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					SBE Meeting 02/2011                                                                Attachment : LFI   5

                                                EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Title:   Renewal Recommendations for Charter Schools with Charters Expiring June 2011

Type of Executive Summary:
        Action        Action on First Reading                Discussion           Information

Policy Implications:
        Constitution
        General Statute #115C-238-29D(d)
        SBE Policy #TCS-U-007
        SBE Policy Amendment
        SBE Policy (New)
        APA #
        APA Amendment
        APA (New)
        Other

Presenter(s):     Mr. Philip Price (Chief Financial Officer, Financial and Business Services) and
                  Mr. Joel Medley (Consultant, Office of Charter Schools)


Description:
Based on GS115C-238.29D(d) and SBE Policy TCS-U-007, the following schools are requesting renewal of their
charters:

Dillard Academy
Kestrel Heights School
The Hawbridge School
Torchlight Academy

As part of the renewal process, the Office of Charter Schools examined DPI compliance forms and made renewal
site vists to each school. After gathering this data, the Office of Charter Schools used the following guidelines to
formulate recommendations to the SBE:
(1) Ten-Year Renewal: consistent and regular high performance and growth with few (if any) issues;
(2) Three-Year Renewal: issues relating to the charter policies, governance, academic performances or operations
that require additional monitoring; but, the issues are not severe enough to warrant recommending closure.

The attachment lists the charter schools with charters expiring in June 2011. The performance and compliance of
each school is outlined per the criteria of the renewal rubric. The process and timeline followed by the Office of
Charter Schools are included in the materials.

Any items currently identified as an area of concern will require a corrective action statement from the charter
school to be submitted to the Office of Charter Schools for continued monitoring.

Resources:
N/A

Input Process:
Office of Charter Schools, The Leadership for Innovation Committee, and DPI

Stakeholders:
Charter Schools, parents, students, and staff

Timeline For Action:
This item is presented for Discussion in the February 2011 and for Action during the March 2011 SBE meeting.
                                                                                                                                                   1102_LFI 5_Attachment


                                                   Data for Charter Schools Seeking Charter Renewal in 2011

         Blank Cells denote areas of compliance
         * Data Not Available

School Name       Academic Performance                         Low        Met Growth       AYP              Title   Financial   Governance    EC          Enrollment
                                                            Performing                     (targets met/      I
Grades                                                                                     total targets)                                                   (Best 1 of 2)
                  Year     Composite     Reading   Math
(County)
                  05/06    50.0          50.0      33.3                  No                No – 1/2                                                             113
Dillard           06/07    49.4          63.6      48.5                  Yes               Met – 2/2                                                            114
Academy           07/08    49.1          25.6      60.5                  Yes/HG            No – 8/13                                                            133
                  08/09    51.9          34.0      69.8                  Yes               Met - 13/13                                                          146
Gr. K-4
                  09/10    39.4          30.3      48.5                  Yes/HG            No – 7/13                                                            152
(Wayne)

                           The SBE granted Dillard a three-year renewal in 2008. The school has met growth the last four years, and high growth in two of the last three
Summary Information:       years. The December 2010 compliance reports completed by DPI staff reveal that Dillard Academy is compliant in all areas. However,
                           Dillard’s performance composite has consistently been unacceptable. Staff feels that the school has not met academic expectations necessary
                           for a 5 year renewal.
Office of Charter School   April 25, 2007; October 4, 2007; November 15, 2007; January 9, 2008; February 20, 2008; September 10, 2008; December 1, 2010
Site Visits:
                           DPI recommends a maximum of a three-year renewal.
Recommendation:




                                                                                       1
                                                                                                                                                       1102_LFI 5_Attachment




                                                      Data for Charter Schools Seeking Charter Renewal in 2011
             Blank Cells denote areas of compliance
             * Data Not Available

School Name                 Academic Performance                Low        Met Growth         AYP          Title      Financial     Governance             EC          Enrollment
                                                             Performing                   (targets met/      I
Grades                                                                                    total targets)                                                              (Best 1 of 2)
                   Year    Composite    Reading    Math
                                        Grades     Grades
(County)
                                        6-8        6-8
                   05/06   67.8         88.3       60.8                   No             Yes – 13/13               Incorrectly      Questions about                       189
Kestrel Heights    06/07   52.1         75.3       51.4                   No             No – 12/17        Not     enrolling        selectively                           387
                   07/08   58.8         65.7       66.1                   No             Yes – 17/17       Title   students in      admitting                             413
Gr. 6-12           08/09   67.6         78.7       81.2                   Yes/HG                                                                                          470
                                                                                         No – 17/19          I     courses,         students
(Durham)
                   09/10   73.9         80.5       87.7                   Yes            No – 16/17                including dual                                         518
                                                                                                                   enrollment and
                                                                                                                   improper EOC
                                                                                                                   student
                                                                                                                   enrollment

                           The SBE granted Kestrel Heights a three-year renewal in 2008. While financial and deficit issues have been resolved, the school continues to be non-
Summary Information:       compliant in Student Accountability/Testing, Governance, EC, and Title II.

                           Compliance reports completed by DPI staff identified the following areas of concern:
                           (1) Accountability and Testing in that NCWISE student course enrollment issues continue to arise despite repeated training sessions; problems with
                           identifying and testing LEP students; problems with students not being enrolled in the proper courses; in 2007-2008 the school was found non-compliant
                           in using appropriate accommodations as outlined in students’ IEPs and in the handling of student tests during EOG administration.
                           (2) Governance in that the school selectively admitted students by requiring incoming students to have a 2.0 cumulative GPA and pass the 5th grade EOG.
                           The school was notified of these concerns in an October 2009 letter and met with the Office of Charter Schools in the same month. The school, however,
                           did not change its policy until another verbal warning during a September 2010 site visit and did not vote, as a board, to change their policy until
                           December 2010.
                           (3) EC – 2007-2008 found non-compliant in the area of secondary transition plan. 2008-2009 found non-compliant in the area of child find – Only 60%
                           compliant in determining eligibility and placement within 90 days. Kestrel has not submitted its PRC 29 suspension report and its CIPP submission was
                           not on time. For 2009-2010 it was found that Kestrel Heights denied FAPE (Free Appropriate Public Education) for one student and did not conduct the
                           appropriate evaluations for another resulting in 18 hours of compensatory time and 13 hours of compensatory time respectively.
                           (4) Title II in that they failed to meet the 100% highly qualified requirement, thus, they must submit an HQT Improvement Plan/HQT Financial
                           Accountability Plan per sec. 2141 of NCLB
Office of Charter School   March 20, 2007; October 2, 2007; April 8, 2008; September 11, 2008; September 15, 2010; December 9, 2010
Site Visits:
                           Based upon the above information, DPI recommends a maximum of a three-year renewal and the stipulation that Kestrel Heights remain in compliance in
Recommendation:            all areas for three consecutive years.


                                                                                           2
                                                                                                                                                   1102_LFI 5_Attachment


                                                  Data for Charter Schools Seeking Charter Renewal in 2011

         Blank Cells denote areas of compliance
         * Data Not Available

School Name                Academic Performance                Low        Met Growth           AYP          Title   Financial   Governance    EC         Enrollment
                                                            Performing                     (targets met/      I
Grades                                                                                     total targets)                                                  (Best 1 of 2)
                  Year     Composite    Reading    Math
(County)
                  05/06    44.7                                          Met/HG            No – 1/2         Not                                                 80
The Hawbridge     06/07    62.6                                          Met/HG            No – 1/2         Title                                               82
School            07/08    71.6         N/A        N/A                   No                Yes – 2/2          I                                                 90
                  08/09    88.1                                          No                Yes – 3/3                                                            81
Gr. 6-12
                  09/10    95.7                                          Met/HG            Yes – 3/3                                                            82
(Alamance)

                           The Hawbridge School was granted a three -year renewal in 2008. The SBE approved grade expansion for the school allowing them to add
Summary Information:       grades 6-8 this academic year. In November 2009, the charter school review checklist noted that the school had not met their growth goals for
                           two consecutive years and did not have 100% highly qualified staff. The Hawbridge School made High Growth in 2009-10, met AYP the last
                           three years, and has 100% highly qualified teachers in 2010.

                           The compliance reports completed by DPI staff identified the following areas of concern:
                           (1)EC -- the school needs to get in BUD for ARRA funding
                           (2)Title II with only 96.88% of teachers HQ but they were commended for making great strides toward making the 100%.

Office of Charter School   January 26, 2007; September 25, 2007; January 16, 2008; September 9, 2008; September 30, 2008; November 16, 2010
Site Visits:
                           DPI recommends a ten-year renewal.
Recommendation:




                                                                                       3
                                                                                                                                                                        1102_LFI 5_Attachment




                                                          Data for Charter Schools Seeking Charter Renewal in 2011
             Blank Cells denote areas of compliance
             * Data Not Available

                                                          ABCs Accountability                                                    Financial           Governance             EC            Enrollment

School Name                                                                                                                                      Governance
                            Academic Performance                                                                                                  Non-compliance
Grades                                                                                                                       Financial non-      Includes Insurance,                      Enrollment
                                                                                                       AYP                     compliance           Bonding, and           EC
(County)                                                             Low                           (targets met/     Title    Includes NC         Criminal History        Non-           (Best 1 of 2)
                  Year     Composite      Reading     Math
                                                                  Performing     Met Growth        total targets)      I     WISE Reporting            Checks           compliance
Torchlight        05/06    38.3           61.7        16.0        05/06 LP       No              No – 7/9                    Testing and                                                     223
Academy           06/07    47.0           60.3        32.1                       Met             No – 7/9                    finance non-                                                    305
                  07/08    37.4           26.9        43.3                       Met/HG          No – 7/9                    compliance                                                      328
Gr. K-5           08/09    59.0           48.3        73.9                       Met/HG                                                                                                      373
                                                                                                 Yes – 9/9                   issues.
(Wake)
                  09/10    72.0           68.9        82.3                       Met/HG          Yes – 9/9                                                                                   407

Summary Information:       The SBE granted Torchlight Academy a two-year renewal March 5, 2009, with four conditions placed upon the school.

                           I. Torchlight Academy must submit an audit to the Local Government Commission (LGC) by October 1 of each year.
                           II. The results of any audit submitted in section I above shall be in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Any audit deficiency may result in
                           disciplinary action up to and including termination of the charter.
                           III. Torchlight Academy shall resolve any deficiencies or noncompliance issues giving rise to its current “probationary” status (per letter dated April 30, 2008) by April 6,
                           2009. Furthermore, Torchlight shall not incur any additional warnings or disciplinary actions pursuant to NCSBE policy.
                           IV. Torchlight Academy shall submit the Plan for Restructuring (Title I, Sec. 1116.Academic Assessment and Local Education Agency and School Improvement Plan) that
                           was required to be developed during the 2007-2008 school year to the Office of Charter Schools by April 6, 2009.

                           Failure to satisfy any of the foregoing conditions may result in disciplinary action against the charter, up to and including termination of the charter. In addition to
                           meeting these requirements, Torchlight Academy remains subject to all terms and conditions as stated within its charter, which includes applicable federal and state laws
                           and State Board of Education policies.

                           The compliance reports completed by DPI staff identified the following areas of concern:
                           (1) Accountability and Testing had multiple testing issues in 2008-2009 including having students enrolled in incorrect grade levels, Grade 3 pre-tests
                           being administered in incorrect order, and late administration of W-APT for students with Limited English Proficiency. 2009-2010 still has one student
                           not enrolled in NCWISE at correct grade level for end of year testing.
                           (2)Finance non-compliance is related to multiple issues – The 2009-2010 audit stated that Torchlight is not reconciling their accounting records to the
                           Budget Balance Reconciliation Report and the Cash Balance Report monthly. They did not include the required state language in one installment note as
                           required in 115C-238.29H(al). During the year ending June 30, 2007, the school opened a line of credit with RBC Centura for $30,000 to cover
                           operating expenses during the year. The balance as of 7/1/09 was $14,737. The school increased the balance by $15,000 in order to cover current year
                           operating expenditures. The school’s general fund balance at June 30, 2010, was $2,806, but expenditures exceeded revenues by $136,473. An additional
                           obligation was incurred on July 1, 2010, when the school approved opening a retirement annuity for both the executive director and the school principal
                           for $20,000 each for past services rendered to the school. The annuity for the executive director was funded on July 22, 2010, and the annuity for the
                           principal has not yet been funded. In the fiscal year 2009-2010, the school also had a deficit in the School Lunch program of $119,284.
                           (3) EC in that they have not submitted their Maintenance of Effort which was due in September nor has their PRC 29 suspension report been submitted.
                           Additionally, they are not in BUD for the ARRA funding.           4
                                                                                                                                                        1102_LFI 5_Attachment



                                                     ABCs Accountability                                            Financial        Governance             EC          Enrollment

School Name                                                                                                                       Governance
                           Academic Performance                                                                                    Non-compliance
Grades                                                                                                           Financial non-   Includes Insurance,                   Enrollment
                                                                                            AYP                    compliance        Bonding, and          EC
(County)                                                       Low                      (targets met/    Title    Includes NC      Criminal History       Non-         (Best 1 of 2)
                   Year    Composite   Reading    Math
                                                            Performing     Met Growth   total targets)     I     WISE Reporting         Checks          compliance



Office of Charter School   January 14, 2007; March 23, 2007; May 10, 2007; May 11, 2007; May 21, 2007; May 29, 2007; May 30, 2007; June 7, 2007; August 2, 2007; August 14,
Site Visits:               2007; August 16, 2007; August 20, 2007; August 27, 2007; September 5, 2007; April 17, 2008; May 14, 2008; June 11, 2009; December 7, 2010;
                           December 20, 2010; January 12, 2011
DPI Recommendation:        Based upon the above information, DPI recommends a maximum of a three-year renewal and the stipulation that Torchlight remain in compliance in all
                           areas for three consecutive years.




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                                                                                         1102_LFI 5_Attachment
 


                              2009‐2010 STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS 

                         FOR CHARTER SCHOOLS SEEKING RENEWAL 

                                                        

                                  FRL  
    State/LEA/Charter                                          Student Demographics 
                                   % 
                                                                                                   American 
                                              White         Black         Asian       Hispanic 
                                                                                                    Indian 
                                               %              %            %             % 
                                                                                                      % 
              
     North Carolina              53.68         54.1          31.1          2.6          10.9          1.3 
              
Alamance – Burlington 
                                  52.6         53.6          26.7          1.4          17.8          0.5 
 
        Hawbridge  School 
                                   **          87.6          7.4            0            5             0 
              
Durham Public Schools 
                                 63.26         21.3          56.8          2.6          19.1          0.2 
 
           Kestrel Heights 
                                   **          40.5          47.7          3.9          7.9            0 
                           
Wake  
                                 37.14         51.1          30.7          6.1          11.8          0.3 
              
       Torchlight Academy 
                                   **            0           89.7           0           10.3           0 
                           
Wayne 
                                 63.53         44.3           42           1.0          12.5          0.2 
 
          Dillard Academy 
                                  100           3.9          94.8           0           1.3            0 
                           
 

**Free and Reduced Lunch (FRL) figures are tabulated based on the 2009‐10 data provided by Child 
Nutrition Services.  If a charter school does not participate in the Child Nutrition Services program, these 
statistics are unavailable for comparison. 

 




                                                        
                                                       6
                                                                                                               1102_LFI 5_Attachment




                          TIMELINE FOR CHARTER RENEWAL
            (Renewal is a two year process: Year One – next to last year of charter, Year Two – last year of charter)

          DATE                                                  ACTION

August             (year one)                        Renewal packet emailed to applicable schools.

September          (year one)                        DPI staff returns compliance sheets to the OCS.
                                                     The OCS and applicable schools discuss the renewal
                                                     process on a conference call.

October            (year one)                        Renewal self-study emailed to the OCS. Mail a
                                                     signed hard copy of the cover page to the OCS and
                                                     include; (1) a copy of the board’s by-laws including any
                                                     amendments or changes from the original document (2)
                                                     a copy of the current student handbook and, (3) a copy
                                                     of the most recent board “Policies and Procedures”
                                                     manual.

October            (year one)                        OCS review team completes the initial screening of
                                                     the self-study.

November           (year one)                        Areas of concern are identified by the OCS, schools
                                                     are notified of the areas of concern and create a
                                                     Corrective Action Plan.

December           (year one)                        Corrective Action Plans are due to the OCS.


December           (year one)                        Schools will implement Corrective Action Plans
through                                              which will be monitored by the OCS and
November           (year two)                        appropriate divisions of DPI. Any non-compliance
                                                     issues found from November through June of year two
                                                     will be reported the LFI Committee and may result in
                                                     recommendation of non-renewal or revocation of the
                                                     school’s charter.

January            (year two)                        LFI Committee receives renewal information and
                                                     recommendations from the OCS. (Discussion item)

February           (year two)                        SBE takes action on recommendations from the LFI
                                                     Committee.

The new renewal begins July 1st of the calendar year. Any non-compliance issues reported from
February through June may result in recommendation of non-renewal or revocation of the
school’s charter.




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                                                                     1102_LFI 5_Attachment


            THE NORTH CAROLINA CHARTER SCHOOLS SELF STUDY
                              SECTION 1




I.     COVER PAGE

School Name: Dillard Academy

Mailing Address: Post Office Box 1188,
                 Goldsboro, NC 27533-1188

Primary Contact Person:   Hilda G. Hicks

Title: Director

Phone #: 919 581-0166 Fax #: (919) 581-0122 E-mail Address: hhicks@dillardacademy.org


Contact Information for the Board Chairperson:

Name: John Stokes

Term of Office: 2002-present

Mailing Address: 1602 Stephens St., Goldsboro, NC 27530

Phone #:(919) 738-1206 Fax #:(919) 581-0122 E-mail Address:
jstokes@dillardacademy.org


Board Chair Signature: _____________________________________       Date__________




                                                 8
                                                                                1102_LFI 5_Attachment


        LETTER OF INTENT (Letter from Board Chairperson)
  This letter should include the renewal term requested and highlights of the school’s success.

 Pursuant to G. S. 115C-238.29D the Dillard Academy Board of Directors is requesting a 10-year
renewal of its charter to provide educational services to elementary school students in Wayne
County North Carolina. Dillard Academy was originally granted a 5-year charter in 1998, was
renewed for 5 years in 2003, and was renewed for 3 years in 2008. The reason for this request is
to continue the growth and progress that the school has made.

Dillard Academy is the home of the population described in our original charter. We serve
well the at-risk inner city student. Our enrollment is 154, and we continue to maintain a
low student-adult ratio with a teacher, a teacher assistant and a Foster Grandparent in each
classroom. We provide comprehensive services to our Title I School-wide population,
which includes 42 children with special needs. We have a history of High Growth with
student achievement on the End-of-Grade (EOG) Test. Additionally, our lower grade
classes are showing tremendous growth evidenced by an average growth of 1.5 years in the
2008-09 kindergarten class as measured by the IOWA Test of Basic Skills.

In addition to the quality instructional program offered in our school by Highly Qualified
teachers and teacher assistants, Dillard Academy in Partnership with the Center for
Academic, Social, Technology, Literacy, and Economic Solutions (CASTLES), a 21st
Century Community Learning Center (21 CCLC), a DSS licensed afterschool program and
a NC Dropout Prevention program (DAVI), offers high quality after-school care. The
CASTLES 21 CCLC originally approved in 2005 has recently been renewed for another 4
years. Dillard Academy’s afterschool programs serve approximately 240 students from
throughout the community in afterschool each year.

Dillard Academy operates provides a DSS licensed child care program for parents involved
in work, school and charter school activities. The school is a Microsoft Authorized
Refurbisher and as such is able to accept and refurbish donated computers to be made
available to non-profit organizations, needy individuals and households. The community
at-large is served through the school’s Food Pantry which donates food to needy families
including the families of many of the students enrolled in the school. Dillard Academy’s
school wide, NC Standard Course of Study-linked garden program is currently under study
by NC State University as a best practice through a Gillings Foundation grant.

Parent involvement in student learning is eclipsed only by parent enthusiasm about our new
ABE and GED classes offered onsite, with the traditional barriers of transportation and
childcare being removed by the school. Eight parents are currently on the waiting list to
start GED classes at Dillard Academy through partnership with Wayne Community
College. Dillard Academy also serves as a host site for 15 vocational education local high
school students.

One of our greatest accomplishments has been gaining support for our student and families
through community partnerships. Many of our students have already failed in other settings
when th.ey come to us. We are proud of the progress the children have made and the
whole staff is dedicated to continuous improvement.

______________________________________________                      _______________________
John D. Stokes, Chairman                                            Date
Dillard Academy Board of Directors
                                                9
                                                                                 1102_LFI 5_Attachment




                              EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This summary should begin with the school’s mission as stated in the initial charter application
(or a revised mission statement that has been formally approved by the State board of
Education). The remainder of the summary should be specific and succinct in describing how the
School is or is not successfully fulfilling the Mission. (Limit 2 pages)

       The mission of Dillard Academy Charter School is to provide a quality community-
based education for students by focusing on the whole-child through strong parental
involvement, community outreach, technology, character development, cultural enrichment
and a high quality staff. In order to achieve that mission, we provide several services to the
Goldsboro community, the primary of which is a free, public education choice for students
Kindergarten through 4th grade.


        In all of Wayne County, Dillard Academy is the only free alternative to the
traditional LEA. We emphasize student academic growth and development through the use
of highly qualified teachers and paraprofessionals to instruct based on the NC Standard
Course of Study. We also use a variety of technology and print resources to enhance
student’s learning. Teacher helpers, Foster Grandparents and trained volunteers are
available to ensure a small student to staff ratio. This ratio enables us to deal with each
individual child where they are (academically, developmentally, emotionally, socio-
economically, etc.). We use individual development plans to help each child reach his full
potential.


        In an effort to truly leave no child behind, we aggressively implement appropriate
identification of and delivery of services to special needs children. Dillard Academy uses
employees and contracted service providers to perform exceptional children’s services to
reduce the gap between students with and without exceptionalities. Among those
providing special services to our students are a behavioral specialist, a speech therapist
with an assistant, an occupational specialist, a full-time resource teacher and a social
worker.

        The focus of all activities is the development of the total child. The programs we
offer support the child and the family by encouraging quality parent involvement through
parent/student activities, personal and professional development for parents, and
transportation and childcare for parents during school-sponsored activities. Dillard
Academy boasts an active Parent Teacher Organization, which spearheads fundraisers,
sponsors family reading nights, Parents Using Standards at Home (PUSH) trainings, Open
Mic Nights, and supports extra-curricular activities through the parent Booster Club.


        Wayne Community College works with Dillard Academy to provide GED classes at
our site in order to address the most common reasons given for not attending classes at the
college--the cost of classes and child care, and transportation. We currently provide free
basic education, career development and basic computer skills classes for students’ adult
family members. As a Microsoft Office Refurbisher, Dillard Academy trains parents to
update donated computers for re-distribution to needy families and groups. Parents are also
encouraged to come into the school and use school computers for school projects, job
                                                 10
                                                                                 1102_LFI 5_Attachment


searches, resume writing, etc. The school’s technology coordinator is available to instruct
parents on basic computer skills, as well as software and web applications.

        For those who require full-time child care, Dillard Academy provides safe,
supervised, quality afterschool and daycare programs licensed by the NC Division of
Children’s Services. We have reduced rates for staff and parents to help them overcome
the enormous financial burden of quality child care. In a community where the rate of
poverty is so high that it warrants six low-income housing units within a five-mile radius,
this benefit allows parents who would normally not be able to work, go to school or
obtain/maintain gainful employment do so.

       Dillard Academy also focuses on social and character development through our
school-wide Positive Behavior plan, and focused workshops in afterschool. Dillard
Academy is active in our community, participating in and hosting several service learning,
healthy living, garden, and cultural activities, such as Hispanic Heritage and Black History
Month parades, the annual health fair, and the annual Cotillion. These activities broaden
our students’ horizons and help them develop positive self-esteem.

        A huge benefit for our students and parents is Dillard Academy’s strong afterschool
program. Most Dillard Academy students, as well as elementary students from other
public schools in the Goldsboro area reap the benefits of Dillard Academy’s DSS licensed
afterschool program, our 21st Century Community Learning Center Program, and our
Dropout Prevention program. These programs provide homework assistance by HQ
teachers and paraprofessionals, fun academic remediation activities, inquiry-based learning
opportunities, character development training, social behavior and conflict resolution
workshops, athletics, gardening, cheerleading, arts and crafts, and games.

        A community hub, as well as a school, Dillard Academy offers a weekly Food Bank
distribution. Additionally, produce and products from the garden project are sold at the
local mini-farmer’s market or given away in the Food Bank. Students learn about nutrition
and community service by working in the food bank. As further evidence of the
community involvement Dillard Academy inspires, we have had nine parent volunteers,
thirty community volunteers (including interns, Foster Grandparent, Air Force and National
Guard volunteers and Wayne County Public School Teachers), and twenty-eight 6th
through 12th grade student volunteers who all worked at Dillard Academy in the 2008-09
school year for more than ten hours each. Additionally, over 35 parents and health
professionals and other community members volunteered for fewer than ten hours last
school year.

        At Dillard Academy, we believe the old African Proverb, “it takes a Village to raise
a child.” Through the aforementioned programs we strive to provide a more stable school
and home life for our students, and to bring the community into the school to help us
address the whole-child. At Dillard Academy, we envision a place that serves as not only
an epicenter of education, but as a beacon of the community used to mobilize parents,
families, local organizations and businesses for the sake of raising confident, well-adjusted,
educated citizens who are prepared to succeed in life and be leaders in their communities.




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                                                                                    1102_LFI 5_Attachment




                           THE EDUCATION PROGRAM
A.      Curriculum

     1. Name or describe the curriculum design presently used.
     The Dillard Academy curriculum is based on the NC Standard Course of Study.
     Students are instructed in the basic core curriculum. Each student is assigned
     Harcourt Reading and Math primers. Additionally, teachers are encouraged to use a
     variety of educational resources in order to convey objectives in various ways. The
     curriculum includes speech/language and resources to meet the needs of exceptional
     children. The design of the curriculum allows for low student-teacher ratio, small and
     large group instruction, multi-disciplinary approach for teaching, hands-
     on/manipulative activities, games, movement activities, audiovisuals, and technology.
     The design stresses teacher to student and student to student interaction through
     viewing, listening, speaking, reading, writing, and mathematical concepts. Students are
     formally assessed quarterly using Study Island. Study Island begins with a pre-test and
     ends with a post test.

     2. Is this the design submitted in the original charter application? X Yes      No
        (If yes is checked, answer questions three, five, six and seven, and skip four. If no is
        checked, skip question three and answer four, five, six and seven.)

     3. If the answer to number two is yes;

        a. What have been the strengths of this curriculum design for your school?
         - It aligns to the testing instrument in NC (EOG tests).
         - The curriculum has sufficient objectives that allow us to adequately address the
                 main goals.
        Our approach is flexible enough to allow students with various learning styles to
                 access the curriculum.
        b. What have been the weaknesses of this curriculum design for your school?
        As a charter school, with limited funding, until this year, we have been unable to
        provide new textbooks that continue to be aligned well with the NC Standard Course
        of Study
        c. How are weaknesses of the design being addressed?
             Dillard Academy has overcome design weakness by encouraging our teachers to
             be innovative and by utilizing differentiated instruction to help each child access
             the curriculum.
             Dillard Academy has hired all Highly Qualified Teachers, one third of whom,
             have advanced degrees. We provide continuing high quality staff development
             to all teachers and paraprofessionals.
     4. If the answer to number two is no:

        a. Describe why the change in curricula was made.

        b. What have been the strengths of this curriculum design for your students?

        c. What have been the weaknesses of this curriculum design for your students?

                                                  12
                                                                                1102_LFI 5_Attachment


        d. How are weaknesses of the design being addressed?


     5. What tools and/or observations are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the school’s
        curriculum?
        NC End of Grade Tests for Grades 3 and 4
        Study Island benchmarking web application for all Grades
        Study Island pre and post test for all grades
        IOWA Test of Basic Skills for Kindergarten through Grade 2
        Quarterly Report Cards
        Mid-Quarter Progress Reports


     6. Describe the steps taken to align the school’s curriculum with the NC Standard
        Course of Study.
        Each teacher has a copy of the NC Standard Course of Study that is used as a
        companion in planning weekly and daily lessons. Each teacher utilizes grade level
        and subject pacing guides that incorporate the Standary Course of Study. All
        instructional plans are aligned with the Standard Course of Study.



B.       Instructional Methodology or Techniques

     1. Summarize the instructional methodology or techniques employed. (i.e., Direct
        Instruction, Hands on, Experiential, Expeditionary Learning, etc.)
        Teachers employ varied methods/techniques in providing differientiated instruction
        to meet the needs of the unique population at Dillard Academy. Direct Instruction
        allows teachers to present new material to enhance the teaching-learning process.
        Team Teaching takes advantage of the strengths of the teaching staff. Teachers
        interact with students through questions and discussions. Research Projects are
        used to allow students to learn through discovery. Audiovisuals are used to provide
        information and to motivate the students, while reinforcing study content. Creative
        writing projects allow students to stretch their imaginations. The Computer Lab
        along with educational software, aligned with the NC Standard Course of Study,
        provide avenues for teachers to take advantage of technology in the process of
        educating students.
     2. Is this the design submitted in the original application? Yes      or   No

     3. If the answer to number 2 is yes:

        a. What have been the strengths of these methods for your students?
        The strengths of these methods have been to reach children who might not
        ordinarily be reached and to share experiences such that the students consistently
        experience Expected Growth and High Growth on the End of Grade Tests.
        b. What have been the weaknesses of these methods for your students?
        In the past some teachers have lacked the knowledge or discipline to work without
        more strict parameters (i.e. basals, one text for each subject).
        c. How have the weaknesses in the methods been addressed?
        We have hired a new, licensed principal to train and support teachers to take
        advantage of various resources available in order to address individual student
                                                13
                                                                                               1102_LFI 5_Attachment


          needs. We are providing staff development in order to increase teacher confidence
          in various instructional methods to reach our unique population.
     4. If the answer to number two is no:

         a. Describe why the change in instructional methodology was made.

         b. What have been the strengths of this instructional methodology for your students?

         c. What have been the weaknesses of this instructional methodology for your students?

         d. How are weaknesses of the methodology being addressed?

C.         Student Accountability Performance


     1. Complete the following charts of student performance data. If the year or grade level is
        not applicable, enter N/A in the corresponding box.

     ABCs Student Performance Data: Provide the student performance composite for applicable grade
     levels for the years indicated.
                     2004-2005       2005-2006      2006-2007         2007-2008         2008-2009
                 Reading   Math     Reading   Math     Reading     Math       Reading   Math    Reading   Math
     3rd Grade    57.1     57.1       53.3    40.0      73.7       63.2        21.7     78.3     35.5     87.1
     4th Grade    n/a      N/A        46.7    26.7      50.0       28.6        30.0     40.0     31.8     45.5
     5th Grade

     6th Grade

     7th Grade

     8th Grade



                                              Performance Results
                                  2004-2005   2005-2006          2006-2007      2007-2008   2008-2009
            English I               N/A          N/A              N/A            N/A            N/A
            Algebra I
            Algebra II
            Geometry
            Biology
            Chemistry
            Physical Science
            Physics
            ELPS
            US History


                ABCs Accountability            Performance                               Met AYP
                                                                        Designation
                      Summary                   Composite                               Yes    No
            2004-2005                              57.1             Priority, High             X
            2005-2006                               50                 Priority                X


                                                        14
                                                                               1102_LFI 5_Attachment


     2006-2007                            49.4           Priority,        X
                                                         Expected
                                                          Growth
     2007-2008                            49.1         Priority, High               X
                                                          Growth
     2008-2009                            51.9           Priority,        X
                                                         Expected
                                                          Growth




2. Does the school use other evaluation instruments to assess student performance (i.e.
   NWEA/MAP or Iowa testing)?X Yes or         No. If yes, please describe those assessments.
   The Iowa Test of Basic Skills is administered to the K-2 population in the fall and in
   the spring each year. Results are used to determine individual strengths and
   weaknesses, so that instruction and instructional methods can be adjusted to meet
   the individual needs of the students. Study Island Benchmarking is used for
   quarterly assessments in the kindergarten through 4th grade.


4. How is student data used to improve student learning and to raise the academic
   performance of all students?
   Test results are used as gross indicators of student learning and achievement.
   Teaching methods and techniques are adjusted to respond to student strengths and
   weaknesses. Staff development is driven by teacher and student needs.


5. Is this school identified by the Department of Public Instruction as an Alternative
   School?
       Yes or XNo. If yes, please answer a, b, and c.

   a. List the three local options goals (and percents) set by your school.

   b. List the types of data collected to track the results of each of the three options?

   c. List in detail the school’s results for the last three years. (Percent set and percent met
   in each option)


            EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN’S PROGRAM
1. a. How many students at your school are currently identified as students with
   disabilities? 45

   b. What percent of the entire school population does this represent? 30%

   c. List the exceptionalities the school is presently serving and the number of students
   identified in each.
         - Speech/Language Impaired 27
         - Developmentally Delayed          5
         - Specific Learning Disabled 9
                                             15
                                                                             1102_LFI 5_Attachment


        - ID Mild                          1
        - Other Health Impaired            2

2. How many students with disabilities does your school currently serve in each of the
   following continuum levels:

    44 Regular

    1 Resource

    0 Separate

    0 Separate School

    0 Residential

    0 Home/Hospital



3. At your school, is all specially designed instruction currently provided to students with
    disabilities delivered by a teacher who holds a license in Special Ed? X Yes or     No.
   If no, please explain


4. List all related services currently provided for students.
   Are all related service providers certified? XYes or No.
   How are the related service providers employed? (i.e. part-time, contracted, permanent)
   All are contractors.

5. List any non-compliance concerns cited by the state that resulted in fiscal revisions and
   the implemented corrective action plan. No non compliance concerns cited by the
   state.

6. If your school has not applied for federal EC funds, please explain the reason for this.
   NA

7. List, by year, all Exceptional Children’s trainings, regional meetings and conferences
   (state and national) staff has attended during the last two years.
                 - 2008 CECAS Forms Training
                 - 2008 Annual EC Conference
                 - 2008 Child Count Training
                 - 2008 SAT Training - WCPS
                 - 2008 Local Documentation and Compliance Training
                 - 2009 Local Documentation and Compliance Training
                 - 2009 Dealing with Difficult Behaviors

      BUSINESS PLAN AND FINANCIAL REPORTING
1. During the past five years has the school had any financial warnings, been on Financial
   or Governance Cautionary status, Probationary Status, or Noncompliance Status?
                                               16
                                                                              1102_LFI 5_Attachment


        Yes or X No

     If yes, describe the circumstances and the actions taken by the school to return to
    compliance, result of these actions, and steps taken to ensure continued compliance.


2. For each of the past five years, has the school complied with the annual financial audit
   requirement, and submitted it by October 31? XYes or      No.
   If No, explain the circumstances of each occurrence, and what steps have been taken to
   ensure future compliance.

3. In the past five years has this school had an end of year financial deficit?
       Yes or X No.

    If yes, describe the circumstances leading to the deficit, how the shortfall was resolved,
    and what steps were taken to keep the problem from recurring.


4. During the last five years of operation has enrollment increased, decreased, or remained
   steady? If there has been fluctuation in enrollment please explain.
   Enrollment has increased.


5. Complete the table below regarding school enrollment:

                                        1st 20 Day ADM              Membership Last Day
Year 1 (05-06)                                 110                         100
Year 2 (06-07)                                 107                         102
Year 3 (07-08)                                 135                         126
Year 4 (08-09)                                 143                         140
Year 5 (09-10)                                 147             NA

6. During the last five years has this school changed grade levels served? X Yes or        NO
   If yes, explain the changes below.
   From a K-3 program to a K-4 program

7. Does the school currently have a waiting list?    Yes or XNo.
   If yes, how many students and at what grade level(s)


8. Include below a copy of your school’s admission policy.
   DILLARD ACADEMY CHARTER SCHOOL ADMISSIONS POLICY:
   Dillard Academy Charter School is a tuition free public school. Any child who is
   qualified under the laws of North Carolina for admission to a public school is qualified
   for admission to a charter school. To qualify to attend a NC public school, a student must
   be a resident of North Carolina. County boundaries or school attendance areas do not
   affect charter school enrollment. Dillard Academy Charter School does not limit
   admission to students on the basis of intellectual ability, measures of achievement or
   aptitude, athletic ability, disability, race, creed, gender, national origin, religion or
   ancestry. The School may give enrollment priority to siblings of currently enrolled
   students who were admitted to the School in a previous year and to the children of
   teachers, teacher assistants, and principals.
                                             17
                                                                              1102_LFI 5_Attachment


   During each period of enrollment, Dillard Academy Charter School will accept
   applications for new students. Once enrolled, students are not required to enroll in
   subsequent enrollment periods. In order to properly plan, the school will routinely inquire
   with parents in early spring through letters of intent to ascertain if students will return to
   Dillard Academy Charter School the following year. Applications for new students are
   available in the School office and on the School website. If needed, the application may
   be mailed or emailed to the parent of a prospective student.
   The enrollment period will begin March 1 and end on the last day of April of each year.
   During the enrollment period, the School shall enroll an eligible student who submits an
   application within this period, unless the number of applications exceeds the capacity of a
   program, class, grade level, or building. If the number of applications exceeds the number
   of available spaces, a lottery will be held to fill vacant seats for the next school year.
   After seats are filled, the drawing will continue to determine the order of a waiting list.
   Current year waiting lists dissolve when the next enrollment period begins. Lottery
   procedures will comply with the NC Open Meetings Laws provided in G.S. 143-
   218.10(a) by publicizing the date and location of the meeting as well as allowing anyone
   to attend.
9. Include below your school’s lottery policy and procedures.
   LOTTERY PROCEDURE:
   Each applicant will have an index card with their name and grade. The selection process
   will be by random drawing. Upon filling all available positions, the acceptance by lottery
   will continue, thereby, creating a School wait list. Cards for siblings of current
   instructional personnel of Clover Garden School will be drawn separately and first;
   followed by cards for siblings of students enrolled in a previous year. Cards for the
   general wait list for each grade level will then be randomly drawn one card at a time,
   starting with the lowest grade level in the School. The lottery process will then proceed
   for each grade. As openings become available at the applicable grade level, students will
   be admitted based on their current lottery number. If applicants who are selected for
   admission decide NOT to enroll at Dillard Academy Charter School, the parents of the
   next child on the wait list for that grade will be notified immediately.


10. Does this school receive Title I funds? X Yes or       No

11. Fill in the table below to reflect the demographic make-up of the school’s student
    population


              Percent African   Percent           Percent           Percent         Percent
              American          American          Caucasian         Other           eligible for
                                Indian                                              free or
                                                                                    reduced
                                                                                    lunch
     2006-    99.07 %           0                 .93 %             0               95.6%
     2007
     2007 -   99.26 %           0                 .74 %             0               100%
     2008
     2008 -   97.21 %           0                 2.79 %            0               99%
     2009
     2009 -   96.6 %            0                 3.4 %             0               98%
     2010


                                             18
                                                                             1102_LFI 5_Attachment


12. Fill in the table below to reflect the demographic make-up of the student population of
the LEA in which the school resides.
             Percent African   Percent           Percent Asian   Percent           Percent
             American          American                          Caucasian         Other
                               Indian
    2006-    Awaiting
    2007     requested
             information
    2007 -   38.48 %           .16 %             1.08 %          45.38 %           14.9 %
    2008
    2008-    38.2 %            .17 %             1.06 %          44.55 %           16.02 %
    2009
    2009 -    Awaiting
    2010     requested
             information

13. How does the marketing plan of your school address the need for the school to reflect the
diversity of the community in which your school resides?
    Dillard Academy’s population closely reflects the population of the traditional LEA
schools closest to the charter school. The Goldsboro city attendance area student
population is a stark contrast to the overall LEA population. The majority of the
public school students in the Goldsboro attendance area, where Dillard Academy is
located, are black. Dillard Academy solicits students from the entire community by
distributing flyers in various locations, such as grocery stores, malls and churches. We
also strive to reach the community at large with annual ads in the local newspaper. We
have reached out more specifically to the growing Hispanic population through
introductions and meetings with Hispanic community groups and leaders.

14. Include below your school’s transportation plan and an explanation of the procedures
used to implement it.
    Dillard Academy provides door-to-door transportation for student pick-up and drop-off
    within the Goldsboro city attendance area and some areas in the county, where there is a
    concentration of Dillard Academy students.


GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

1. List below the members of the Board of Directors and offices held. (Include; name,
   address, occupation, and years served.)
        John Stokes– Chairman, 1602 Stephens St, Goldsboro, NC 27530,
           Retired school administrator, served seven years
        Darren Lynch - 4326 US Highway 311, Randleman, NC 27317,
           Plastics Recycling Company co-owner, served five years
        Dawad Norville - 207 Pinegate Circle, Apt #12, Chapel Hill, NC
           27514, Taxi Cab Company owner, served for four years
        Bernice Simmons - 541 Rollingwood Dr., Dudley, NC, 28333,
           Nutritionist, served six years
        David Simmons – 351 Piedmont Airline Rd., Goldsboro NC, 27534,
           Owner, electrical company, served one year
        Thomas Smith – 305 Todd Drive, Goldsboro, NC 27534, Behavioral
           Specialist, served one year
                                            19
                                                                          1102_LFI 5_Attachment


          Darrel Dalager – 308 Maplewood Dr., Goldsboro, NC 27534, Civilian
           Service employee, served three years


2. Are any of the above Board Members employees of the school? If so, what is his/her job
   at the school?
   Thomas Smith – Behavioral Specialist/ISS monitor
   John Stokes – Afterschool Supervisor

3. Are there any family relationships between Board members and staff at the school? If so,
   what is the relationship and how is the relationship prevented from being a conflict of
   interest?
   no

4. How are members selected to serve on the Board of Directors? (Include who makes the
    selection.)
     Directors are required to be at least eighteen years of age, live in North
Carolina and hold at least a high school diploma or its equivalent. A qualified
applicant must submit to a screening process by the Board of Directors including
a criminal history check and a personal written statement as to their reason for
wanting to join the board; their understanding of the Articles of Incorporations
and by-Laws; their support of Dillard Academy’s purposes; their personal
background, talents and experiences that could contribute to the function of the
board and a list of personal references. Directors are elected by written ballot
during a regular board meeting.


5. How does the Board of Directors measure parent, student, and staff satisfaction?
    Provide, as an attachment, a sample of any surveys the school uses to measure the
    overall success of the school in this area.
    Parents and teachers complete surveys at the beginning and end of each
school year indicating their level of satisfaction with the school and their listing
needs (training, etc). The principal is has a comment box posted outside his
office so that staff, students and parents can make anonymous comments and
suggestions. Comment cards are available in the front office. Comments and
suggestions requiring Board action are brought before the board at regular
meetings. The Board strongly relies on the experiences of the faculty and staff.
The principal provides a report to the board during each meeting including but
not limited to student performance; licensure and staff development; and staff,
student and parent satisfaction. Dillard Academy also boasts a Parenting for
Success program, in which parents take classes (parenting, basic education,
trades, technology, career development) at and through the school. In addition,
these parents are active and vocal within the school. They are charged with
monitoring the school on behalf of students and parents. Through reports to the
board from various groups within the school, the board is able to measure the
school’s overall success.


6. Describe how the Board of Directors uses feedback from stakeholders to refine its
   operations.

                                           20
                                                                            1102_LFI 5_Attachment


   Dillard Academy Board of Directors uses the Deming Cycle of “plan, do,
study, act” to refine its operations. The board elicits feedback from staff,
students and families in order to review and weigh those comments in their
decision-making. Statistics and graphs are used to identify areas of
improvement. Improvement ideas are devised and solicited from members and
experts (both within the school and outside the school). Once the board
evaluates these proposals, a vote is taken. These resolutions are tested and
results are brought back to the board for further review.


7. List any Board-sanctioned standing committees and the function of each committee.
Parenting for Success Committee – Consists of faculty members and parents –
the committee is a partnership between parents and the school in which the
school provides various classes for parents and parents provide oversight of
school operations through active participation in the school.
Afterschool Advisory Council – Consists of afterschool staff, parents, community
members and program partners – the advisory council monitors and helps
implement operation of the CASTLES 21st Century Community Learning
Center, the Dropout Prevention program, and the DSS licensed afterschool.
Technology Committee – Consists of staff members and parents. Addresses the
technology needs of the school, and how to better utilize technology to
accomplish the Dillard Academy mission


   7a. What procedures do these committees follow to report their work to the Board of
   Directors? These committees report their findings and recommendations directly
   to board members during regularly scheduled board meetings.

8. List below any major policy changes that have affected the school’s original governance
   structure.
   If no major policy changes have occurred, please check this box. X


9. Include in the space provided below, a copy of the school’s grievance policies for families
    and for staff.
    If none, please check this box.


                         Dillard Academy Grievance Policy

   A grievance is a formal complaint. Informal attempts to settle employee
   concerns should be tried before filing a grievance. An informal attempt
   includes an oral discussion with the supervisor.

   Employees of Dillard Academy have the right to file a grievance on any
   condition of employment at any time. This right does not apply to
   contractors or other service providers who do not have an employer-
   employee relationship with the charter school. A grievance on a specific
   event must be filed within 30 calendar days of the occurrence of the
   event. Specific events include adverse actions, such as failure to
   promote, suspension or termination, along with other actions the
                                            21
                                                                            1102_LFI 5_Attachment


employee feels are unfair or inappropriate. A grievance must be in
writing and must be addressed to the employee’s first line supervisor.

       Step 1

       The written grievance must clearly state
       1) the condition of employment that gives rise to the grievance
       and
       2) the redress the employee seeks

       Step 2

       The supervisor will respond in writing to the grievance within 10
       working days of receipt of the timely filed grievance.

       Step 3

       If the grievant fails to be satisfied with the first line supervisor’s
       response to the grievance, a request for hearing may be made to
       the Director. A request for hearing must be in writing and should
       state the reason for the employee’s dissatisfaction and the redress
       sought. It must be filed within 10 calendar days of receipt of the
       supervisor’s grievance decision.

       Step 4

       The hearing will be conducted within five business days of the
       receipt of the request for hearing. The decision of the director
       will be in writing and will be issued within 5 working days of the
       hearing.

       Step 5

       If the grievant continues to be dissatisfied after the hearing
       decision, a request for an appeal may be made to the Board of
       Directors. The request for an appeal must be in writing and
       should state the reason for the employee’s dissatisfaction and the
       redress sought. It must be filed within 10 calendar days of
       receipt of the director’s hearing decision. The decision of the
       Board is final.

Grievances on ongoing conditions may be filed at any time and will
follow the time frames outlined in the grievance procedure regarding a
specific event.

Grievances, hearings and appeals not filed in a timely manner will be
dismissed.

Parent Appeal Policy

At Dillard Academy, parents are very important. Children cannot develop and learn
                                          22
                                                                             1102_LFI 5_Attachment


   without parental involvement. Parents are encouraged to be active in the educational
   progress of their children and to be involved in the school.

   Dillard Academy’s commitment to parental involvement is reflected in the make up of
   the school’s governing body. The PTO chairperson serves as the parent’s representative
   to the Board of Directors.

   Parents may grieve any aspect of the school’s operation.

   Step 1
   Grievances are made either verbally or in writing to the Principal. The Principal will act
   within 10 workdays to address the concern and report the action taken to the parent. If
   the grievance was initially submitted in writing, the response will be furnished in writing.
   Verbally concerns may be responded to verbally.

   Step 2
   If the parent is not satisfied with a decision made by the Principal, the decision may be
   appealed to the Superintendent. Step 2 appeals must be filed within 30 days of the
   notification (either verbal or written) of the Step 1 decision. The appeal to the
   Superintendent must be in writing. The Superintendent will respond in writing to the
   parent within 5 workdays. The Superintendent will always furnish a written decision to
   the Step 2 appeal.

   Step 3
   If the parent is not satisfied with the decision made by the Superintendent, the parent may
   appeal to the Board of Directors. An appeal to the Board must be in writing and must be
   made within 30 days of the notification of the Step 2 decision. The Board will take up
   the matter at its next regularly scheduled Board meeting. (The Board may meet in special
   session to address the issue if the matter warrants such attention.) The Board will
   respond to the parent in writing within 5 workdays after a decision is made. The decision
   of the Board is final.


10. Has your board of directors had formal board training during the last five years?
    X Yes or      No
    If yes, who led the training and when was the training done?
    Governance and School Finance Training by the Office of Charter Schools - 2008

11. Bylaws, Policies and Procedures
    Submit the following as electronic attachments:

   a. The most recent copy of your Board’s By-Laws including all amendments and
      changes from the original document.

   b. A copy of your current parent/ student handbook.

   c. The most current copy of your school’s board approved personnel policies.

   d. Copies of any other Board approved policies


                                            23
                                                                                   1102_LFI 5_Attachment




                      Current Teacher Licensure Data (School year 09/10)
           (If your school does not include a particular grade level, indicate with N/A)
                        School Name: Dillard Academy Charter School

Grade      Total Number          Number of NC            Percent of       Percent of
Level       of Teachers            Licensed             Teachers NC       Teachers Highly
                                   Teachers               Licensed        Qualified
 K-5              9                   8*                   89%*                 89%*
 6-8
 9-12

*One teacher has completed all requirements for HQ teacher licensure and her paperwork
is being submitted to NC DPI Licensure.

                           Paraprofessional Data (School Year 09/10)
           (If your school does not include a particular grade level, indicate with N/A)


                                                          # with Associate’s
                         Total # of        # with High     Degree and/or 2     # with 4-year
                      Paraprofessionals   School Degree    years of higher        Degree
                                                              education
Grades K-5:                  6                 6                  5                 2
Grades 6-8:
Grades 9-12:




                                                   24
     1102_LFI 5_Attachment




25
     1102_LFI 5_Attachment




26
                                                                                     1102_LFI 5_Attachment




                  DILLARD ACADEMY CHARTER SCHOOL
                         OFFICE OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
                           504 W. Elm Street, P.O. Box 1188
                                Goldsboro, NC 27530
                          919-581-0128 (main office)  919-581-0122 (fax)
                                    hhicks@dillardacademy.org
______
____________________________________________________________________________
Hilda G. Hicks
        Superintendent
                                         December 18, 2009

Jean Kruft, Consultant
The Office of Charter Schools
N. C. Dept. of Public Instruction
6303 Mail Service Center
Raleigh, NC 27699-6303

Dear Ms. Kruft,

The following action plans are submitted pursuant to your request(s) for additional information
for our renewal:

Student Accountability and Performance

While Dillard Academy has had three or more consecutive years of below 60% proficient, we
have met growth every year, except one. The year that we did not meet growth was due in large
part to the fact that we lost three highly qualified, certified teachers in the fourth grade class (half
of our testing population) that year. Short of directing our recruitment methods toward enrolling
students who are already performing at or above grade level, we will:

    1) Extend our school day by 1.5 hours per day beginning with the 2009-10 school year,
    2) Establish a baseline and monitor individual student performance on weekly through
       research-based Study Island software,
    3) Timely adjustment and modification of instruction based on student needs,
    4) Provide merit pay for teaching staff, directly related to student achievement, in order to
       recruit and retain the most effective teachers,
    5) Offer quality after school programs through 21st Century Community Learning Center
       and dropout prevention for students who are performing below grade level and who are
       having behavior problems in school,
    6) Offer homework assistance, tutoring and Saturday Academies,
    7) Involve parents in the school through parent literacy activities and Parent and Children
       Together time,
    8) Make parents partners in our Reading for Success reading program designed to get
       students and their families to read together at home,
    9) Offer SES services,


                  Principal (919) 581-0132        Superintendent (919) 581-0166
                                                   27
                                    “Believe, Achieve, Succeed.”
                                                                                  1102_LFI 5_Attachment




   10) Offer a school wide, comprehensive positive behavior support program,
   11) Offer behavioral management for students and classroom management training to reduce
       distractions during academic time,
   12) Incorporate a garden project aligned to the NC Standard Course of Study, which is being
       studied by UNC-Chapel Hill for its impact on student achievement
   13) Provide access to technology through classroom computers, a full computer lab, general
       purpose Promethium boards, overhead projectors, teleconferencing capability, and laptop
       computers for check out (Teachers will be encouraged to integrate the use of technology
       into their daily instruction.),
   14) Provide the connectivity and software that supports the teacher to be more exploratory
       and resourceful in their approach to teaching, and
   15) Provide student services through coaches and other contracted providers.

Teacher Licensure

100% of Dillard Academy’s K-4 teachers are NC DPI licensed and are highly qualified. They
are all teaching in the field in which they are licensed, pursuant to federal and state requirements.
In an effort to continue with a highly qualified, certified staff the following guideline will be
followed:

   1. Continue to recruit and hire Highly Qualified, certified teachers through such quality
       teacher recruitment sources as Teacher-Teacher and Career Builders.
   2. Continue attending job fairs and recruiting from colleges and universities that have good
       teaching programs, such as ECU, UNC, Fayetteville State and NCCU, etc.
   3. Continue tapping the ever increasing pool of Highly Qualified retired elementary
       education teachers, especially in light of the fact that their State retirement income is not
       impacted by the salary they receive from a charter school which does not participate in
       the State retirement plan.
   4. We will continue to offer an attractive and competitive employment package which
       includes a generous salary component, a 401K plan, State Employees Health Insurance,
       life insurance, identity theft protection and performance bonuses in the form of Merit Pay
       tied to student achievement.
   5. We will continue to offer quality, sustained, research-based staff development that has
       been proven to have positive results for teachers who deal with our population.
   6. We will follow state guidelines for developing Initial Licensed Teachers
   7. We will coin best practices and share them internally, while continuing to encourage
       additional best practices through team teaching, lesson modeling, and providing a forum
       for sharing varied and divergent group strategies and experiences.
   8. We will encourage individual growth through attendance at meeting, conferences,
       workshops, and community involvement activities.
   9. To the extent that funds are available we will pay for local and online classes that have a
       good chance of enhancing staff skills and including classes for paraprofessionals who
       aspire to become professionals.
   10. We will encourage teachers to become National Board Certified.
   11. We will continue quarterly staff appreciation activities.




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                                                                                1102_LFI 5_Attachment




   12. We will provide access to technology through classroom computers, a full computer lab,
       general purpose Promethium boards, overhead projectors, teleconferencing capability,
       and laptop computers for check out. Teachers will be encouraged to integrate the use of
       technology into their daily instruction.
   13. Provide the connectivity and software that supports the teacher to be more exploratory
       and resourceful in their approach to teaching.
   14. We will use the state’s new Teacher Evaluation system to assure teacher growth and
       provide timely and meaningful feedback for appraisals.

Thank you for the opportunity to provide this information to you. If you have any further
questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me. I am very interested in being kept
informed about our status and any recommendations being made to the LFI committee and the
State Board of Education regarding the renewal of our charter.


Sincerely,



Hilda G. Hicks
Superintendent




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                                                                      1102_LFI 5_Attachment




            THE NORTH CAROLINA CHARTER SCHOOLS SELF STUDY
                              SECTION 1




I.     COVER PAGE

School Name: Kestrel Heights School

Mailing Address: 4700 S. Alston Ave. Durham, NC 27713

Primary Contact Person:   Tim Dugan

Title: Director

Phone #: 919-484-1300 Fax #: 919-484-1355 E-mail Address: tddugan@aol.com


Contact Information for the Board Chairperson:

Name: Emory Mac Bare

Term of Office: One Year

Mailing Address: 1301 Virginia Avenue Durham, N.C. 27705

Phone #: 919-286-5575 Fax #:             E-mail Address: macabre@msn.com


Board Chair Signature: _____________________________________        Date__________




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                                                                                   1102_LFI 5_Attachment




            LETTER OF INTENT (Letter from Board Chairperson)
 This letter should include the renewal term requested and highlights of the school’s success.
                                       (Limit one page)
Dear Sir:

I write today to formally request that the Charter of Kestrel Heights School, Durham NC be
extended for a period of 10 years beyond its current term.

Kestrel has been serving grades 6-10 for more than a decade. After moving to our current
facility four years ago we fulfilled our goal to serve students grades 6-12. We’ve now graduated
two 12th grade classes. Many graduates are pursuing higher education at various 2- and 4-year
colleges. Each year our waiting list for admittance has grown longer, especially in grades 6-8.

Kestrel’s test scores over the last three years have shown solid growth. Three of the past five
years we have achieved Annual Yearly Progress goals. A one-year downturn in 2005-2006 was
caused by two factors: extremely serious disruption in the first six weeks of the school year due
to late delivery of our building, a factor totally out of our control; and the overnight doubling in
size of our student body during that same year. Today we’re back on track in building a very
strong educational culture in our student body from grade 6 through 12.

The ethnic and economic diversity of our student body is excellent. Our 12 year track record is
one in which we take pride. Reflecting on the earliest days of Kestrel Heights, its first “senior”
class (9th graders) had five members. One of the five is now earning his Ph.D. in microbiology at
the U. of Hawaii; another is attending graduate school in Texas. Even more significant were the
two young men enrolled in our school with a background of extreme gang violence. Both were
considered very dangerous by police. Both became valued citizens of KHS, graduated in 2008,
are now working and pursuing further education.

In the last school year we paid, from current revenues, about $500,000.00 of short term debt
obligations accumulated due to our previous relationship with Imagine Schools. Our very small
remaining debt will be eliminated entirely by the end of this fiscal year.

In athletics KHS is thriving. Because of our relatively small size we provide opportunities that
simply are not available to the vast majority of students at Durham’s very large public high
schools. We established a new football program this year, a real landmark that has given our
students a great deal of school pride.

KHS is also committed to assist the greater community by sharing our wonderful facilities with
many other groups. This has included the Durham Literacy Council, the South Durham Little
League, AAU Basketball, a church, an Indian Language school that meets on Sundays, Girl
Scouts, Boy Scouts, and Durham Eagles Football, to provide some examples.

In light of these and other accomplishments, I respectfully request that the charter of Kestrel
Heights School be extended for an additional ten years.

Thank you for your consideration,

Emory M. Bare, Chairman of the Board
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                                                                              1102_LFI 5_Attachment




                             EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
This summary should begin with the school’s mission as stated in the initial charter application
(or a revised mission statement that has been formally approved by the State board of
Education). The remainder of the summary should be specific and succinct in describing how the
School is or is not successfully fulfilling the Mission. (Limit 2 pages)

“The mission of Kestrel Heights School is to promote the educational goals of the Paideia
Proposal while utilizing effective and innovative teaching techniques at the secondary level.
Students will develop to their fullest potential and the entire charter school community will
share a commitment to learning as a lifelong process.” Since the creation of this mission
statement we have worked diligently to make this goal a reality at our school. Over the past
twelve years we have worked very closely with the National Paideia Center at UNC Chapel
Hill to continue to improve as a Paideia school. Our students continue to be evaluated in
the areas of citizenship and effort two areas we feel are equally as important as academic
content grades, on their quarterly report cards. “Active” citizenship is stressed in our
school and we expect students to model this on our campus and throughout our
community. A concrete example of this is the requirement that all of our students complete
some type of community service during the year and our seniors must complete twenty five
hours during their senior year in order to graduate.

This past school year we continued to work on our Paideia seminars, both by individual
classroom teachers and in “whole school” seminars where all students participated in the
seminar using the same text, work of art, or music at the same time We then carry on a
school wide “discussion” of what was learned and how this seminar changed or improved
our thinking or understanding of an important topic. (This has proven to be a very
powerful learning tool as the discussion is being held sometimes between a group a 6th
graders and a group of say 10th grade students.) This year we have made a commitment to
continue to develop and improve school wide seminars but also to work on “coached”
projects another critical component of Paideia instruction. At the end of September, as a
way to demonstrate to our school community that we are working hard at moving towards
our ideal school, envisioned in our mission statement, we held our first ever “Project
Night” where every student displayed their coached project to the rest of the school
community.

Another example of how we are continuing to focus on the original mission of the school is
our growing relationship with the National Paideia Center and our efforts to bring the
Paideia Proposal to more schools throughout the country. Over the past two years the
Paideia Center has been using our students and classrooms to make training films for
teachers interested in becoming Paideia teachers. This collaboration has helped improve
our teaching and student learning in a very positive way. We envision that our relationship
and the collaboration we have had with the educators at the National Paideia Center will
continue to grow and develop and this will help our school to reach the original goals of the
mission statement.




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                           THE EDUCATION PROGRAM
A.      Curriculum

     1. Name or describe the curriculum design presently used.
        Kestrel Heights continues to use the North Carolina Standard Course of Study.

     2. Is this the design submitted in the original charter application? Yes        No
        (If yes is checked, answer questions three, five, six and seven, and skip four. If no is
        checked, skip question three and answer four, five, six and seven.)

     3. If the answer to number two is yes;

        a. What have been the strengths of this curriculum design for your school?
        We continue to “mainstream” students and design classes that have a diverse group
 of learners. We also continue to expand our course offering particularly in our elective
 courses. In the past few years we have been able to offer physics, Spanish III, Art I and II,
 Japanese, Dance, and technology to name a few.
        b. What have been the weaknesses of this curriculum design for your school?
        We continue to struggle with non-traditional learners who do not perform well on
 standardized tests.
        c. How are weaknesses of the design being addressed?
        We have been using Study Island and the Northwestern Evaluators Association’s
MAP Testing to improve our students learning and their performance on standardized
tests.

     4. If the answer to number two is no:

        a. Describe why the change in curricula was made.

        b. What have been the strengths of this curriculum design for your students?

        c. What have been the weaknesses of this curriculum design for your students?

        d. How are weaknesses of the design being addressed?


     5. What tools and/or observations are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the school’s
        curriculum?
        In evaluating the effectiveness of our curriculum we look at student performance on
        Study Island and MAP Tests along with teacher tests and project assignments. We
        also look at how our students perform on the EOG’s and EOC’s. We have also held
        informal discussions with students who have graduated from our school to
        determine how well prepared they were for post secondary schooling and whether
        or not we needed to make any changes.


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                                                                               1102_LFI 5_Attachment




    6. Describe the steps taken to align the school’s curriculum with the NC Standard
       Course of Study.
       We have always used the NC Standard Course of Study and believe we are fully
aligned with the states curriculum.



B.       Instructional Methodology or Techniques

     1. Summarize the instructional methodology or techniques employed. (i.e., Direct
        Instruction, Hands on, Experiential, Expeditionary Learning, etc.)
        Paideia instruction can be classified into three columns. First, Didactic Instruction
        where the goal is the acquisition of knowledge. Second, Coached Projects where the
        main goal is the exercise or usage of the knowledge combined with supervised
        practice. The third column consists of Socratic questioning and student dialogue
        that should lead to a greater understanding of the ideas and values presented.
     2. Is this the design submitted in the original application? Yes or   No

     3. If the answer to number 2 is yes:

        a. What have been the strengths of these methods for your students?
        By using the Paideia method of instruction we believe students have gained a
        greater understanding and mastery of knowledge, ideas and values.
        b. What have been the weaknesses of these methods for your students?
        Students who join our student body who are not fully prepared to take on the
        challenges of our curriculum and our expectations of citizenship are a great
        challenge to us.
        c. How have the weaknesses in the methods been addressed?
        By using MAP Testing and Study Island and also by using the Student Assistance
        Program (SAP) to quickly identify the weaknesses and the needs of these students
        we are able to make effective personal education plans for each student.

     4. If the answer to number two is no:

        a. Describe why the change in instructional methodology was made.

        b. What have been the strengths of this instructional methodology for your students?

        c. What have been the weaknesses of this instructional methodology for your students?

        d. How are weaknesses of the methodology being addressed?




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                                                                                                 1102_LFI 5_Attachment




C.         Student Accountability Performance


     1. Complete the following charts of student performance data. If the year or grade level is
        not applicable, enter N/A in the corresponding box.

     ABCs Student Performance Data: Provide the student performance composite for applicable grade
     levels for the years indicated.
                     2004-2005       2005-2006      2006-2007         2007-2008         2008-2009
                 Reading   Math     Reading   Math      Reading     Math      Reading     Math    Reading   Math
      rd
     3 Grade

     4th Grade

     5th Grade

     6th Grade    80.0     >95        84.8    63.0       66.7       42.3       76.4       74.2     77.3     83.9

     7th Grade    89.5     76.3       >95     78.0       81.5       56.8       61.8       69.7     70.0     76.6

     8th Grade    75.6     64.4       84.8    36.4       77.2       54.3       57.1       51.4     65.8     62.1



                                              Performance Results
                                  2004-2005   2005-2006           2006-2007     2007-2008    2008-2009
            English I                55          68.8               46.0           62.5           67.0
            Algebra I               83.3         69.4               43.0           40.0           46.0
            Algebra II              n/a          n/a                18.0            <5            30.0
            Geometry                25.0         23.1               11.0           51.4           38.0
            Biology                 16.7         n/a                21.0           48.7           62.0
            Chemistry               n/a          n/a                n/a            35.7           n/a
            Physical Science        n/a          n/a                n/a            n/a            39.0
            Physics                 n/a          n/a                n/a            n/a            n/a
            ELPS                    n/a          n/a                23.0           56.4           67.0
            US History              n/a          n/a                36.0           31.3           56.0


                ABCs Accountability            Performance                                 Met AYP
                                                                      Designation
                      Summary                   Composite                                 Yes    No
            2004-2005                              70.3                   NR
            2005-2006                              67.8                   NR
            2006-2007                              52.1                 Priority
            2007-2008                              58.6                 Priority
            2008-2009                              67.8              Progress/High




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                                                                                  1102_LFI 5_Attachment




   2. Does the school use other evaluation instruments to assess student performance (i.e.
      NWEA/MAP or Iowa testing)? Yes or           No. If yes, please describe those
      assessments.

      This will be our second year using MAP testing. After using the program last year
      we have determined that we will continue to use the tests with our middle school
      students. It has become a valuable tool for our students, teachers, and parents.
      We also continue to use Study Island for all middle school students and for all high
      school courses with an EOC. We have found both of these programs to be great
      instruments for student learning.

    4. How is student data used to improve student learning and to raise the academic
       performance of all students?
       By using Study Island and MAP testing we can quickly identify the strengths and
weaknesses of all students and the teachers can quickly develop personal education plans
for each student.


   5. Is this school identified by the Department of Public Instruction as an Alternative
      School?
          Yes or No. If yes, please answer a, b, and c.

      a. List the three local options goals (and percents) set by your school.

      b. List the types of data collected to track the results of each of the three options?

      c. List in detail the school’s results for the last three years. (Percent set and percent met
      in each option)


               EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN’S PROGRAM
   1. a. How many students at your school are currently identified as students with
      disabilities? 70

      b. What percent of the entire school population does this represent? 13%

          d. List the exceptionalities the school is presently serving and the number of students
             identified in each.
          AU= 8 ED= 2 HI= 1 IDMI= 2 LD= 24 OH= 20 SI= 4 TB= 1

          We are awaiting the arrival of several IEP’s from other LEA’s.

   2. How many students with disabilities does your school currently serve in each of the
      following continuum levels:

       70 Regular

              Resource
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                                                                            1102_LFI 5_Attachment




            Separate

            Separate School

            Residential

            Home/Hospital



3. At your school, is all specially designed instruction currently provided to students with
    disabilities delivered by a teacher who holds a license in Special Ed?     Yes or    No.
   If no, please explain


4. List all related services currently provided for students.
   Are all related service providers certified?     Yes or No.
   How are the related service providers employed? (i.e. part-time, contracted, permanent)
   Our school psychologist is employed by us part time. She is a licensed psychologist
   and adjunct professor at UNC Chapel Hill. Our Speech Pathologist is employed part
   time. Our Occupational Therapist is contracted through a private company.


5. List any non-compliance concerns cited by the state that resulted in fiscal revisions and
   the implemented corrective action plan.
   There were no non-compliant concerns cited by the state that resulted in fiscal
   revisions.

6. If your school has not applied for federal EC funds, please explain the reason for this.

   We have applied for all federal and state funds that we are presently aware of.


7. List, by year, all Exceptional Children’s trainings, regional meetings and conferences
   (state and national) staff has attended during the last two years.
   2008&2009: E.C. Directors Training, 2008&2009: Conference on Exceptional
   Children, 2008&2009: EC Forms Training, 2008 and 2009: CECAS Periodic Head
   Count Training, 2008: Wilson Writing Training, 2009: Conflict Resolution
   Training, 2008: 504 Training-DPI Consultant, 2008: IEP Training-DPI Consultant


      BUSINESS PLAN AND FINANCIAL REPORTING
1. During the past five years has the school had any financial warnings, been on Financial
   or Governance Cautionary status, Probationary Status, or Noncompliance Status?
       Yes or    No

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                                                                                 1102_LFI 5_Attachment




      If yes, describe the circumstances and the actions taken by the school to return to
     compliance, result of these actions, and steps taken to ensure continued compliance.
     KHS was placed on “Financial Probationary Status” in January of 2008 due to a
budget deficit. The problem was corrected within the 60 day limit and we currently are
running a budget surplus. Once we separated from our Management Company we
removed the reason for all of our deficits.


   2. For each of the past five years, has the school complied with the annual financial audit
      requirement, and submitted it by October 31?      Yes or    No.
      If No, explain the circumstances of each occurrence, and what steps have been taken to
      ensure future compliance. The 2008 audit was submitted late. We have discussed with
      the auditor the absolute necessity of the report being turned in before the deadline
      with all future audits. A major reason for the lateness of the report was the
      complicated transaction of our building from one entity to another and our
      separation from our management company. At years end, the Board was
      negotiating with a company to purchase the property from the management
      company. The complicated transaction saved the school tens of thousands of dollars
      in management fees, but the process took longer than anticipated.

   3. In the past five years has this school had an end of year financial deficit?
          Yes or     No.

        If yes, describe the circumstances leading to the deficit, how the shortfall was resolved,
        and what steps were taken to keep the problem from recurring.
         Kestrel Heights partnered with a management company in 2006. The management
company charged a fee that caused us to run a budget deficit for two years. We have
separated from the management company and we expect to run budget surpluses in the
future.

   4. During the last five years of operation has enrollment increased, decreased, or remained
      steady? If there has been fluctuation in enrollment please explain.

       Our enrollment has steadily increased over the last four years. In 2006 we
       completed construction of a new facility in Research Triangle Park and we more
       than doubled our enrollment that year. We continue to grow our high school and
       hope to have a total of 625 students next year.




   5. Complete the table below regarding school enrollment:

                                           1st 20 Day ADM              Membership Last Day
   Year 1 (05-06)                                 191                         181
   Year 2 (06-07)                                 388                         372
   Year 3 (07-08)                                 414                         398
   Year 4 (08-09)                                 454                         450
   Year 5 (09-10)                                 514             NA

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                                                                              1102_LFI 5_Attachment




  6. During the last five years has this school changed grade levels served?   Yes or NO
      If yes, explain the changes below.
      In 2006 we moved into our new facility and we were able to add an eleventh grade.
 The following year we added our first senior class. It took us 8 years of hard work and
 “hanging on” to realize the dream we had from the creation of our school in 1998.

   7. Does the school currently have a waiting list?    Yes or     No.
      If yes, how many students and at what grade level(s)

      Sixth Grade = 62 Seventh Grade = 59          Eighth Grade = 39     Ninth Grade = 32

      Tenth grade = 40 Eleventh Grade = 32 Twelfth Grade = 19 Total = 283




   8. Include below a copy of your school’s admission policy.

                         Kestrel Heights School Admissions Policy


              North Carolina State Board of Education policy (NCAC6D.0304)
              requires that students demonstrate proficiency on North
              Carolina End-of-Grade and Writing Assessment tests in order
              to be considered for promotion to grade nine. To be admitted
              to Kestrel Heights School in grades six through nine, students
              must meet test proficiency standards (Level III or IV on EOG
              tests) and receive a passing grade (D or better) in:

    Language Arts

    Mathematics

    Either Social Studies or Science and

    half of all remaining courses taken.

Students with an Individual Education Plan (IEP), identified as English as a Second
Language (ESL) student, or with extenuating circumstances will be considered on a case-
by-case basis. Student grade level and course placement is at the discretion of the Director.
High school applicants must present a transcript, and ALL students must be prepared for
Algebra 1 or higher mathematics. Kestrel Heights School follows the North Carolina
Standard Course of Study, and ONLY follows a college preparatory curriculum.


   9. Include below your school’s lottery policy and procedures.


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                                                                                   1102_LFI 5_Attachment




When applications exceed the number of seats available we take all the applications and
give each student a number. All the “numbers” are then placed in a box and the
director pulls a numbered slip of paper from the box. We do not have separate boxes
for males or females or any other “group”. When the class is full we place the
remaining students on a wait list.

10. Does this school receive Title I funds?        Yes or   No


11. Fill in the table below to reflect the demographic make-up of the school’s student
    population
                                  Kestrel Heights School

             Percent African   Percent               Percent             Percent         Percent
             American          American              Caucasian           Other           eligible for
                               Indian                                                    free or
                                                                                         reduced
                                                                                         lunch
    2006-    45                0                     33                  22              n/a
    2007
    2007 -   43                0                     35                  22              n/a
    2008
    2008 -   38                0                     37                  25              n/a
    2009
    2009 -   42                0                     41                  17              n/a
    2010




12. Fill in the table below to reflect the demographic make-up of the student population of
    the LEA in which the school resides.
                                     Durham Public Schools

             Percent African   Percent              Percent Asian   Percent              Percent
             American          American                             Caucasian            Other
                               Indian
    2006-    54                0                    3               24                   19
    2007
    2007 -   54                0                    3               24                   19
    2008
    2008-    54                0                    3               24                   19
    2009
    2009 -   54                0                    3               24                   19
    2010

13. How does the marketing plan of your school address the need for the school to reflect the
    diversity of the community in which your school resides?

We have not found it necessary to do any marketing over the past two years. We
continue to draw students from every zip code in Durham and we also continue to get
students from surrounding counties.

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                                                                          1102_LFI 5_Attachment




14. Include below your school’s transportation plan and an explanation of the procedures
    used to implement it.

   We’ve set up a carpool committee through our PTSO. We also have a carpool site
   on Yahoo.com. We also worked with Durham Area Transit Authority to have a bus
   stop move from the busy corner of Hwy. 54 and Alston Ave. to the front of our
   school. This way, students can exit or enter the bus from our sidewalk that runs
   beside the school.


GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

1. List below the members of the Board of Directors and offices held. (Include; name,
   address, occupation, and years served.)

   Emory Mac Bare President 1301 Virginia Ave. Durham, N.C. 27705 Pastor
   8 years

   Carl Schumacher Vice-President 4 Akal Court Durham, N.C. 27713
   Software Engineer
   5 years

   Kim Anglin Treasurer 4006 Trotter Ridge Road Durham, N.C. 27707 CPA
   12 years

   Robert Matheson III Secretary 1000 Pinedale Road Apex, N.C. 27502 Public
   School Administrator
   6 years

   Grace Marsh Director 5808 Solitude Way Durham, N.C. 27713
   Executive Director of WoMen in Action for the Prevention of Violence, Inc.
   3 years



2. Are any of the above Board Members employees of the school? If so, what is his/her job
   at the school?

   No.

3. Are there any family relationships between Board members and staff at the school? If so,
   what is the relationship and how is the relationship prevented from being a conflict of
   interest?

   No.

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                                                                            1102_LFI 5_Attachment




4. How are members selected to serve on the Board of Directors? (Include who makes the
   selection.)

   Board of Director’s candidates fill out an application and apply to the Board. After
   a review by the board and interview(s) the Director’s hold an election. If the
   candidate receives a majority vote they are approved and elected to the Board.

5. How does the Board of Directors measure parent, student, and staff satisfaction?
   Provide, as an attachment, a sample of any surveys the school uses to measure the
   overall success of the school in this area.

   One key measure of parent and student satisfaction with the school is the
   re-enrollment rate from year to year. We currently have a 90% + re-enrollment rate
   which we feel is an indication of parent and student satisfaction with our program.
   As for our staff, we have very little turnover of staff and a majority of our staff have
   been with the school for 5 or more years. One-third of our staff has been with the
   school for 7 or more years.

6. Describe how the Board of Directors uses feedback from stakeholders to refine its
   operations.
   The Board allows for “public comment” at every Board meeting. Staff, parents, or
   students may present complaints, information, or suggestions which the board takes
   under advisement.

7. List any Board-sanctioned standing committees and the function of each committee.

   7a. What procedures do these committees follow to report their work to the Board of
   Directors?

8. List below any major policy changes that have affected the school’s original governance
   structure.
   If no major policy changes have occurred, please check this box.


9. Include in the space provided below, a copy of the school’s grievance policies for families
    and for staff.
    If none, please check this box.




9. Has your board of directors had formal board training during the last five years?
       Yes or     No
   If yes, who led the training and when was the training done?


11. Bylaws, Policies and Procedures
    Submit the following as electronic attachments:
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                                                                                       1102_LFI 5_Attachment




        a. The most recent copy of your Board’s By-Laws including all amendments and
           changes from the original document. Submitted

        b. A copy of your current parent/ student handbook. Submitted

        c. The most current copy of your school’s board approved personnel policies. None

        d. Copies of any other Board approved policies


                      Current Teacher Licensure Data (School year 09/10)
           (If your school does not include a particular grade level, indicate with N/A)
                             School Name: Kestrel Heights School

Grade      Total Number          Number of NC                Percent of       Percent of
Level       of Teachers            Licensed                 Teachers NC       Teachers Highly
                                   Teachers                   Licensed        Qualified
 K-5
 6-8             13                       9                    70%                 91%
 9-12            11                       8                    72%                 100%



                           Paraprofessional Data (School Year 09/10)
           (If your school does not include a particular grade level, indicate with N/A)


                                                              # with Associate’s
                         Total # of            # with High     Degree and/or 2     # with 4-year
                      Paraprofessionals       School Degree    years of higher        Degree
                                                                  education
Grades K-5:
Grades 6-8:                  2                     2
Grades 9-12:




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                          Kestrel Heights School

                  Charter School Renewal Action Plan

                        Submitted December 18, 2009


I.    Student Accountability and Performance

      The Testing Coordinator, Exceptional Children’s Coordinator, and Principal
      will provide sufficient leadership with respect to meeting LEP testing policies,
      test administration training of staff, testing accommodations for EC students,
      along with ensuring the correctness of EOG and EOC course lists. Both the
      Testing Coordinator and the Principal will communicate with the Office of
      Charter Schools, the Office of Student Accountability, EC Department at DPI,
      and any other responsible office or person to ensure that the school is
      compliant in these areas.

      Benchmark 1 = On or before February 28th all class lists for EOG and EOC
                    Courses will be checked to verify that they are 100% correct.

      Benchmark 2 = On or before February 28th the school will check to verify that
                    they have complied with all LEP testing.

      Benchmark 3 = On or before May 1st the Testing Coordinator and EC
                    Coordinator will Check and verify that all EC students are
                    listed correctly and that they will be receiving their
                    appropriate testing accommodations.

      Benchmark 4 = At the completion of administering all EOG’s and EOC’s
                    (June 11th) the school will be 100% compliant in the area of
                    Student Accountability.


II.   Business Plan and Financial Reporting

      The school will continue to monitor the budget and will work to ensure that
      the school does not run a budget deficit.

      Benchmark 1 = At the end of the fiscal year (June 30th, 2010) the school will
                   have a budget surplus.




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   III.    Exceptional Children’s Program

           The EC Coordinator and Principal will work to ensure that all appropriate
           IEP’s have a secondary transition plan. They will also attend training offered
           By DPI for the Continuing Improvement Performance Plan with the goal of
           Being 100% compliant in this area.

           Benchmark 1 = On or before March 1st the EC Coordinator will verify that all
                        Appropriate IEP’s have a secondary transition plan.

           Benchmark 2 = By May 1st the school will have attended at least one training
                         Session for the Continuing Improvement Performance Plan.

           Benchmark 3 = At the end of the academic school year (June 11th, 2010) the
                        school will be 100% compliant in the area of the Exceptional
                        Children’s Program.

   IV.     Governance

           The Director and Board of Director’s will work together to ensure that the
           Corporation Bylaws are changed to reflect the current board tradition and that
           they comply with all state and federal laws.

           Benchmark 1 = On or before June 30th, 2010 the board will verify that the
                        Bylaws accurately reflect the operation of the school and that
                        the Bylaws comply with all federal and state laws.


   V.      Student Admissions Policy

           The sixth grade student admissions policy was changed to comply with
           General Statute: 115C238.29F(g) and states:


Kestrel Heights School will enroll any student who is selected in our blind lottery
admission process, and who has been promoted from the 5th grade to the 6th grade by
any other North Carolina Public School or by any other state school system. In the case
of home schooled students or students coming from unaccredited private schools KHS
will base all enrollment decisions on nationally recognized testing results the student may
have completed; or we will have such student take a series of tests to assess their
appropriate grade placement.




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   VI.   Board Policy Manual

         The Director and the Board of Directors will work to create a grievance policy
         for families and staff. They will also create a manual of personnel
         policies.

         Benchmark 1 = On or before June 30th, 2010 the Director will ensure
                       that the school has a published grievance policy for families
                       and staff.

         Benchmark 2 = On or before June 30th, 2010 the Director will ensure that
                       there is a published personnel policy manual.




This Action Plan was approved by the Board Chairman on December 14th, 2009.




Signed ______________________________________ Date ____________
       Chairman of the KHS Board of Director’s




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THE NORTH CAROLINA CHARTER SCHOOLS SELF STUDY
                          SECTION 1




I.     COVER PAGE

School Name: The Hawbridge School

Mailing Address: P.O.Box 162, Saxapahaw, NC 27340

Primary Contact Person:    Dr. Marcia Huth

Title: Director

Phone #: 336.376.1122 x203 Fax #: 336.376.6996      E-mail Address:
mhuth@hawbridgeschool.org


Contact Information for the Board Chairperson:

Name: Andrew Zeman

Term of Office: 9/2007-12/2009

Mailing Address: 106 Quailview, Chapel Hill, NC 27516

Phone #: 919.967.2571     Fax #: n/a   E-mail Address: aezeman@bellsouth.net


Board Chair Signature: _____________________________________           Date__________




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     LETTER OF INTENT (Letter from Board Chairperson)
This letter should include the renewal term requested and highlights of the school’s success.
                                      (Limit one page)




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                                 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The wording of the original Mission Statement of New Century Charter School, now The Hawbridge
School, was changed and approved by the State Board of Education with the 2006 charter renewal
documents. The new wording is this:

        The Hawbridge School community engages in a learning partnership. Students develop the
        skills, values, and strategies required to master the challenging curriculum and to pursue
        lifelong learning and personal growth. Relationships based on mutual respect honor
        individual learning preferences and create an environment that is intellectually,
        emotionally, and physically healthy.

The original Mission and Purposes of the school, however, have neither changed nor been reworded,
and the Mission and Purposes Section of the original charter application is included in the following
document under section A, Curriculum, question 2. The Hawbridge School fulfills not only its original
Mission and Purposes but all six of the purposes of charter schools included in the legislation that created
charter schools, 115C-238.29A.

This summary will focus on the school’s success in the three main areas set out in the charter application.
The Hawbridge School Community does the following:

    1. recognizes all students as special learners and engages them in the learning process.
    2. increases enthusiasm for teaching and learning.
    3. encourages flexibility and innovation in teaching methodologies.

Recognizing all students as special learners and engaging them in the learning process: The
Hawbridge School faculty members recognize that each student is different, with different strengths and
learning styles that need to be understood and utilized for students to be successful. Weekly faculty
meetings dedicated to student success take place on Tuesday mornings before school opens; during these
meetings the teachers focus on students who are struggling academically or in other ways and design
individual plans to assist them.

The Hawbridge enrollment usually is between 25% and 40% Exceptional Children, but all students are
treated with the same attention to learning styles and strengths as EC programs provide. Small classes,
daily tutorials, cooperation among teachers, multiple teaching methodologies, differentiated instruction,
and a faculty familiar with the latest research on learning theory have contributed to the academic success
Hawbridge has seen. The Exceptional Children’s program coordinator and one of the teachers who is a
Ph.D. candidate in Educational Psychology specializing in Learning Theory assist teachers in finding
methodologies that work best for individual students. One third of the faculty either holds a doctoral
degree or is a doctoral candidate and thus knowledgeable in research methodology and able to investigate
additional teaching practices. For students who work best on a computer, the student: computer ratio at
Hawbridge is 1:1.

Increase enthusiasm for teaching and learning: Research has shown that enthusiasm for learning
occurs most often if the learning is relevant to the student’s life and if it is facilitated by a teacher with
whom the student has a respectful relationship. Therefore, the Hawbridge faculty has designed and
adopted several innovative programs that demonstrate the relevance of the NCSCOS for our students and
scaffold new learning onto concepts with which the students are familiar either intuitively or through
experience. The research, design and planning efforts, and opportunity to learn about new concepts and
ideas that such innovative programs provide energize the faculty and substantially increase their
enjoyment of teaching, turning Hawbridge into a learning community. The IU’s for 2009-2010 are
(details listed only for the first):
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The use of Interdisciplinary Units that organize the NCSCOS goals and objectives around themes, bring
in specialists and practitioners for instructional sessions with the students, include at least two field trips
relevant to the theme, and require each Hawbridge student to design and produce a project or product.
The Interdisciplinary Units for 2009-2010 are (details given only for the first):
         Footprints of the Past, an Introduction to Archaeology and Anthropology, for which the speakers
are Dr. Bill Vincent, Chair of Anthropology at Elon University, and Theresa McReynolds, Anthropology
graduate student, UNC-Chapel Hill; field trips are to the Alamance County Museum to view their
collection of projectile points, and to the Occaneechi Homeland Preservation Project; and products are
rust-dyed fabrics that celebrate the textile mill history, and the development of a late 1800’s mill dig site
as an outdoor classroom.
         The other three are Climate Change; Clothing and Costumes; and Sound and Light.
         The Hawbridge faculty presented on the Interdisciplinary Units at the 2008 and 2009 Charter
Schools Conferences and the 2009 North Carolina Exceptional Children’s meeting. The Interdisciplinary
Units have been published in Mathematics Teacher, May issue, vol 102, #9, and are given out at the NC
Pottery Center in Seagrove. The Director presented on the Hawbridge curriculum at the American
Philosophical Association meeting, July, 2009.

The use of the following Outdoor Classrooms for research projects and instruction: an organic garden;
archaeological dig site; Haw River Trail/Mountains-to-the-Sea Trail (some of which the students created);
the Saxapahaw waste treatment plant; the Haw River, Lake Louise, Motes Creek, and Saxapahaw Lake;
constructed wetlands; a Zen rock garden created by the students; and a rock climbing area. Hawbridge
faculty members also are participating in the design and planning of the Saxapahaw Mill Village and
Historical Museum, which will be located across the street from the school and include several outdoor
components the school will use in the future. The faculty is presenting on Outdoor Classrooms at the
upcoming Outdoor Classroom Symposium at the NC Botanical Garden in Chapel Hill, and hosting
Saturday afternoon tours of our campus.

The use of Micro Enterprises, designed with the help of Dr. Jim Johnson, chair of the Entrepreneurship
MBA at Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC-Chapel Hill, with the goal of incorporating the NCSCOS
and providing students the opportunity to investigate careers and the colleges that specialize in
preparation for each career. The current Micro Enterprises are Hawbridge Gardens (students grow
organic vegetables, natural dye plants, and heirloom vegetables to sell; the profits are used to purchase
gardening supplies); Hawbridge Designs (students create art works such as silk scarves that are sold and
the profits are used to buy art supplies); HOutdoors (part of the summer camp that will begin in 2010 and
the ME that provides opportunities for camping trips throughout the year as part of the Environmental
Science focus of the school); Hawbridge Summers (a summer camp that will begin in 2010); and
Hawbridge Recycles.

Encourages flexibility and innovation in teaching methodologies: The administration and faculty
strive to create an environment that allows each person to use his or her best talents so that there is a
continual synergistic interaction among teaching methodologies, student learning styles, and the
information to be learned. The adults in the Hawbridge community share a philosophy that centers on
two principles: “no gossip” and “focus on the positive.” Teachers model respectful relationships that
honor individual teaching and learning styles and encourage involvement in the process of teaching and
learning, and the students learn through observation to respect their own strengths and one another. “No
gossip” among the adults translates to “no bullying” among the students, and bullying is, indeed, a rare
occurrence at Hawbridge. The emotional safety to display one’s strengths and reveal one’s ideas is
prevalent throughout the school. A commitment to these principles has contributed significantly to the
school’s success.

During the three years that the Hawbridge School community has been using these innovative
practices, our performance composite has doubled.

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                           THE EDUCATION PROGRAM
A.      Curriculum

     1. Name or describe the curriculum design presently used.
        We use the North Carolina Standard Course of Study.

       Every teacher is responsible for implementing the NCSCOS in his or her classroom,
according to or within the parameters set by NCDPI. The faculty, composed of highly
qualified, creative, intelligent, independent teachers with a track record of success,
incorporate sections of the standard course of study each year into four or five month-long,
school-wide interdisciplinary units, which the teachers write.
       With the help of Dr. Jim Johnson, chair of the Entrepreneurship MBA program at
Kenan-Flagler Business School at UNC-Chapel Hill, The Hawbridge School also has
developed several micro enterprises that incorporate the NCSCOS while also providing
students opportunities to investigate career options and to learn how businesses operate.
Examples are Hawbridge Designs, through which students design and sell art works, with
the money going back into the art program, and Hawbridge Gardens, through which
students grow and sell vegetables, natural dyes, and heirloom seeds.

     2. Is this the design submitted in the original charter application? xYes
        (If yes is checked, answer questions three, five, six and seven, and skip four. If no is
        checked, skip question three and answer four, five, six and seven.)

        Please note: When the Association for the Advancement of Education applied for a
        charter, the ABC’s program was in its first year at the high school level. In the following
        Mission and Purposes section of the application, the North Carolina Standard Course of
        Study is not mentioned specifically, although it is implied.

        EXCERPTS FROM THE ORIGINAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT
        OF EDUCATION REQUEST FOR A CHARTER, DBA NEW CENTURY CHARTER
        SCHOOL (now The Hawbridge School; name change approved at the August, 2007, SBE
        meeting), DATED JANUARY 21, 1998.

        Purposes of Charter Schools as explained in 115C-238.29A, and response of the AAE
        Board of Directors in application documents written during the fall of 1997:

        Purposes:

        The purpose of this Part is to authorize a system of charter schools to provide
        opportunities for teachers, parents, pupils, and community members to establish
        and maintain schools that operate independently of existing schools, as a method to
        accomplish all of the following:

        (1) Improve student learning;


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       (2) Increase learning opportunities for all students, with special emphasis on
       expanded learning experiences for students who are identified as at risk of academic
       failure or academically gifted;

       (3) Encourage the use of different and innovative teaching methods;

       (4) Create new professional opportunities for teachers, including the opportunities
       to be responsible for the learning program at the school site;

       (5) Provide parents and students with expanded choices in the types of educational
       opportunities that are available within the public school system; and

       (6) Hold the schools established under this Part accountable for meeting measurable
       student achievement results, and provide the schools with a method to change from
       rule - based to performance - based accountability systems. (1995 (Reg. Sess., 1996),
       c. 731, s. 2.)

At The Hawbridge School we currently fulfill all six of these purposes.

The next section is from the original application approved by the State Board of Education in
early 1998:

A. Describe how the school’s program implements one or more of the purposes, 115C-238.29A

The New Century Charter School (NCCS, now The Hawbridge School) aims to create an
educational setting that recognizes all students as special learners and provides consistent support
for both teachers and students in achieving a synergy between effective teaching and active
learning. Its main purpose is to salvage the latent enthusiasm for learning among students who
have become apathetic or alienated from education. While many at-risk students are so
identified and assisted in secondary schools, not all students who fail to live up to their potential
are identified and assisted. Many students lose motivation because their learning styles are
incompatible with the structure of the traditional secondary school curriculum. The New
Century Charter School will provide students with a structured curriculum as rigorous as the
standard curriculum but one that permits more flexibility and a variety of methodologies within
its parameters. The school’s ultimate goal is to engage students in the learning process so that
they may take progressively greater responsibility for their own education, mastering a variety of
heuristic strategies that will carry them through adulthood.

The school will implement these purposes by instituting a program with the following
characteristics:
    a teacher-rich environment that allows small classes and a favorable teacher-student ratio
       (a goal of 1:15)
    a practice-based curriculum that emphasizes coaching and in-class work
    a schedule that provides the time for in-depth learning and in-class work and the
       flexibility to include innovative experiments, i.e., fewer periods and longer
    cooperative teaching and partnered- or group-project learning
    a meta-cognitive approach in which teachers model the learning process, teaching
       students how to learn
    student-centered and criteria-guided assessment
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      emphasis on self-directed learning with instruction and guidance that lead toward
       independent study and self-assessment

To create an environment with these characteristics, the school will hire a sufficient number of
teachers in the four core subject areas to allow small classes in those areas. The smaller class
size will enable teachers to use more coaching and practice-based models of instruction in the
classroom. Teachers will not simply transmit information but will model the learning process
and act as mentors in the students’ construction of knowledge. Student mastery of processes of
learning will thus be as important as mastery of subject matter.

While initially offering less choice in subject matter than other area schools, this program will
offer more flexibility of method within the traditional subject areas. This school will therefore
reach out to students who prefer in-depth study to a broader, more segmented curriculum.
Moreover the program will attempt to accommodate a wide range of student learning types,
potentially including many within the range of special education concerns. However, this
program should be useful to any and all students who wish to become more aware of their native
learning styles and to develop creative strategies for moderating the shortcomings inherent in
each. By concentrating on the learning process within a few subjects, this program intends to
create self-directed, self-motivated students capable of pursuing study programs independently,
beyond the expertise of teachers and texts. Such independence will be made progressively more
available to students as they demonstrate prowess in the learning process.

To help students develop their own interests and assume ownership of the learning process, an
experimental tutorial program will be instituted. Each tutorial group will meet regularly with its
tutor who will oversee the group’s progress both as a group and as individuals. This will provide
students will small group opportunities for seminars and other group learning projects, as well as
offering the close support of a teacher. It is projected that students will be clustered into tutorial
groups partially on the basis of mutual interests and partially on the basis of educational needs.
The tutorial will also allow teachers a period in which to pursue experimental or innovative
educational ventures of their own choice. Each tutor will be free to design projects to augment
the group’s learning in order to enlarge the students’ ideas of what it means to be an educated
person. The tutorial may concern subjects within or outside the instructor’s expertise and could
involve members of the broader school or local community to supplement faculty expertise.
Thus, in the tutorial groups, students will be guided in enlarging their array of skills to include
others than those taught in the four core subject areas. The goal of the tutorial is to provide both
teachers and students with arenas in which to experiment with creative ideas.

The Hawbridge School faculty currently meets every expectation set forth in this section of
the original charter, while also teaching the NCSCOS and differentiating lessons in every
respect. The tutorials can be combined into whole school projects such as the
interdisciplinary units and micro enterprises. Because of our location beside the Haw
River and the availability of so many outdoor classroom spaces, we have adopted an
Environmental Studies focus, but this does not change any of our operations or instruction,
only reorganizes some of it. These changes were made with the help of Dr. Douglas
Crawford-Brown, then chair of the UNC-Chapel Hill Environmental Studies program and
Institute for the Environment, and a group of practitioners including representatives of the
Haw River Assembly, Bayer Crop Science, the EPA, the NIEHS, Elon University
Environmental Studies program, the US Department of Agriculture, and local organic
farmers.
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B. State the Educational Focus for the Proposed Charter School. 115C-238.29B(A)(C)

The educational focus of the New Century Charter School will be on the learning process itself.
This school aims to teach students how to teach themselves so as to become lifelong learners
able to adapt to the demands of a changing global economy. It has been projected that today’s
student may need to change careers as many as seven times in his or her adulthood. To prepare
students for such a necessity, this school will offer a program that provides more challenge and
more feedback in a more personalized setting than standard secondary school programs offer.
Through such an environment it is anticipated that students will begin to develop a sense of
ownership and responsibility with respect to their own education. By implementing a simpler
structure than the traditional eight-period curriculum, this school will be able to offer both more
guidance and more flexibility within that structure. The content to be mastered will be largely
the same for all students but the ways of learning it will be diversified to accommodate differing
student learning styles. While this school will make available some subjects outside the core
subjects, its program will focus on mastering learning strategies within a limited number of
subjects. Thus the school intends to foster self-directed learning among its students to enable
them to pursue other subjects independently. Once students have mastered the skills of learning,
they will be empowered to survive in a future that will demand constant learning and relearning
of new methodologies and technologies.

The Hawbridge School currently meets every expectation set forth in this section of the
original charter. The day is divided into six periods, with sixth period often extending into
seventh period and the morning periods collapsing into extended time for guest speakers
relevant to the Interdisciplinary Units; the seventh period is a tutorial in which students
work one-on-one or in small groups with a teacher, on research projects that involve self-
directed learning, honors work, or remediation.


   3. If the answer to number two is yes;

            a. What have been the strengths of this curriculum design for your school?
Using the North Carolina Standard Course of Study as our curriculum provides
Hawbridge students an outstanding education and also prepares them for the state’s end-
of-course tests. Organizing the NCSCOS goals and objectives into four or five
Interdisciplinary Units each year helps the students understand the connections between
and among disciplines and makes learning more relevant by scaffolding new knowledge
onto concepts with which the students are familiar. Organizing the NCSCOS goals and
objectives into Micro Enterprises helps the students envision career and college choices
that will utilize their strengths and allow them to work in a field they enjoy.

The strengths of this design have been shown dramatically by the doubling of our
performance composite over the last three years.

The strengths of the original charter application’s description of the school’s curriculum
and educational purposes are primarily their flexibility and emphasis on one-on-one and
small group tutorials between and among teacher and students. At The Hawbridge School,
each school day ends with a tutorial hour during which teachers and students gather into
small groups for remediation; honors help; teacher-designed instruction such as the

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Outdoor Skills course; research; or participation in one of the Micro Enterprises, such as
Hawbridge Designs.


          b. What have been the weaknesses of this curriculum design for your school?

We have not seen any weaknesses. The original plan was flexible enough to allow
Hawbridge to grow and develop in ways that are very advantageous to our students.

       c. How are weaknesses of the design being addressed?
       N/a

   4. If the answer to number two is no:

       a. Describe why the change in curricula was made.

       b. What have been the strengths of this curriculum design for your students?

       c. What have been the weaknesses of this curriculum design for your students?

       d. How are weaknesses of the design being addressed?


   5. What tools and/or observations are used to evaluate the effectiveness of the school’s
      curriculum?
      The end-of-course tests and other formative and summative assessments throughout
      the year, frequent observations of teaching by the Director, feedback from students,
      parents, and teachers. Additionally, each week during the school year, on Tuesday
      mornings before the school day begins, the faculty meets for 45 minutes to evaluate
      student performance and agree on adjustments to instruction for students who are
      not excelling. These meetings are in addition to the regular faculty meetings on
      Thursday afternoons, at which curriculum discussions play an important role.

       During the eight professional development days before school opens in August, the
       faculty meets to review curriculum for the coming year, and design lesson plans that
       incorporate the NCSCOS into the four or five Interdisciplinary Units scheduled for
       that year. During the two professional development days at the end of the school
       year, the faculty meets again to evaluate the curricular successes for the year just
       completed, adopt interdisciplinary unit themes for the coming year, and design and
       structure the interdisciplinary units so they may be worked on while teachers map
       their NCSCOS curricula for the next year over the summer.


   6. Describe the steps taken to align the school’s curriculum with the NC Standard
      Course of Study.
We use the NC Standard Course of Study as our curriculum. During the year we organize
some of the goals and objectives into Interdisciplinary Units and Micro Enterprises. When
we began using the units, we looked very closely at the NCSCOS to determine the

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commonalities among and across disciplines and discovered there are about a dozen, all of
which turned out to be 21st century skills.



B.       Instructional Methodology or Techniques

     1. Summarize the instructional methodology or techniques employed. (i.e., Direct
        Instruction, Hands on, Experiential, Expeditionary Learning, etc.)

        The instructional methodology employed at The Hawbridge School is
        differentiation; the faculty members use a myriad of instructional methods to meet
        students’ diverse academic needs. Teachers incorporate a combination of direct
        instruction, hands on, experiential, cooperative learning, lecture, lecture with
        discussion, presentation of experts, brainstorming with students, videotapes/slides
        and other visual technology, blogs, class web pages, discussion, small group
        discussion, demonstration, journals, case studies, cooperative learning, peer
        tutoring, role playing, worksheet/surveys, guest speakers, expeditionary learning,
        and, most especially, inquiry-based learning, all of which are tailored to the
        NCSCOS and individual student learning styles and needs.

        As examples of expeditionary learning, whole school field trips relevant to the
        Interdisciplinary Units for that year are taken at least four times per semester. At
        least monthly students go on overnight camping-backpacking-canoeing expeditions
        as part of the Environmental Studies focus of the school.

        These techniques are especially relevant since the school is between 25% and 40%
        Exceptional Children (the class of 2009 was 50% EC), and allow for differentiation
        since there are highly gifted children in the same class with those who struggle
        academically.

        Is this the design submitted in the original application? XYes or   No

     2. If the answer to number 2 is yes:

        a. What have been the strengths of these methods for your students?
        The use of such a variety of instructional methodologies allows the flexibility for
        teachers to use what works best for their individual teaching styles, strengths, and
        capabilities, depending on the individual lesson being taught and the learning styles
        of the particular students being taught. On any particular day and in any
        particular class, the tools used by the Hawbridge faculty to teach a particular lesson
        are dependent upon the needs and learning styles of each child, the piece of
        curriculum in the teacher’s discipline, and individual teaching styles. This allows
        everyone to use what works best for the particular student, the particular lesson,
        and the particular teacher.

        Teachers do independent research on instructional methods that fit the needs of
        their students. They interact constantly with one another to provide feedback and
        insight about teaching and learning. Both Susan Hedges, the Exceptional
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   Children’s coordinator and teacher, and Rinnel Atherton, a doctoral candidate at
   UNC-Chapel Hill in Educational Psychology with a focus on Learning Theory, assist
   individual teachers in finding appropriate methodologies for each student.
   Additionally, the teachers do Action Research projects each year on an aspect of
   their teaching in order to facilitate reflective practice and as part of their
   evaluations.

   Finally, the faculty devotes considerable time and energy to the seventh period
   tutorial, during which students who are struggling academically are assisted and
   students who are excelling academically are challenged with additional assignments
   and one-on-one research projects with the teacher.

   b. What have been the weaknesses of these methods for your students?
   There are no weaknesses because teachers are not limited to specific instructional
   methodologies but may use what fits each situation best, and research alternatives
   or new methodologies if those are not adequate.

   c. How have the weaknesses in the methods been addressed?


3. If the answer to number two is no:

   a. Describe why the change in instructional methodology was made.

   b. What have been the strengths of this instructional methodology for your students?

   c. What have been the weaknesses of this instructional methodology for your students?

   d. How are weaknesses of the methodology being addressed?




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C.         Student Accountability Performance


     1. Complete the following charts of student performance data. If the year or grade level is
        not applicable, enter N/A in the corresponding box.

     ABCs Student Performance Data: Provide the student performance composite for applicable grade
     levels for the years indicated.
                     2004-2005       2005-2006      2006-2007         2007-2008         2008-2009
                 Reading   Math    Reading   Math      Reading     Math      Reading     Math    Reading   Math
      rd
     3 Grade      N/a      N/a       N/a     N/a        N/a         N/a       N/a        N/a       N/a      N/a
     4th Grade    N/a      N/a       N/a     N/a        N/a         N/a       N/a        N/a       N/a      N/a
     5th Grade    N/a      N/a       N/a     N/a        N/a         N/a       N/a        N/a       N/a      N/a
     6th Grade    N/a      N/a       N/a     N/a        N/a         N/a       N/a        N/a       N/a      N/a
     7th Grade    N/a      N/a       N/a     N/a        N/a         N/a       N/a        N/a       N/a      N/a
     8th Grade    N/a      N/a       N/a     N/a        N/a         N/a       N/a        N/a       N/a      N/a


                                             Performance Results
                                 2004-2005   2005-2006           2006-2007     2007-2008       2008-2009
            English I               75           66                 85            88.9           83.3
            Algebra I              43.8         23.5               31.3           66.7           66.7
            Algebra II             44.4          50                42.9           36.4            75
            Geometry               43.5         30.8               37.5           43.8            85
            Biology                 24           30                84.6           67.7           100
            Chemistry              N/a          N/a                N/a            N/a            N/a
            Physical Science        25          72.7               N/a            87.5           100
            Physics                N/a          N/a                N/a            83.3           N/a
            ELPS                   N/a          54.2               84.6           70.4           93.3
            US History             N/a          32.4                75            100            81.8


                ABCs Accountability           Performance                                 Met AYP
                                                                     Designation
                      Summary                  Composite                                 Yes    No
            2004-2005                            40.2%                PRI EXP                     X
            2005-2006                            44.7%               PRI HIGH                     X
            2006-2007                            62.6%               PRO HIGH                     X
            2007-2008                            71.6%                NO REC               X
            2008-2009                            88.1%                NO REC               X

We would like to point out that we did achieve growth status academically during 2008-
2009. Unfortunately, however, fewer students graduated on the college prep or college tech
prep diploma tracks than had the previous two years. This is perhaps at least partially due
to the fact that our 2009 graduating class of 14 was 50% (seven) EC.

Also, we attract many home-schooled and private-schooled students into our freshman
classes, most of whom have been extremely well prepared, but these students do not have
the 8th grade math and reading scores for the comparisons on which growth is based for
Algebra I, English I, and Biology, and are thus left out of the formula. These three courses
are taken during 9th grade and are three of the five courses whose scores are the basis for

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determining the academic portion of the growth formula. At least a third of our students
are not included.

2.   Does the school use other evaluation instruments to assess student performance (i.e.
     NWEA/MAP or Iowa testing)? Yes or x No. If yes, please describe those assessments.

        We have attended MAP information sessions but do not believe they are relevant
        enough at the high school level to warrant the expense. Additionally, because we are
        small, and because of the daily tutorial sessions, the teachers are in contact with
        students and able to help them on a daily basis. Our test scores have risen steadily,
        doubling in three years.

3.    How is student data used to improve student learning and to raise the academic
     performance of all students?

The state testing results come with an accounting of each NCSCOS goal and many of the
objectives for each course tested, and clearly show how well the students did in each area
the teacher should have covered during the year. These accountings are very helpful in
discovering patterns in instructional strengths and weaknesses; teachers use them during
the summer to map their curricula for the coming year. The strengthening of each teacher
as an individual strengthens the faculty as a whole, and teaching and learning in the school.

As a faculty, we review all of the data on each student as he or she is admitted in order to
determine individual strengths and weaknesses, and each teacher reviews all of the data
relevant to his or her discipline while the student attends Hawbridge. The Director reviews
all of the student data in order to make school-wide decisions and plans for improvement.


4. Is this school identified by the Department of Public Instruction as an Alternative School?
            Yes or xNo. If yes, please answer a, b, and c.

        a. List the three local options goals (and percents) set by your school.

        b. List the types of data collected to track the results of each of the three options?

        c. List in detail the school’s results for the last three years. (Percent set and percent met
        in each option)


                 EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN’S PROGRAM
     1. a. How many students at your school are currently identified as students with
        disabilities? 21

        b. What percent of the entire school population does this represent? 25%

        c. List the exceptionalities the school is presently serving and the number of students
        identified in each. LD-14, AU-3, OHI-4
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2. How many students with disabilities does your school currently serve in each of the
   following continuum levels:

    21 Regular; we are a full inclusion school.

            Resource

            Separate

            Separate School

            Residential

            Home/Hospital



3. At your school, is all specially designed instruction currently provided to students with
    disabilities delivered by a teacher who holds a license in Special Ed? x Yes or     No.
   If no, please explain


4. List all related services currently provided for students. Counseling, Psychological
   Testing
   Are all related service providers certified? xYes or No.
   How are the related service providers employed? (i.e. part-time, contracted, permanent)
   permanent and contracted (school psychologist)

5. List any non-compliance concerns cited by the state that resulted in fiscal revisions and
   the implemented corrective action plan. none

6. If your school has not applied for federal EC funds, please explain the reason for this.
   We have applied for and received federal EC funds.

7. List, by year, all Exceptional Children’s trainings, regional meetings and conferences
   (state and national) staff has attended during the last two years. (9/15/09) Region 5 EC
   Directors/Charter Schools Meeting, (3/27/09) Region 5 EC Directors/Charter
   Schools Meeting, (3/10-11/09) EC Director's Institute, (12/8/08) CECAS DEC 4,
   (10/16-17/08) Charter School Conference 2 EC sessions Grants and CECAS
   training, (9/25/08) Special Education Administration course, 3 credit hours,
   University of Phoenix, (9/10/08) CECAS Preparing for the Periodic Child Count,
   (8/4-5/08) Summer Institute, (7/1-3/08) ISTE Conference on Educational Technology
   attended sessions on using technology for EC, (3/18/08) Functional Behavioural
   Assessment Workshop, (12/13/07) Creating Units to Support Differing Learning
   Styles-30 hours, (7/25-28/07) EC Summer Institute.




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BUSINESS PLAN AND FINANCIAL REPORTING
   1. During the past five years has the school had any financial warnings, been on Financial
      or Governance Cautionary status, Probationary Status, or Noncompliance Status?
          Yes or x No

        If yes, describe the circumstances and the actions taken by the school to return to
       compliance, result of these actions, and steps taken to ensure continued compliance.


   2. For each of the past five years, has the school complied with the annual financial audit
      requirement, and submitted it by October 31? x Yes or     No.
      Petway, Mills, and Pearson are our auditors. Our audits have been clear.

       If No, explain the circumstances of each occurrence, and what steps have been taken to
       ensure future compliance.

   3. In the past five years has this school had an end of year financial deficit?
      x Yes or      No.

         If yes, describe the circumstances leading to the deficit, how the shortfall was resolved,
         and what steps were taken to keep the problem from recurring.
          During the 2007-2008 budget year, The Hawbridge School used an accounting firm
that delegated responsibilities for our budget and accounting to an employee with very
little accounting knowledge or background. This employee calculated the school costs for
both employee retirement and health insurance at one half the actual cost. During that
year we had a financial surplus that covered the additional expenses, but, unfortunately
and unknowingly, the budget for 2008-2009 was planned with those same incorrect figures.
That, plus the state’s reversion funds, and two fewer students than anticipated, led to a
financial deficit during 2008-2009. The 2008-2009 year, however, began with a
considerable amount in savings, so the overage was covered. Our budget for 2009-2010 is
balanced.
         We changed accountants following the 2007-2008 year to one with an excellent
reputation and her work during the 2008-2009 year and the budgeting process for 2009-
2010 has been exact.
         The new accountant was hired before the errors were discovered because the 2007-
2008 accounting firm did not provide adequate services in other areas. The 2007-2008
accounting errors were not discovered until the new accountant began work and Petway,
Mills, Pearson auditors began our audit, in late August, 2008. Further complicating
matters, the Board treasurer during 2007-2008, a Senior Financial Planning and Analysis
Manager with a master’s degree, changed jobs three times during the year, each time for a
better position, and did not spend as much time reviewing our budget as she had in
previous years, so did not catch the errors.

   4. During the last five years of operation has enrollment increased, decreased, or remained
      steady? If there has been fluctuation in enrollment please explain.
      The enrollment numbers have not fluctuated very much, but remained in the mid-
      70’s to mid-80’s ADM range. Our location beside the Haw River in the village of
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    Saxapahaw is 15-20 miles from any population center, and both a blessing and a
    curse – a blessing because it provides a beautiful, healthy, interesting environment
    with numerous outdoor classroom spaces in which to educate students, and a curse
    because transportation remains an issue.

    Since there currently is an elementary school in the village of Saxapahaw, and the
    closest middle school is 12 miles away, we are requesting the addition of a middle
    school for the 2010-2011 year. This will provide a feeder situation for Hawbridge
    and we should begin to grow as rapidly as state policies permit. There also are two
    new housing developments in the village of Saxapahaw, one of them consisting solely
    of “green” homes, and those should help our enrollment numbers improve in the
    near future.

    It also should be noted that the school has gone through a transformation from the
    old New Century Charter High School that was failing in many ways to The
    Hawbridge School, an innovative school with an environmental focus, excellent
    faculty and considerable academic success. Like all organizational transformations,
    this one has taken several years and cost a number of enrollees who were not
    committed to their educations.




5. Complete the table below regarding school enrollment:

                                      1st 20 Day ADM              Membership Last Day
Year 1 (05-06)                                75                         77
Year 2 (06-07)                                79                         76
Year 3 (07-08)                                86                         76
Year 4 (08-09)                                80                         74
Year 5 (09-10)                                81             NA


6. During the last five years has this school changed grade levels served?      Yes or xNO
   If yes, explain the changes below.


7. Does the school currently have a waiting list? x Yes or    No.
   If yes, how many students and at what grade level(s)
   We have a waiting list for a middle school.

8. Include below a copy of your school’s admission policy.
   The Hawbridge School accepts applications from prospective students until March
   15 of each year. The applications contain our Partnership Agreement, which sets
   forth the expectations for behavior and participation of everyone involved in the
   partnership, i.e., the Association for the Advancement of Education Board of
   Directors, the Director of Education, the faculty and staff, students, and students’
   families, and is signed by the student, parents or guardians, and Director of
   Education or School Counselor.
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       With the application, the following information is required:

      Application Packet including signed Partnership Agreement
      Prior School Records (including Testing and any IEP Info)
      Interview with Student and Family
      Immunization Records
      Birth Certificate
      Social Security Card
      Proof of Residence (must be an electric, water, or gas bill (not telephone or cable) that
       shows the name and address; the entire bill, before it is paid and a portion is torn off, must
       be brought to the school and photocopied. Also, a lease or mortgage is acceptable.)

       On March 15 of each year, students are notified of their admission. If there were to
       be more applications than allotted slots, a lottery would be held in compliance with
       the lottery procedures set out in the charter schools legislation. We have not yet
       needed a lottery. After March 15, students are admitted on a rolling basis.

       The Partnership Agreement is as follows:


                                   Partnership Agreement

Philosophy of the Partnership

The partnership philosophy is implemented by a formal agreement among parents, students, the
board of Directors of the Association for the Advancement of Education, and the faculty.
Commitment to this agreement is a requirement of initial and continued enrollment. The
Partnership Agreement includes two general areas of participation: a requirement to be involved
in the development of the student, and a requirement that families support the overall operation
of the school.


Standards and Expectations for Families

       To communicate honestly, thoroughly, and respectfully with the faculty and
       administrators of Hawbridge School.
       To attend the parent-teacher conferences scheduled twice each year.
       To contribute at least one hour per month to school-centered activities. A volunteer sheet
       accompanies this application packet.
       To reinforce learning by engaging in frequent and detailed discussions with your student
       about his or her academic and behavioral progress.
       To provide a home environment in which education is valued.
       To foster cooperation and communication with the faculty by providing complete current
       contact information.
       To ensure compliance with interventions and assist with remedial needs.
       To provide positive reinforcement for appropriate attitudes and behaviors.
       To ensure that your student attends school daily, arrives on time, and is ready to learn.
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Standards and Expectations for Students

       No disruptions of the learning process will be tolerated.
       Profanity toward faculty and administrators will result in an automatic suspension.

Expectations for Student Behavior Compiled by Hawbridge Students
       Be on time for school and classes.
       Respect others, yourself, and the environment (this includes the school building.)
       Tend to your personal problems ONLY, and leave the drama at home.
       Take student conflicts to a faculty member for mediation.
       Use inside voices, good manners, appropriate language and things to talk about;
       remember that there is a time for everything.
       Treat others as you wish to be treated.
       No drugs, alcohol, weapons, tobacco products, sexual activity, or gambling.
       No put-downs or bullying.
       Take personal responsibility for your choices, actions, and life.
       Be open-minded and accepting of others.

Classroom Expectations
       Come prepared to work with the necessary materials.
       Discuss appropriate topics with appropriate language (do no talk about drugs, alcohol,
       sex; no anger, hatred)
       Focus on learning:
           o Arrive on time
           o Pay attention (no sleeping)
           o Care for your environment (no vandalism, including writing on desks, posts,
               walls, floors, furniture)
           o Cooperate with the learning process (no disruption)
       Electronic equipment and CELL PHONES MUST BE TURNED OFF AND OUT OF
       SIGHT except during lunch or they will be confiscated.
       Practice honesty and courtesy, the kind your grandmother would be proud of.
       Use a hall pass.
       All other policies as stated in the Student Handbook

Standards and Expectations for Faculty and Administrators
      To ensure the accomplishment of the mission of Hawbridge School by creating a safe,
      orderly, academically challenging, and emotionally nurturing learning environment.

Standards and Expectations for the Board of Directors of The Association for the
Advancement of Education
      To ensure that the mission of Hawbridge School is met.
      To perform duties as specified by the by-laws.
      To behave lawfully and ethically, and use its authority properly.
      To oversee organizational performance, engage in multi-year planning, and provide
      financial oversight.
      To assume responsibility for ensuring long-range commitments of resources; establish a
      financial development plan and participate in its implementation.
      To encourage attendance and participation at its monthly meetings by students, parents,
      faculty, and members of the community.
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       To communicate clearly through accurate public record of its meetings, activities,
       decisions, and actions (except for the proceedings of executive sessions)
       To support the standards and expectations as stated in this document for students, their
       families, and faculty.
       To maintain confidentiality of student and personnel actions.
       To continually develop its capabilities and the capacity to govern effectively.


Partnership Agreement Compliance Issues

Family and Student Concerns: Please see the Parent/Student Handbook for the Grievance
Procedure and Appeals Process.

School Concerns: If the school finds that the student or parents are not in compliance with the
Partnership Agreement, the school will take the following actions:
       1. Notify the family by telephone that the school has a concern regarding compliance
           with the Partnership Agreement. A school representative and the family will meet to
           formulate and agree upon a plan to come into compliance and establish a time frame
           for evaluation.
       2. Notify the family by letter that the school continues to have concerns about the
           compliance with the Partnership Agreement. Families will be asked to attend a
           conference with the Director and/or the Dean to discuss a plan for compliance.
       3. In the event of noncompliance with the potential to result in termination, families will
           be asked to attend a conference with the Director and Mentor. At this conference,
           continued enrollment will be discussed and determined.


This application must be truthful and complete. Failure to comply may result in the student’s
dismissal.

I agree to the tenets of the Partnership Agreement:

Student: _________________________________________ Date: _________________

Family Member: __________________________________ Date: _________________

Faculty Member: __________________________________ Date: _________________

Board Member: ___________________________________ Date: _________________



   9. Include below your school’s lottery policy and procedures.
      We have not yet needed a lottery, but will follow all charter legislation, procedures
   and policies when we do.

   10. Does this school receive Title I funds?        Yes or xNo

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11. Fill in the table below to reflect the demographic make-up of the school’s student
    population

             Percent African   Percent           Percent           Percent         Percent
             American          American          Caucasian         Other           eligible for
                               Indian                                              free or
                                                                                   reduced
                                                                                   lunch
    2006-    9.2%              2.6%              85.5%             2.7%            N/a
    2007
    2007 -   7.1%              0%                86.3%             6.6%            N/a
    2008
    2008 -   5.4%              0%                87.8%             6.8%            N/a
    2009
    2009 -   4.9%              0%                87.6%             7.5%            N/a
    2010




12. Fill in the table below to reflect the demographic make-up of the student population of
    the LEA in which the school resides.
It should be noted that although we are located in Alamance County, we draw students
from eight school districts this year, 2009-2010.

             Percent African   Percent          Percent Asian   Percent            Percent
             American          American                         Caucasian          Other
                               Indian
    2006-    26%               0%               1%              57%                16%
    2007
    2007 -   27%               0%               1%              55%                17%
    2008
    2008-    27%               0%               1%              55%                17%
    2009
    2009 -   22.3%             .31%             1.35%           54.46%             21.58%
    2010

13. How does the marketing plan of your school address the need for the school to reflect the
    diversity of the community in which your school resides?
    The primary methods of marketing we utilize are post card mailings and word of
mouth. Post cards are mailed out by a local company that provides a list of families
with students of all descriptions aged 11-17. We also partner with African-American
community members who are politically active and interested in having more African-
American students enroll in Hawbridge.

Hawbridge has students from eight districts this year: Wake, Durham, Chatham,
Orange, Randolph, Guilford, Alamance, and Chapel Hill-Carrboro Schools.

14. Include below your school’s transportation plan and an explanation of the procedures
    used to implement it.
    Students or their parents drive to Hawbridge, mostly in carpools. Maps and sign-up
    sheets are put out at the Open House the evening before school opens in August, and
    families find others with whom to carpool. The school counselor also facilitates
    carpool formation. Alamance County currently is looking into mass transportation
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    and it is expected that the bus will service Saxapahaw. In the meantime, as reported
    above, our students this year come from eight districts: Wake, Durham, Chatham,
    Orange, Randolph, Guilford, Alamance, and Chapel Hill-Carrboro Schools, thus
    precluding a bus service offered by the school.




GOVERNANCE STRUCTURE

 1. List below the members of the Board of Directors and offices held. (Include; name,
    address, occupation, and years served.)
    Andrew Zeman, Board chair (2 years)
    106 Quailview
    Chapel Hill, NC 27516
    Owner, Benjamin Vineyards, Saxapahaw, NC

    Dr. Douglas MacLean, Board Secretary (1 year)
    510 Hawthorne Lane
    Chapel Hill, NC 27517
    Professor, Department of Philosophy, UNC-CH

    Dr. Catherine E. Matthews (3 years)
    3818 Chestnut Ridge Church Road
    Efland, NC 27243
    Professor, TEHE, Science Education, UNC-G

    Mrs. Katy Vinroot O’Brien (1 year)
    8808 Morrow Mill Road
    Mebane, NC 27302
    Assistant Editor, University of North Carolina Press

    Dr. Mark Roseman (3 months)
    321 Country Club Road
    Chapel Hill, NC 27514
    Vice President, Key Accounts
    PPD, Inc.

 2. Are any of the above Board Members employees of the school? If so, what is his/her job
    at the school?
    No

 3. Are there any family relationships between Board members and staff at the school? If so,
    what is the relationship and how is the relationship prevented from being a conflict of
    interest?
    No
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   4. How are members selected to serve on the Board of Directors? (Include who makes the
      selection.)

       The Board and the Hawbridge parent-teacher association have a joint dinner and
       meeting the 3rd Wednesday in October each year. All of the families are invited and
       encouraged to attend, and most do so. At that meeting the current Board chair
       addresses the families about the Board, its duties and responsibilities, and invites
       interested persons to contact one of the Board members to express interest in Board
       membership.

       Members of the Board also invite community members with expertise useful to the
       school and its governance body.

   5. How does the Board of Directors measure parent, student, and staff satisfaction?
      Provide, as an attachment, a sample of any surveys the school uses to measure the
      overall success of the school in this area.
      Because The Hawbridge School is small, the Board measures satisfaction primarily
      through individual encounters with parents, teachers, and students. The annual
      meeting and dinner with families and faculty members facilitates these exchanges.

   6. Describe how the Board of Directors uses feedback from stakeholders to refine its
      operations.
      The Board of Directors seeks and receives feedback primarily during the annual
      meeting and dinner held in October each year, and uses the information to set goals
      and action items for the following year.

       There also is an email address for the Board on the school web site,
       www.hawbridgeschool.org.

   7. List any Board-sanctioned standing committees and the function of each committee.
      A Financial Committee reviews the budget and reports to the Board at large.
      A Facilities Committee interacts with the current landlord and investigates potential
      locations for purchase or lease if the need arises.
      7a. What procedures do these committees follow to report their work to the Board of
      Directors? The two committees are used on an as-needed basis, and report to the
      Board at its monthly meetings.

   8. List below any major policy changes that have affected the school’s original governance
      structure.
      If no major policy changes have occurred, please check this box. x
      N/a

   9. Include in the space provided below, a copy of the school’s grievance policies for families
       and for staff.
       If none, please check this box.
       APPEALS PROCESS for students (from the Parent and Student Handbook)
Students and families may appeal Hawbridge academic intervention or serious discipline
decisions. The first step in the appeals process is for the parents or guardians to make an
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appointment with the faculty member(s) involved, which the parents or guardians and student
must attend. Second step: If dissatisfied with the result in step 1, the parents or guardians should
make an appointment for a conference with the Director, which the parents or guardians and
student must attend. Third step: If dissatisfied with the result in step 2, submit a written request
for a review of the school’s decision in a sealed envelope to the Hawbridge Director. The
Director will deliver this appeal to the Board President at the Board’s next meeting. The Board
will consider the appeal at its meeting and determine if the appeal merits hearing, and then
contact the parents or guardians, inviting them to the following Board meeting, where the parents
or guardians and student will present the appeal. The Board will then consider the appeal and
either deny the appeal or take such actions as deemed appropriate. All decisions by the Board
are final.

DISCIPLINARY PROCEDURES FOR FACULTY MEMBERS (Faculty Handbook):

The Director will strive to provide ongoing feedback to employees on performance, both through
formal performance reviews as well as informal encouragement, corrections, and kudos as
appropriate.
If an employee violates any of The Hawbridge School policies (s outlined in this Handbook, as
well as those set by the Director and/or the Board of Directors), the employee may be subject to
disciplinary action. In addition, poor performance may also be cause for following the
disciplinary process. The Disciplinary process can include immediate termination based on the
severity of the violation.

For violations that do not evoke immediate termination, the following plan will be followed:
       1. Official Verbal Warning: the performance problem or policy will be discussed
            verbally by the Director with the employee. The Director will specify the
            performance problems or policy violation, detail expectations, and include objective
            measures and time frames. In addition, the ramifications of non-compliance will be
            outlined.
       2. Official Written Warning: Again, the Director will specify the issue, detail
            expectations, and include objective measures and time frames. Detailed ramifications
            of non-compliance also will be addressed. All of the above will be compiled in
            writing and placed in the employee’s file.
       3. Termination: Should the employee fail to meet expectations or be non-compliant, the
            Director may move to termination as the third and final step.

Complaint Procedure
In order to ensure the employee of fair treatment, the employee will be allowed to take any
grievance or disciplinary action to the Board of Directors. This privilege should not be used
until all possible methods have been attempted to solve the employee’s grievance through the
internal school procedures.




   9. Has your board of directors had formal board training during the last five years?
      x Yes or      No
       If yes, who led the training and when was the training done?
      Jean Kruft led the trainings, the last of which occurred in January, 2009.
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11. Bylaws, Policies and Procedures
    Submit the following as electronic attachments:

   a. The most recent copy of your Board’s By-Laws including all amendments and
      changes from the original document.

   b. A copy of your current parent/ student handbook.

   c. The most current copy of your school’s board approved personnel policies.

   d. Copies of any other Board approved policies




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                      Current Teacher Licensure Data (School year 09/10)
           (If your school does not include a particular grade level, indicate with N/A)
                             School Name: The Hawbridge School

Grade      Total Number            Number of NC           Percent of       Percent of
Level       of Teachers              Licensed           Teachers NC        Teachers Highly
                                     Teachers             Licensed         Qualified
 K-5             N/a                   N/a                   N/a                  N/a
 6-8             N/a                   N/a                   N/a                  N/a
 9-12      9 (6 full time)             6 (5)             67% (83%)                100



                           Paraprofessional Data (School Year 09/10)
           (If your school does not include a particular grade level, indicate with N/A)


                                                           # with Associate’s
                       Total # of         # with High       Degree and/or 2     # with 4-year
                    Paraprofessionals    School Degree      years of higher        Degree
                                                               education
Grades K-5:                  N/a             N/a                  N/a               N/a
Grades 6-8:                  N/a             N/a                  N/a               N/a
Grades 9-12:                  0              N/a                  N/a               N/a




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                          Charter School Renewal Checklist

School Name: The Hawbridge School


Date of Review:11/2009

Compliance                           Check if      Concerns to be addressed by action plan
Area                                 complete
                                     and no
                                     questions
                                     or concerns
Cover Page                           X
Letter of Intent                     X

       # of years requested __10__

Executive Summary                    X
Education Program                    X

(Curriculum and instructional
methodology same as submitted in
original charter?)
Student Accountability &                                             Performance        Met          Met
                                                         Year
Performance                                                           Composite        Growth        AYP
                                                        04/05             40.2           Yes         No
                                                        05/06             44.7           Yes         No
                                                        06/07             62.6           Yes         No
                                                        07/08             71.6           No          Yes
                                                        08/09             88.1           No          Yes

                                                   Hawbridge has not met expected growth for two years.
                                                   Please provide a plan for addressing meeting student growth
                                                   expectations.
Business Plan & Financial            X
Reporting
Exceptional Children’s Program       X
Governance                           X




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Teacher Licensure                   Teacher
                                    Licensure
                                    percentage
                                    data is not
                                    available at this
                                    time
Supporting       By-laws            X
Documentation    Student            X
                 Handbook
                 Board Policy                           The admissions policy included in the Self
                 Manual (School                         Study does not appear to be a policy but a
                 and Personnel                          procedure the school uses for enrollment.
                 Policies)                              The Hawbridge board needs to adopt an
                                                        approved admission policy.

DPI              NCWISE             X
Compliance       Criminal History   X
Data             Checks
                 Insurance &        X
                 Bonding
                 Certificate of     X
                 Occupation
                 Tax Exempt         X
                 Title I            X
                 Child Nutrition    NA
                 Title II                               School is not at 100% in the area of Highly
                                                        Qualified Teachers:
                                                                     Percent HQ Teachers
                                                         2005                    44.5%
                                                         2006                    11.11%
                                                         2007                    37.5%
                                                         2008                    95.38%
                                                         2009                    96.88%


___X___ Action Plan needed in the area(s) of: Student Accountability Performance,
Admissions Policy, Highly Qualified Teachers

Action Plan is due to the Office of Charter Schools December 18, 2009




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                             Charter Renewal Action Plan
                               The Hawbridge School
                               Saxapahaw, NC 27340


Introduction

The Hawbridge School continues to make remarkable progress toward meeting all of the
state and federal requirements for demonstrating student achievement. This progress is
especially evident considering that the school’s enrollment remains between one-fourth
and one-third Exceptional Children.

The school’s innovative uses of outdoor classrooms, microenterprises, and
interdisciplinary units that incorporate the NCSCOS make learning relevant for students.
Furthermore, the excellent Hawbridge faculty is committed to student success and has
initiated a 50-minute daily tutorial during which one-on-one work with honors students or
students needing remediation takes place. The culture of innovation predominant at the
school has brought about a doubling in the composite score in the last three years.

Yet there remains much to be done and we therefore submit this Charter Renewal Action
Plan that covers the areas of Student Accountability and Performance and Highly
Qualified teacher status, and sets out a Board-approved admissions policy.

Student Accountability and Performance

Performance Composite: Our Performance Composite has risen steadily, doubling in the
past three years.

Met Growth: “The ABCs of Public Education Academic Change for Schools, 2008-
2009,” dated August 20, 2009, sets out a three-part formula for determining growth at the
high school level. The parts are:

       1. Academic Change for each student and each course, averaged for the school
       2. Percentage of graduates on the college prep or college tech prep diploma track
       3. Drop-out rate

   1. Academic Change: The Academic Change formula uses only the five End-of-
      Course tests for Algebra I, Biology, Civics and Economics, English 9, and U.S.
      History. For each of these exams there is an earlier exam used for comparison,
      called a “predictor” test, and a formula used to translate the dissimilar scoring
      methods for the two tests. For example, the comparison exam for English 9 is the
      8th grade End-of-Grade reading test, and the comparison exam for Algebra 1 is the
      8th grade End-of-Grade math test. The comparison exams for the other three
      courses are more complicated. Quoting from the “The ABCs of Public Education
      Academic Change for Schools, 2008-2009,” the “U.S. History Prediction Formula
      for 2007-2008 and 2008-2009: In 2007-2008, the Biology EOC test was a new



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   edition and so Biology was removed as a predictor for U.S. History for that year.
   Civics and Economics was used in its place for the 2007-2008 ABCs calculations
   of academic change. Subsequently, the predictors for U.S. History were re-
   evaluated using the most recent data from the new Biology test. In these analyses,
   it was found that Civics and Economics proved to be a slightly better predictor,
   but that Biology was an acceptable substitute.

   “Consequently, for the 2008-2009 ABCs growth calculations, the SBE approved
   the use of Civics and Economics in conjunction with English I as the primary and
   secondary predictors for US. History when both scores are available [i.e., students
   have taken Civics and Economics and English 1 before U.S. History]. Biology
   and English I are used as predictors if Civics and Economics is not available.
   Civics and Economics is used alone if English I is not available. Biology is used
   alone if neither Civics and Economics nor English I are available.”

   Unfortunately for Hawbridge students and the school-wide scores, however, any
   of the tests that use the 8th grade reading and math competencies as the Predictor
   exclude many of our students – often our best students -- from the growth
   formulas because they enter the ninth grade either from home-school or private
   school settings, with an additional few from out of state, and they therefore did
   not take the North Carolina public school 8th grade End-of-Grade reading and
   math tests. Unlike the U.S. History data, above, there are no substitute predictor
   tests for English 9 or Algebra 1, and, since most 9th graders at Hawbridge take
   Biology, the predictor score for Biology also would be missing.

2. Percentage of Graduates on the college-university prep or college tech prep
   diploma track: The percentage of graduates each year on the college-university
   prep or college tech prep diploma tracks must exceed the average of the two
   previous years’ graduates on those diploma tracks. The other two diploma tracks
   are career prep and the occupational diploma track, for “selected IEP students
   excluded from EOC Proficiency Level requirements. Hawbridge does not have
   any students on the occupational diploma track.

   With a career prep diploma, students can be admitted to any of North Carolina’s
   community or technical colleges, many private colleges in the state, including
   Lenoir-Rhyne as an example, and some out of state colleges such as Savannah
   College of Art and Design, where many of our graduates have attended college.
   The primary difference among the diploma tracks is the mathematics courses and
   levels required, and some of our students who are gifted in art are not equally
   gifted in mathematics.

   Also, it should be noted that, beginning this year, the state has switched from the
   diploma tracks to the “Future-Ready Core,” so, for students entering ninth grade
   in 2009-2010 and afterwards, there will be one diploma only.




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   3. Drop-Out Rate: The number of students who drop out of the school must
      improve based on the average of the two previous year’s numbers. This
      calculation always runs a year behind, however, because the graduation data is not
      released until November. Thus, for the 2008-2009 growth calculations, the drop-
      out rate for 2007-2008 is used.

Meeting Growth is calculated by averaging Academic Change in the five EOCs -- Alg 1,
Biology, Civics and Economics, English 9, and U.S. History -- as compared with the
Predictor test scores for each of the five, with the CUP/CTP Percentage, and the Drop-
Out Rate. Each of these seven holds the same weight in the final calculation for growth.
Students must be enrolled in Hawbridge 140 days to be counted in the growth
calculations, and must have the Predictor score required for the calculation.


Addressing The Hawbridge School’s failure to meet Growth during 2007-2008:

The Hawbridge School did not make growth during 2007-2008 on any of the EOCs
except U.S. History. The data for our CUP/CTP Percentage and Drop-Out Rate are not
on the Secure Shell, but even if both of those calculations were in the school’s favor we
would not have met growth.

When the faculty became aware of this failure, we added the 50-minute daily tutorial to
help ensure student success, and brought in additional tutors during the two months prior
to the 2008-2009 EOCs. The EOC scores improved.

Addressing The Hawbridge School’s failure to meet Growth during 2008-2009:

During 2008-2009 The Hawbridge School’s growth data were these:

       1. Academic Change:
             a. Algebra I: Did not meet growth.
             b. Biology: High Growth
             c. Civics and Economics: High Growth
             d. English I: High Growth
             e. U.S. History: Did not meet growth.

       Discussion: The Hawbridge School did make Academic Change growth, with a
       +.095 EOC average.

       The Biology, Civics, and English teachers taught at Hawbridge during 2007-2008,
       while the History and Algebra teachers were new to teaching and to Hawbridge.
       Additionally, as stated above, several of the best Algebra I students were not
       included in the growth formula because they came from private or home-school
       eighth grade settings and did not take the 8th grade mathematics EOG. Many
       Hawbridge students are excellent artists and do well on verbal tests but struggle
       with mathematics.



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The addition of the 50-minute tutorial, retention of the 2008-2009 faculty, and
better understanding of the requirements for Academic Change and the growth
formula should enable the school to perform equally well or better academically
in 2009-2010 and future years. We also are using the SAS EVAAS program, the
NCSCOS goals and objectives accountings that come with the EOC testing
information, Study Island and other test-taking preparation software packages,
and additional tutors throughout the year to improve the test scores.

Finally, because Hawbridge is so small, the school attracts a number of students
with anxiety issues who are seeking a faculty personally involved on a daily basis
with their students. Many of these students score poorly on standardized tests,
especially on the first try, but often improve dramatically the second time,
sometimes from an F or 1 to an A or 4. In previous years the second tests were
not included in the Academic Change accounting, but during 2009-2010 they will
be. We have learned over the last several years that students with anxiety issues
test much better in very small groups, in a very quiet space where the material
was learned, and attended by the teacher and testing personnel. There is
considerable scientific research that supports this theory, which we have put into
practice.

Action Plan: Continue the current process, with emphasis on:
       1. counseling incoming new teachers to use the existing Hawbridge
          system, and to work with more seasoned teachers one-on-one to learn
          that system.
       2. attempting to discern which students have anxiety issues prior to the
          beginning of EOCs, and test them in smaller groups. Set up 504 plans
          if necessary. The faculty meets in weekly 40-minute sessions to
          discuss students with academic or personal problems; anxiety issues
          needs to be a separate topic during those meetings.
       3. sending all faculty to SAS EVAAS training and to trainings by NCDPI
          RACs who understand the accountability system and can explain it.



2. CUP/CTP Percentage: This calculation was low enough to outweigh all the
   other data and, thus, the school did not meet Growth.

Discussion: The Hawbridge Class of 2009 was an unusual group. Of the 14
graduates, seven (50%) were Exceptional Children, and four of those were LD in
Math, with IEPs that stipulated that they not take Algebra I or that Algebra I be
their highest level mathematics course. Since the primary difference between the
CUP/CTP diploma tracks and the career prep diploma track is the mathematics
requirement, this precluded their being on any other diploma track than career
prep.




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The Class of 2009:
   1. Four of the 14 were on the C-UP diploma track.
   2. One student transferred in from Colorado as a senior and did not have the
       math credits needed to be on any diploma track other than the career prep
       diploma track.
   3. Four were both EC and LD in Math, necessitating their being on the career
       prep diploma track because of mathematics requirements on the C-UP and
       CTP tracks.
   4. Of the five remaining students, three completed Algebra 2 and could have
       been on the CTP diploma track rather than the career prep diploma track.
       Hawbridge has a very strong art program, however, that includes a
       microenterprise, Hawbridge Designs, which teaches many of the skills
       learned in marketing courses but is more focused on art. Each student
       chose the career prep diploma track because it has an Arts Education focus
       to fulfill the four career/technical courses required on either the College
       Tech prep or the career prep diploma tracks and they could take four art
       courses.
           The College Tech Prep foci are Agricultural Education, Business and
       Information Technology, Career Development, Family and Consumer
       Sciences, Health Occupations, Marketing, Technology, and Trade and
       Industrial. The only plan similar to the career prep Arts Education focus is
       marketing, but the classes would not be in art, rather in the business of art.
       All three of these students currently are enrolled at Alamance Community
       College and are in programs that will lead to their career choices: nursing,
       music education, and working as a chef.
   5. One of the other two students completed Geometry but is extremely
       talented in art and also chose the career prep diploma track so he could
       take more art courses. He is working this year with a plan to attend the
       Penland School of Crafts next fall.
   6. The fifth currently is at Alamance Community College training to be a
       police officer, his career choice; he did not choose to attempt more
       difficult mathematics courses because they are not required for the police
       program.

Action Plan:

1. The school counselor will meet with all incoming students and their families
   to discuss their diploma tracks, emphasizing the importance of a college
   education and the need to be on the college prep diploma track. We will
   encourage all students to take the most advanced courses possible.
2. The counselor will provide information on scholarships and programs that
   assist students whose families are unable to afford college, like the Carolina
   Covenant, http://www.unc.edu/carolinacovenant/. No student who qualifies
   for a four-year college will go unassisted in pursuing that goal.




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       3. Hawbridge will develop the existing Sustainable Agriculture and Art
          programs further so that they can have CTP Agricultural Education and
          Marketing correlates that are more attractive to students who currently choose
          the career prep diploma track so they can take more art courses and still finish
          high school in four years.

Drop-Out Rate: The Hawbridge School did not have any dropouts in 2007-2008.



Met AYP: The Hawbridge School has met AYP for the past two years.

The AYP formula differs from the North Carolina growth formula, and is designed to
calculate the school’s success in following the mandates of the federal No Child Left
Behind legislation.

The AYP formula is calculated only on tenth graders. The percentage of tenth graders
tested must be at or above 95%. The AYP formula consists of:

   1. Math: The Algebra I EOC, which must be taken in 9th or 10th grade, and for
      which the score must be at the “proficient” level, i.e., a 3 or 4.
   2. Reading: The Reading AYP calculation is based on a combination of the English
      9 EOC and the 10th grade writing test. Students must be proficient, i.e., a score of
      3 or 4, on both.
   3. OAI: Other Academic Indicator: The cohort graduation rate has to be 80% or
      better or improve .1% over the previous year. The graduation cohort is composed
      of all students who entered the school as freshmen four years prior to that year,
      with the following caveats:
          a. If the student left to go to another NC LEA or charter school and registers
               in that school so his or her records are in NC-WISE, that student is no
               longer part of the Hawbridge cohort.
          b. If a student leaves to attend a private, home-school, or out-of-state school,
               the student no longer is part of the Hawbridge cohort.
          c. If the student drops out, they remain in the cohort and count against the
               graduation rate.
          d. If the student tests successfully for a GED or transfers full time to a
               community college, the student is considered a drop-out and counts
               against Hawbridge in the graduation cohort.
          e. If the student comes in as a sophomore-senior and is on track to graduate
               in four years, s/he is added to the cohort.
          f. If the student comes in and is already off-track for the four-year
               graduation, that student is not added to the Hawbridge cohort.

Discussion: Hawbridge struggled for several years with AYP, primarily because of the
mathematics tests. Most of our students who are LD in Math do not take Algebra I, or do
not take it until their senior year, but the AYP formula requires a math test score and does



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not recognize an Algebra I score if the course is taken after the sophomore year.
Therefore, the state had a tenth grade math competency exam that students missing the
Algebra I score had to take, but, unfortunately, the competency was composed mostly of
algebra and geometry problems and our LD-Math students scored very poorly. That test
has been dropped from the Math test requirements and our students have done much
better. However, if the student does not take Algebra I until his or her junior or senior
year, s/he counts against Hawbridge in the growth calculations that occur in his or her
sophomore year.

Action Plan: We will continue the current system, which stresses:
   1. one-on-one tutoring for students who struggle in any subject, especially math.
   2. teaching reading to students who struggle with reading.
   3. keeping careful records of all students who leave Hawbridge to ensure they are
       represented correctly in the graduation cohort data that comes from our RAC,
       Barbara Collins.



Highly Qualified Teacher Status

One teacher was not Highly Qualified in 2008-2009. That teacher is a Ph.D. candidate in
educational psychology with a focus in learning theory at UNC-Chapel Hill, who teaches
mathematics at Hawbridge and is HQ in mathematics by virtue of 60 credit hours in
mathematics during her undergraduate, master’s, and doctoral courses. Unfortunately,
over 80% of the students in one math class during 2008-2009 were Exceptional Children,
and she therefore needed to be HQ in EC, also. Her doctoral courses in learning theory
do not suffice, but Nadine Ejire in Licensure said she may take the Praxis II in EC and
become HQ in EC. Since she is among the 50% of charter school teachers at the high
school level who are not required to be licensed or certified, there is no way to add EC
certification to her license by taking the Praxis II, but the test will establish her HQ status.
We will ensure that none of her classes goes above 80% EC in the meantime. This class
was basic math, one of the classes that students who are LD in math take.

Please note that, although our HQ percentages were dreadful prior to 2007-2008, those
percentages were caused by incorrect data and not because Hawbridge actually had only
11.11% of its teachers who were HQ. For example, one of the math teachers’ social
security number had 2 numbers transposed, thus making it appear that he was not
qualified to teach any of the five courses he taught, in spite of an undergraduate degree in
mathematics from Cornell and a master’s in applied mathematics from the University of
Wisconsin at Madison. The 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 faculties were almost identical;
the person responsible for data entry was replaced.

Action Plan:
       1. Make certain that all data for teachers’ Highly Qualified status is correct on
           the Lic/Sal web site.




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       2. Continue to make certain that all teachers hired at Hawbridge are Highly
          Qualified in each subject they teach.
       3. Continue to keep abreast of all changes affecting Highly Qualified status, such
          as the recent decision to require each teacher of each class that is more than
          80% Exceptional Children to be Highly Qualified in both EC and the subject
          matter being taught.




Board-Approved Admissions Policy:

Several Open Houses for Prospective Students and their Families will be held during the
fall semester for the following year. Appointments will be made for individual tours of
the school for those unable to attend an Open House.

The following information will be collected on applicants during the fall semester:
       Name
       Contact information
       Parents’ or Guardians’ names and contact information
       Current school attended

On January 15 of each year, or the previous Friday if the 15th falls on a weekend,
students will be admitted to Hawbridge for the coming year, and notified of their
admission. If there are more applicants than spaces for the coming year, a lottery will be
held in accordance with all legislated procedures for charter school lotteries. If no lottery
is needed, all applicants will be admitted and those applying from January 15 until
registration is full will be admitted on a rolling basis; once registration is full further
applicants will be placed on a waiting list.

Once students are admitted, additional information including transcripts and copies of all
Exceptional Children’s records will be requested.




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Recommendations:
It is recommended that the SBE accept the renewal recommendations as presented.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Audiovisual equipment requested for the presentation:
             Data Projector/Video (Videotape/DVD and/or Computer Data, Internet, Presentations-PowerPoint preferred)
             Specify:

             Audio Requirements (computer or other, except for PA system which is provided)
             Specify:

             Document Camera (for transparencies or paper documents – white paper preferred)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Motion By: ______________________________                                                     Seconded By: ______________________________
Vote: Yes __________          No __________                                                   Abstain __________
Approved __________     Disapproved __________                                                Postponed __________     Revised __________

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
*Person responsible for SBE agenda materials and SBE policy updates: Janice Ham 807-3491




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