HSES 244—THE HISTORY AND FOUNDATIONS OF PHYSICAL by dcsvzebge

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									                                           HSES 244
                          History and Foundations of Physical Education

Professor:        Dr. Angela Lumpkin
Office:           146B Robinson
Telephone:        785-864-0778
E-mail:           alumpkin@ku.edu
Office Hours:     8:30 am – 10 am Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays; also by
                  appointment

Course Description
The study of the history, foundational concepts, and current principles of physical education, exercise
science, and sport programs

Course Objectives
1. Students will identify the purpose and objectives of physical education, exercise science, and sport
   programs and be able to explain the meaning and importance of each.
2. Students will learn about the foundational concepts of the exercise and sport sciences.
3. Students will begin to understand the duties and responsibilities of a professional physical
   educator, exercise scientist, or sport educator.
4. Students will formulate a personal philosophy of physical education, exercise science, or sport
   based on an understanding of fundamental philosophical theories.
5. Students will investigate possible careers in physical education, exercise science, and sport and
   participate in activities to help prepare for a chosen career.
6. Students will learn about the heritage of physical activity programs from the ancient Greeks to the
   present time through an investigation of people, programs, and events.
7. Students will examine the legacy of the historical occurrences of physical education, exercise
   science, and sport as these have influenced and shaped existing programs.
8. Students will analyze current issues and trends in physical education, exercise science, and sport.

Required Textbook
Lumpkin, A. (2011). Introduction to physical education, exercise science, and sport studies (8th ed.).
Boston: McGraw-Hill.

Course Requirements
1. Class attendance and punctuality are expected in this pre-professional course. For every absence
   over one class (unless excused by the professor), your final grade will be lowered one portion of a
   letter grade (i.e., A- to B+ or B+ to B). If you choose to attend only half of any class, this will
   count as half of an unexcused absence. If you miss more than three classes, you will receive an F in
   this course. Please be respectful of your classmates and professor by being on time for each class.
2. Write (must be typed) a personal philosophy (around one single-spaced page) regarding your
   chosen career that includes what you believe are the important values for professionals in this field
   and how your personal values align with these (see pages 122-124 for examples of personal
   philosophies, although these do not have to be used as models). This paper must be submitted
   during class on June 14. A total of 50 points can be earned through this assignment. This paper will
   be graded using the following rubric with the potential number of points:
    (41 - 50)  Includes a detailed description of the values important in your chosen field.
                 Explains how your personal values are aligned with the values in the chosen field.
                 Is clearly written at a level expected for an undergraduate student.
     (20 - 40)  Includes a brief explanation of the values important in your chosen field.
                 Provides a limited explanation of how your personal values relate to the values
                    associated with your chosen field.
                 Mentions, but does not describe, how your personal values are aligned with the
                    values associated in the chosen field.
                 Is somewhat clear, but shows a lack of in-depth understanding and clarity in writing.
     (0 - 19)  Describes personal characteristics or actions rather than values.
                 Fails to explain how your personal values relative to your chosen field.
                 Is poorly written indicating limited thought and editing.
3. Conduct an interview with a person who works in a physical education, exercise science, physical
    therapy, or sport field (this person cannot be a student or an intern). You may use the questions
    provided on pages 136 and 187 in your textbook as a guide or you may use your choice of
    questions. Do not just provide answers to these questions as statements from the person
    interviewed. Rather, write (must be typed) a summary and analysis of what you learned from this
    interview. This report should be no more than two single-spaced pages. A total of 50 points can be
    earned through this assignment. This report must be submitted during class on June 21. This paper
    will be graded using the following rubric with the potential number of points:
     (41 - 50)  Describes in detail, with examples of responses provided, insights into the
                    preparation, responsibilities, and perspectives of the individual interviewed.
                  Provides an in-depth personal analysis and application of what you learned from the
                    person interviewed that may help you in your career.
                  Is clearly written at a level expected for an undergraduate student in college.
     (20 - 40)  Describes a broad overview of the background and work of the person interviewed.
                  Provides only one or two types of information learned from the person interviewed
                    that may help you in your career and makes only minimal personal application of
                    what is learned.
                  Is somewhat clear, but shows a lack of in-depth understanding and clarity in writing.
     (0 – 19)  Lists only the questions and responses to these questions.
                  Includes no analysis and no personal application of what is learned.
                  Is poorly written indicating limited thought and editing.
4. Report on a related book — Select one of the books on the readings list and write (must be typed)
    no more than three, single-spaced pages discussing at least five specific things that you learned
    from reading this book. A book not included on this list may be read, but only if approved in
    advance by the professor. (Biographies of athletes and coaches will not be approved.) This report
    must be submitted during class on June 28. This report is worth 100 points. This paper will be
    graded using the following rubric with the potential number of points:
  (90 - 100)  Includes a comprehensive description that shows a strong understanding of at least
                   five key points of information that you learned from reading this book.
                 Is written in a clear, understandable, and in-depth manner that is appropriate for
                   college-level writing with few or no grammatical or spelling errors.
                 Provides a complete citation for the book read (see textbook listing in this syllabus
                   for an example of the correct format)
  (76 - 89)      Includes a general description and broad understanding of less than five key points
                   of information that you learned from reading this book.
                 The writing, at times, lacks clarity in the presentation of information.
                 Contains several grammatical or spelling errors.


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                 Provides an incomplete citation for the book read.
  (61 - 75)      Includes a brief overview of contents of the book but with limited explanation of the
                   importance of what is presented.
                 Uses numerous quotes from the book instead of summarizing the key points in your
                   own words.
                 Presentation of information is difficult to follow and lacks clarity.
                 Contains numerous grammatical or spelling errors.
                 Fails to provide a complete citation for the book.
  ( 0 - 60)      Includes only a topical overview of the book that indicates minimal understanding.
                 Relies heavily on quotes or paraphrases rather than your words thus showing a lack
                   of personal understanding of the contents.
                 Includes extensive grammatical or spelling errors showing a failure to edit the
                   report.
                 Provides no citation for the book.
5. For each of chapters 1-12 in the textbook, complete the on-line (Blackboard) quiz prior to the first
    day of class in which that chapter is scheduled to be discussed (except the chapter 1 quiz that
    should be completed by class on June 8), as listed on the course outline. Each quiz is worth 10
    points. These quizzes may be completed using your textbook. There are 12 quizzes, each worth up
    to 10 points. These quizzes count only 100 points in the final grade, so any total points you earn
    over 100 points count as bonus points. These quizzes will disappear from Blackboard at 10:20 am
    on the dates listed below, so you will no longer be able to access these quizzes. Should you get
    locked out of a quiz prior to this deadline, please send me an email message so you can be provided
    access to the quiz.
6. Examinations — There will be two examinations that will count 100 points each, and a final
    comprehensive examination that will count 100 points. Examinations may have both objective and
    subjective questions.

Grading: The grading scale is based on a total of 600 points (grades are not curved upward):
       A = 558-600 points B+ = 522-539 points C+ = 462-479 points D+ = 402-419 points
       A- = 540-557 points B = 498-521 points C = 438-461 points D = 378-401 points
                              B- = 480-497 points C- = 420-437 points F = below 378 points

Additional Information
1. Please place your name tent on your desk each class so the professor can more easily learn your
   name.
2. Cell phones and pagers must be turned off during class. No instant messaging is permitted during
   class. If you are using or even holding your cell phone during class, it will be taken from you (and
   returned after class). Computers are permitted as long as they are used to facilitate your learning.
3. Please do not sit in the same seat during each class. Please do not sit beside the same classmates on
   a regular basis. In many classes, you will be asked to work with other students, so sitting in various
   seats will automatically change those with whom you work.
4. This class will be organized to combine lectures using PowerPoint slides as an outline, class
   discussions, small group work during class, and written assignments.
5. If you have an identified disability, please talk with the professor privately about any needed
   accommodations.

Academic Honesty



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Students are expected to adhere to the highest standards of academic honesty, with academic integrity
an expectation of this class. All student work must be completed individually. Plagiarism occurs when
a student uses or purchases papers or reports written by someone else, including downloading from the
Web. It also occurs when a student utilizes the ideas of or information obtained from another person
without giving credit to that person. Any time you quote from another person, you must give credit to
this person by providing a complete citation (including the page number) for the source from which
you quoted. This includes quoting from the book in your book report. Plagiarism is academic
misconduct and is a violation of rules and regulations of the University of Kansas. Penalties for
academic misconduct range from failure of the assignment to expulsion from the university. In this
course, plagiarism on an assignment will result in a zero for that assignment, and any additional
plagiarism will result in failure of the course and possibly further penalties. Plagiarism on an
examination will result in failure of the course, regardless of the current status of your grade.

Chapter Topical Outline

  Date                             Topics and Activities                            Assigned Readings
                                                                                     and Assignments
June 7     Chapter 1 — Physical Education, Exercise Science, and Sport              Chapter 1
           Studies — Dynamic Fields
            The dynamic fields of human movement
            Quality of life issues
            Importance of physical activity
            Definitions of key terms, such as physical education, exercise
              science, sports, kinesiology, exercise, play, games, leisure,
              recreation, health, athletics, physical activity, physical fitness,
              health-related fitness, skill-related fitness, and wellness
            National goals and studies
               Surgeon General’s Report on Physical Activity and Health
               Healthy People 2010
               2008 Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans
            Objectives of physical education, exercise science, and sport
              programs
               Cognitive development
               Affective development
               Psychomotor development
June 8     Chapter 2 — Exercise and Sport Sciences                                  Chapter 2 and
            Characteristics an academic discipline                                 chapter 1 and
            Understanding exercise physiology                                      chapter 2 quizzes
            Understanding athletic training
            Understanding motor development
            Understanding motor control and motor learning
            Understanding sport biomechanics
            Understanding sport history
            Understanding sport management
            Understanding sport philosophy
            Understanding exercise and sport psychology
            Understanding sport sociology


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June 9    Chapter 3 — Profession of Physical Education, Exercise Science,        Chapter 3 and quiz
          and Sport
           Characteristics of a profession
           Pedagogy
           Adapted physical education
           Undergraduate specializations of athletic training, coaching,
            fitness, sport management, exercise science, physical therapy, and
            teaching
           American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation
            and Dance and its organizations
           Specialized professional organizations
June 13   Chapter 4 — Philosophy of Physical Education, Exercise Science,        Chapter 4 and quiz
          and Sport
           Philosophy
           Five traditional philosophies of idealism, realism, pragmatism,
             naturalism, and existentialism
           Ethics and ethical theories
           Moral reasoning
           Ethical choices and dilemmas in sports
           Developing a personal philosophy
June 14   Chapter 5 — Selecting a Career                                         Chapters 5 and 6
           Assessing factors influencing your career choice                     and chapter 5 and
           Assessing lifestyle preferences                                      chapter 6 quizzes;
           Careers in teaching                                                  personal
           Careers in fitness, and the exercise and sport sciences              philosophy due
           Careers in leisure services
           Careers in athletic training and physical therapy
           Careers in athletics
           Careers in sport management
           Careers in sport marketing and promotions
           Careers in sport communication
          Chapter 6 — Preparation for a Career
           Setting career goals
           Volunteer activities
           Officiating
           Internships
           Certifications
           Graduate education options
           Resumes, job applications, and interviews
           Preparing a portfolio
           Review for unit one examination
June 15   Examination over chapters 1-6
          Chapter 7 — Early Heritage in Sports and Gymnastics
           Early cultures of Egypt, China, and India
           Homeric Greeks
           Spartans


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           Early Athenians
           Late Athenians
June 16    Pan-Hellenic festivals, and especially the Olympic Games
           The Roman Republic and Roman Empire
           Medieval Europe and the knights
           The Renaissance and the Reformation
June 20    The Age of Enlightenment                                        Chapter 7 quiz
           Jean Jacques Rousseau
           Philanthropinum and Johann Basedow
           Schnepfenthal Institute and Johann GutsMuths
           Friedrich Jahn and turner gymnastics
           Adolph Spiess and German school gymnastics
           Franz Nachtegall and Danish gymnastics
           Per Henrik Ling and Swedish gymnastics
           Hjalmar Ling and Swedish school gymnastics
           Sports in Great Britain
June 21   Chapter 8 — Early American Physical Education and Sport           Chapter 8 and quiz
           Physical activities of Native Americans and colonists           interview due
           German gymnastics in the United States
           Catharine Beecher and calisthenics
           Dioclesian Lewis and light gymnastics
           Edward Hitchcock and daily, required physical education at
            Amherst College
           Dudley Sargent and individualized programs at Harvard College
           Swedish gymnastics in the United States
           Battle of the Systems
           Normal schools for physical education
           Founding of the national association
           Promotion of play for children
           Development of amateur sports
           Collegiate sports for men
           Collegiate sports for women
June 22   Chapter 9 — Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Physical           Chapter 9 and quiz
          Education, Exercise Science, and Sport
           Leaders in the new physical education
              Luther Gulick and play
              Thomas Wood and natural activities
              Clark Hetherington and play
              Jay Nash and recreation
              Jessie Williams and education through the physical
           Women’s physical education
           Charles McCloy and education of the physical
           Exercise science
           Human movement
           Amateur and collegiate sports
           Youth sport programs


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           Intramurals
June 23    Collegiate sports for men
           Collegiate sports for women
           Amateur sports
           Play and recreation
           Fitness testing
           Federal legislation and its impact on physical education programs
           Coeducational physical education
           Adapted physical education, inclusion, and Individualized
            Education Program
June 27   Review for second examination
          Examination over chapters 7-9
June 28   Chapter 10 — Opportunities and Challenges in Physical Education         Chapter 10 and
          and Exercise Science                                                    quiz;
           Value of participating in physical activity                           book report due
           Program adherence factors
           Physical activity tips
           Recreation and leisure services
           Exercise science
           Specialists and interdisciplinary research
           Elementary, middle, and secondary school physical education
            programs
           Challenges facing school physical educators
           Teacher licensure and accreditation
           Accountability based on standards and assessments
           Career burnout
          Chapter 11 — Issues in Sports
           Threats to the integrity of sports
           Girls and women in sports
           Equality for ethnic minorities and especially African Americans
           Equality for senior citizens
           Equality for individuals with special needs
June 29    Youth sports programs                                                 Chapter 11 and
           Interscholastic sports                                                quiz
           Intercollegiate athletics                                             Chapter 12 and
           International sports and especially the Olympic Games                 quiz
          Chapter 12 — Leadership for Active Living
           Leadership characteristics, theories, styles, and what good leaders
            do
           Possible changes in physical education, exercise and sport
            sciences, sports, and physical activity
           Changing identity from physical education to the exercise and
            sport sciences and sports
           Promoting physical activity throughout life
           Science and athletics
June 30   Final examination over chapters 1-12


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