a sports college. With their certification they are prepared to seek
summer or part time employment in the sports industry. The students can acknowledge a year that has already assisted
them in a career. All courses are part of their degree program during the second year. It is the second year the student
begins the more formal and traditional studies of general education and liberal studies. In that second year through
graduation students are continuously taking courses to advance them not only to a degree but a career.

The curriculum of Pacifica College has been designed to meet the standards set forth in the purpose, objectives, and
philosophy of the institution, with particular attention paid to the ethics and integrity required in all of our academic
disciplines. PC has certain core values that define us in all of our endeavors-whether in the classroom, on the athletic field,
or in our interactions with one another. These values include self-discipline, high ethics, passion, and a focus on all-
around excellence.

When a student decided to attend PC, he/she will have made a "lifestyle choice" to be among classmates and faculty who
share and reflect these values. Like you, your fellow students will have a passion for sports and a burning desire to pursue
a sports-industry dream, a dream that will culminate in the reality of a career in which you will creatively capitalize on the
concepts and skills you have learned at Pacifica College to attain the financial and personal success you deserve.
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All students enrolled in Pacifica College are required to take a sports activity class each semester. Students have a wide
variety of activity courses to choose from at different skill levels.

FRESHMAN YEAR

As stated above the freshman year is extremely important. Students are attempting to adapt to a different environment and
are continuously attempting to find their direction. Pacifica College recognizes this and has procedures in place to help.
     Dean of Students is readily accessible to the student
     Attendance and grades are continuously monitored to detect any trends
     Tutoring is readily accessible
     Personal counseling is accessible by mental health staff
     All entering freshman select a certificate program to complete during their first year. This allows them to take
        classes that will be useful in securing a summer or part-time job. These credits are transferable to the student’s
        major.

ONLINE EDUCATION

Embracing the future, Pacifica College decided that all students need Internet access for a successful and well-
rounded educational experience. Naturally, Internet access is an inherent part of the online program for students
enrolled from all parts of the world. However, Internet access is also required for campus students so they, too,
can benefit from Pacifica's outreach programs, such as chat rooms, study centers, and informational bulletin
boards—all accessible only through the Internet. Two of the most notable experiences for the Pacifica student,
whether on campus or online, are that classmates often become lifelong friends. It will not be unusual for
alumni to meet regularly after graduation to maintain friendships made during the program or to reach out to
former instructors for mentoring. The primary contributing factors to these bonds are small, intimate classes and
moving students through in a group (cohort). Pacifica’s online education is NOT a correspondence course. The
online program replicates the on campus experience through cohort learning, interactive education (where
students regularly communicate with classmates and instructors) and collaborative learning (where
student/instructor interactions replace lectures).


ONLINE VIA THE INTERNET

Most of our programs are offered on campus and online. Curriculums of the online programs
follows the on campus program exactly. Our online programs are NOT glorified correspondence endeavors
where the student receives downloads of information in a sterile model of academic learning. The online
programs require active participation from class members and faculty and are created for those students whose
time and distance from the college preclude participation in the classroom.

Learning via the Internet at Pacifica College is collaborative (Socratic method of learning) and
interactive experience (student participation) in synchrononmous platforms (assigned group
meetings in virtual classroom with audio/video software) and asynchrononmous (weekly Discussion Boards
participation at students’ convenience). In almost every online class, students
move through the program in a cohort (same classmates for all classes) and meet online weekly
with the instructor at an appointed time. This structure of the online program provides a deep, full learning
experience for students who often describe their education at Pacifica College as a highlight in their lives due to
the friendships and depth of interactions formed with classmates and mentors. Pacifica College has instituted
this complete experience of small class size moving through the program in a cohort so as to replicate the
nearest thing to an on campus class. Most colleges design online programs for large classes taught by taped
videos, teachers’ assistants and periodic participation. The online programs at Pacifica College are different.
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They require active participation and interaction. With the audio/visual component of the online classes,
instructors use instant surveys, video and Power Point presentations and didactic lectures to cover course
content. One of the important features for student dyads and practice assignments is the archive component that
allows recording of participants in real time including any video, text chat or Power Point Presentations.
Whatever is archived can be viewed at a later date. This allows classmates and instructors to later review
assignments for discussion during Live Chats or to post comments on the Discussion Board. In the Online
educational program, faculty members are selected both for their expertise as practicing clinicians who enjoy
teaching AND for their proficiency in working within the computer environment of the Internet.

SchoolFlex Program

Need an extra year after graduating from high school to physically, mentally or emotionally prepare for the
rigors of college? With our SchoolFlex program a student can train at Pacifica College, while taking classes,
earning a certificate and playing their favorite sport. Sports offered at Pacifica College are men’s basketball,
men’s rugby, men & women’s lacrosse, men’s baseball and women’s softball. Coming soon are men &
women’s volleyball, women’s basketball and men & women’s golf.

Why SchoolFlex? Become more marketable. Enhance your job performance, gain recognition and increase your
marketability in your career field or an area of interest. Our professional certification programs will help you gain
valuable knowledge, skills and training in a specific field. Some certificate programs even offer you the opportunity
to continue after the first year to earn college credits and a degree. Regardless of your academic level, there’s a
certificate program to match your interest.

Pacifica College offers student two courses each quarter for the first year. After the first year the student will
receive a certification in their specialty. There are ten certificate programs offered (Sports Psychology, Personal
Trainer, Strength and Conditioning, Wellness and others) and are the student’s choice. Find the full list of
certificates on our web site. Since students only study part-time, enrollment in the courses does not affect
NCAA eligibility. At the end of the first year and if a student wishes to continue at Pacifica College all classes
are accepted toward a bachelor’s degree.

In SchoolFlex our classes are a combination of in the classroom and online. You meet with your professor each
Monday. Evening classes are also available. Take part in a lecture and receive your weekly assignment. The
remainder of the week you are taking part in sports, strength training and being with your fellow students. The
best part---- cost of the program is only half of what it costs to be enrolled as a full time student.


CERTIFICATES & DEGREES

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Certificate programs are comprised of the program-specific courses that make up each discipline. The following
certificate programs require completion of 28 Quarter units:

       Sports Medicine
       Sports Studies
       Sports Fitness
       Sports Management
       Wellness
       Sports Strength and Conditioning
       Personal Training
       Sports Coaching

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       Sports Administration
       Sports Psychology

Associates of Arts Degree in Sports Administration require completion of 90 quarter units.

Bachelors: Bachelor’s Degrees require completion of 185 quarter units

       Bachelor of Business Administration in Sports Management
       Bachelor of Science/Arts in Human Performance Management
       Bachelor of Science/Arts in Physical Education
       Bachelor of Science in Sports Psychology
       Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training
       Bachelor of Science in Athletic Therapy
       Bachelor of Science/Arts in Recreation Management

Bachelor’s Degrees are comprised of:

       General Education                       63 Quarter Units
       Core Courses                            54 Quarter Units
       Program-Specific Courses                45 Quarter Units
       Sports Activity Courses                 23 Quarter Units
       Total:                                  185Quarter Units

Bachelors of Science Degree in Athletic Training is comprised of:

       Core Courses                            38 Quarter Units
       Philosophy                              14 Quarter Units
       Written & Oral Communication            14 Quarter Units
       Science and Mathematics                 24 Quarter Units
       Social and Behavioral Sciences          14 Quarter Units
       Humanities and Fine Arts                14 Quarter Units
       Program-Specific Courses                83 Quarter Units
       Total:                                  201 Quarter Units

Master’s: Completion of 45 Quarter units.

       Masters of Business Administration in Sports Management
       Masters of Science Sports Psychology

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Sports Management (select 28 Quarter Units)

• SMC 301      Sports Administration (4)
The purpose of this course is to demonstrate to the prospective sport manager the importance of a basic
understanding of administration theory and practice. The course will help students understand the sport
manager's position and the environment in which he or she must perform.
• SMC 302      Sports Business and Personnel Management (4)
This course involves the study of the principles of personnel management including staffing, training, creation
of a favorable work environment, labor relations, compensation, benefits, laws, position descriptions, and
employee evaluations.
• SMC 303      Sports Marketing (4)

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This course includes an in-depth study of sports marketing and the influence it has in accomplishing objectives
in today's world of sports. It involves a thorough review of the product (in both its tangible and "service" forms)
and of how the product is brought to market. Topics include advertising, promotions, public relations, location,
pricing, sponsorships, licensing, market segmentation, and the role of research.
• SMC 304       Sports Facilities and Event Management (4)
This course involves the study of the principles, guidelines, and recommendations for planning, constructing,
using, and maintaining indoor and outdoor sports, physical education, recreation, and fitness facilities
• SMC 305       Sports Fund Raising (4)
This course is a study of the concepts of sports fundraising activities that provides a framework by which
development staff, managers, and directors can operate and develop fundraising programs
*SMC 306        Sports Public Relations (4)
This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of public relations and its role in sports
management. A clear understanding of the differences between public relations and advertising, marketing,
publicity, or promotion is provided. The basic areas of public relations are covered, and an understanding of
public relations planning is provided.
• SMC 307       Introduction to Business of Sports Agents (4)
This course is designed to examine the role of the sports agent in today’s world of sports. An emphasis is placed
on NCAA rules and state regulations surrounding recruitment by agents and the potential pitfalls an athlete
could face. A thorough understanding of the sports agency profession is provided, including the techniques
necessary to operate successfully in the profession.

Sports Coaching (28 Quarter Units)

• SCC 301       Sports Administration (4)
 The purpose of this course is to demonstrate to the prospective sport manager the importance of a basic
understanding of administration theory and practice. The course will help students understand the sport
manager's position and the environment in which he or she must perform.
• SCC 302       Sports Strength and Conditioning (4)
This course presents approaches to assessing and enhancing human sport performance through improving
strength and cardiovascular endurance. The various methods of achieving this are examined with a focus on
injury prevention as well.
• SCC 303       Sports Coaching Methodology (4)
 This course is designed to provide the student with a conceptual blueprint for teaching sport and the
fundamentals of sport coaching. The development of a personal coaching philosophy will be derived from a
process of consciously assessing critical issues and developing a clear rationale for holding to one particular
approach as opposed to another.
• SCC 304       Sports Psychology (4)
This survey course focuses on the study of motivational phenomena that affect the performances of individual
athletes and teams. Stress and leadership characteristics of coaches and athletes will also be studied.
• SCC 305       Sports Medicine (4)
 This course is designed to give the student the basic understanding needed to recognize sport-related injuries
and to provide appropriate emergency treatment, along with ensuring proper follow-up sports health care
• SCC 306       Sports Facilities and Event Management (4)
 This course involves the study of the principles, guidelines, and recommendations for planning, constructing,
using, and maintaining indoor and outdoor sports, physical education, recreation, and fitness facilities.

Sports Psychology (28 Quarter Units)

*SPC301        Sports Psychology (4)
This course is designed to give the student the basic understanding needed to recognize sport-related injuries
and to provide appropriate emergency treatment, along with ensuring proper follow-up sports health care
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*SPC302        Applied Sport and Fitness
*SPC303        Leadership
*SPC304        Contemporary Issues in Sport and Fitness
*SPC305        Anger Management
*SPC306        Human Growth and Development
*SPC308        Sports Elective

Personal Training (28 Quarter Units)

*PTC301         Personal Training (4)
This course will combine sport science and entrepreneurial principles in the design and implementation of a
personal training business.
*PTC302         Human Anatomy and Physiology (4)
This course is a study of the structure and function of the various systems of the human body.
*PTC303         Scientific Principles of Coaching (4)
In order to optimize performances, guarantee safety, and promote well-being in athletes, coaches must
constantly update and modify their coaching practices by regularly seeking out new knowledge in the sport
sciences. Course is designated to teach coaches to be active consumers and appliers of scientific information.
*PTC304         Sports Performance Enhancement (4)
Course is designed for sport coaches to study human movement as it relates to sport activities. Coaching
techniques and methodology are addresses to learn how to analyze skills and improve sport performance.
*PTC305         Sports and Fitness Nutrition (4)
Course covers the principles of sound nutrition as it relates to the athlete as well as to the average individual in
our society. In addition, the course covers the physiological aspects of how nutrition affects the body in terms of
overall optimal health.
*PTC306         Psychological Aspects of Health and Fitness Programming (4)
Course is a study of the psychological and sociological aspects of health and fitness programming and the
applications of this knowledge to the development of effective motivational and behavioral modification
strategies

Wellness Coaching and Administration (28 Quarter Units)

*WCC301         Sports and Fitness Nutrition (4)
This course covers the principles of sound nutrition as it relates to the athlete as well as to the average
individual in our society. In addition, the course covers the physiological aspects of how nutrition affects the
body in terms of overall optimal health.
*WCC302         Scientific Principles of Coaching (4)
In order to optimize performances, guarantee safety, and promote well-being in athletes, coaches must
constantly update and modify their coaching practices by regularly seeking out new knowledge in the sport
sciences. This course is designated to teach coaches to be active consumers and appliers of scientific
information
*WCC303         Principles of Fitness and Health (4)
This course will study of the importance of physical activity on the enhancement of quality of life, performance,
and prevention of diseases such as coronary artery disease and obesity. This course will examine the principles
of physical activity as it relates to the athlete as well as to the average individual in our society. Additionally,
this course includes the physiological aspects of how physical activity affects the body in terms of overall
health.
*WCC304         Psychological Aspects of Health and Fitness Programming (4)
This course is a study of the psychological and sociological aspects of health and fitness programming and the
applications of this knowledge to the development of effective motivational and behavioral modification

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strategies.
*WCC305         Concepts of Wellness (4)
This course will combine sport science and entrepreneurial principles in the design and implementation of a
personal training business.
*WCC306         Sports Entrepreneurship (4)

Sports Medicine (28 Quarter Units)

*SMC301         Sports First Aid (4)
Sports First-Aid is a coach’s guide to preventing, responding and managing sports injuries. Being a successful
coach requires knowing more than just the X’s and O’s of the sport – but also fulfilling the role of a ―first
responder‖ for their athletes.
*SMC302         Seminar in Sports Medicine (4)
An overview of the sports medicine profession designed to educate athletic trainers, fitness professionals, and
sport coaches on how to assess and manage sports injuries.
*SMC303         Sports Injury Evaluation (4)
This course is designed to enhance the student's assessment techniques in the evaluation of athletic injuries and
illnesses. This course considers the connection between structure and function, with anatomy being the structure
upon which biomechanical and physiological function is based. Particular emphasis is placed upon the
development of a sound systematic and methodical evaluation technique to assess abnormal biomechanics
(pathomechanics) and abnormal physiology (pathology). Such a technique is critical for making decisions on
how to best manage and rehabilitate the injured or ill athlete.
*SMC304         Sports and Fitness Nutrition (4)
This course covers the principles of sound nutrition as it relates to the athlete as well as to the average
individual in our society. In addition, the course covers the physiological aspects of how nutrition affects the
body in terms of overall optimal health.
*SMC305         Sports Performance Enhancement (4)
The course is designed for sport coaches to study human movement as it relates to sport activities. Coaching
techniques and methodology are addresses to learn how to analyze skills and improve sport performance
*SMC306         Management Strategies in Sports Medicine (4)
The study of the basic concepts, theories, and organization of management as applied to the field of sports
medicine. Topics emphasized include organizational structure and function, program development and
administration, human resource management, financial management, inventory control, information
management, insurance issues, and legal considerations in sports medicine.

Sports Studies (28 Quarter Units)

*SSC301         History of Sports (4)
A study of the development of competition from its beginnings to the highly organized forms of sport.
*SSC302         Sociology of Sports (4)
This is a course designed to introduce the students to the mutual influences which society and sport exercise
have on each other. How people in sports relate to one another and create social measures that enable them to
compete without compromising a basic social contract is one focus of this course. Understanding sports groups
and the social issues that have an impact on sports is also a central theme
*SSC303         Olympic Culture (4)
This is a seminar course which examines the history, the basis, the culture, and the structure of Olympics and
the Olympic movement as both a genesis and a product of the history of sport in the human condition. The
connection between sport as a human activity and its relationship to other human activities will be surveyed and
evaluated
*SSC304         Contemporary Issues in Sports (4)

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This course is designed to introduce current issues in society and their impact on sport at all levels of
participation. Emphasis focuses on a variety of issues facing sport as a leisure activity and as an industry, as
well as how the issues are addressed by the media, sport organizations, coaches, and administrators.
*SSC305         Sports Psychology (4)
This course is designed to give the student the basic understanding needed to recognize sport-related injuries
and to provide appropriate emergency treatment, along with ensuring proper follow-up sports health care
*SSC306         Sports for All (4)
This course is designed to introduce you to the mutual influences that society and physical activity have on each
other. How people in sports relate to one another and create social measures that enable them to be physically
active without compromising a basic social contract is one focus of this course. Understanding sports groups
and the social issues that have an impact on personal health is a central theme.

Sports Fitness (28 Quarter Units)

*SFC301          Sports Administration (4)
The purpose of this course is to demonstrate to the prospective sport manager the importance of a basic
understanding of administration theory and practice. The course will help students understand the sport
manager's position and the environment in which he or she must perform.
*SFC302          Scientific Principles of Coaching (4)
In order to optimize performances, guarantee safety, and promote well-being in athletes, coaches must
constantly update and modify their coaching practices by regularly seeking out new knowledge in the sport
sciences. Course is designated to teach coaches to be active consumers and appliers of scientific information.
*SFC303          Personal Training (4)
This course will combine sport science and entrepreneurial principles in the design and implementation of a
personal training business.
*SFC304          Sports and Fitness Nutrition (4)
This course covers the principles of sound nutrition as it relates to the athlete as well as to the average
individual in our society. In addition, the course covers the physiological aspects of how nutrition affects the
body in terms of overall optimal health.
*SFC305          Sports Strength and Conditioning (4)
Sports Strength and Conditioning is a course designed to study the fundamental principles of training and
nutrition in sports and exercise. The course is intended to develop within students a knowledge of the
anatomical and physiological systems challenged by sports conditioning, strength training, and an awareness of
fitness and nutrition programs which can be used to enhance individual and team performance in sports. This
knowledge base should translate into the ability to design and implement various types of sports conditioning
programs.
*SFC306          Sports Psychology (4)
This course involves the study of human psychological behavior and its influence in sports and exercise
settings. It is designed to provide the student with the information gleaned from research in the field of sports
psychology as well as practical knowledge to become a more effective sports management professional, coach,
or fitness instructor.

Sports Strength & Conditioning Certification (28 Quarter Units)

*SSCC301        Sports Strength and Conditioning (4)
Sports Strength and Conditioning is a course designed to study the fundamental principles of training and
nutrition in sports and exercise. The course is intended to develop within students a knowledge of the
anatomical and physiological systems challenged by sports conditioning, strength training, and an awareness of
fitness and nutrition programs which can be used to enhance individual and team performance in sports. This
knowledge base should translate into the ability to design and implement various types of sports conditioning

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programs.
*SSCC302        Human Anatomy & Physiology (4)
This course is a study of the structure and function of the various systems of the human body.
*SSCC303        Applied Sports Performance (4)
This course is designed to cover the complete spectrum of training intensity. A conditioning program is
established to meet the needs of each specific sport.
*SSCC304        Seminar in Sports Medicine (4)
An overview of the sports medicine profession designed to educate athletic trainers, fitness professionals, and
sport coaches on how to assess and manage sports injuries
*SSCC305        Scientific Principles of Coaching (4)
In order to optimize performances, guarantee safety, and promote well-being in athletes, coaches must
constantly update and modify their coaching practices by regularly seeking out new knowledge in the sport
sciences. This course is designated to teach coaches to be active consumers and appliers of scientific
information.
*SSCC306        Psychological Aspects of Health and Fitness Programming (4)
This course is a study of the psychological and sociological aspects of health and fitness programming and the
applications of this knowledge to the development of effective motivational and behavioral modification
strategies.




Associate of Arts Degree
Sports Administration

QUARTER I
Natural Sciences (Biology, Chemistry or Physiology)
EDUC Mastering Academic Excellence
ENGL Expository English Composition
PE
QUARTER 2
HIST History of the United States to 1865
CEM Sports Business and Personnel Management
Natural Sciences (Biology, Chemistry or Physiology)
PE
QUARTER 3
ENGL Research Writing and Literary Analysis
HIST History of the United States since 1865
MATH Introductory Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences
SPT Sports Elective
PE
QUARTER 4
CEM Sports Administration
SPEECH Fundamentals of Effective Speech OR Organizational and Professional Communication
Humanities (English, History, Philosophy)
PE
QUARTER 5
GOVT American Government and Politics
CEM Sports Marketing

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CEM Sports Facilities and Event Management
PE
QUARTER 6
Visual and Performing Arts (Arts, Drama, Music)
GOVT State and Local Government
CEM Sports Law and Risk Management
CEM Student Life Skills
PE




BACHELOR’S DEGREE COURSES

General Education (Complete 45 units of required courses, plus an additional 18 units of electives for a
total of 63 Quarter Credit Units)

A well-rounded liberal arts course of study is essential for any undergraduate education. Future leaders in the world of
sports need to be effective written and oral communicators; proficient in mathematics, general sciences, nutrition and
health; and knowledgeable about United States and world history. All students must complete the following minimum
units in General Education courses (any non-required course can serve as an elective; transferrable coursework will be
credited at the Dean’s discretion). Courses marked with an (*) are required:

Composition – 8 units
       All students will take two quarters of composition, ENG 115 and ENG 116.
Speech Composition and Presentation – 4 units
       SPH 113 is a required course.
Mathematics – 8 units
       Students who test out of MAT 109 may proceed to MAT 110. MAT 111 may be taken without MAT 110 as a
       prerequisite.
History – 8 units
       HIS 102 is a required course. Students must also take either HIS 101 or HIS 103.
Life Sciences – 4 units
       Students may select from BIO 118, BIO 119 and BIO 120.
Physical Sciences – 4 units
       Students may select from SCI 121 and AST 122.
Nutrition and Health – 4 units
       NUT 108 is a required course.
Electives – 16 units
       Students may select from among any non-required courses in the above disciplines, plus BUS 104, BUS 105, PSY
       106, MAT 112, SPH 114, LIT 117 and PHL 123-126.
*BUS101 Intro to Business
                                                                                                                           14
*BUS 102 Ethics
*BUS 103 Workplace Writing
*BUS 105 Principles of Economics
•HIS 101 Introduction to Western Civilization
•HIS 102* United States History
•HIS 103 World History
•PSY104 General Psychology
*PSY 105 Child Abuse
*PSY 106 Sexuality: Sexual Behavior, Gender Differences
*PSY 107 Alcohol and Drugs in American Society
*PSY 108 Anger Management
•SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology
•PHL 106 Introduction to Philosophy
•ART 107 Introductions to the Arts
•NUT 108 Nutrition and Health
•MAT 109 College Math
•MAT 110 College Algebra
*MAT 111 Business Statistics
•MAT 112 Applied Mathematics: Principles of Accounting
*CMP101 Intro to Computers
•CMP 112 Computer Concepts and Applications
•SPH 113 Speech Composition and Presentation
•SPH 114 Communication and Interpersonal Relations
•ENG115 English Composition I
•ENG 116 English Composition II
• LIT 117 World Literature
• BIO 118 Introduction to Biology
• BIO 119 Human Growth & Development
• BIO 120 Human Anatomy & Physiology
• SCI 121 Introduction to Physical Sciences
• AST122 Introduction to Astronomy
• PHL 123-126 Ethics and Moral Development Seminars

Core Courses (48 Quarter Credit Units)

Because Pacifica College’s mission is to produce leaders in the sports industry, the foundation of the curriculum lies in the
Core Courses. Students will select 12 of the 18 Core Courses to explore such topics as the history and rules of sports;
social, cultural, gender and ethnic issues; sports and health psychology; the science of performance; management skills;
and law and ethics.

• PC 101    Organizational Behavior
• PC 102    Sports, Games, and Culture
• PC 103    Ethics and Culture in Sports
• PC 104    Sports Ethics & Law
• PC 105    Sports Psychology
• PC 106    Health Psychology
• PC 107    Recreation and Leisure
• PC 108    Principles of Learning and Skills Acquisition
• PC 109    History of Sports
• PC 110    Exercise Physiology
• PC 111    Conceptual Basis of Kinesiology
• PC 112    Analysis of Team Sports
• PC 113    Analysis of Individual Sports
• PC 114    Small Business Development
• PC 115    Small Business Management
                                                                                                                          15
• PC 116     Leadership Principles
*PC 117      Sports & Personal Development
• PC 118     Ethnic, Cultural, and Gender Issues in Sports

Physical Education (24 Quarter Units)
Pacifica College requires all students to take at least 1 units of Physical education each quarter. PE classes offered are:

• PE 101     Archery
• PE 102     Badminton
• PE 103     Basketball
• PE 104     Bowling
• PE 105     Boxing
• PE 106     Dance I
• PE 107     Dance II
• PE 108     Golf
• PE 109     Judo
• PE 110     Soccer
• PE 111     Softball
• PE 112     Strength & Fitness
• PE 113     Swimming
• PE 114     Taekwondo
• PE 115     Table Tennis
• PE 116     Tennis
• PE 117     Volleyball
• PE 118     Weight Lifting
Bachelor of Business Administration - Sports Management
The Bachelor of Business Administration undergraduate program in Sports Management stresses both theoretical and
practical objectives which will give the graduate the necessary background and tools to obtain a position in the field of
management, marketing, and recreation management. The program includes information on marketing principles,
consumer behavior, and on the practical aspects of relating this discipline to the general public. The College offers courses
planned to meet the interests of the students as they fulfill the general education and core coursework, with an emphasis
on the business and practical aspects of the subject.

General Education Curriculum (63 Credits)
Sports Activity (23 Credits)
Business Core Curriculum (52 Credits)
Major Curriculum (24 Credits)
Electives (16 credits)

Students must complete 13 courses to develop a solid understanding of all areas of business:

           ACCT 201. Introductory Accounting I
           ACCT 202. Introductory Accounting II
           ECON 201. Principles of Economics I (Micro)
           ECON 202. Principles of Economics II (Macro)
           ECON 303. Microeconomics or
            ECON 304. Macroeconomics*
           FINC 332. Business Finance
           ISOM 241. Business Statistics
           ISOM 247. Business Information Systems
           ISOM 332. Operations Management
           LREB 315. Law and the Regulatory Environment of Business I
           MGMT 201. Managing People and Organizations
                                                                                                                              16
           MGMT 304. Strategic Management
           MARK 201. Principles of Marketing

* ECON 303 is required for finance and economics majors.

In addition to the Business Core, student must also complete the following requirements: (24 Credits)

           CMUN 101. Public Speaking
           MATH 131 or 161. Elements of Calculus or Calculus I
           MGMT 341. Business Ethics
           BSAD 220. Internship and Career Preparation
           Two Writing Intensive courses
           Global Awareness.

Major Courses: (*) are required in the major. (24 Credits)

• MMR 301*      Sports Business and Personnel Management
• MMR 302*      Sports Administration and Finance
• MMR 303       Public Relations and Fundraising
• MMR 304       Managing Sports Facilities
• MMR 305*      Consumer Behavior
• MMR 306*      Marketing Principles
• MMR 307       Sports Marketing
• MMR 308       Sports Marketing Communication
• MMR 309       Law and Sports Marketing
• MMR 310*      History and Philosophy of Recreation
• MMR 311*      Sociology of Sports
• MMR 312       Commercial Recreation
• MMR 313       Recreation in the Multicultural Community
• MMR 314       Dynamics of Early Childhood Play




                                                                                                        17
Human Performance Management Major
BACHELOR'S DEGREE (BS or BA)

» Credit Hour Requirements: A total of 185 credit hours are required for graduation -- a total of 63 credit hours for
this major. Nine to 10 credit hours of required support courses may be used as general education credit. A total of 40
upper division credit hours are required with 34-36 upper division hours possible within the required courses for this
major.

General Education
Refer to General Requirements for either Bachelor of Science or Bachelor of Arts requirements.

Course Requirements for BS or BA

Required Core Courses (34 credit hours)

       HAS 3020 Health Care Marketing (4)
       HLTH SS1030 Healthy Lifestyles (4)
       HLTH 2300 Emergency Response (4)
       HLTH 3200 Methods in Health Education (4)
       PEP 2200 Foundations of Human Performance Management Professions (4)
       PEP SI3600 Measurement for Evaluation & Research (4)
       PEP 4620 Leadership Concepts for Human Performance Management (4)
       PEP 4800 Individualized Project (1)
          and PEP/REC 2890/4890 Cooperative Work Experience (4)
        or PEP/REC 2890/4890 Cooperative Work Experience (5)
       AT 4990 Senior Seminar (1)
                                                                                                                         18
Professional Areas of Emphasis

A student must complete the required and support courses in either the Wellness or the Sports and Recreation Services
Emphasis.

° Wellness Emphasis

Required Specific (36 credit hours)

       AT 3600 Ergonomics for Health and Safety (4)
       HLTH 4150 Needs Assessment & Planning Health Promotion Programs (4)
       NUTR 2320 Food Values, Diet Design & Health (4)
       NUTR 3020 Sports Nutrition (4)
        or NUTR 4420 Nutrition and Fitness (4)
       PEP 2300 Fitness Evaluation and Exercise Prescription (4)
       PEP 3270 Teaching Aerobic Conditioning (4)
       PEP SI3500 Kinesiology (4)
       PEP 3510 Exercise Physiology (4)
       PEP 4370 Exercise Management for Special Populations (4)




Electives (5-6 credit hours total)

       HLTH 2400 Art of Emotional Wellness (4)
       HLTH 3400 Substance Abuse Prevention (4)
       PEP 3280 Teaching Neuromuscular Conditioning (4)
       NUTR 2220 Prenatal & Infant Nutrition (4)
       NUTR 2420 Childhood & Adolescent Nutrition (4)
       NUTR 3220 Foundations of Diet Therapy (4)
       NUTR DV3420 Multicultural Health & Nutrition (4)
       NUTR 3020 or NUTR 4420 (if not taken in the core) (4)
       NUTR 3320 Health and Nutrition in the Older Adult (4)
       NUTR 4320 Current Issues in Nutrition (4)
       PE 1010 Aerobics (1)
       PE 1040 Walking for Fitness (1)
       PE 1043 Jogging (1)
       PE 1070 Cross Training for Fitness (1)
       PE 1080 Strength Training (1)
       PE 1300 Swimming (1)
       PE 1310 Water Aerobics (1)
       PE 1630 Cross Country Skiing (1)

Required Support Courses (12 credit hours)

       HTHS LS1110 Bio-medical Core Lecture (4)
        or ZOOL LS1020 Human Biology (4)
       NUTR LS1020 Foundations in Nutrition (4)
       CHEM PS1010 Introductory Chemistry (4)

° Sports and Recreation Services Emphasis

Required Specific (28 credit hours)
                                                                                                                        19
       PEP 3550 Issues in Sport (4)
       PEP 3700 Facilities and Events Management (4)
       PEP 4830 Directed Readings (4)
       REC 3050 Recreation and leisure (4)
       REC 3810 Recreation Leadership and Administration (4)
       REC 3600 Outdoor Adventure Recreation (4)
        or REC 3840 Therapeutic and Social Recreation (4)
       REC 4550 Outdoor Education (4)

Electives (10 credit hours total)

(Choose 8 credit hours from the following elective courses)

       HLTH 2400 Art of Emotional Wellness (4)
       HLTH 3400 Substance Abuse and Prevention (4)
       REC 3600 or REC 3840 (if not taken in the core) (4)
       PEP 3540 Physiological Aspects of Human Performance (4)

(Choose 3-5 credit hours from the following elective courses)

       PE 1010 Aerobics (1)
       PE 1040 Walking for Fitness (1)
       PE 1043 Jogging (1)
       PE 1070 Cross Training for Fitness (1)
       PE 1080 Strength Training (1)
       PE 1310 Water Aerobics (1)
       PE 1520 Hiking (1)
       PE 1527 Rock Climbing (1)
       PE 1630 Cross Country Skiing (1)

Required Support Courses (12 credit hours)

       COMM HU1020 Principles of Public Speaking (4)
        or COMM HU2110 Interpersonal & Small Group Communication (4)
       COMM HU2010 Mass Media & Society (4)
       ECON SS2010 Principles of Microeconomics (4)




                                                                       20
Athletic Training BS Curriculum

Distribution Requirements and Co-requisites
Courses specifically required are listed below each subject area with a double asterisk (**) and must be completed with a
grade of C or better. In addition, all major core courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.

Philosophy: 12 credit-hours
PHI 201                                       Principles of Leadership                                                      (4)
PHI 220                                       Intro. to Philosophy                                                          (4)
PHI                                           Elective                                                                      (4)
Written and Oral Communication: 12 credit-hours
ENG 111                                       First Year Literature and Composition                                         (4)
ENG 112 OR 210                                 Second Year Literature and Composition                                       (4)
SPE 101 OR COM 104 OR Spanish 101                                                                                           (4)
Science and Mathematics: 19 credit-hours
** BIO 220                                    Human Anatomy and Laboratory                                                  (5)
** BIO 240                                    Intro. to Human Physiology & Lab                                              (5)
** MAT 152                                    Elementary Probability & Statistics                                           (4)
** PHY 151                                    Introductory Physics & Lab                                                    (5)
Social and Behavioral Sciences: 12 credit-hours
** PSY 281                                    Introduction to Psychology                                                    (4)
*SOC 201                                      Introduction to Sociology                                                     (4)
BEH/SOC                                       Elective                                                                      (4)
Humanities and the Fine Arts: 16 credit-hours
From Approved Distribution List (9)
SES Core Requirements: 33 credit-hours


                                                                                                                              21
SES 210                                    Foundations of Sport & Exercise Sciences                           (4)
SES 212                                    Emergency Response                                                 (4)
SES 270                                    Concepts of Fitness & Wellness                                     (4)
SES 335                                    Psycho-Social Aspects of Sport                                     (4)
SES 340                                    Adapted Physical Activity, Sport & Recreation                      (4)
SES 361                                    Exercise Physiology & Lab                                          (5)
SES 465                                    Administration of Programs and Facilities                          (4)
SES 480                                    Contemporary Issues & Ethics in Sport                              (4)
Athletic Training Major Requirements: 81 credit-hours
CAT 102                                    Basic Computer Applications                                        (4)
SES 181                                    A. T. Pre-Clinical Skills I                                        (2)
SES 220                                    Care and Prevention of Athletic Injuries & Laboratory              (4)
SES 281                                    A. T. Pre-Clinical Skills II                                       (2)
SES 316                                    Therapeutic Modalities and Laboratory                              (5)
SES 318                                    Therapeutic Exercise and Laboratory                                (5)
SES 320                                    Kinesiology & Laboratory                                           (5)
SES 321                                    Advanced Upper Extremity Assessment of Athletic Injuries and Lab   (5)
SES 322                                    Advanced Lower Extremity Assessment of Athletic Injuries and Lab   (5)
SES 330                                    Nutrition for Physical Performance                                 (4)
SES 381A                                   A.T. Pre-Clinical Skills II Pt. 1                                  (4)
SES 381B                                   A.T. Pre-Clinical Skills II Pt. 2                                  (4)
SES 481A                                   A.T. Pre-Clinical Skills III Pt. 1                                 (4)
SES 481B                                   A.T. Pre-Clinical Skills III Pt. 2                                 (4)
SES 487                                    Senior Seminar in Athletic Training                                (6)
SES 499A                                   A.T. Internship - I                                                (9)
SES 499B                                   A.T. Internship - II                                               (9)
DEGREE TOTAL (ATHLETIC TRAINING, BS): 180 CREDIT-HOURS




                                                                                                                22
Athletic Therapy
Students develop knowledge and technical skills in the theoretical and applied practices of athletic therapy related to
physical activity and sport. These skills include prevention of athletic injury, assessment of injury to athletes, acute-injury
management, rehabilitation of athletic injuries, and a safe return to competitive sport.

Bachelor’s Degrees are comprised of:
• Core Courses                            54 Quarter Units
• General Education                       63 Quarter Units
• Program-Specific Courses                45 Quarter Units
• Sports Activity Courses                 23 Quarter Units
• Total:                                  185Quarter Units

Program Specific Courses (45 Quarter Units)

Biology 231 –      Introduction to Cellular Biology
Kinesiology 201 – Activity: Essence and Experience
Kinesiology 203 – Activity: Health and Performance
Kinesiology 213 – Introduction to Research in Kinesiology
Kinesiology 237 - Introduction to Nutrition
Kinesiology 243 – History of Movement Culture
Kinesiology 245 – Socio-Cultural Perspectives in Sport
Kinesiology 251 – Mind Sciences I
Kinesiology 253 – Mind Sciences II
Kinesiology 261 – Human Anatomy
Kinesiology 263 – Biomechanics I (Prerequisite: Kinesiology 261)


                                             Introduction to Cellular Biology

     Examination of many fundamental principles of life common to all organisms; continues with an overview of
                     structure, replication and function in viruses, bacteria, protists and fungi.
                                                   Course Hours:
                                                  Biology 231

                                                                                                                             23
                                   Prerequisite(s): Biology 30 and Chemistry 30.


Kinesiology                                     Activity: Essence and Experience
  201

Experience in various activities and movement patterns and the study of the fundamental factors that influence the
                                     activities we choose and the way we move.
                                                    Course Hours:


Kinesiology                               Activity: Health, Fitness, and Performance
  203

                       A variety of activities to experience the short-term benefits of exercise.
                                                     Course Hours:




Kinesiology                                 Introduction to Research in Kinesiology
  213

An introduction to research in kinesiology with an emphasis on understanding the research process, including basic
    statistical knowledge, and its relationship to critical thinking. Practical application of concepts through direct
                                     involvement in individual and group projects.
                                                     Course Hours:


Kinesiology                                         Introduction to Nutrition
  237

              Provides students with a basic understanding of the role of nutrition in health and fitness.
                                                  Course Hours:
                                Prerequisite(s): Biology 231 or Kinesiology 259.




Kinesiology                                       History of Movement Culture
  243

  A historical examination of physical and movement culture, with an emphasis on sport, from ancient to modern
                                                     times.
                                                Course Hours:




Kinesiology                                   Socio-Cultural Perspectives in Sport
  245

An examination of current methodologies in the study of cultural meanings of sport, leisure, and physical education.
                                                 Course Hours:


Kinesiology                               Introduction to Motor Control and Learning
  251

    An introduction to neural and cognitive concepts underlying human behavior in physical activity and health.
                                                  Course Hours:


Kinesiology                             Introduction to Exercise and Sport Psychology

                                                                                                                     24
  253

  An introduction to the psycho-social concepts underlying an understanding of human behavior in physical activity,
                                                  sport, and health.
                                                   Course Hours:


Kinesiology                                      Human Anatomy and Physiology I
  259

 The instructional approach is a combination of systematic and regional anatomy and physiology with some surface
   anatomy and radiologic considerations. General cell physiology, bone anatomy, neurophysiology and muscular
  physiology, as well as skeletal structure, types of connective tissues, structure of joints and muscles of the axial
 and appendicular skeleton will be covered. Laboratories utilize human tissue materials, anatomical models, charts,
                                   and prosected cadavers and cadaver specimens.




Kinesiology                                     Human Anatomy and Physiology II
  260

  The instructional approach is a combination of systematic and regional anatomy and physiology with some surface
 anatomy and radiologic considerations. Physiology and anatomy of the cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine, renal
 and gastrointestinal systems as well as anatomy of the reproductive and integumentary systems and special senses
   will be covered. Laboratories utilize human tissue materials, anatomical models, charts, and prosected cadavers
                                                and cadaver specimens.
                                 Course Hours: Prerequisite(s): Kinesiology 259.




Kinesiology                                          Quantitative Biomechanics
  263

    Basic principles of force system analysis, impulse-momentum, work-energy and particle kinematics applied to
                            biological structures, including extensive mathematical analyses.
     Course Hours: Prerequisite(s): Kinesiology 259 or 261 and Pure Mathematics 30 or Mathematics 31.


B.S. IN RECREATION MANAGEMENT




The strength of this major is its innovative curriculum design. It focuses on the unique management needs of the
recreation, tourism, and park fields. Secondly, the curriculum allows students to shift from say public municipal
recreation, to non-profit , to commercial water park resort and still have assurance they have the critical management
skills to perform in any one of the employment fields, As further evidence, listed below are the required courses:

 REC 150         Foundations in Recreation                                                                           4 credits
 REC 200         Program Leadership of Recreation Activities                                                         4 credits
 REC 300         Program Planning in Recreation                                                                      4 credits
 REC 302         Recreation Leadership and Supervision                                                               4 credits
 REC 304         Maintenance of Park and Outdoor Recreation Areas                                                    4 credits
 REC 305         Operation and Management of Swimming Pools and Spas                                                 3 credits
 REC 320         Enterprises in Commercial Recreation and Tourism                                                    4 credits

                                                                                                                           25
 RTH 325          Recreation for Persons with Special Needs                                                         3 credits
 REC 340          Evaluation Methods and Practices                                                                  4 credits
 REC 400          Planning for Park and Recreation Facilities                                                       4 credits
 REC 401          Management in Park and Recreation Resources                                                       4 credits
 REC 402          Risk Management in Leisure Service Organizations                                                  4 credits
 REC 420          Commercial Recreation Management                                                                  4 credits
 REC 449         Internship/Professional Preparation                                                                 2 credit
 REC 450         Internship                                                                                        24 credits




BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN SPORT PSYCHOLOGY
MAJOR IN SPORT PSYCHOLOGY
Faculty Advisor: William E. Myers • bmyers@pacificacollege.com• (888) 412-9379

The Bachelor of Arts in Sport Psychology program offers a comprehensive introduction to the contemporary discipline of
sport psychology. Graduates of this program are well prepared to seek employment in entry-level coaching positions and
admission to graduate psychology programs at the master’s or doctoral level.

Requirements
To receive a Bachelor of Arts in Sport Psychology degree, students must complete at least 180 quarter units as articulated
below, 76.5 of which must be completed at the upper-division level. The following courses are specific degree
requirements. In the absence of transfer credit, students may need to take additional general electives to satisfy the total
units for the degree.

Preparation for the Major
(2 courses; 9 quarter units):

                                                                                                                          26
MTH 210 Probability and Statistics*
(Prerequisite: Placement Evaluation)
PSY 100 Introduction to Psychology*
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101)
*May be used to satisfy general education requirements.

Requirements for the Major
(12 courses; 54 quarter units)
PSY448 History of Sport & Psychology
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)
PSY449 Group Dynamics in Sport
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)
PSY300 Social Psychology of Sport
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)
HUB 441 Analysis of Research
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)
PSY440 Sport Psychology for Coaches
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)
PSY443 Culture and Sport Psychology
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)
SCI 385 Biomechanics of Sport
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)
PSY446 Positive Psychology
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)

Emphasis in Applied Sport Psychology
Designed for students wishing to prepare for entry into professional coaching, this specialization focuses upon the
application of psychological principles to athletics. The specialization includes a senior project and practicum designed to
give students practical experiences in the field of sport psychology.
PSY444 Wellness and Peak Performance
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)
PSY445 Applied Sport Psychology
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)
PSY442 Seminar in Applied Sport Psychology
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101 and PSY 100)
PSY485 Sport Psychology Sr. Project (two month course)
(Prerequisites: ENG 100/101, PSY 100, and at least 10 courses completed in the major)

Upper Division Electives
(4 courses; 18 quarter units)
Choose 4 upper division electives from available offerings.




                                                                                                                          27
Master’s Degree Programs
Sport and Exercise Psychology Specialization - MS in Movement Science
The Master of Science in Movement Science with a specialization in Sport and Exercise Psychology is a two-year
program. You may opt to take eight to twelve credits per semester. Requirements for this 48 credit-hour master's degree
program include a thesis or a practicum. If you select the applied (or practicum) option, you must complete a
comprehensive examination. You must pass an oral exam in the semester of graduation.

Core Courses (20 credits required)
SES 520 Biomechanics (4 credits)
SES 616 Research Methods (4 credits)
SES 621 Ethical Issues in SES (4 credits)
SES 689 Masters Thesis (8 credits)
or
SES 686 Practicum (4 credits) and
SES 679 Internship (4 credits)

                                                                                                                          28
Concentration Courses (20 credits required)

Sport Psychology Concentration
SES 537 Sport Psychology (4 credits)
SES 625 Motor Learning and Control (4 credits)
SES 660 Performance Enhancement (4 credits)
SES 664 Motor Development (4 credits)
PSY 513 Abnormal Psychology (4 credits)

Exercise Psychology Concentration
SES 527 Sport Psychology (4 credits)
SES 625 Motor Learning and Control (4 credits)
SES 662 Exercise Psychology (4 credits)
SES 664 Motor Development (4 credits)
PSY 526 Health Psychology (4 credits)

Elective Courses (8 credits required)

* 4 hours in SES from the following courses:
SES 533 Sport Marketing Management (4 credits)
SES 541 Cardiac Rehabilitation (4 credits)
SES 561 Advanced Exercise Physiology (4 credits)
SES 563 Applied Physiology of Resistance Training (4 credits)
SES 660 Performance Enhancement (4 credits)
SES 662 Exercise Psychology (4 credits)
SES 668 Psychophysiology of Human Performance (4 credits)
SES 701 Advanced Studies in Statistics (4 credits)

* 4 hours in PSY from the following courses:
PSY 513 Abnormal Psychology (4 credits)
PSY 526 Health Psychology (4 credits)
PSY 594 Physiology and Treatment of Substance Abuse (4 credits)
PSY 620 Behavior Modification (4 credits)
PSY 639 Introduction to Neuropsychology (4 credits)
CSL 652 Individual Counseling Procedures (3 credits)

MASTER OF BUSNIESS ADMINISTRATION IN SPORTS MANAGEMENT

The graduate level program, Master of Business Administration in Sports Management, is intended to provide advanced
study for academic growth and development in the education and management of sport-related fields of interest. This is
accomplished by building on foundation Core courses from undergraduate study, emphasizing the physical performance
of the discipline, and applying the foundational theory to the practical application in the industry of sports.

Course Descriptions

Introductory Course (one course, Four Credits)

Required: SPRT K4220. Social-Historical Foundations of American Sport.

Accounting/Finance Sequence (three courses, 12 credits)
    BUSI K4009. Financial Accounting. 4 credits
    BUSI K4003. Corporate Finance. 4 credits
    SPRT K4360. Sports Accounting and Finance. 4 credits


                                                                                                                     29
Marketing Sequence (two courses, eight credits)

Required:

       BUSI K4020. Introduction to Marketing and Marketing Management. 4 credits
       Choose one from:
       SPRT K4550. Sports Marketing, Sponsorship, and Sales. 4 credits
       SPRT K4560. Sports Media Marketing. 4 credits
       SPRT K4570. Sports Business Communications and Public Relations. 4 credits

    Core Courses (three courses, twelve credits)

       Required:
       SPRT K4410. Leadership and Personnel Management in the Sports Industry. 4 credits
       Choose two from:
       SPRT K4620. Sport Facility and Event Management. 4 credits
       SPRT K4460. Sports Law and Ethics. 4 credits
       SPRT K4740. Intercollegiate Athletics Administration. 4 credits

Seminar (one course, four credits)

       Choose from:
       SPRT K5150. Seminar in Sports Business. 4 credits
       SPRT K5160. Seminar in Sports Media. 4 credits
       SPRT K5175. Seminar in Sports Marketing. 4 credits

    Project Requirement (one course, four credits)
     SPRT K4980. Internship in Sports Management. 4 credits
     SPRT K4990. Supervised Project in Sports Management. 4 credits
     Elective
     Choose one additional course from above, or approved elective.




SPRT K4220. Social-Historical Foundations of American Sport.
Description

The foundation course for the Sports Management program is a chronological and topical examination of the history of
American sport, beginning in the colonial era and ending in the present. The major events and trends in sports history are
analyzed and placed within the broader context of American history, considering how historical processes influenced the
rise of sport, and how sport influenced major social and cultural developments. Particular emphasis is given to the
commercialization of sport. Throughout, students read seminal works on the history of sports. Through analysis of the
historical, social, commercial, and economic context of American sport, the course teaches students to understand and
manage contemporary issues in the business of sport.

BUSI K4003. Corporate Finance.
Prerequisite

One accounting course (ECON W2261/W4261 Introduction to Accounting and Finance or the equivalent) and one course
in finance (BUSI K4001 Introductory Finance or the equivalent). Appropriate professional experience may meet either
prerequisite.


                                                                                                                        30
Description

An exploration of the central concepts of corporate finance for those who already have some basic knowledge of finance
and accounting. This case-based course considers project valuation; cost of capital; capital structure; firm valuation; the
interplay between financial decisions, strategic consideration, and economic analyses; and the provision and acquisition of
funds. These concepts are analyzed in relation to agency problems: market domination, risk profile, and risk resolution;
and market efficiency or the lack thereof. The validity of analytic tools is tested on issues such as highly leveraged
transactions, hybrid securities, volatility in initial public offerings, mergers and acquisitions, divestitures, acquisition and
control premiums, corporate restructurings, and sustainable and unsustainable market inefficiencies.

BUSI K4009. Financial Accounting.
Prerequisite

At least one accounting course (ECON W2261/W4261 Introduction to Accounting and Finance, or the equivalent) and one
course in finance (BUSI K4001 Introductory Finance, or the equivalent). Students with substantial and relevant
professional experience in financial institutions may be able to meet the demands of this course without a previous
accounting or finance course.

Description

An introduction to the principles of financial accounting, designed to teach students how to read, understand, and interpret
the financial statements of a business enterprise. Covers how to evaluate a business’ performance, analyze its cash flows,
and assess its financial position. The course incorporates an examination of the generally accepted accounting principles
(GAAP) underlying financial statements, their implementation in practice, and the role of independent auditors. Also
considered are the limitations of financial reports and their evolution in response to changing business conditions, current
accounting controversies, as well as the ethical issues and the constraints that limit the freedom, and affect the course of
action, of rule makers and regulators.


SPRT K4360. Sports Accounting and Finance
Prerequisite

BUSI K4009 Financial Accounting and BUSI K4003 Corporate Finance.

Description

This course provides an extensive overview of the business of professional sports and the financial and accounting skills
necessary for sports managers to succeed in professional sports organizations. This course aims to provide practical,
hands-on experience to real-life financial and accounting challenges. The first section of the course examines the sports
industry from a macroeconomic perspective, surveying the business models of the major sports leagues, organizations,
and various business sectors (such as media, licensing, facilities, etc). The second section of the course examines the
professional sports industry on a microeconomic level by teaching the practical financial and accounting skills used in day
to day operations of professional sports organizations. By the end of the course, students will have a solid comprehension
of the role of finance and accounting in the sports industry and be able to successfully apply that knowledge to financial
and accounting issues routinely faced by sports managers.

BUSI K4020. Introduction to Marketing and Marketing Management.
Description

No previous background in marketing is required. Course objectives: (1) to provide an overview of the basic concepts in
marketing; (2) to develop decision-making skills by applying these concepts to real-life problems; and (3) to provide
experience in developing marketing strategies for products in various stages of their product life cycle. These objectives
are achieved by a combination of lectures, readings, and class discussions.
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SPRT K4550. Sports Marketing, Sponsorship, and Sales.
Prerequisite

BUSI K4020 Introduction to Marketing and Marketing Management.

Description

Examination of corporate sponsorship, its growing role and importance in the corporate/brand marketing mix; importance
to event and property producers/organizers, participants, athletes, entertainers, communities and the media. Overview of
the industry and instruction on effective methods to plan, price, organize, acquire, implement, measure, and evaluate
sponsorships including the development of a corporate sponsorship plan. Emphasis on and post program analysis utilizing
various types of marketing research.

SPRT K4560. Sports Media Marketing.
Prerequisite

BUSI K4020 Introduction to Marketing and Marketing Management.

Description

Billions of dollars are spent annually by the sports industry in an attempt to generate awareness, establish images, and
attract visitors. Such persuasion activities are the focus of advertising and public relations which seek to influence
consumers' choices to participate in and/or attend sports or sporting events. This course delves deeply into this aspect of
marketing through exploration of the techniques and activities used to advertise and promote sports events. Specific topics
include: the marketing mix, the evolution of media in the 21st century, advertising awareness, brand awareness, critical
and frequently used brand metrics, message recall, consumer motivation and attitudes, behavior, endorsements,
promotions, naming rights, licensing, sponsorship, media management, constructing the advertising message, as well as
designing advertising and, more broadly, sports marketing campaigns.

SPRT K4570. Sports Business Communications and Public Relations.
Description

This course provides a comprehensive survey and analysis of the best practices and techniques for effective
communication in the sports and entertainment industry. Topics include how to define, develop, and deliver an effective
campaign; the use of mass and social media platforms for brands, personalities and teams; and the management and
mitigation of crisis. Course pedagogies include case-studies, simulations, and guest speakers.

SPRT K4410. Leadership and Personnel Management in the Sports Industry.
Description

This course examines issues of management and organizational behavior within the broad context of the sports industry,
with specific reference to issues of staffing, motivation, and communication. Introduces leadership theory, as well as the
tools and techniques for its practical applications, including how to most effectively put leadership theory to work on a
daily basis within a sports organization.


SPRT K4460. Sports Law and Ethics.
Description

With specific reference to the role of the sports manager, this course provides an extensive overview of legal principles
and ethical issues in professional sports. It begins with an introduction to the different fields of law and a survey of the
broad issues related to sports law (such as antitrust exemption, labor law, and the athlete/agent relationship), before

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turning to consider the legal issues routinely faced by sports managers (such as the legal aspects of risk management). The
course concludes with a study of the role and application of ethics in the decision-making process.

SPRT K4620. Sport Facility and Event Management.
Description

This course provides students with an understanding of the complexity involved in sport facility and event management.
Sport facility management includes a variety of activities such as planning and designing a sports facility, staff
management, facility marketing, developing revenue streams, and facility scheduling and operating. Sport event
management consists of identifying goals of the event and coordinating people in the organizations involved to achieve
those goals with the resources available

SPRT K4740. Intercollegiate Athletics Administration.
Description

This course, normally taken in the last year, builds on prior coursework (particularly finance, marketing, management, and
facility/event superintendence) and applies the knowledge learned therein to the particular demands of the college setting.
Through identification and analysis of the unique aspects of college sports administration, the course permits students to
transfer the professional skills acquired in the program to the collegiate sector. Topics such as Title IX compliance,
fundraising, and university communications are explored.

SPRT K5150. Seminar in Sports Business
Prerequisite

Advanced standing in the Sports Management program, with at least 44 credits points (11 courses) completed.

Description

Usually taken in the last semester of study, the Seminar in Sports Business is the capstone course in the finance sequence.
Through examination and analysis of sports business operations from a meta-perspective, it aims to tie together the
elements mastered in the finance sequence with the material presented in other courses. Though specific topics, emphases,
and case studies vary term to term, the course seeks to impart a mastery and understanding of the structure and operation
of sports organizations and their place in the national business landscape, specifically through analysis and evaluation of
the essential foundations of the industry: labor, agencies and representation, customer and client development, finance and
accounting, facility management and operation, new revenue opportunities, and the media (including television and the
Internet). Finally, it considers corporate American’s relatively recent connection to sports through sponsorships and
marketing, endorsements and licensing.

SPRT K5160. Seminar in Sports Media.

Description

Usually taken in the last semester of study, the Seminar in Sports Media is a capstone course in the finance sequence.
Through historical and contemporary examination and analysis of sports media operations, it aims to provide a
comprehensive understanding of the elements crucial to success. Specific topics include managing talent, production staff,
financing, marketing, and promotions.

SPRT K4980. Internship in Sports Management.
Prerequisite

Advanced standing in the Sports Management program, with at least 24 credits (6 courses) completed, or completion of
the finance sequence through SPRT K4360 Sports Accounting and Finance.

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Description

The Internship in Sports Management provides students not currently working in the industry with hands-on experience in
a sports organization of their choice. Students will be required to successfully undertake, implement, and complete a
timely, industry-specific project in a sports organization, under the supervision of an internship adviser. Students
completing internships meet with their advisers at least four times per term to discuss the progress of their projects. At
term’s end, students submit a written summary of their final projects to the internship adviser and the program director.
Although students have broad flexibility in the types of organizations at which they might intern, the internship project(s)
and terms of service must be approved, in advance, by the internship adviser and the Program Director. SPRT K4980
Internship in Sports Management is offered every term, including summer.

SPRT K4990. Supervised Project in Sports Management.
Prerequisite

Advanced standing in the Sports Management program, with at least 24 credits (6 courses) completed, or completion of
the finance sequence through SPRT K4360 Sports Accounting and Finance.

Description

The Supervised Project in Sports Management is designed for students currently employed in the industry, and provides
an additional opportunity to enhance or refine skills developed in the program, or to undertake training in another.
Working together as a group, students undertake a research project under the supervision of a faculty member who is
involved in, either through scholarship or other professional responsibilities, or can develop a project of significant
pedagogical or professional value. For instance, students might undertake a project that focuses on the application of
statistics to managerial decision-making. In addition, some projects might be geared for one specific subset of students,
such as students working in Intercollegiate Athletics, or those who hold the J.D. SPRT K4990 Supervised Project in Sports
Management is generally offered in the summer, and requires a combination of class meetings, independent and
collaborative research, and a final group presentation.

SPRT K5175. Seminar in Sports Marketing
Prerequisite

K4020 Introductory Marketing/Marketing Management and one advanced Marketing Course (SPRT K4550 Sports
Marketing, Sponsorship, and Sales, SPRT K4560 Sports Media Marketing or SPRT K4570 Sports Business
Communications and Public Relations).


PE Activity Classes

PE 101 Archery (1 Quarter Units)

PE 102 Badminton (1 Quarter Units )

PE 103 Basketball (1 Quarter Units )

PE 104 Bowling (1 Quarter Units )

PE 105 Boxing (1 Quarter Units )

PE 106 Dance I (1 Quarter Units)

PE 107 Dance II (1 Quarter Units)

PE 108 Golf (1 Quarter Units )
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PE 109 Judo (1 Quarter Units )

PE 110 Soccer (1 Quarter Units )

PE 111 Softball (1 Quarter Units )

PE 112 Strength & Fitness (1 Quarter Units )

PE 113 Swimming (1 Quarter Units )

PE 114 Taekwondo (1 Quarter Units)

PE 115 Table Tennis (1 Quarter Units )

PE 116 Tennis (1 Quarter Units )

PE 117 Volleyball (1 Quarter Units )

PE 118 Weight Lifting (1 Quarter Units )

Master of Business Administration - Sports Business

PU 501 Adapted Physical Activity (4 Quarter Units )

Application of theories of learning and principles of teaching to the selection of instructional procedures to be used in
physical education.



PC 502 Philosophy of Human Performance (4 Quarter Units )

Development of a consistent set of basic professional values compatible with individual differences which may serve as a
frame of reference for professional behavior.

PC 503 Historical Interpretation of Human Performance (4 Quarter Units )

A historical examination of the origins and development of the various sport and physical education forms around the
world.

PC 504 International Physical Education and Sport ($ Quarter Units )

An analysis of the current structure, organization and methods of physical education and sport in selected countries.
Social, cultural, political, economical and religious influences.

PC 505 Sport Sociology (4 Quarter Units )

An in-depth study of the relationship between sport and society. Focus will be on social and cultural factors that affect
how Americans play and view sport.

PC 506 Principles and Concepts of Perceptual Motor Learning (4 Quarter Units )

Motor behavior and the learning patterns developed in acquiring skill in a motor activity.

PC 507 Legal and Ethical Aspects of Sport (4 Quarter Units )
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Topics include sport and its relationship to the common law of contracts and torts, the statutory law of labor and antitrust,
constitutional and civil rights law, communications law, and ethics.

PC 508 Marketing and Social Aspects of Sport (4 Quarter Units )

Sport and its relationship to market research designs, strategies, plans, fundraising, consumer behavior, political,
sociological and historical parameters.

PC 509 Management, Leadership and Communication in Sport (4 Quarter Units)

 Management, administration, organizational behavior and communication theories, problems and issues in leadership in
sports.

PC 510 Graduate Project (4 Quarter Units)

Pre-requisite: Completion of all required coursework and approval of graduate advisor.

COLLEGE COURSES

The College reserves the right to cancel any course for which there is insufficient enrollment.

General Education

HIS 101 Introduction to Western Civilization (4 Quarter Units)

The roots of modern civilization in the West as revealed by a study of significant cultures and societies of the past from
the earliest times with emphasis upon the historical development of basic elements of culture and problems of
contemporary times.

HIS 102 United States History (4 Quarter Units)

United States History is an interpretation of the more meaningful and significant issues, events, and ideas that have played
a major role in shaping present day America. Main attention is focused upon political and economic aspects with some
treatment of social and cultural developments.

HIS 103 World History (4 Quarter Units)

An overview of world history from the earliest writings through the rise of capitalism. Brief survey of civilizations from
those of Mesopotamia, Egypt, China and Mesoamerica through the Middle Ages, Renaissance and Industrial Revolution.

PSY 104 General Psychology (4 Quarter Units)

General Psychology is an intensive study of human behavior. The course examines scientific principles, biological basis
of behavior, sensation, perception, learning memory, motivation, thinking, individual differences, intelligence,
personality, behavior disorders, and therapeutic behavior change.

SOC 105 Introduction to Sociology (4 Quarter Units)

This course will introduce systematic methods of empirical investigation and critical analysis to develop knowledge about
social structure and activity, with the goal of applying it to the world of sports.

PHL 106 Introduction to Philosophy (4 Quarter Units)


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Introduction to Philosophy is an overview of the classical and modern problems of philosophy. A consideration of the
nature of knowledge, views of the cosmos or world, and the problems of truth, beauty, ethics, and theology.

ART 107 Introductions to the Arts (4 Quarter Units)

The objective of this course is to trace the history and development of sport art through the ages. The influences of
culture, technology, and artistic expression on sport art will also be reviewed.

NUT 108 Nutrition and Health (4 Quarter Units)

Nutrition and Health is a course in nutrition and physical fitness. It provides the student with an overall study of the
relationship between nutrition and physical fitness. The effects of nutrition on the anatomical and physiological aspects of
the body are emphasized. The course also examines the production of energy from the intake of a variety of nutritional
sources. The process of metabolism as a means toward energy production and physical activity is also discussed. Meal
planning, basic physiology, current nutritional practices, eating disorders, weight control, and athletic training are
examined as they relate to the nutritional aspects of physical fitness.

MAT 109 College Math (4 Quarter Units)

This course covers the fundamentals of mathematics, including integers, fractions, decimals, ratios, proportions, percents,
geometric constructions and elements of pre-algebra.

MAT 110 College Algebra (4 Quarter Units)

This course includes problem solving, elementary number theory, algebra, logic, and measurement. Selected problems are
explored and extended across content strands. Various instructional methods and assessment alternatives are modeled.




MAT 111 Applied Mathematics: Principles of Accounting (4 Quarter Units)

This course includes instruction in applying core mathematical skills to the essential elements of business operations in
accounting. Subjects covered include: keeping ledgers, profit and loss, gross and net income, loan interest, calculating
taxes and maintaining a payroll.

CMP 112 Computer Concepts and Applications (4 Quarter Units)

For students with little or no computer experience. Topics include: history of computing, computer applications, program
translation, hardware, and technology and society.

SPH 113 Speech Composition and Presentation (4 Quarter Units)

Theory and techniques of public speaking in a democratic society. An introduction to a variety of perspectives and
approaches used to research, organize, deliver, and evaluate public presentations.

SPH 114 Communication and Interpersonal Relations (4 Quarter Units)

Communication and Interpersonal Relations is designed to teach communication and interpersonal relations skills that are
crucial in the sports industry.

ENG 115 English Composition I (4 Quarter Units)



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Development of analytical, comparative skills in reading and writing. Academic (interpretive, analytical, argumentative)
writing based largely on reading of literary/imaginative texts linked by a common theme or issue. Outside research
leading to analysis, comparison, and synthesis in documented research paper.

ENG 116 English Composition II (4 Quarter Units)

Continued development of student writing, analytical and comparative skills. The class culminates in a research paper,
complete with title page, footnotes and bibliography.

LIT 117 Modern World Literature (4 Quarter Units)

Selected literature from around the world since the Second World War from the United States, Middle East, Europe, Latin
America, Africa and Asia.

BIO 118 Introduction to Biology (5 Quarter Units)

This course will explore living organisms through the five different principles of modern biology: cell theory, evolution,
gene theory, homeostasis, and energy.

BIO 119 Human Anatomy (5 Quarter Units)

Human Anatomy comprehensively covers the systems of the human body. The laboratory includes the study of tissues
using the microscope and a detailed study of the human skeleton.

BIO 120 Human Physiology (5 Quarter Units)

Human Physiology focuses on how organ systems operate and interact to maintain homeostasis including responses to
common challenges and disorders.




SCI 121 Introduction to Physical Sciences (5 Quarter Units)

A basic introduction to the study of the physical world. A study of material systems for the non-science major, with an
emphasis on the principles of physics and inorganic chemistry.

AST 122 Introduction to Astronomy (5 Quarter Units)

Introduction to Astronomy provides a quantitative introduction to the solar system, stars, the interstellar medium, the
galaxy, and the universe, as determined from a variety of astronomical observations and models.

PHL 123-126 Ethics and Moral Development Seminars (4 Quarter Units)

The series of seminars is to develop within students the ability to recognize and evaluate ethical and moral situations.
Students will also learn how to approach and better understand different perspectives.

Core Courses

PC 101 Organizational Behavior (4 Quarter Units)

Organizational Behavior is a presentation of major concepts of the behavioral sciences which apply to the management of
sports organizations. The focus is on understanding factors and developing skills which affect the behavior and ultimately
the performance of individuals and groups within organizations.


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PC 102 Sports, Games, and Culture (4 Quarter Units)

Sports, Games, and Culture is designed to help students understand the role of sports in society with a special emphasis on
drug use and abuse as well as differences in how sports are viewed in different cultures.

PC 103 Ethics and Culture in Sports (4 Quarter Units)

This course explores themes within the culture of sports and how ethics is portrayed, clouded, or discovered within the
nuances of the industry.

PC 104 Sports Ethics and Law (4 Quarter Units)

Sports and Law is a course designed to introduce the rules of law as they relate to the sports industry and its transactions.
The class defines and classifies the different types of law, court systems and procedures.

PC 105 Sports Psychology (4 Quarter Units)

Sports Psychology starts the semester with a basic background in general psychology. During the second half of the
semester, this class studies the dynamics of group and individual interaction in sports.

PC 106 Health Psychology (4 Quarter Units)

Study in areas of health, illness, injury, treatment, delivery of treatment, and rehabilitation that are understood by
psychological principles, including perception and emotions. Also includes the use of psychological principles in the
rehabilitation process from illness and injury and the sustaining of optimal health.

PC 107 Recreation and Leisure (4 Quarter Units)

Recreation and Leisure is the examination of fundamental concepts, principles, and the process of planning, construction,
use and management of leisure facilities (sport, fitness, physical education, recreation, resort, park, and tourism). It is also
the study of positive and negative economical, social, environmental, and political implications of leisure facility
development as well as recommendation for planning, construction, use, and operation of recreation facilities.

PC 108 Principles of Learning and Skills Acquisition (4 Quarter Units)

This course focuses on the domain of human learning and how individuals gain skills. The course uses experimental
findings of human cognitive conditioning, retention, transfer of training, and relationship between motivation and
learning. Genetic, behavioral, cognitive and social environment aspects are discussed. Individual differences that affect
learning and skill acquisitions (e.g., anxiety, culture, prior knowledge, perception, values, and motivation) are explored.

PC 109 History of Sports (4 Quarter Units)

A survey history course of sports in both western and eastern civilizations. The history of sports provides information on
social changes throughout time and how society has changed its beliefs, evident in the creation of new games and rules.

PC 110 Exercise Physiology (5 Quarter Units)

Exercise Physiology studies the various factors which can affect human performance, including regulatory mechanisms,
responses, and adaptations that occur as a result of physical activities.

PC 111 Conceptual Basis of Kinesiology (4 Quarter Units)

This course addresses the broad spectrum of human performance as a discipline, the concept of humans as moving beings.
Aims and objectives of physical education as well as current issues and professional responsibilities.


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PC 112 Analysis of Team Sports (4 SQuarter Units)

Analysis of Team Sports is a course designed to introduce students to the rules and strategies of team sports.

PC 113 Analysis of Individual Sports (4 Quarter Units)

Analysis of Individual Sports is a course designed to introduce students to the rules and strategies of individual sports.

PC 114 Small Business Development (4 Quarter Units)

Small Business Development provides students the tools necessary to cull information, research, and prepare in the
development of a small business. The course delves into undergraduate business topics, but with an emphasis on sports.

PC 115 Small Business Management (4 Quarter Units)

Students study the specific management skills in addition to knowledge of key business practices that aid in efficiently
managing a small business. Leadership traits, decision-making skills, and how to manage employees will be covered.

PC 116 Leadership Principles (4 Quarter Units)

Leadership Principles is a course designed to teach the students basic skills of leadership in the business world.

PC 117 Sports and Personal Development (4 Quarter Units)

Sports provide not only physical development, but also an emotional and mental development. This course will explore
the underlying themes of sports and its effects on personal growth.

PC 118 Ethnic, Cultural, and Gender Issues in Sports (4 Quarter Units)

The study of sports from a global perspective, from the viewpoint of ethnic minorities, differing cultures and women in
sports.

Sports Management, Marketing, and Recreation Management

MMR 301 Sports Business and Personnel Management (4 Quarter Units)

Sports Business and Personnel Management is the study of the principles of personnel management including staffing,
development of human resources, and creation of a favorable work environment, management-labor relations,
remuneration, security, and system appraisal as they apply to sport.

MMR 302 Sports Administration and Finance (4 Quarter Units)

Sports Administration and Finance introduces the concepts of sports administration and finance. Sports Administration
and Finance is an analysis of the financial decision-making process of a firm from both internal and external points of
view.

MMR 303 Public Relations and Fundraising (4 Quarter Units)

Public Relations and Fundraising is a study of the nature, content, and application of public relations in sport programs.
The course also includes concepts of sport fundraising activities.

MMR 304 Managing Sports Facilities (4 Quarter Units)

Managing Sports Facilities is the study of the principles, guidelines, and recommendations for planning, construction, and
the use and maintenance of indoor and outdoor sport, physical education, recreational and fitness facilities.
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MMR 305 Consumer Behavior (4 Quarter Units)

Consumer Behavior is a comprehensive study of behavioral models and concepts to help understand, evaluate, and predict
consumer behavior in terms of marketing implications. Determinants of consumer behavior are explored to gain
understanding of the complex forces as they affect the marketplace. The course emphasis is upon understanding the
processes that influence the acquisition, consumption, and disposition of private and public sector goods and services.

MMR 306 Marketing Principles (4 Quarter Units)

Marketing Principles develops a managerial viewpoint in planning and evaluating marketing decisions of the firm:
products, pricing, channels, promotion, information processing, legal implications, and marketing in contemporary
society.

MMR 307 Sports Marketing (4 Quarter Units)

Sports’ Marketing is the study of the sport marketing principles. An evaluation of the elements of the marketing mix
(product, place, price, promotion, and public relations) and their unique applications to the sport industry will be held as
the core of the subject.

MMR 308 Sports Marketing Communication (4 Quarter Units)

Sports Marketing Communication is an overview of sports marketing communications including advertising and sales
promotion. Topics covered include behavioral, legal, economic, and institutional aspects, as well as decision models
applied to selected areas of promotion.

MMR 309 Law and Sports Marketing (4 Quarter Units)

Law and Sports Marketing introduce the students to the concepts of must-know laws in the field of sports marketing.



MMR 310 History and Philosophy of Recreation (4 Quarter Units)

History and Philosophy of Recreation covers the major historical and philosophical developments in sports and recreation.

MMR 311 Sociology of Sports (4 Quarter Units)

A critical exploration of the function of sports in American culture. The course takes an interdisciplinary view in studying
sports as a social, community, religious, political, business and economic phenomena. The course covers all level of
sports including: youth, high school, college and professional. The course will also review sports from a historical
framework to the contemporary scene.

MMR 312 Commercial Recreation (4 Quarter Units)

This course provides the student with an introduction to community and commercial leisure enterprises including: history,
types of services, trends, careers, relationship between business and leisure programs, services and products.

MMR 313 Recreation in the Multicultural Community (4 Quarter Units)

Recreation in the Multicultural Community is a combination of classroom and field-based learning approaches that
introduce the student to the role of leisure services and recreation as a socializing force in the multicultural urban
environment. Emphasis is on discussion, reflection and analysis of course materials and experiences.

MMR 314 Dynamics of Early Childhood Play (4 Quarter Units)

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Dynamics of Early Childhood Play is the study of play in relation to the child’s early growth and development. The course
focuses on the implications for functional, environmental, and leadership dimensions of organized play experiences in
early years.

Sports Coaching, Fitness, and Health

CFH 301 Introduction to Athletic Training (4 Quarter Units)

Introduction to Athletic Training focuses upon the acquisition of strength and cardiovascular enhancement as a means of
improving sport performance. The application of sound nutritional principles for athletes is also reviewed.

CFH 302 Principles of Conditioning (4 Quarter Units)

Conditioning is a very important part of an athlete. Principles of Conditioning is a course designed to teach sports training
and fitness major students the correct way of conditioning one’s body to be in the best shape for competition.

CFH 303 Theory and Methodology of Coaching (4 Quarter Units)

Theory and Methodology of Coaching is the study of theory, philosophy, methods, and techniques relating to the coaching
of a variety of sports. The class emphasizes on practice and event preparation; individual and team fundamentals; and
program administration and evaluation.

CFH 304 Teaching Techniques for School Physical Education (4 Quarter Units)

Teaching Techniques for School Physical Education is an advanced instruction in and practice of teaching competencies
in physical education. Additional emphasis is placed on teaching strategies, developing lesson plans, class organization,
discipline, safety, and performance evaluation.




CFH 305 Coaching Principles: Individual Sports (4 Quarter Units)

Coaching Principles: Individual Sports is the advanced study of theory, philosophy, methods, and techniques relating to
the coaching of various individual sports. Emphasis is placed on practice and event preparation; offensive and defensive
techniques and strategies; motivation, training, and conditioning.

CFH 306 Coaching Principles: Team Sports (4 Quarter Units)

Coaching Principles: Team Sports is the advanced study of theory, philosophy, methods, and techniques relating to the
coaching of various team sports. Emphasis is placed on practice and event preparation; offensive and defensive techniques
and strategies; motivation, training, and conditioning.

CFH 307 Principles of Sports and Exercise Management (4 Quarter Units)

Principles of Sports and Exercise Management combines sport science and entrepreneurial principles in the design and
implementation of a sports and/or personal training business.

CFH 308 Principles of Teaching Group Fitness (4 Quarter Units)

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the educational concepts, performance techniques,
program design, and leadership skills needed to teach group-led exercise programs and design personal training programs.
The course will include basic analysis and application of safe and effective exercise procedures for all fitness levels.


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CFH 309 Promoting Health and Fitness (4 Quarter Units)

This course is designed to teach students the principles of promoting health and fitness. The concepts learned in this class
may be used to promote health and fitness programs for gyms or physical education classes.

CFH 310 Physical Activity and the Aging Process (4 Quarter Units)

Physical Activity and the Aging Process is a study of the psycho-social aspects of aging as related to physical activity.
The class also focuses on implications for functional, environmental and leadership dimensions of leisure and recreation
experiences in the later years as well as the aging process.

CFH 311 Introduction to Sports Health (4 Quarter Units)

Introduction to Sports Health is the study of modalities including the physiological effects, rationale, principles, and
methods of applying physical agents, therapeutic exercises and evaluation, and treatment planning in the practice of
Sports Health.

CFH 312 Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries (5 Quarter Units)

Theories and methods in the prevention, assessment, treatment, and rehabilitation of sports injuries.

CFH 313 Treatment Strategies in Sports Health (5 Quarter Units)

Treatment Strategies in Sports Health is designed as the in-depth study of treatment strategies in the practice of Sports
Health.

CFH 314 Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Injury (5 Quarter Units)

Biomechanics of Musculoskeletal Injury examines the methods of in-depth analysis of normal and abnormal human
movement and function. Lectures will focus on the understanding of joint structure and function as applied to the human
body in health and injuries. Laboratory sessions will focus on evaluation procedures for assessing joint mobility, muscle
strength and function, limb length and girth, and analysis of human movement.
INTENSIVE ENGLISH PROGRAM

Program Description

The IEP Program at Pacifica College offers 2 ESL levels. Each session is quarter-long. To ensure and reinforce proper
learning, all students in ESL classes are administered quizzes on material learned, in addition to the requirement of a final
comprehensive exam.

Program Objectives

The curriculum emphasizes all four language skills: listening, speaking, writing, and reading. Students then learn to
communicate in English, which in turn helps them to understand the many facets of American culture.

Program Descriptions:

ESL I
Students are introduced to Basic English grammatical structures, progressing through the session into more complex
structures using the present past and future verb tenses, as well as more complicated uses of these verb tenses. In the
conversation/listening module, students will learn simple conversational models, such as greetings, and develop them in
sample conversations and role-playing. Eventually, we familiarize the student with these grammatical structures by
practicing in situational conversations. The goal is to allow students to engage in English conversation naturally and at a
manageable pace.

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ESL II

In Level II, we continue teaching more complex grammatical structures so the student can connect the develop ideas
clearly and concisely. In this level we also focus on reading and writing. Students write sentences as daily homework and
correct the sentences of other students. Students are also assisted in experiencing the cultural experiences, through
exposure to a variety of media, such as television, cinema, and literature.

Admission to the Program

The Registered Program in IEP is open for regular enrollment. Each student must complete an examination for purposes
of placement. Pacifica College (PC) places the student at the appropriate level to benefit from the instruction, based on
placement test scores. The prospective student is required to demonstrate ability, at the minimum level, of reading and
writing sufficiently to comprehend the beginning level of instruction.

Tuition and Fee Policy

All students enrolling in a Registered Program of IEP instruction must complete an Enrollment Agreement that includes
full disclosure of fees and cancellation and refund policies.

Disclosure of Registered Status (To be completed in near future)

Pacifica College is registered with the State of California. Registration means we have met certain minimum standards
imposed by the state for registered schools on the basis of our written application to the state. Registration does not mean
we have met all of the more extensive standards required by the state for schools that are approved to operate or licensed
or that the state has verified the information we submit with our registration form.

Transfer into Degree Program

All students prior to beginning classes will take an internally administered proficiency exam. Students who pass may enter
into the degree programs. Those who do not pass will enter into the ESL level class that corresponds with their score.
ADMISSIONS INFORMATION


ADMISSION TO PACIFICA COLLEGE

BACHELOR’S DEGREES AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

The admission process and standards are the same for the Bachelor’s degree programs and certificate programs, as
follows:

All applicants must provide confirmation of high school graduation by one of the following:

• High school diploma or GED certificate;
• Transcript: All applicants must request official transcripts sent directly from the institution of origin. Transcripts must
include confirmation a student graduated or left the institution in good standing, with a minimum GPA of 2.0. Students
who are applying to the bachelor degree or certificate programs and who have completed some college coursework must
submit both college and secondary school transcripts.

GRADUATE PROGRAM - MASTER OF SPORTS BUSINESS



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Admission to the Master’s Degree program requires that the applicant has earned a baccalaureate degree from a regionally
accredited, or state-approved, academic institution. In general, applicants must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 (on
a 4.0 scale) in order to be competitive in the admissions process.

• All applicants must provide confirmation of award of a baccalaureate degree in the form of an official transcript;
• Student must submit a written essay explaining why the background of preparation is appropriate to qualify for
admission to a graduate degree in Sports Business.

INTENSIVE ENGLISH PROGRAM

Admission to the Intensive English Program requires all applicants to take a placement test which will determine the level
of instruction the applicant will be participate in. The Intensive English Program has an open enrollment; therefore, all
applicants will be granted admission to the program. Credits earned in the Intensive English Program are not credited
towards either Bachelor of Business Administration or Master of Business Administration degrees.

ADMISSION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS (On Hold at this time)

Pacifica College issues I-20 eligibility certificates to improve students’ chances of entering the United States. The
University does not supply visas, a service provided only at the U.S. Embassy. International students do not qualify for
need-based financial aid. Students already residing in the U.S. and holding other non-immigrant visas (such as E2, H2, or
L2) are classified as international students.

Admission

International applicants (those who are or will be in the United States on non-immigrant visas) are required to submit the
following documents. Additional information may be required by the academic departments.

1. Application for admission.
2. Application fee – a check or money order drawn on a U.S. bank in U.S. currency and made payable to Pacifica College
must accompany the application; the fee is nonrefundable and cannot be deferred.
3. Scores on examinations required for admission (e.g. TOEFL) must be sent to AIU by the testing agency.
4. One official copy of academic records with certified English translation.
5. Documented evidence of financial support (see Financial Guarantee Statement).
6. Graduate students must submit letters of recommendations directly to the appropriate academic department as
requested.

Financial Guarantee Statement

The United States government requires all international applicants to provide proof of ability to pay tuition and living
expenses before a formal letter of admission or the forms needed for obtaining a visa will be issued. International students
are also required to have health and accident insurance. The cost of college-provided insurance will be added to the
student’s fees unless he or she presents proof of adequate coverage.

Each applicant relying on personal or family support must furnish, at the time of application, an original financial-
guarantee letter indicating the sponsor’s name and address and verifying the ability to pay all education-related expenses
for the first academic year. This document must be verified by bank seal. It is crucial for students to submit their financial-
guarantee letters with their applications if they wish to receive notification of admission as quickly as possible.

Applicants whose financial support will come from their home governments or other official agencies must submit
similarly appropriate documents from their sponsors at the time of application. International students cannot meet the full
amount of their educational expenses by working while in the United States. The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization
Service rarely allows students to work off-campus, and employment opportunities are further limited by legislation that
requires holders of student visas to be full-time students.


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Deadline for International Applications

Students should send completed applications with the required documents and fee to the Office of Admission. All
international students must follow the deadlines in the application for their particular program of study. Only an admission
letter from the Office of Admission grants official admission.

Official Document to Enter the United States

The Office of Admission will provide I-20 eligibility certification for the student to enter the United States. Any student
entering the United States by means of a document issued by AU must register for the semester in which he/she is
admitted. Failure to register disqualifies the student from reapplying for one year from that semester. Re-acceptance is not
guaranteed.

Registration Requirements for International Students

International students on student visas must be registered full-time. Such students are considered in violation of
immigration laws if not formally registered.

PC will not issue a Certificate of Eligibility (Form I·20) until the student has been admitted and has been financially
certified by the University.

The Admissions Office will issue letters of acceptance to successful applicants who have completed satisfactorily all
requirements. Form I-20 will be sent to international students.
Students must report to school within seven (7) days after arriving in the U.S. or the I-20 will be void. An F1 student must
remain in attendance at the university that issued the I-20 form a minimum of two semesters before transferring to another
school.

Admission Credit Evaluations

All official transcripts of previous work completed overseas, as well as at U.S. colleges or universities, should be directed
to the Office of Admissions.


English Language Requirements

All instruction offered by PC is in the English language. An international student must score 213 or higher on the
computer-based test or must score 79 or higher on the internet-based test on the Test of English as a Foreign Language
(TOEFL) in order to qualify for the admission. The student also has the option of passing the AIU-issued English
equivalency exam.

Exceptions to the Admission Standards

Exceptions to the Admission Standards may be made at the discretion of the College President, Academic Dean, and / or
Admissions Director.

ACADEMIC INFORMATION

UNIT OF CREDIT

The quarter credit hour is the unit of academic measurement used by the College. Four hours of contact time equals one
unit of credit for labs, and one hour of contact time equals one unit of lecture.

ACADEMIC CALENDAR
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The College begins classes several times each year. For specific start dates, refer to the calendar. An academic year varies
from 30 to 34 weeks in length in which full-time undergraduate students can earn at least 45 quarter credit hours.

ENROLLMENT STATUS

Undergraduate Class Level
Students are classified by level based on academic credits completed:

Freshman 0-43
Sophomore 44-87
Junior 88-131
Senior 132+

All undergraduates must pursue full-time studies unless admitted to Special Status.

The normal load for undergraduates is 12-16 quarter credits. When registration falls below 12 credits, students are not
eligible to participate in certain extracurricular activities, such as athletics, and jeopardize their financial aid status.

CREDIT FOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Pacifica College does not allow credit for prior experience toward any educational programs.

TRANSFER CREDIT

The awarding of credit for coursework completed at any other institution is at the sole discretion of Pacifica College.
Additionally, Pacifica College does not imply, promise, or guarantee that any credits earned at Pacifica College will be
transferable or accepted by any other institution.




General Criteria and Process

• Official evaluation of acceptability for transfer: An official evaluation of all previously completed college credit is
prepared by the Registrar as part of the process of approval of a transfer student for general admission to the College.
Only the Academic Dean is authorized to speak for the University with respect to the transferability of credit.

• Acceptability for transfer: At the time of admission to the College, previously earned college credit is evaluated by the
Registrar in accordance with regulations established by the Academic Dean as to acceptability for transfer. A summary of
all previous college work and all transferable work is prepared by the Academic Dean for use in advisement of the
student. Such evaluation does not constitute an agreement to accept any specific credit in lieu of any specific requirement
for graduation from Pacifica College. The following general criteria are used by the Dean in determining acceptability for
transfer:

• Credit is accepted from regionally accredited post-secondary institutions, from institutions accredited by bodies
recognized by the Council on Regional Post-Secondary Accreditation (CORPA) and by state-approved schools.

• Foreign institutions: Guidelines presented in the AACRAO World Education Series are applied. Where credit and
content determination cannot be made from foreign transcripts, the Registrar will require that the transcripts be reviewed
by a recognized credential evaluation service at student expense before transfer of credit will be considered. The Registrar
will require that transcripts in languages other than English be translated at student expense. The Registrar reserves the
right to determine whether or not foreign transcripts meet the College requirements for acceptance as official records.

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• Transfer coursework must be established as equivalent (comparable) to coursework required in the program in which the
student is enrolled. This is established through review of transcripts and catalogs of the institution in which credit was
earned.

• Only courses bearing grades of C minus (C-) or higher may be transferred to an undergraduate program. Graduate
coursework must be completed at a minimum grade level of "B". Courses bearing grades such as "pass" or "credit" may
be transferred provided the regulations of the sending institution indicate that such credit represents work at the level of C-
or higher for undergraduate programs. Coursework bearing "pass" or "credit" grades may only be accepted for inclusion in
a specific program upon review and approval of the program faculty.

• In the case of credit that is to be included in a program, time limits on applicability to the program may be established by
the program faculty.

• Transfer of credit by students matriculated at Pacifica College: In general, it is expected that, once enrolled at Pacifica
College, a student will earn all subsequent credit toward the degree at the college.

Scholastic Regulations

Academic Probation

Students who earn a grade of below 70% for two or more courses within one semester, or whose applied performance
does not meet the school’s standard as determined by the applied teaching faculty, shall be placed on academic probation.
Students on probation are required to improve their work sufficiently during the next quarter of enrollment to remove
them from this status. Students who remain on probation for more than one quarter risk dismissal from the school. Each
student on probation shall be notified in writing by the Academic Dean of the requirements that must be satisfied to
preclude dismissal.

Academic Progress

The Pacifica College curriculum is designed to give each and every student a series of courses in a specific order to ensure
optimum learning and understanding from beginning to end. Each course within the program is completed in a fifteen-
week period of time.
Evaluations for appropriate levels of progress are established by:

• Class grades and attendance
• Satisfactory completion of assignments both in and outside of class
• Attainment of the expected level of accomplishment in performance as required

Attendance Policy

Regular class and sports team practice attendance will be taken for each period of educational training. To successfully
complete a course and to receive academic credit, students must attend at minimum 90% of lectures and classes. Special
exceptions to this policy may be made. In the case of illness or family emergency, the student is required to provide
written documentation of such. The student is solely responsible for making up all work missed due to absence.

Auditing

Students who wish to audit (attend without academic credit) a course must request permission in writing from the
Academic Dean of the school. Auditing is available only with such permission.

Disciplinary Probation, Suspension, Expulsion

Any student at Pacifica College may be expelled, suspended, placed on probation, or given a lesser sanction for one or
more of the following causes listed below, which must be campus related. Any disciplinary action by the administration
must be administered in a fair and reasonable manner. Prior notice of at least 15 days will be given before a formal
                                                                                                                                48
disciplinary action is taken. The notice shall be in writing and shall state the facts which prove that one of the offenses has
been committed and what, if any, informal actions have been taken. Students may appeal the disciplinary action and
demand a hearing through the Student Grievance procedure.

Causes for Sanction

1. Cheating or plagiarism in connection with an academic program at the campus.

2. Forgery, alteration, or misuse of campus documents, records, or identification, or knowingly furnishing false
information to a campus official.

3. Misrepresentation of oneself or of an organization to be an agency of the campus.

4. Obstruction or disruption, on or off campus property, of the campus educational or administrative process, or any
campus function.

5. Physical abuse on or off campus property of the person or property of any member of the campus community or of
members of his or her family or the threat of such physical abuse.

6. Theft of or non-accidental damage to, campus property or property in the possession of, or owned by, a member of the
campus community.

7. Unauthorized entry into, unauthorized use of, or misuse of campus property.

8. On campus property, the sale or knowing possession of dangerous drugs, restricted dangerous drugs, or narcotics as
those terms are used in California statutes, except when lawfully prescribed pursuant to medical or dental care, or when
lawfully permitted for the purpose of research, instruction, or analysis.

9. Knowing possession or use of explosives, dangerous chemicals, or deadly weapons on campus property.

10. Engaging in lewd, indecent, or obscene behavior on campus property or at a campus function.

11. Abusive behavior directed toward, or hazing of, a member of the campus community.

12. Violation of any order of the administrative officers of the school, notice of which has been given prior to such
violation and during the academic term in which the violation occurs, either by publication in the campus newspaper or by
posting on an official bulletin board designated for this purpose, and which order is not inconsistent with any of the other
provisions of this section.

13. Soliciting or assisting another to do any act which would subject a student to expulsion, suspension, or probation
pursuant to this section.

14. Conviction of a serious crime.

Academic Honors

Students who receive their degrees from Pacifica College and graduate with cumulative GPAs as listed below will be
honored with special mention in the graduation ceremony:

Academic honors are earned by undergraduate students only and
are granted at graduation according to their GPA:                        3.40 - 3.69
Cum Laude
Magna Cum Laude                                                          3.70 - 3.89
Summa Cum Laude                                                          3.90 - 4.00

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Grading System

Grades are assigned according to the following system of evaluation for undergraduate and graduate programs:

Grade                    Score                    Grade Explanation         Grade Point
A                        100-94                   Excellent                 4.00
A-                       93-90                                              3.67
B+                       89-87                    Good                      3.33
B                        86-84                                              3.00
B-                       83-80                                              2.67
C+                       79-77                    Average                   2.33
C                        76-74                                              2.0
C-                       73-70                                              1.67
D+                       69-67                    Unsatisfactory            1.33
D                        66-64                                              1.00
D-                       63-60                                              0.67
F                        Below 60                 Failing                   0.33
CR                       Credit
NC                       No Credit
IN                       Incomplete
W                        Withdrawal

Standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress

A student who is making reasonable progress toward graduation (measured by completed credit hours) and is not subject
to academic probation is considered to be in good standing. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.00 in all work taken at the
College-including major, minor, and related subjects-is necessary to graduate.

Maximum Time in Which to Complete

No course that has been completed more than six years before the date of graduation will be counted toward a PC degree.
Special circumstances will be reviewed by the Academic Dean.
Appeal of Grades

The grade an instructor awards cannot be changed by anyone other than that instructor. A disputed grade given by a PC
instructor may be appealed to a review board for mediation and resolution. Decisions of the board in such cases are final
and not subject to further appeal.

Reinstatement

Students who have withdrawn and seek readmission must submit a readmission application to the Office of Admissions.
Readmitted students must meet the requirements in effect at the time of readmission.

Graduation Requirement

All candidates for graduation must submit an Application of Intent before midterm of the last quarter prior to graduation.
These will be available from the Dean of Students.

To become a candidate, each undergraduate student must achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 on all work attempted
at Pacifica College. All students must satisfactorily complete 180 units in order to graduate.

Graduate students must achieve a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 on a minimum of 45 quarter units.


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In addition to being in good academic standing, a graduating student must have fully discharged all financial obligations
incurred to the College.

Leave of Absence

Students who provide adequate evidence of extenuating circumstances may interrupt their studies and apply for a Leave of
Absence (LOA). Requests must be made in writing to the Academic Dean and approved by the Dean in writing.

The written request must include the length and purpose of absence, with documentation of the latter. Only students
making satisfactory progress in their studies will be granted leaves.

Students who do not contact the Academic Dean for leave approval will be dismissed after five school days of consecutive
absences. Students who have "dropped out" or discontinued instruction without administrative approval will have to re-
apply and satisfy the requirements in place at that time.

Financial Information

Tuition and Fees
Students are required to pay all fees in the form of cash, check, money order, or credit card.

A summary of all student tuition charges is as follows:

Tuition in U.S. Dollars

Program                  Cost Per Unit Tuition Per Year               Total Program
1. Bachelor Degree Programs              $14,220
2. Certificate Programs   $595 per class
3. Master Degree Program                  $14,220

Textbooks are estimated at $300 to $500 per term, but are dependent upon course load.




Undergraduate Tuition and Fees - per credit hour

              Based on 12
 Resident
               hours max
   $14,220                    Annual Tuition

   $10.50         126.00      Academic facility fee
   $3.25           39.00      Academic Records fee
   $5.00           60.00      Advising/Assessment fee
   $1.50           18.00      Consumable Materials fee
   $0.30            3.60      E-Mail fee
   $3.00           36.00      Energy fee
   $7.70           92.40      Facility fee

   $10.80         129.60      Library Automation and Technology fee
   $2.50           30.00      Life Safety and Security fee
   $2.30           27.60      Parking fee
   $2.50           30.00      Student Activity fee
   $3.00           36.00      Student Activity fee - Athletic fee

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   $2.00          24.00      Student Development fee

   $2.30          27.60      Transportation Services fee
                             College Technology and
   $9.40         112.80
                             Infrastructure Maintenance fee
Graduate tuition and fees - per credit hour
  Resident     6 hours max
                             Annual Tuition
   $10.50         63.00      Academic Facility fee
   $3.25          19.50      Academic Records fee
   $5.00          30.00      Advising/Assessment fee
   $1.50           9.00      Consumable Materials fee
   $0.30           1.80      E-Mail fee
   $3.00          18.00      Energy fee
   $7.70          46.20      Facility fee

   $10.80         64.80      Library Automation and Technology fee
   $2.30          13.80      Parking fee
   $2.00         $12.00      Student Development fee
   $2.30         $13.80      Transportation Services fee
                             University Technology and
   $9.40         $56.40
                             Infrastructure Maintenance fee


Application fee---- $35.00       Official Transcript---- $10.00        Unofficial Transcript ----- $5.00
Returned Check--- $50.00         Graduation Fee----      $150.00       Late payments--- 5% of balance

The College reserves the right to increase all fees and tuition without notice, at its discretion.

Refund Policy

Refunds are made for students who withdraw or are withdrawn from Pacifica College prior to the completion of their
programs and are based on the tuition billed for the term in which the student withdraws. Refunds will be based on the
total charge incurred by the student at the time of withdrawal, not the amount the student has actually paid. Tuition and
fees attributable to a quarter beyond the quarter of withdrawal will be refunded in full. When a student withdraws from the
institution, he/she must complete a student withdrawal form with the Academic Dean.

The date from which refunds will be determined is the date the letter was submitted. Refunds will be made within eight to
ten weeks of the notification of an official withdrawal or date of determination of withdrawal by the institution.

Withdrawal Time Frame                                         Refund Given
Before 1st day of class                                       100% of tuition
Up to drop deadline (generally second week of                 100% of tuition
classes)
Third week of classes                                         70% of tuition
Fourth week of classes                                        50% of tuition
Fifth week of classes                                         25% of tuition
Beginning of the sixth week of classes                        NO REFUND

Policy on Cancellation

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A Student who cancels an Enrollment Agreement prior to the first day of class will receive a refund of all monies paid
except the nonrefundable Application Fee. If the Student is denied admission to Pacifica College or if Pacifica College
cancels this Agreement prior to the first day of class attendance, all monies will be refunded, except for the nonrefundable
Application Fee. All requests for cancellation by the Student must be made in writing and mailed or hand delivered to the
Registrar, Pacifica College.

Further details can be found in the Enrollment Agreement in the Appendix.

Withdrawal Date

The withdrawal date used to determine when the student is no longer enrolled at Pacifica College is:

• The date the student began the official withdrawal process, submitting an official withdrawal form to the Academic
Dean and ceasing to attend classes or other College activities. A student who submits a completed official withdrawal but
who continues to attend classes or other College activities will not be considered to have officially withdrawn from the
College.

Student Tuition Recovery Fund

Any Student who is a resident of California, who pays his or her own tuition, either directly or through a loan, must pay a
state-imposed fee for the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF). Students who are not California residents are not
eligible for protection under and recovery from the STRF nor are students who are recipients of third-party payer tuition
and course costs.

You must pay the state-imposed fee for the Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) if all of the following applies to you:

• You are a student who is a California resident and prepays all or part of your tuition either by cash, guaranteed student
loans, or personal loans, and
• Your total charges are not paid by any third-party payer such as an employer, government program, or other payer unless
you have a separate agreement to repay the third party.

You are not eligible for protection from the STRF and you are not required to pay the STRF fee if either of the following
applies:

• You are not a California resident.
• Your total charges are paid by a third party, such as an employer, government program or other payer, and you have no
separate agreement to repay the third party.

The Student Tuition Recovery Fund (STRF) was established by the California legislature to protect any California
resident who attends a private postsecondary institution from losing money if he or she prepaid tuition and suffered a
financial loss as a result of the school closing, failing to live up to its enrollment agreement, or refusing to pay a court
judgment.

To be eligible for STRF, the student must be a "California resident" and reside in California at the time the enrollment
agreement is signed or when the student receives lessons at a California mailing address from an approved institution
offering correspondence instruction. Students who are temporarily residing in California for the sole purpose of pursuing
an education, specifically those who hold student visas, are not considered a "California resident."

To qualify for STRF reimbursement, the student must file an STRF application within one year of receiving notice from
the Bureau that the school is closed. If the student does not receive notice from the Bureau, he or she has 4 years from the
date of closure to file an STRF application. If a judgment is obtained, the student must file an STRF application within
two years of the final judgment.

It is important that the student keep copies of the enrollment agreement, financial aid papers, receipts or any other
information that documents the monies paid to the school.
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STUDENT INFORMATION

Academic Advising

The College offers students a variety of success-oriented services as well as activities for the benefit of students and the
community. Students seek help and advice during their college education for many reasons. At Pacifica College, the
student comes first. Every effort is made to develop a relationship with the student body so that individuals feel
comfortable in requesting and receiving assistance.

The Academic Dean is responsible for providing academic assistance and should be consulted when assistance is desired.
Referrals to outside agencies may also be provided as needed. The administrative staff and the faculty are also available
for advising assistance.

Career and Placement Services

Pacifica College makes no explicit or required guarantee of job placement. Faculty and staff will provide assistance in
investigating job opportunities and will conduct workshops on resume writing and interviewing techniques.

Faculty

Each member of our faculty will combine relevant professional experience with appropriate academic credentials. PC’s
faculty members will bring the highest level of professionalism to the classroom and be recognized by their academic
peers. Through the guidance of the faculty, theoretical, practical and creative applications addressed in the curricula will
be reinforced by interaction with professionals in the sports industry. AU is in the process of assembling an experienced
faculty with outstanding academic and athletic credentials. They will be continuously introduced via PC’s Website as they
are added to our staff.

Orientation

Students are introduced to the College and to each other, with a library tour and orientation at the beginning of each term.
The purpose of this Orientation is to educate the students on access to information about library resources and services
and to foster group interaction.

Housing

Off campus housing is at the discretion of the student.

Student Handbook (Catalog)

Each student will receive a Student Handbook outlining the details of Pacifica College’s policies and regulations. Students
are expected to read the Student Handbook and comply with its contents.

Students are expected to be familiar with the information presented in this catalog, in any supplements and addenda to the
catalog, and with all College policies. By enrolling in Pacifica College, students agree to accept and abide by the terms
stated in this catalog and all College policies.

If there is any conflict between any statement in this catalog and the Enrollment Agreement signed by the student, the
provision in the Enrollment Agreement controls and is binding.

Student Records

The College will maintain student records necessary for the educational guidance and/or welfare of students, for the
orderly and efficient operation of the College, and as required by law. All information related to individual students will
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be treated in a confidential and professional manner. All records required by the BPPVE Reform Act are retained for a
minimum of five years, with student transcripts retained for a minimum of fifty years.

Student records are the property of the College but will be made available to appropriate parties in accordance with local,
state, and federal law as well as Bureau (BPPVE) policy.

Academic Warnings

A student who does not earn a minimum of a 2.0 GPA (grade point average) for the term will be placed on academic
warning for the next term of attendance. The student will meet with a member of the staff in order to determine the course
of action needed to improve the student’s academic performance. Possible courses of action are a reduction in course load,
procurement of tutorial services, development studies, and/or withdrawal from extracurricular activities. Any student who
is on academic warning and changes programs will remain on warning during the first term of his or her new program.

Student Conduct

The College is committed to maintaining a safe and healthy living and learning environment for students, faculty, and
staff. Each member of the campus community must choose behaviors that contribute toward this end. Student behavior
that is not considered appropriate is addressed through an educational process that is designed to promote safety and good
citizenship and, when necessary, to impose appropriate consequences.

Harassment-Free Environment

It is the policy of the College that no student should be subjected to unsolicited, unwelcome, abusive, or offensive conduct
of either a verbal or physical nature. Harassment refers to behavior that is not welcome, is personally offensive, interferes
with efficacy or creates uneasiness. Examples of harassment include, but are not limited to: repeated offensive sexual
flirtations, advances or propositions; continued or repeated verbal abuse of a racial nature; graphic, degrading, or
demeaning ethnic comments about on individual or about his/ her appearance; the display of sexually suggestive objects
or pictures; or any other offensive or abusive verbal comments or physical contact.

Further, students will not be subjected to third-party harassment, which is defined as behavior that is personally offensive
to an observing party.

Students engaging in any act of harassment that discriminates against another student because of race, color, national or
ethnic origin, gender, religion, marital status, or the presence of a disability, will not be tolerated. Such conduct is
specifically prohibited.

In the event that a student alleges that an act of harassment has taken place, the College will take an appropriate action in
accordance with set policies and procedures.

Student Freedom of Expression

The free expression of student opinion is an important part of education in a democratic society. Students’ verbal and
written expression of opinions at the College is to be encouraged so long as it does not substantially disrupt the operation
of the College or defame, slander, or harass a member of the College community. Students are, however, expressly
prohibited from the use of vulgar and/or offensive terms, images, and behaviors.

Nondiscrimination

The College does not discriminate against applicants and students on the basis of gender, religion, race, color, marital
status, disability, national origin, ethnic origin or any other class prohibited by law. The College has adopted this non-
discrimination policy, makes this policy known to the general public, and operates in a bona fide manner in accordance
with the administration of its educational and admissions policies, scholarship and loan programs, and other College


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administered programs. The College’s non-discrimination policy will be published in accordance with local, state, and
federal law.

Student Grievance Policy

1. Filing a Grievance: The complainant shall file a written grievance with the President. The complainant shall record with
specificity the circumstances of his/ her grievance.

2. The President will appoint a Committee consisting of three members from the faculty/ staff. The President may, at
his/her discretion, also elect to appoint a student member of the Committee. The President shall make every effort to
ensure that a fair, impartial and representative Committee hears the matter.

3. Notification: The President shall give the respondent written notification that a grievance has been filed, as well as a
copy of the grievance. The President shall provide a copy of the response to the complainant.

4. Investigation: The following standards for the investigation will be observed:

   A. In conducting the investigation, the Committee shall receive and review the grievance, the response, and other
pertinent statements or documents in confidence.
   B. The complainant and respondent shall be given the opportunity to respond to one another’s statements, and to
present witnesses or concerned parties in conformity to the evidence presented.

5. When, in the judgment of the Committee, the positions of the complainant and respondent have been equitably heard,
the Committee shall submit a written report to the President.

6. Disposition: The President will make the decision regarding any action taken. The President will discuss the decision
with the Chairman of the Board prior to taking any action, if the action to be taken differs from the Committee’s
recommendation. Current or former students of Arete College who believe that the university, or anyone representing the
College, has acted unlawfully have the right to file a complaint with the California Bureau for Private Postsecondary and
Vocational Education, 400 R Street, San Francisco, California 94105-3517.




Library

PC’s Library is primarily a virtual library with connections online. The College houses books, periodicals, pamphlets,
articles, and other support materials chosen to supplement the College’s curriculum. PC also provides access to internet.
Library orientations, conducted at the beginning of each term, as an introduction to the location of materials and services
within the library. They also serve as an opportunity to meet one another in a group setting.




                                                                                                                              56
Appendix I:      Transfer Credit Form

Appendix II:     Enrollment Application

Appendix III:    Enrollment Agreement

Appendix IV:     Academic Scholarship Application

Appendix V:      Athletic Scholarship Application

Appendix VI:     Leadership Scholarship Application

Appendix VII:    UES Work Study Application

Appendix VIII:   Student Loan – Promissory Note

Appendix IX:     Internship Application

                                                      57
Appendix X:    Disability Identification Form

Appendix XI:   Miscellaneous




                                                58
                                                                             Pacifica College
                                                                             Riverside, CA


                                     Transfer Credit Form
                                    Pre-approval Evaluation

   1.   Courses will transfer in compliance with transfer regulations.
   2.   You must submit course descriptions listed in the institution’s catalog.
   3.   A final transcript of your work must be sent to the Registrar.
   4.   A passing grade of ―C‖ is required for the course to be considered for transfer approval.


Name: ___________________________________                SSN: _____________________ DOB: _______________

E-mail Address: ____________________________Telephone:_____________________

Address: ________________________________________________________________

Class: Freshman      Sophomore       Junior         Senior          Major: __________________

Name of last institution attended: ____________________________________________

Address of Institution: _____________________________________________________ Telephone:
______________________

                                                                                                ----------- FOR OFFICIAL
USE ONLY -----------
Department           Course No.                   Course Name              Dep. Equivalent              Dept. Approval for
                                                                                                        Tran.




_______________________                                      _______________________
Signature                                                     Department ________________________
_______________
Registrar Signature                                          Date




                                                                                                                             59
                                      Pacifica College Enrollment Agreement

Last                    First                     Middle                      SSN


Address                                           City                        State          Zip

Home Phone: ____________Work: _____________ Cell: ____________ E-mail: ____________________

Date of Birth ____________ Program ______________ Sex: M                F     Citizen Status ________________

Start Date ____ / ________      Expected Grad. Date ____ / ________          Payment Method ____________

Circle One:    Autumn                    Winter            Spring             Year: __________

Class No.            Class Name                   Instructor Name           Units     Dean Approval




       A) Total Fees, Charges, & Expenses

       By Year                                                      By Semester
       Registration Fee: $                                 Registration Fee: $
       Tuition:          $                                 Tuition:          $
       Room & Board: $                                     Room & Board: $
       Lab Fee:          $                                 Lab Fee:          $
       Student Services:          $                                 Student Services:         $
       Total Charges: $                                    Total Charges     $

       B) Scholarship and Loans

       Academic Scholarship:             $
       Athletic Scholarship:             $
       Student Loan:                     $
       Expected Family Contribution:     $

       C) Enrollment Down Payment
              A 10% down payment of the total charges minus scholarships and loans is required with the signed
              enrollment agreement by July 31, 20__. This payment will be put towards tuition and is subject to the
              refund provisions below.

       Total Charges:          $
       - Academic Scholarship:           $
       - Athletic Scholarship: $
       - Student Loan:         $
       Total Cost:             $

       Enrollment Down Payment (10% of Total Cost) =                $



                                                                                                                      60
        *Student must meet academic requirements to maintain financial package. Financial packages are subject
        to review each and every semester the student is enrolled.*

Section I: Introduction
This agreement is made by and between Pacifica College, hereafter ―The College‖ and the Student named below. It
outlines the terms and conditions for enrollment at Pacifica College. The use of a student ID and password to access
College websites and systems is the equivalent of a legal signature and creates the same obligations for the student. Each
student will be responsible for any and all future registrations by accessing the computer with an assigned student ID. All
transactions on the Arete College website and systems constitute official records recognized by the institution.
Section II: Purpose
The Student enters into this agreement for the purpose of undertaking education in the pursuit of the degree for which she
or he has made an application for admission to Pacifica College. Pacifica College enters into this agreement for the
purpose of providing the materials, instruction, and guidance to deliver the educational value of the degree for which the
Student has applied.

Section III: Terms of Enrollment
By submitting this form, the Student will become enrolled in the College and will gain access to programming and
resources.
By submitting this form, the Student will be considered a candidate for the degree for which she or he has applied to the
College.
Courses offered under this Agreement shall include those for which credit may be applied toward the degree for which the
Student is enrolled in the College and those courses the Student may choose to take as electives.
By submitting this form, the Student agrees to participate with Pacifica College in the development of an official Degree
Completion Plan.
Pacifica College agrees, upon approval of the Degree Completion Plan, to award the degree for which the Student enters
this agreement.
Pacifica College and the Student agree to be bound by terms, policies, and procedures as outlined in the College catalog,
policy manuals, and such other documents as may apply.
This agreement binds Pacifica College and the Student to the terms and conditions in force as of the day of this
agreement.
Section IV: Costs
The Student shall bear the cost of tuition development fees, review fees, and enrollment fees for these activities.
Pacifica College shall publish its current tuition and fees on its website.
Costs of course books materials, and learning resources associated with College courses shall be borne by the Student.

    Refund Provisions – Notice of Student Rights

BUYER’S RIGHT TO CANCEL Formal withdrawal ordinarily is allowed only prior to the examination period.
Withdrawal means that courses and grades are expunged from the student’s record and that the student does not receive
any registration credit. Any student withdrawing must notify the Office of the Dean in writing at once; any financial
adjustments are reckoned from the date on which the Office of the Dean receives this written notification. The approval of
the Dean is required for all completed withdrawals. The student is considered registered, and the student’s responsibility,
both academic and financial, continues in all courses for which the student has registered until he or she is notified by the
Dean’s Office that the withdrawal has been approved and accepted. If the Student is denied admission to Pacifica College
or if Pacifica College cancels this Agreement prior to the first day of class attendance, all monies will be refunded, except
for the nonrefundable Application Fee. Students who register and withdraw before the first class will be refunded the
entire tuition minus the application and registration fee.
Refund Policy When Dropping Individual Courses
Tuition for courses dropped by the last day of the Change of Program period is refunded in full. There is no refund of
tuition for individual courses dropped after the last day of the Change of Program period. The Change of Program period
is usually the first two weeks of the fall or spring semesters.


Refund Schedule
Withdrawal Time Frame                                      Refund Given

                                                                                                                          61
Before 1st day of class                                    100% of tuition
Up to drop deadline (generally second week of classes)     100% of tuition
Third week of classes                                      70% of tuition
Fourth week of classes                                     50% of tuition
Fifth week of classes                                      25% of tuition
Beginning of the sixth week of classes                     NO REFUND


Policies and Disclosures
1.       Catalog: Information about PC is published in a catalog that contains a description of certain policies, rules,
procedures, and other information about the College. PC reserves the right to change any provision of the catalog at any
time. Notice of changes will be communicated in a revised catalog, an addendum or supplement to the catalog, or other
written format. Students are expected to read and be familiar with the information contained in the College catalog, in any
revisions, supplements and addenda to the catalog, and with all College policies. By enrolling in PC, the Student agrees to
abide by the terms stated in the catalog and all College policies. The catalog in effect at the time of student enrollment
remains the catalog of record.

2.       Changes: PC reserves the right to make changes at any time to any provision of the catalog, including the amount
of tuition and fees, academic programs and courses, College policies and procedures, faculty and administrative staff, the
College calendar and other dates, and other provisions. PC also reserves the right to modify curriculum.

3.       Transfer of Credits: The awarding of credit for coursework completed at any other institution is at the sole
discretion of PC. Additionally, PC does not imply, promise, or guarantee that any credits earned at PC will be transferable
or accepted by any other institution.

                      ―Notice Concerning Transferability of Units and Degree Earned at Our School‖
Units you earn in our degree program or certificate programs in most cases will not be transferable to any other college or
university. In addition, if you earn a degree from our College, in most cases it will not serve as a basis for obtaining a
higher-level degree at another college or university.

I certify that Pacifica College has met the disclosure requirements of the Education Code of the Private Postsecondary
and Vocation Refund of 1998 and this agreement are accepted.




___________________________________                                               _________________
Signature of Student                                                      Date


___________________________________                                               _________________
Signature of College Official                                             Date


White Copy -                             Pink Copy -                              Green Copy -




                                                                                                                         62
                                                Pacifica College
                                        Academic Scholarship Application

This scholarship has been established to help students in need who have demonstrated a history of earning good grades in
their academic pursuits. PC hopes to introduce and encourage today’s youth to pursue a career in the business side of
sports by attending our university. We at Pacifica College realize that the world of sports is steadily changing and the
need for quality people on the business side is of greater demand now than ever before. The value of this scholarship is
$____.

Application Deadline: August 15, 20__.

Criteria to apply:

High School senior in good standing expected to graduate in 2009

High School Graduate

GPA: 3.0 or higher

Attendance: 80% or higher

Essay (no more than 500 words)

School Official Letter of Recommendation (more than one may be submitted)


Athletes and non-athletes are encouraged to apply.

Name: __________________________________                            Date: _______________

Address: ________________________________________________________________



Date of Birth: ________________                               SSN: ____________________

Phone #: _______________________          E-mail: ____________________________

Current school: _____________________________________            GPA: ____________


Extracurricular Activities and Position(s) Held:
________________________________________________________________________



________________________________________________________________________


Awards: ________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________



                                                                                                                      63
If you feel that the above space is not sufficient, please attach a document with more information.

Intended major at PC: _______________________________

What do you see yourself doing post-graduation?



                                                           Essay

Your essay must be no more than 500 words and double spaced. Demonstrate how leadership can make a difference in
your school, home and community life. Also explain how leadership will play a role in your future goals. Please attach
with this application.

All applications and scholarship materials should be returned to your Pacifica College Representative or mailed to the
following address:


                                                Scholarship Committee
                                                    Pacifica College
                                                   7121 Magnolia Ave
                                               Riverside, California 92504




No application will be processed until application is fully completed and all support documents are received.

Names of those writing recommendations:

___________________________________ From ________________________

Received on:

___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:

___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:
 Office Use

 Received By:                                      Date Received:
 Reviewed By:                                      Date Reviewed:




                                                                                                                         64
                                                   Pacifica College

                                          Athletic Scholarship Application

This scholarship has been established to help students in need who have demonstrated an advanced level of excellence in
the area of athletic competition while earning good grades in their academic pursuits. PC hopes to introduce and
encourage today’s youth to pursue a career in the business side of sports by attending our university. We at Pacifica
College realize that the World of Sports is steadily changing and the need for quality people on the business side is of
greater demand now than ever before.

Application Deadline: August 15, 20__.

Criteria to apply:

High School senior in good standing expected to graduate in 2010

High School Graduate

GPA: 2.0 or higher

Coach’s Recommendation: Scholarship %_________________________________

Essay (no more than 500 words)

School Official Letter of Recommendation (more than one may be submitted)


Athletes are encouraged to apply.

Name: __________________________________                             Date: _______________

Address: ________________________________________________________________



Date of Birth: ________________                               SSN: ____________________

Phone #: _______________________          E-mail: ____________________________

Current school: _____________________________________            GPA: ____________




Extracurricular Activities and Position(s) Held:
________________________________________________________________________




                                                                                                                       65
________________________________________________________________________


Awards: ________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________



If you feel that the above space is not sufficient, please attach a document with more information.

Intended major at PC: _______________________________

What do you see yourself doing post-graduation?



                                                           Essay

Your essay must be no more than 500 words and double spaced. Demonstrate how leadership can make a difference in
your school, home and community life. Also explain how leadership will play a role in your future goals. Please attach
with this application.

All applications and scholarship materials should be returned to your Pacifica College Representative or mailed to the
following address:


                                                Scholarship Committee
                                                    Pacifica College
                                                   7121 Magnolia Ave
                                               Riverside, California 92504




No application will be processed until application is fully completed and all support documents are received.


Names of those writing recommendations:

___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:

___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:

___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:

 Office Use

 Received By:                                        Pacifica College
                                                   Date Received:
 Reviewed By:                                      Date Reviewed:
                                                                                                                         66
                                             Leaders of Tomorrow Scholarship

This scholarship has been established to introduce and encourage today’s youth to pursue a career in the business side of
sports by attending our university. We at Pacifica College realize that the world of sports is steadily changing and the
need for quality people on the business side of it is greater than it has ever been before.

Application Deadline:

Criteria to apply:

High School senior in good standing expected to graduate in 2008

High School Graduate

GPA: 2.5 or higher

Attendance: 80% or higher

Essay (no more than 500 words)

School Official Letter of Recommendation (more than one may be submitted)


Athletes and non-athletes are encouraged to apply.

Name: __________________________________                              Date: _______________

Address: ________________________________________________________________



Date of Birth: ________________                                SSN: ____________________

Phone #: _______________________           E-mail: ____________________________

Current school: _____________________________________              GPA: ____________


Extracurricular Activities and Position(s) Held:
________________________________________________________________________



________________________________________________________________________


Awards: ________________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________________



If you feel that the above space is not sufficient, please attach a document with more information.

Intended major at PC: _______________________________
                                                                                                                        67
What do you see yourself doing post-graduation?



                                                          Essay

Your essay must be no more than 500 words and double spaced. Demonstrate how leadership can make a difference in
your school, home and community life. Also explain how leadership will play a role in your future goals. Please attach
with this application.

All applications and scholarship materials should be returned to your Arete College Representative or mailed to the
following address:


                                               Scholarship Committee
                                                   Pacifica College
                                                  7121 Magnolia Ave
                                              Riverside, California 92504



No application will be processed until application is fully completed and all support documents are received.

Names of those writing recommendations:

___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:

___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:

___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:
 Office Use

 Received By:                                     Date Received:
 Reviewed By:                                     Date Reviewed:




                                                                                                                         68
                                    College Employment Services (CES)

Application



Reply to Posting # ______

Name: ______________________________________                Date: ________________

Major / Year: _________________________ / ___________

Phone #: (_____) _______- __________ E-mail: ___________________________

Birthday: ____ / ____ / _______

Extracurricular Activities / Jobs:
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________

When are you available to work?



How many hours a week would you like to work?


Please list skills:




    Office Use Only

    Received by:                                        Date Received:




No application will be processed until application is fully completed and all support documents are received.

Names of those writing recommendations:

___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:

___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:



                                                                                                                69
___________________________________ from ________________________

Received on:

 Office Use

 Received By:                        Date Received:
 Reviewed By:                        Date Reviewed:




                                                                    70
                                                        Tuition Deferment Contract
1. Except as provided by a Tuition and Fees Deferment Agreement, all tuition and fees are due at the time of registration. Tuition payment deadlines
will be established each term, and students’ registrations will be cancelled if their tuition and fees are not paid by the deadline. The only exception
will be for students who have completed an approved Tuition Deferment Application/Promissory Note.

2. Students seeking a deferment of payment of tuition and fees must meet eligibility criteria and enter into a contract with PC by completing a Tuition
Deferment Application/Promissory Note form in the Financial Aid Office.

3. The Tuition Deferment Application/Promissory Note must be approved by the Financial Aid Office. The student will be given a copy of the
completed form with an authorization signature

4. A co-maker on the note will be required for students under the age of 18.

5. Students will be charged a $20 service charge for any late payments. Failure to repay the deferment also will result in the student being denied
student services, including but not limited to receiving grades and official transcripts. Legal action may be taken against the student as specified in
the promissory note.

6. A promissory note will be signed by the student and or designated co-signer at the time of enrollment or registration into College classes. Please
see the Finance Administrator to sign your promissory note and turn in this deferment contract at the time of registration.

SECTION 1: BORROWER IDENTIFICATION
SSN: ______-_____-________
Name: ________________________
Address: _______________________
City, State, Zip: ______________________________
Telephone – Home: ____________________
Telephone – Other: ____________________
E-mail Address: ______________________________

SECTION 2: DEFERMENT REQUEST
Before answering any questions, carefully read the entire form, including the instructions.

I meet the qualification for the deferment and request that my loan holder defer repayment of my loan(s).
          - While I am enrolled at Pacifica College as a FULL-TIME STUDENT.

SECTION 3: BORROWER UNDERSTANDINGS AND CERTIFICATIONS
I understand that I am not required to make payments of loan principal during my deferment. Interest will not be charged on my subsidized loan(s)
during my deferment.

My deferment will begin on the date the condition that qualified me for a deferment began, as certified by the authorized official who completes
Section 4 of this form. My deferment will end on the earlier of the date that I no longer meet the condition that qualified me for the deferment, or the
ending date of that condition as certified by the authorized official. If my deferment does not cover all my past due payments, my loan holder may
grant me a forbearance for all payments due before the begin date of deferment or – of the period for which I am eligible for a deferment has ended –
a forbearance for all payments due at the time of my deferment request is processed.

I certify that: 1) The information I provided in Sections 1 and 2 above is true and correct. 2) I will provide additional documentation to my loan
holder, as required, to support my deferment status. 3) I will notify my loan holder immediately when the condition(s) that qualified me for the
deferment ends. 4) I have read, understand, and meet the eligibility criteria of the deferment for which I have applied.

Borrower’s Signature _____________________________________ Date ____________

Cosigner’s Signature ____________________________________              Date ____________

SECTION 4: AUTHORIZED OFFICIAL’S CERTIFICATION
I certify to the best of my knowledge and belief, that the borrower named above is enrolled as a full-time student during the academic period from
____ - ____ - ________ to ____ - ____ - ________ and is reasonably expected to complete his/her program requirements on ____ - ____ -
________.

Name/Title of Authorized Official ___________________________________________
Authorized Official’s Signature _______________________________Date __________


                                                                                                                                                          71
       SECTION 5: DEFINITIONS FOR IN-SCHOOL DEFERMENT REQUEST
       An authorized certifying official for an In-School Deferment is an authorized official of the school where I am enrolled as a full-time student.

       Capitalization is the addition of unpaid interest to the principal balance of my loan. This will increase the principal and the total cost of my loan.

       A deferment is a period during which I am entitled to postpone repayment of the principal balance of my loan(s).

       Forbearance means permitting the temporary cessation of payments, allowing an extension of time for making payments, or temporarily accepting
       smaller payments than previously scheduled. I am responsible for the interest that accrues on my loan(s) during forbearance. If I do not pay the
       interest that accrues, the interest may be capitalized.

       SECTION 6: IMPORTANT NOTICES
       The principal purposes for collecting the information on this form, including your SSN, are to verify your identity, to determine your eligibility to
       receive a loan or a benefit on a loan (such as a deferment, forbearance, discharge, or forgiveness), to permit the servicing of your loan(s), and, if it
       becomes necessary, to locate you and to collect on your loan(s) if your loan(s) become delinquent or in default. We also use your SSN as an account
       identifier and to permit you to access your account information electronically.
       The information in your file may be disclosed to third parties as authorized under routine uses in the appropriate systems of records. The routine uses
       of this information include its disclosure to federal, state, or local agencies, to other federal agencies under computer matching programs, to agencies
       that we authorize to assist us in administering our loan programs, to private parties such as relatives, present and former employers, business and
       personal associates, to credit bureau organizations, to educational institutions, and to contractors in order to verify your identity, to determine your
       eligibility to receive a loan or a benefit on a loan, to permit the servicing or collection of your loan(s), to counsel you in repayment efforts, to enforce
       the terms of the loan(s), to investigate possible fraud and to verify compliance with federal student financial aid program regulations, to locate you if
       you become delinquent in your loan payments or if you default, to provide default rate calculations, to provide financial aid history information, to
       assist program administrators with tracking refunds and cancellations, or to provide a standardized method for educational institutions efficiently to
       submit student enrollment status.
       In the event of litigation, we may send records to the Department of Justice, a court, adjudicative body, counsel, party, or witness if the disclosure is
       relevant and necessary to the litigation. If this information, either alone or with other information, indicates a potential violation of law, we may send
       it to the appropriate authority for action. We may send information to members of Congress if you ask them to help you with federal student aid
       questions. In circumstances involving employment complaints, grievances, or disciplinary actions, we may disclose relevant records to adjudicate or
       investigate the issues. If provided for by a collective bargaining agreement, we may disclose records to a labor organization recognized under 5
       U.S.C. Chapter 71. Disclosures may also be made to qualified researchers under Privacy Act safeguards.

       Paperwork Reduction Notice
       According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a currently
       valid OMB control number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 1845-0005. The time required to complete this
       information collection is estimated to average 0.16 hours (10 minutes) per response, including the time to review instructions, search existing data
       records, gather and maintain the data needed and complete and review the information collection.


                                             LOAN MASTER PROMISSORY NOTE (Student Loan)

     Section A: Borrower Section
SECTION A: BORROWER SECTION
1. Name (last, first, middle initial) and                        2. Social Security Number _____-______-________
Permanent Address (street, city, state, zip code)                3. Date of Birth (mm/dd/yyyy) ______________________
                                                                 4. Home Area Code/Telephone Number_______________
                                                                 5. DL Number (state): _____________________________

     Section B: School Section
SECTION B: SCHOOL SECTION
6. School Name & Address (street, city, state, zip code)                     7. Loan Amount
                                                                             8. Annual Interest Rate


       Terms and Conditions: (Note: Additional Terms and Conditions follow on subsequent pages)
       APPLICABLE LAW - The terms of this Promissory Note (hereinafter called the Note) and any disbursements made under this Note shall be interpreted in accordance
       with Part E of Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended (hereinafter called the Act), as well as Federal regulations issued under the Act. All sums
       advanced under this Note are subject to the Act and Federal regulations issued under the Act.
       REPAYMENT - I am obligated to repay the principal and the interest that accrues on my loan(s) to the above-named institution (hereinafter called the School) over a
       period beginning 6 months (or sooner if I am a Less-Than-Half-Time Borrower) after the date I cease to be at least a half-time student at an institution of higher
       education or a comparable School outside the United States approved by the United States Department of Education (hereinafter called the Department) and ending 10
       years later, unless I request in writing that my repayment period begin sooner. I understand that the School will report the amount of my installment payments, along
       with the amount of this loan to at least one national credit bureau. Interest on this loan shall accrue from the beginning of the repayment period. My repayment period
       may be shorter than 10 years if I am required by my School to make minimum monthly payments. My repayment period may be extended during periods of deferment,

                                                                                                                                                                           72
hardship, or forbearance and I may make graduated installments in accordance with a schedule approved by the Department. I will make my installment payments in
equal monthly, bimonthly, or quarterly installments as determined by the School. The School may round my installment payment to the next highest multiple of $5.
LATE CHARGES - The School may impose late charges if I do not make a scheduled payment when due or if I fail to submit to the School on or before the due date of
the payment, a properly documented request for any of the forbearance, deferment, or cancellation benefits as described below. No late charges may exceed 20 percent
of my monthly, bimonthly, or quarterly payment. The School may add the late charges to principal the day after the scheduled payment was due or include it with the
next scheduled payment after I have received notice of the charge, and such notice is sent before the next installment is due.
FORBEARANCE, DEFERMENT, OR CANCELLATION - I may apply for a forbearance, deferment, or cancellation on my loan. During an approved forbearance
period, payments of principal and interest, or principal only, may be postponed or reduced. Interest continues to accrue while my loan is in forbearance. During an
approved deferment period, I am not required to make scheduled installment payments on my loan. I am not liable for any interest that might otherwise accrue while my
loan is in deferment. If I meet the eligibility requirements for a cancellation of my loan, the institution may cancel up to 100 percent of the outstanding principal loan
amount. Information on eligibility and application requirements for forbearances, deferments, and cancellations is provided on pages 2 and 3 of this Note. I am
responsible for submitting the appropriate requests on time, and I may lose my benefits if I fail to file my request on time.
DEFAULT - The School may, at its option, declare my loan to be in default if (1) I fail to make a scheduled payment when due; (2) I fail to submit to the School, on or
before the due date of a scheduled payment, documentation that I qualify for a forbearance, deferment, or cancellation; or (3) I fail to comply with the terms and
conditions of this Note or written repayment agreement. The School may assign a defaulted loan to the Department for collection. I will be ineligible for any further
financial assistance authorized under the Act until I make arrangements that are satisfactory to the School or the Department to repay my loan. The School or the
Department shall disclose to credit bureau organizations that I have defaulted and all other relevant loan information. I will lose my right to defer payments and my
right to forbearance if I default on my loan. The School or the Department may accelerate my defaulted loan. Acceleration means that the School or the Department
demands immediate payment of the entire unpaid balance of the loan, including principal, interest, late charges, and collection costs. I will lose my right to receive
cancellation benefits for service that is performed after the date the School or the Department accelerated the loan.
CHANGE OF STATUS - I will inform the School of any change in my name, address, telephone number, Social Security Number, or driver’s license number.
PROMISE TO PAY: I promise to pay the School, or a subsequent holder of the Note, all sums disbursed under the terms of this Note, plus interest and other fees which
may become due as provided in this Note. I understand that multiple loans may be made to me under this Note. I understand that by accepting any disbursements issued
at any time under this Note, I agree to repay the loans. I understand that each loan is separately enforceable based on a true and exact copy of this Note. I understand
that I may cancel or reduce the amount of any loan by not accepting or by returning all or a portion of any disbursement that is issued. If I do not make any payment on
any loan under this Note when it is due, I promise to pay all reasonable collection costs, including attorney fees, court costs, and other fees. I will not sign this Note
before reading the entire Note, even if I am told that I am not required to read it. I am entitled to an exact copy of this Note. This loan has been made to me without
security or endorsement. My signature certifies I have read, understand, and agree to the terms and conditions of this Note.
I UNDERSTAND THAT I MAY RECEIVE ONE OR MORE LOANS UNDER THIS MASTER PROMISSORY NOTE AND THAT I MUST REPAY SUCH
LOANS.

_______________________________________________________                                    _________________________
Borrower’s Signature                                                                       Date
DISCLOSURE OF LOAN TERMS - I understand that under this Note, the principal amount that I owe, and am required to repay, will be the sum of all disbursements
issued unless I reduce or cancel any disbursements. The School will determine whether to make any loan under this Note after my loan eligibility is determined. At or
before the time of first disbursement for each loan, a disclosure statement will be provided to me identifying the amount of the loan and any additional terms of the loan.
I may decline a loan or request a lower amount by contacting the School. Any disclosure statement I receive in connection with any loan under this Note is hereby
incorporated into this Note.
LOAN REHABILITATION - If I default on my Loan and that loan has not been reduced to a judgment as a result of litigation
against me, I may rehabilitate my defaulted loan by requesting the rehabilitation and by making a voluntary, on-time, monthly payment, as determined by the School,
each month for twelve consecutive months. If I successfully rehabilitate my defaulted loan, I will again be subject to the terms and conditions and qualify for any
remaining benefits and privileges of this Note and the default will be removed from my credit history. I understand that I may rehabilitate a defaulted loan only once.
After my loan is rehabilitated, collection costs on the loan may not exceed 24 percent of the unpaid principal and accrued interest as of the date following the
application of the twelfth consecutive payment. If I default on my rehabilitated loan, the cap on collection costs is removed.
ASSIGNMENT - A loan made under this Note may be assigned by the School only to the United States, as represented by the United States Department of Education.
Upon assignment, the provisions of this Note that relate to the School will, where appropriate, relate to the Department.
HARDSHIP REPAYMENT OPTIONS - Upon my written request, the School may extend my repayment period (1) for up to an additional 10 years if I qualify as a
low-income individual during the repayment period; or (2) for the period necessary beyond my 10 year repayment period if, in the School’s opinion, prolonged illness
or unemployment prevent me from making the scheduled repayments. Interest will continue to accrue during any extension of a repayment period. If I am required by
the School to make a minimum monthly payment on my loan, the School may also permit me to pay less than the minimum monthly payment amount for a period of
not more than one year at a time if I experience a period of prolonged illness or unemployment. However, such action may not extend the repayment period beyond 10
years.
GRACE PERIODS - Unless I am a Less-Than-Half-Time Borrower, I will receive an initial nine-month grace period before the first payment of my loan must be made.
After the close of an authorized deferment period, I will receive a post-deferment grace period of 6 months before my payments resume. Interest does not accrue during
the initial grace period or during the post-deferment grace period. The nine-month initial grace period for loans does not include any period up to three years during
which I am called or ordered to active duty for more than 30 days from a reserve component of the Armed Forces of the United States, including the period necessary
for me to resume enrollment at the next available enrollment period. I must notify the school that made my loan of the beginning and ending dates of my service, and
the date I resume enrollment. If I am in my initial grace period when called or ordered to active duty, I am entitled to a new nine-month initial grace period upon
completion of the excluded period. If I am a Less-Than-Half-Time Borrower with outstanding loans, my repayment period begins when the next scheduled installment
of my outstanding loan is due. If I am a Less-Than-Half-Time Borrower with no other outstanding loans, my repayment begins the earlier of: 9 months from the date
my loan was made, or 9 months from the date I became a less-than-half-time student, even if I received the loan after I became a less-than-half-time student.
PREPAYMENT - I may prepay all or any part of my unpaid loan balance, plus any accrued interest, at any time without penalty. Amounts I repay in the academic year
in which the loan was made and before the initial grace period has ended will be used to reduce the amount of the loan and will not be considered a prepayment. If I
repay amounts during the academic year in which the loan was made and the initial grace period has ended, only those amounts in excess of the amount due for any
repayment period shall
be considered a prepayment. If, in an academic year other than the academic year in which the loan was made, I repay more than the amount due for an installment, the
excess funds will be used to repay principal unless I designate it as an advance payment of the next regular installment.
MINIMUM MONTHLY PAYMENT - If required by the School, I will make a minimum monthly payment in the amount of $40 or its bimonthly or quarterly
equivalent. If the total monthly payment amount on this loan and any outstanding loans I may have is less than the minimum monthly payment amount established by
the School, the School may still require a minimum monthly payment amount. A minimum monthly payment amount will combine my obligation on this and all my
outstanding loans, unless I have received loans with different grace periods and deferments.
FORBEARANCE - Upon making a properly documented written request to the School, I am entitled to forbearance of principal and interest or principal only,
renewable at intervals of up to 12 months for periods that collectively do not exceed three years, under the following conditions: If my monthly Title IV loan debt
burden equals or exceeds 20 percent of my total monthly gross income; if the Department authorizes a period of forbearance due to a national military mobilization or


                                                                                                                                                                       73
other national emergency; or if the School determines that I qualify due to poor health or for other reasons, including service in AmeriCorps. Interest accrues during any
period of forbearance.
DEFERMENTS - To apply for a deferment, I must request the deferment from the school. My request does not have to be in writing, but the School may require that I
submit supporting documentation to prove my eligibility for a deferment. I may defer making scheduled installment payments and will not be liable for any interest that
might otherwise accrue (1) during any period that I am enrolled and attending as a regular student in at least a halftime course of study at an eligible School (If the
School obtains student
enrollment information showing that I qualify for this deferment, the School may grant the deferment without my request providing the School notifies me and gives me
the option to cancel the deferment); (2) during any period that I am enrolled and attending as a regular student in a graduate fellowship program approved by the
Department; engaged in graduate or post-graduate fellowship-supported study outside the US; enrolled and attending a rehabilitation training program for disabled
individuals approved by the
Department; or engaged in public service that qualifies me to have part or all of my loan canceled; (3) for a period not to exceed three years during which I am seeking
but unable to find full-time employment; (4) for a period not to exceed three years, for up to one year at a time, during which I am experiencing an economic hardship
as determined by the School. I may qualify for an economic hardship deferment for my loan if I provide my school with documentation showing that I have been
granted such a deferment for the period of time for which I am requesting an economic hardship deferment for my loan. If I am serving as a volunteer in the Peace
Corps, I am eligible for an economic hardship deferment for my full term of service. An economic hardship deferment based on service as a Peace Corps volunteer may
not exceed the lesser of three years or my remaining period of economic hardship eligibility; and (5) effective July 1, 2001, for a period not to exceed three years during
which I am serving on active duty during a war or other military operation or national emergency, or performing qualifying National Guard duty during a war or other
military operation or national emergency.
I may continue to defer making scheduled installment payments and will not be liable for any interest that might otherwise accrue for a six-month period immediately
following the expiration of any deferment period described in this section. I am not eligible for a deferment while serving in a medical internship or residency program.
CANCELLATIONS - Upon making a properly documented written request to the School, I am entitled to have up to 100 percent of the original principal loan amount
of this loan canceled if I perform qualifying service in the areas listed in paragraphs A, B, C, D, and E below. Qualifying service must be performed after the enrollment
period covered by the loan. A. Teaching • a full-time teacher in a public or other nonprofit elementary or secondary school, designated by the Department in accordance
with the provisions of section 465(a)(2) of the Act as a school with a high concentration of students from low-income families. An official Directory of designated low-
income schools is published annually by the Department. • a full-time special education teacher in a public or nonprofit elementary or secondary school system; or • a
full-time teacher, in a public or other nonprofit elementary or secondary school system, who teaches mathematics, science, foreign languages, bilingual education, or
any other field of expertise that is determined by the State Department of Education to have a shortage of qualified teachers in that State. B. Early Intervention Services
• a full-time qualified professional provider of early intervention services in a public or other nonprofit program under public supervision by a lead agency as authorized
by section 632(5) of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Early intervention services are provided to infants and toddlers with disabilities. C. Law
Enforcement or Corrections Officer • a full-time law enforcement officer for an eligible local, State, or Federal law enforcement agency; or • a full-time corrections
officer for an eligible local, State, or Federal corrections agency. D. Nurse or Medical Technician • a full-time nurse providing health care services; or • a full-time
medical technician providing health care services. E. Child or Family Service Agency • a full-time employee of an eligible public or private non-profit child or family
service agency who is directly providing or supervising the provision of services to high-risk children who are from low-income communities and the families of such
children. Cancellation Rates - For each completed year of service under paragraphs
A, B, C, D, and E a portion of this loan will be canceled at the following rates: • 15 percent of the original principal loan amount for each of the first and second years; •
20 percent of the original principal loan amount for each of the third year and fourth years; and • 30 percent of the original principal loan amount for the fifth year. F.
Head Start Cancellation - Upon making a properly documented written request to the school, I am entitled to have up to 100 percent of the original principal loan
amount canceled for qualifying service performed after the enrollment period covered by the loan as: • a full-time staff member in the educational component of a Head
Start program which is operated for a period comparable to a full School year and which pays a salary comparable to an employee of a local educational agency.
Cancellation Rate - For each completed year of service under the Head Start Cancellation provision, this loan will be canceled at the rate of 15 percent of the original
principal loan amount. G. Military Cancellation - Upon making a properly documented written request to the School, I am entitled to have up to 50 percent of the
principal amount of this loan canceled for qualifying service performed after the enrollment period covered by the loan as: • a member of the Armed Forces
of the United States in an area of hostilities that qualifies for special pay under section 310 of Title 37 of the United States Code.
Cancellation Rate - For each completed year of service under the Military Cancellation provision, this loan will be canceled at the rate of 12½ percent of the original
principal loan amount. H. Volunteer Service Cancellation - Upon making a properly documented
written request to the School, I am entitled to have up to 70 percent of the original principal loan amount of this loan canceled for qualifying service performed after the
enrollment period covered by the loan as: • a volunteer under the Peace Corps Act; • a volunteer under the Domestic Volunteer Service Act of 1973 (ACTION
programs). Cancellation Rate - For each completed year of service under the Volunteer Service Cancellation provision, a portion of this loan will be canceled at the
following rates: • 15 percent of the original principal loan amount for each of the first and second 12-month periods of service; and • 20 percent of the original principal
loan amount for each of the third and fourth 12-month periods of service.
DISCHARGES - My obligation to repay this loan may be partially or totally discharged for the reasons specified in paragraphs A, B, C, and D below. A. Death - In the
event of my death, the School will discharge the total amount owed on this loan. B. Total and Permanent Disability - If I become totally and permanently disabled after
I receive this loan, the School will discharge the total amount owed on this loan. If my disability discharge claim is approved by the School, this loan will be assigned to
the United States Department of Education, which will discharge the total amount owed on this loan if it determines that I am eligible for a total and permanent
disability discharge. C. School Closure - Under certain conditions, my total liability will be discharged, including refunding any amounts I have already paid on the
loan, if I was unable to complete the program in which I was enrolled because my School closed. D. Bankruptcy - Under certain conditions, my loan may be discharged
in bankruptcy. In order to discharge a loan in bankruptcy, I must prove undue hardship in an adversary proceeding before the bankruptcy court.
Disclosure of Information
STUDENT LOAN OMBUDSMAN - If I dispute the terms of my Federal Perkins Loan in writing to my School, and my School and I are unable to resolve the dispute,
I may seek the assistance of the Department of Education’s Student Loan Ombudsman. The Student Loan Ombudsman will review and attempt to informally resolve
the dispute.
Notice About Subsequent Loans Made Under This Master Promissory Note
This Note authorizes the School to disburse multiple loans during the multi-year term of this Note upon my request and upon the School’s determination of my loan
eligibility. Subsequent loans may be made under this Note for the same or
subsequent periods of enrollment at this School. The School, however, may, at its discretion, close this Note at any time and require me to sign a new Note for
additional disbursements. I understand that if my School chooses to make subsequent loans under this Note, no such loans will be made after the earliest of the
following dates: (i) the date the School receives my written notice that no further loans may be disbursed under this Note; (ii) twelve months after the date of my
signature on this Note if no disbursement is made during such twelve-month period; or (iii) ten years after the date of my signature on this Note, or the date the School
receives this Note. Any amendment to the Act governs the terms of any loans disbursed on or after the effective date of such amendment, and such
amended terms are hereby incorporated into this Note.


Important Notices
Privacy Act Notice
The Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a) requires that the following notice be provided to you: The authority for collecting the requested information from and about
you is §461 et seq. of the Higher Education Act (HEA) of 1965, as amended (20 U.S.C.
                                                                                                                                                                          74
1087aa et seq.) and the authorities for collecting and using your Social Security Number (SSN) are §484(a) (4) of the HEA (20 U.S.C. 1091(a) (4)) and 31 U.S.C.
7701(b). Participating in the Federal Perkins Loan (Perkins) Program and giving us your SSN are voluntary, but you must provide the requested information, including
your SSN, to participate. The principal purposes for collecting the information on this form, including your SSN, are to verify your identity, to determine your eligibility
to receive a loan or a benefit on a loan (such as a deferment, forbearance, discharge, or forgiveness) under the Perkins Program, to permit the servicing of your loan(s),
and, if it becomes necessary, to locate you and to collect and report on your loan(s) if your loan(s) become delinquent or in default. We also use your SSN as an account
identifier and to permit you to access your account information electronically. The information in your file may be disclosed, on a case by case basis or under a
computer matching program, to third parties as authorized under routine uses in the appropriate systems of records notices. The routine uses of this information include,
but are not limited to, its disclosure to federal, state, or local agencies, to private parties such as relatives, present and former employers, business and personal
associates, to consumer reporting agencies, to financial and educational institutions, and to guaranty agencies in order to verify your identity, to determine your
eligibility to receive a loan or a benefit on a loan, to permit the servicing or collection of your loan(s), to enforce the terms of the loan(s), to investigate possible fraud
and to verify compliance with federal student financial aid program regulations, or to locate you if you become delinquent in your loan payments or if you default. To
provide default rate calculations, disclosures may be made to guaranty agencies, to financial and educational institutions, or to state agencies. To provide financial aid
history information,
disclosures may be made to educational institutions. To assist program administrators with tracking refunds and cancellations, disclosures may be made to guaranty
agencies, to financial and educational institutions, or to federal or state agencies. To provide a standardized method for educational institutions efficiently to submit
student enrollment status, disclosures may be made to guaranty agencies or to financial and educational institutions. To counsel you in repayment efforts, disclosures
may be made to guaranty agencies, to financial and educational institutions, or to federal, state, or local agencies. In the event of litigation, we may send records to the
Department of Justice, a court, adjudicative body, counsel, party, or witness if the disclosure is relevant and necessary to the litigation. If this information, either alone
or with other information, indicates a potential violation of law, we may send it to the
appropriate authority for action. We may send information to members of Congress if you ask them to help you with federal student aid questions. In circumstances
involving employment complaints, grievances, or disciplinary actions, we may disclose relevant records to adjudicate or investigate the issues. If provided for by a
collective bargaining agreement, we may disclose records to a labor organization recognized under 5 U.S.C. Chapter 71. Disclosures may be made to our contractors for
the purpose of performing any programmatic function that requires disclosure of records. Before making any such disclosure, we will require the contractor to maintain
Privacy Act safeguards. Disclosures may also be made to qualified researchers under Privacy Act safeguards.
Financial Privacy Act Notice
Under the Right to Financial Privacy Act of 1978 (12 U.S.C. 3401-3421), the U.S. Department of Education will have access to financial records in your student loan
file.
Paperwork Reduction Notice
According to the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995, no persons are required to respond to a collection of information unless it displays a currently valid OMB control
number. The valid OMB control number for this information collection is 1845-0074. The time required to complete this information is estimated to average 0.5 hours
(30 minutes) per response, including the time to review instructions, search existing data resources, gather and maintain the data needed and complete and review the
information collection. If you have any comments concerning the accuracy of the time estimate(s) or suggestions for improving this form, please write to:
U.S. Department of Education
Washington, DC 20202-4651
If you have any comments or concerns regarding the status of your individual submission of this form, write directly to the le




                                                                                                                                                                           75
                                     PC Internship Application


Reply to Posting # ______

Name: ______________________________________        Date: ________________

Major / Year: _________________________ / ___________

Phone #: (_____) _______- __________ E-mail: ___________________________

Birthday: ____ / ____ / _______

Extracurricular Activities / Jobs:
__________________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________

When are you available to work?



How many hours a week would you like to work?


Please list skills:




   Office Use Only

   Received by:                                  Date Received:




                                                                                        76
                                              PC Disability Identification Form
                      (Submission is optional; however, if services are requested this form must be completed.)


Name ____________________________________
Address___________________________________
__________________________________________
Telephone ( ) _____________________________

Program:      BS                    MS                Certificate

Major: ________________________________               Expected Graduation Date: _____________
Campus Address: ________________________________________________________________
Home Address: __________________________________________________________________
Telephone: Campus ________________________            Home ________________________
Email: ___________________________________
Residence: ____ University Housing     ___ Off Campus (walking distance) ___ Off Campus (commuter)


Disability Information:    ___ Permanent              ___ Temporary (Duration :________________)


        Family Physician                                                * Emergency Contact

Name___________________                                        Name____________________
Address_________________                                       Address__________________
________________________                                       _________________________
Phone___________________                                       Phone____________________
Disability Documentation

        Disability documentation must be on clinician’s letterhead and include diagnosis, nature of disabling condition, limitations,
         and recommended accommodations and duration, if temporary.
        Comprehensiveness and currency of disability documentation is essential to enable the University to assess the
         appropriateness and necessity for accommodations consistent with disability needs, academic standards, and curricular
         requirements.
        No request for accommodation will be considered without sufficient documentation and signed release giving University-
         appointed personnel permission to speak to the clinician. Students should write a note of release.
     Documentation should be submitted to the Registrar.
Nature of Disability (check all that apply)
        ___ ADD/ADHD                                           ___PSYCHIATRIC
        ___CHRONIC MEDICAL CONDITION                           ___SPEECH
        ___EATING DISORDER                                     ___SUBSTANCE ABUSE
        ___HEARING                                             ___TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY
        ___LEARNING                                            ___VISUAL
        ___MOBILITY                                            ___OTHER (Specify) _________________
        ___ Uses braces, crutches, or canes
        ___Uses Wheelchair (___ Electric or ___Manual)

Briefly describe your disability (supporting medical documentation is required):


                                                                                                                                     77
Are you affiliated with your State Department of Vocational Education?          ___YES            ___NO
Do you need accommodations in order to perform your coursework?                 ___YES            ___NO
If YES, please check all that apply:

___Accessibility information       ___Dining Services                  ___ASL interpreters
___Admissions Information          ___Disability information           ___Taped texts
___Bookstore assistance            ___Employment accommodations        ___Tape recorder
___Classroom scheduling            ___Equipment                        ___Testing accommodations
___Computing assistance            ___Leave accommodations             ___Wheelchair
___Libraries                       ___Parking                          ___Other (Specify)
___Note-taking assistance          ___Readers
___Mobility instructor             ___Resource/referral info

Please briefly describe the accommodation you think you will need, allow at least 8 weeks’ notice (14 weeks for taped texts or special
housing arrangements) before the start of the semester involved:

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY CONTACT:

Name: _____________________________________
Address: ______________________________________________________________________________
Telephone: ____________________________      Relationship: _______________________

Please return this form to the Registrar. If you have any questions, please contact the College.




 Office use only
 Received by:                                 Date Received:
 Action taken:




Medical History
Please list any health related problems/conditions for which you are currently under a physician’s care:
____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________



Please list any prescribed medications you are currently taking under a physician’s care:
____________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________

Statement of Health

I affirm that the information above is true to the best of my knowledge and that I am in good health and able to
complete the above named course of study.

Signature_____________________      Date_________________
************************************************************
                                                                                                                                   78
This student health notice has been reviewed with_________________
And based on his/her evidence of good health he/she has been admitted to the school.
Signature_____________________              Date__________________




                                                                                       79
                                  Degree Program Transfer Form



Student Name: ______________________________          Date: ______________
Current Address: _______________________________________________________
Phone: ___________________________       AC E-mail: ______________________
Intended Program: ________________________________ Degree: ______________


ESL/TOEFL Instruction (if relevant)
Instructor Name: _____________________
Instructor’s Notes:




Test Scores
Attach supporting documents.
SLEP                                     TOEFL
Date of Administration: ____________     Date of Administration: __________
Name of Proctor: _________________       Name of Proctor: _______________
Score: ___________                       Score: ___________

Approval by Dean of Academic Affairs

Signature: ______________________________      Date: __________________




                                                                              80
                                          INTENT TO
                                   GRADUATE FORM
                                          Pacifica College

           Deadline for Completion – Winter: November 15; Spring: March 15

Name:                                                     Date of Graduation: __________________
        Semester __________ Year
                                 DIPLOMA NAME

          Print your full name, as you would like it to appear on
         your diploma. For example, do you want a middle name or
         middle initial? Use UPPER & lower case:
         _____________________________________________
         _First                Middle                  Last
         Phonetic Pronunciation for Ceremony
         Example: Phoebe Langley – ‘Fee-bee Lang-lee’
         _____________________________________________
         _
         First                   Middle                     Last
         List your hometown and state that you would like to
         appear in the commencement program and printed on your
         diploma:
         _____________________________________________
         _Hometown           State            Country (if other than U.S.)

         Permanent Address:
         ____________________________________________________
         ____________________________________________________
         __ Local Phone/Cell Phone:
         ___________________________________
         Preferred E-mail Address:
                      CONCENTRATION AND MINOR
         ___________________________________
         Concentration(s)
         __________________________________ Minor (if one)
         ____________________________________

         List the 12 credits of Upper Level concentration courses or
         24 credits for a double concentration:
         Course No.    Credits                    Course No. Credits
         _________ ____                           _________ ____
         _________ ____                           _________ ____
         _________ ____                           _________ ____
         _________ ____                           _________ ____

         The signature of a Registrar is required for any courses that
         do not match the concentration definitions/sequences listed
         in the University Catalog
         ________________________________________________
         __ (Faculty Signature -- if necessary)

         Please return completed form to the Registrar.

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