Residential Smoke Alarm Installation

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					  Residential Smoke Alarm
        Installation
Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center
    University of Kentucky College of Public Health
                         and
        Kentucky Department for Public Health

                  Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
        About This Course
• Developed by the KY Injury Prevention
  and Research Center using information
  provided by:
  – US Consumer Product Safety Commission
  – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
  – National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
  – Other sources

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  About This Course (continued)
• Course Length: 2 hours
• Acceptable for KFS credit when taught or
  overseen by a certified fire instructor
  – Category C – 0000 (Alarms and Comm.)
    • C 0100 if done as part of a Firefighter I training
      program
  – Use appropriate location code

                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
       Administrative Issues
• One 10 minute break at mid-point of class
• Location of important facilities:
  – Break room and vending machine(s) (if any)
  – Restrooms
  – Fire escape routes
• Training facility rules and procedures

                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
        Course Objectives
• At the end of this course you should be
  able to:
  – Describe the two primary types of smoke
    alarm sensors
  – Describe the types of power systems used for
    smoke alarms
  – Differentiate between self-contained smoke
    alarms and linked alarms

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Course Objectives (continued)
• You should also be able to:
  – Identify areas where smoke alarms should
    and should not be installed in residences
  – Identify the materials needed to properly
    install smoke alarms and provide fire safety
    education to residents
  – Describe and/or demonstrate the alarm
    installation and safety education process,
    including related record-keeping
               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Module I: Smoke Alarm
    Technology

Residential Smoke Alarm Installation



          Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
In This Module You Will Learn:
• What smoke alarms are
• Types of smoke alarm sensors
• Types of power systems used by smoke
  alarms
• Maintenance of smoke alarms and
  detectors

             Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
       You Will Also Learn:
• The difference between centrally
  controlled, independent and linked
  alarms
• What nuisance alarms are and some
  steps that can be taken to avoid them
• Some problems that affect smoke alarms


              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
        Smoke Alarms Are…
• Electronic devices designed to detect the
  presence of a fire and sound an alarm
• They generally consist of:
  – One or more sensors
  – A triggering circuit
  – An alarm amplifier and horn
  – A power supply

                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
   Purpose of Smoke Alarms
• Detect presence of combustion products
• Provide warning to persons in the
  structure (and, in some cases, to remote
  monitoring stations)
  – Primary purpose of warning is to facilitate
    escape of persons in the structure
  – Secondary purpose is to initiate an early
    response by fire suppression resources
               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Smoke Alarms Are Used In…
• Industrial Facilities
• Storage and Shipping Facilities
• Office Buildings
• Retail Stores
• Residential Facilities and Private Homes
  – In this course we will focus primarily on
    residential smoke alarms
                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Types of Smoke Alarm Sensors
• There are two primary types of smoke
  alarm sensors:
  – Ionization sensors
  – Photoelectric sensors
• Some alarms also include other types of
  safety sensors, such as heat sensors, or
  carbon monoxide sensors

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
          Ionization Sensors
• Best at detecting fast, flaming fires like grease
  fires
• Detect combustion particles of .01 to 3 microns
  (an average human hair is about 90 microns)
• Most sensitive to dark or black smoke
• Sensitive to steam, so they may produce false
  alarms if installed near kitchens or bathrooms


                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 How Ionization Sensors Work
• Use a weak radiation source (Americium 241)
  to ionize the air in a detector chamber
• The ionized air conducts an electrical current
• The detector circuit senses this current; if it is
  present, the alarm does not sound
• Smoke particles interfere with the current flow;
  when the current is reduced, the alarm sounds


                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Ionization Sensor Illustration




         Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
       Photoelectric Sensors
• Best at detecting slow, smoldering fires like
  furniture ignited by a cigarette
• Detect combustion particles of .3 to 10 microns
• Most sensitive to light gray smoke
• Not very sensitive to steam, so they are better
  for use near kitchens or bathrooms
• Higher power requirements than ionization


                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
How Photoelectric Sensors Work
• An LED creates a beam of infrared light in the
  detector chamber
• The detector circuit senses this light; if it is
  present, the alarm does not sound
• Smoke particles scatter the light, and reduce
  the amount that reaches the detector; when the
  amount of light is reduced, the alarm sounds


                  Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Photoelectric Sensor Illustration




           Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
        Combination Alarms
• Some alarm systems use a combination of
  both types of sensors
  – Most often found in centrally controlled systems
  – Occasionally found in self-contained alarms
  – May also include other types of sensors, such as
    heat, carbon monoxide, etc.
• Combination alarms are more expensive and
  have higher power requirements


                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 Smoke Alarm Power Sources
• AC power (“hard wired”) – linked to normal AC
  wiring system
  – Most have a battery backup in case AC power fails
• Batteries
  – 9 volt carbon zinc (“general purpose”)
  – 9 volt alkaline
  – 9 volt lithium (“ten year battery”)
  – Large rechargeable lead-acid or gel cells

                  Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
                 AC Power
• Most dependable (at least if backup batteries
  are maintained properly)
• Cost-competitive with battery power for new
  construction but expensive to retrofit in older
  buildings
• Normally used as the primary power source for
  centrally controlled alarm systems



                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
         Battery (DC) Power
• Fairly dependable if batteries are checked and
  replaced consistently
• Inexpensive and easy to install, even in older
  buildings
• Often used as the primary power source for
  self-contained independent alarms
• Limited power for horns and auxiliary functions


                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
   Smoke Alarm Maintenance
• Smoke Alarms require regular maintenance,
  which includes:
  – Maintenance of Power Supply
  – Cleaning of Sensor and Air Passages
  – Regular Testing
  – Replacement of outdated Sensors or Alarms




                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Power Supply Maintenance
• For AC powered alarms:
  – Check AC power supply monthly (or more often)
  – Replace backup batteries as recommended by the
    alarm manufacturer
• For battery powered alarms:
  – Test alarm weekly (or as directed by manufacturer)
  – Replace batteries:
     • Every six months for general purpose or alkaline batteries
     • When alarm signals low battery or fails test for lithium
       batteries

                   Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
     Cleaning Smoke Alarms
• For a smoke alarm to work properly, air must
  be able to flow through the detector chamber
  and the chamber must be free of dust and dirt
• A dirty detector chamber will:
  – Reduce alarm sensitivity
  – Increase the chance of a nuisance alarm
• Clean the detector by vacuuming the exterior of
  the alarm with a vacuum nozzle
  – If this isn’t an option, dust the outside of the
    alarm housing
                   Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
       Smoke Alarm Testing
• AC powered alarms should be tested monthly,
  or more often if the manufacturer or codes
  require
• Battery powered alarms should be tested
  weekly, unless the manufacturer recommends
  otherwise
• One of the most common reasons for failed
  smoke alarms is a lack of regular testing


               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Replacing Outdated Alarms
• The recommended service life for most smoke
  alarms is ten years
   – After that point, electronic failure becomes likely
• If an alarm system has separate sensors, the
  sensors and other manufacturer-recommended
  components should be replaced
• If the alarm is self-contained, the entire alarm
  should be replaced


                  Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
    Types of Alarm Systems
• Centrally Controlled Alarms
  – Separate sensors and alarm horns linked to
    a single central controller
• Independent Alarms
  – Each alarm is self contained
• Linked Alarms
  – Each alarm is self-contained, but alarms are
    linked so that if one sounds, all sound
              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 Centrally Controlled Alarms
• Most commonly found in:
  – Industrial and commercial buildings
  – Multi-unit residential buildings
  – Government and public buildings
• May activate fire suppression and
  ventilation systems, elevator shut-off, etc.
• May be combined with intrusion alarm
    and facility monitoring system
              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Sensors for Centralized System




          Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Alarm System Control Panels




        Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
     Self-Contained Alarms
• Most commonly found in single-family
  dwellings and small apartment buildings
• Seldom linked to fire suppression or
  external notification systems
• Linked independent alarms are becoming
  more common in new construction


             Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Some Self-Contained Alarms




        Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
           Nuisance Alarms
• Nuisance alarms occur when the alarm sounds
  without a fire being present
  – Often called “false alarms,” but in most cases
    they’re not – the alarm does detect something
• Usually caused by exposing the alarm to
  smoke, combustion products or steam
  – From tobacco smokers
  – From wood-burning stoves or fireplaces
  – From kitchens and bathrooms

                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
   Reducing Nuisance Alarms
• Locate alarms and sensors away from areas
  where they will be exposed to smoke, other
  combustion products or steam
• Clean the alarm regularly
• Maintain the alarm power supply (low power
  can sometimes trigger a true “false alarm”)
• Avoid activities that trigger the alarm


                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Problems With Smoke Alarms
• Lack of Power
  – Usually due to failure to test alarm and
    replace battery as needed

• Electronic failure
  – Rare, but it happens – testing is important!

• Deliberately disabled alarms
  – Usually due to nuisance alarms, but
    may also be done to get alarm battery
               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
    Ways to Reduce Problems
• Test alarms regularly
    – Will identify lack of power or electronic
      failure

• Replace batteries as needed
• Place alarms properly to avoid nuisance
  alarms
•   Seal alarms to protect battery
                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Other Potential Improvements
• Building codes requiring hard-wired (AC)
  alarms with battery backup
• Use of long life lithium batteries (which
  last up to ten years) instead of general
  purpose or alkaline batteries
• Computerized sensors that help reduce
  nuisance alarms

              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 Module II: Installing
  Smoke Alarms

Residential Smoke Alarm Installation



          Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
In This Module You Will Learn:
• Provisions of NFPA 72 – the National Fire
  Alarm Code – that cover residential
  smoke alarms
• Proper smoke alarm selection
• Locations where you should – and should
  not – install residential smoke alarms


              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
        You Will Also Learn:
• Methods for mounting the alarm
• The importance of the alarm instructions
• The importance of fire safety education
• Tips for doing an effective smoke alarm
  installation and fire safety education visit



               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
                 NFPA 72
• National Fire Alarm Code
• Developed by the National Fire Protection
  Association (NFPA)
• Covers all types of fire alarm systems in
  many different types of occupancies
  – In this course we will focus on the standards
    for residential smoke alarms

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
     Provisions of NFPA 72
• At least one functional smoke alarm on
  every occupied level of the home
  – This includes basements
  – It does not include attics, cellars and other
    areas that are not generally occupied, but…
  – You can put an alarm in an area where a fire
    could easily start, even if the area is not
    usually occupied – so long as that area is
    not too hot, cold or dusty for the alarm
               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Provisions of NFPA 72 (cont.)
• A smoke alarm should be installed
  outside each separate sleeping area
  – This does not mean that each bedroom must
    have it’s own smoke alarm – one alarm in a
    hallway between two adjacent bedroom
    doors is acceptable (for existing structures)
  – In new construction, alarms must be
    installed in every sleeping room

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Provisions of NFPA 72 (cont.)
• If a smoke alarm is installed in or near a
  kitchen the alarm must be photoelectric
  or have a “silence” button (“hush” button)
  – This is because ionization alarms are very
    sensitive to steam
  – This is also a good idea for alarms installed
    near bathrooms, though the code doesn’t
    actually require them to be photoelectric

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Provisions of NFPA 72 (cont.)
• All smoke alarms installed in homes
  should be tested regularly
  – Monthly, or more often if the manufacturer
    recommends it; many manufacturers
    recommend weekly tests
• All residential smoke alarms should be
  replaced when they are ten years old


               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
           Alarm Selection
• If you want to use an alarm with a long life
  lithium battery, you will have to use an
  alarm with an ionization sensor
  – Photoelectric alarms require more power and
    are not currently offered with lithium batteries




                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
       Alarm Selection (cont.)
• If the power source is not a limitation, use
  the type of alarm most suitable for the site
  – Photoelectric alarms work best in or near
    kitchens, bathrooms, laundry rooms and
    other areas where steam may be present
  – Both sensor types work well in other areas
  – Use hardwired (AC powered) linked alarms
    in new construction

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
             Alarm Location
• Installing smoke alarms in proper locations
  is important
• Alarms that are installed in the wrong
  location may:
  – Not provide adequate warning of fire or smoke
  – Fail prematurely due to heat, cold, etc.
  – Produce nuisance alarms

                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
        Alarm Location (cont.)
• Install at least one alarm on each
  occupied level of the house – including
  the basement, if it is regularly occupied
• Install at least one alarm outside each
  separate bedroom area
  – You may need to install alarms inside a
    bedroom in special circumstances, such
    as where a resident smokes in bed

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
     Alarm Location (cont.)
Example of Separate Sleeping Areas




          Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
        Alarm Location (cont.)
• Do not install smoke alarms…
  – In or near kitchens, bathrooms or laundry
    rooms, if the alarm has an ionization sensor
  – In attics, cellars or other areas that become
    very hot, cold or dusty
  – On un-insulated exterior walls or ceilings
    that are not insulated from the roof
    (the alarm will get too hot and/or cold)

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
        Alarm Location (cont.)
• Do not install smoke alarms…
  – In the “dead air zones” that occur within two
    feet of any corner of a room or hallway
  – In the “dead air zone” that is found within
    four inches of the edge of any ceiling, or the
    top edge of any wall
  – In any area where air flow is restricted or
    there is a very strong draft or air flow

                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 Alarm Location (cont.)
DEAD AIR                                          Example of
ZONE
                                                  the “dead air
                                                  zone” at the
     Acceptable mounting
     locations for smoke alarms                   boundary
                                                  between a
                                                  ceiling and
                                                  a wall


           Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 Alarm Location (cont.)




Proper Installation Location
       Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Preferred Placement of Alarms
• Whenever possible, install smoke alarms
  on ceilings
  – Near the center of the room is usually best
  – If the room has an arched, vaulted or gabled
    ceiling, put the alarm at or near the highest
    point of the ceiling
  – Do not install smoke alarms within four inches
    of a wall or within two feet of a corner

                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
    Wall Installation of Alarms
• Ceiling installation is preferable, but if it
  isn’t practical, smoke alarms may be
  installed on a wall
  – Install alarms in the narrow area at least four
    inches, but not more than twelve inches,
    below the ceiling
  – Remember: do not install a smoke alarm on
    an un-insulated exterior wall

                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
     Tips For Placing Alarms
• Try to place the alarm where a resident
  can reach it for testing and cleaning
  – This may not always be practical in rooms
    with high ceilings
• Always test the alarm before you attach it
  to the ceiling or the wall
  – It is much easier to replace a defective alarm
    or battery before the alarm is installed

                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
    Mounting Smoke Alarms
• There are two common methods of
  mounting smoke alarms to ceilings or
  walls
  – Using screws (generally supplied with the
    alarm)
  – Using industrial grade double-sided tape




               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
    Alarm Mounting - Screws
• This is the preferred method of mounting
  the alarm
  – It is recommended by the manufacturer
  – Screws will not lose strength over time
• Screws are usually included in the smoke
  alarm package
  – Masonry anchors are also usually included


                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Alarm Mounting – Screws (cont.)
• Mounting process:
  – Place the alarm base or mounting plate on
    the ceiling or wall
  – Mark screw locations and remove the base
    or mounting plate
  – Drill pilot holes or masonry anchor holes
  – Insert masonry anchors (if needed)
  – Place alarm base or mounting plate
  – Insert and tighten screws
              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
      Alarm Mounting - Tape
• Should be used only if screw mounting is
  not practical
  – On very hard surfaces, such as ceramic tile
  – If a resident refuses to allow the use of screws
• Double-sided mounting tape must be
  purchased separately from alarms
  – Use only heavy-duty industrial type tape
  – Even this tape may eventually fail
                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Alarm Mounting – Tape (cont.)




         Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 Alarm Mounting – Tape (cont.)
• Mounting process:
  – Locate and mark position where alarm will
    be placed
  – Remove tape from roll and stick the exposed
    side of the tape to the alarm base or
    mounting plate (use plenty of tape)
  – Remove the backing from the other side of
    the tape
  – Press the alarm against the surface
    and hold it in place for at least 30 sec.
              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
     Sealing the Alarm Case
• Some smoke alarms have small plastic
  pins that can be used to lock the case
  – This makes it harder to remove the battery
  – If the pin is glued in place, it becomes nearly
    impossible to remove – or change – the battery
• The alarm instructions will explain how to
  use the locking pin (if the alarm has one)

                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
View of Locking Pin in New Alarm
                                                      Pin notch
                                                      must be
Locking pin                                           broken out
must be
removed
from battery
compartment




               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
View of Locking Pin in Use




  Locking pin installed in smoke alarm case
             Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Why Lock or Seal the Case?
• It usually isn’t a good idea to lock the
  case of a smoke alarm that uses alkaline
  or general purpose batteries
• It may be a good idea to lock or seal the
  case of a smoke alarm that uses long life
  lithium batteries, to prevent the battery
  from being removed to disable the alarm

              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
   Smoke Alarm Instructions
• Smoke alarms are packed with detailed
  instructions
  – These instructions often include sections in
    different languages
• You should read and understand the
  instructions before installing an alarm
  – You may have to explain the instructions to
    residents in non-technical terms
               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 The Importance of Education
• Smoke alarms only do one thing – they
  detect fire or smoke and sound an alarm
• In order for smoke alarms to be effective,
  residents must also be educated
• They must learn:
  – How to maintain and test the alarm
  – What to do if the alarm sounds
  – How to prevent fires
               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Education – Alarm Maintenance
• Smoke alarms require testing and care
• The instructions packed with most smoke
  alarms are long and complex – many
  people will not read or understand them
• If you install a smoke alarm for someone,
  you should educate them about how to
  test and maintain the alarm
  – Simplify the information when needed
              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 Education – Escape Planning
• A smoke alarm will not help someone
  who doesn’t know what to do when the
  alarm sounds
• Every home should have a fire escape
  plan – and practice it at least yearly
• Explain the need for a fire escape plan
  and how to develop one
  – Provide details and examples
              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Education – Fire Prevention
• The most effective way to survive a
  residential fire is to avoid having one
  – Smoke alarms are effective, but they are no
    substitute for fire prevention
• Providing fire safety education is an
  effective way to reduce the risk of fire
  deaths
  – Be detailed; provide information about
    “how” as well as “why” to be safe
               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Providing Effective Education
• To provide effective education, you must…
  – Take time to talk - simply handing someone a
    fist full of brochures is not effective
  – Give specific examples of ways to be safe:
     NOT GOOD: “You should be careful so you don’t
     have a cooking fire.”
     GOOD: “Why don’t you get a kitchen timer that
     you can set when you put something on the
     stove, so that you don’t forget that you have
     something cooking?”
                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Using Educational Materials
• Brochures and printed handouts can help
  you explain important safety information
  – Use them to supplement, not replace, a
    discussion – go through them as you talk and
    explain the information in them
• Printed materials are also good because
  residents can refer to them later


               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
   Tips for Doing Installations
• Take all the tools, supplies, educational
  materials and alarms that you may need
• Small teams work very well
  – One person provides fire safety education
    while one or more others install the alarm(s)
• Allow plenty of time to do the job properly


               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Tips for Doing Installations (cont.)
• Have a legible address and/or directions
  to the places where you will install alarms
  – Phone numbers are also very handy
• Wear a uniform or other identification
• Never talk about what you see in a home
• Do any required paperwork as soon as
    you finish doing the installation

              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Module III: The Smoke Alarm
   Installation and Fire
 Education (SAIFE) Project
   Residential Smoke Alarm Installation



             Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
In This Module You Will Learn:
• What the SAIFE Project is
• Smoke alarms used by the project
• Educational materials used by the project
• Project requirements for smoke alarm
  installation and resident education



              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
       You Will Also Learn:
• Forms used to document smoke alarm
  installations
• Reporting requirements




             Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
         The SAIFE Project
• SAIFE = Smoke Alarm Installation and
  Fire Education
• Project is funded by a grant from the US
  Centers for Disease Control and
  Prevention (CDC)
  – Nation Center for Injury Prevention and
    Control (NCIPC) is the funding center

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
     The SAIFE Project (cont.)
• The Kentucky Department of Public
  Health is the state-level funding source
• The Kentucky Injury Prevention and
  Research Center (KIPRC) is responsible
  for conducting the project
  – KIPRC is a joint partnership between the
    Kentucky Department for Public Health
    and the University of Kentucky

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
    SAIFE Project Objectives
• Install smoke alarms in homes that do
  not have functional smoke alarms
• Provide fire safety education to the
  residents of these homes
• Provide fire safety education to other
  people in project communities


              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 SAIFE Project Objectives (cont.)
• Collect information about the percentage
  of homes with working smoke alarms
  before and after the project is conducted
  in a community
• Determine whether alarms installed by
  the project remain functional several
  months after they are installed

              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
   Installation Requirements
• When installing smoke alarms as part of
  this project:
  – Only those alarms needed should be used,
    but the home should meet the standards of
    NFPA 72 when the installation is complete
  – The residents should receive education in
    fire prevention, escape plans and alarm care
  – The installation must be documented
               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
         Project Smoke Alarm
• The standard smoke alarm used by the
  SAIFE project in Kentucky is the FireX
  Model C (4651), which has:
  –   Ionization sensor
  –   Test / Hush button
  –   Long life lithium battery
  –   Lighted power and alarm indicator
  –   Ability to lock the case if desired

                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
FireX Model C Smoke Alarm




        Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
   Project Education Materials
• The following printed materials are used
  for fire safety education:
  –   Smoke Alarms Save Lives! card (yellow card)
  –   E.D.I.T.H. Exit Drills in the Home (brochure)
  –   Ten Tips for Fire Safety (brochure)
  –   how to prevent fires (booklet)
  –   Smoking Can Be Hazardous to Your Health…
      and Your Home card (blue card)

                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Examples of Printed Materials




         Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
   Smoke Alarms Save Live!
• Yellow card stock printed on both sides
• Front is an explanation of the project;
  back lists simplified instructions for
  testing and maintaining FireX Model C
  smoke alarms
• Give to all residents who receive alarms


              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Smoking Can Be Hazardous…
• Blue card stock printed on both sides
• Front contains an explanation of the
  dangers of smoking-related residential
  fires; back gives specific guidelines for
  preventing smoking-related fires
• Use in homes with a smoking resident


                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
       10 Tips for Fire Safety
• NFPA brochure
• A broad overview of home fire safety;
  some of the information in this brochure is
  repeated in more detail in other materials
• Give to all residents who receive alarms



               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
                E.D.I.T.H.
• NFPA brochure (also called fire drills in
  the home and fire drills – the great escape)
• Explains why a home escape plan is
  needed, and how to make and practice
  one
• Give to all residents who receive alarms


               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
         how to prevent fires
• NFPA booklet
• Includes fire prevention information
  designed for older adults
• Restates some of the information covered
  in other materials
• Use in homes with an elderly resident


               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 When Using These Materials…
• Give them to residents one at a time – not
  in a handful (which can be confusing)
• Explain the information in each item
  before giving the next item
• If several residents are present, try to
  involve all of them in the education
       process

                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Good Education Saves Lives
• Smoke alarms are important, but by
  themselves they are not enough
• Good fire safety education saves lives
  – Take the time to provide the best fire safety
    education that you can – if the alarms you
    install ever sound, knowing what to do will
    make the difference for those in the home


                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Documenting Alarm Installation
• It is important that all smoke alarm
  installations be documented
• This provides:
  – Statistics that can be used to help justify
    continued funding for the program
  – Proof that all groups and types of individuals
    are being served fairly
  – A record of the work invested in the
    project
               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Alarm Installation Record Form
• Three-part form
  – One copy for resident, one for installing
    agency and one for KIPRC
• Two major sections on form
  – Top portion is filled out (and waiver signed) by
    person requesting alarms
  – Bottom portion is filled out by installing
    agency
                Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Enrollment and Installation Record




            Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Resident Portion of Form




       Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Local Coordinator Portion of Form




           Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Alarm Installer Portion of Form




          Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
   Completing Installer Entries
• Determine the total number of residents in the
  home and list that number in “# of residents”
• Determine how many residents are 65 or older
  and list that number in “# over 65”
• Determine how many residents are 12 or
  younger and list that number in “12 or younger”
• If the household has had a fire at any time in the
       past, check “yes” and write the date
       of the fire in the blank provided
                 Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Completing Installer Entries (cont.)
• Fill in the number of smoke alarms that you
  installed in the residence
   – If you install alarms in two or more apartments in a
     structure, list each apartment on a separate form
• Fill in the date and time when you installed the
  alarms
• Sign the bottom of the form

            Please gather all of the requested
          information and print or write legibly.
                   Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
    Reporting Requirements
• Local agencies participating in the SAIFE
  project must report the following
  information to KIPRC
  – Percentage of homes with working smoke
    alarms before and after the installation project
  – Number of alarms installed
  – Number of homes served
  – Number of individuals who receive fire
    safety education
               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
 Reporting Requirements (cont.)
• Local agencies must also report other
  project-related activities such as public
  service announcements (PSAs) and other
  media activities
• A six-month follow-up on some of the
  installed alarms is also required
• Information from the installation forms is
     used for part of this reporting
              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
      Summary and Review
• In this class you have learned…
  – Types of smoke alarm sensors and power
    supplies
  – The difference between self-contained,
    linked and central station alarms
  – Smoke alarm testing and maintenance
  – How to minimize nuisance alarms

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
   Summary and Review (cont.)
• You have also learned…
  – Where smoke alarms should – and should
    not – be installed in a home
  – NFPA 72 requirements for residential alarms
  – Methods for installing smoke alarms
  – How and why to lock smoke alarm cases
  – Why fire safety education is important

               Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
  Summary and Review (cont.)
• And you have learned…
  – What the SAIFE project is
  – What the requirements are for participating
    local agencies
  – What alarms and materials are used by the
    project
  – How to complete the required installation
    paperwork
              Residential Smoke Alarm Installation
Questions or Comments?




      Residential Smoke Alarm Installation

				
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