Scouting And The Internet

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Scouting And The Internet Powered By Docstoc
					Five Star
University Of Commissioner Science
January 2002




Scouting And The Internet:
          C-502 – Where To Begin
          C-508 – Tips For The Unit Webmaster




Jim Zeszutek, PE
Southeast Wisconsin Council, Gateway District Commissioner
jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
8121 65th Avenue
Kenosha, WI 53142




Southeast Wisconsin Council, Inc., BSA Home Page: http://www2.wi.net/scouts/
Gateway District Home page: http://www.gatewaybsa.org/
                                                         Leadership Corner
                One of the most simple and memorable verses to me is the Philmont Grace.
                                                       Do you know it? Do you live it?
                     FOR FOOD           For the food of combined thought from all over our great country,
                                                                           to help us grow wiser in scouting.
                          FOR RAIMENT                                               For our scouting uniform,
                                                             which we have not only the blessing to wear,
                                                                                        but the duty to honor.
                               FOR LIFE                  For a life of freedom in these great United States,
                                                     a nation unsurpassed anywhere on this fragile planet,
                                                      where we are truly free to live the aims of scouting.
                                     FOR OPPORTUNITY               For the opportunity of Philmont and this
                                                                scouting event itself. To be here with you,
                                                             some of the finest in the scouting movement.
                                            FOR FRIENDSHIP For those we have met at Philmont,
                                                      and grown to respect through that common interest,
                                                            our devotion to the development of the youth.
                                                    AND FELLOWSHIP To share a laugh. To help
                                                                     a friend in some small way. To share a
                                                                                                      sunrise,
                                                                    a sunset, this scouting event. To return,
                                                                   if only for a moment, to our youth again
                                                                              and together climb a mountain,
                                                                                          and reach the stars.

                                                                               WE THANK YOU GOD
                                                                             Our thanks goes to the one who
                                                                              we individually believe allows
                                                                                     us to share the scouting
                                                                                             experience with
                                                                                                          all.


                                                                                                   Mr.   Z




J.W. Zeszutek                                                                 jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                                               Five Star University Of Commissioner Science - January 2002


                                                                     TABLE OF CONTENTS
                     (For those who do not read directions see http://usscouts.org/netresources/netresources.asp )
INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................................................................................................... 1
   WORLD WIDE WEB................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1
     Why Invest in a Web Site?............................................................................................................................................................................... 2
     Nirvana?.......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2
     Know Your Volunteer’s Internet Experience Level ........................................................................................................................................ 2
S502 – SCOUTING AND THE INTERNET, WHERE TO BEGIN.................................................................................................................... 1
   SCOUTING SITES .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 1
       BSA’s Web Site ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 1
          How To Find Stuff In The BSA Site ........................................................................................................................................................ 1
          Hard To Find Stuff in the BSA Site.......................................................................................................................................................... 1
          Additional BSA Sites ................................................................................................................................................................................ 2
       Volunteer Scouting Sites ................................................................................................................................................................................. 3
       Commercial Scouting Sites ............................................................................................................................................................................. 3
   FINDING INFORMATION ON THE WEB USING TRADITIONAL SEARCH ENGINES .................................................................................................. 3
   EMAIL .................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3
       What Makes Email Different?......................................................................................................................................................................... 3
       Free email........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4
       ISP Email......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
       Domain Name Email ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
   EMAIL LISTS .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
       Scouts-L ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
   NEWSGROUPS ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 5
   EMAIL GROUP LISTS .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 5
   NETIQUETTE .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
       Core Rules of Netiquette ................................................................................................................................................................................. 6
       Other Resources On Netiquette....................................................................................................................................................................... 6
       Ways Of Expressing Feelings/Emotions ......................................................................................................................................................... 6
          Smiley Examples....................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
   INTERNET HOAXES ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 7
S508 – SCOUTING AND THE INTERNET, TIPS FOR THE UNIT WEBMASTER ..................................................................................... 1
   BSA RULES AND REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO "OFFICIAL" COUNCIL WEB SITES .......................................................................................... 1
   ORDER OF THE ARROW GUIDANCE ...................................................................................................................................................................... 1
   YOUTH PROTECTION ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 1
   OFFICIAL BSA COUNCIL SITES ............................................................................................................................................................................. 1
   WEB SITE HOSTING ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 1
       Personal ISP Account Web Hosting ............................................................................................................................................................... 2
           America Online ......................................................................................................................................................................................... 2
           MSN .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 2
       Free Web Hosts ............................................................................................................................................................................................... 2
   THE BASICS OF WEB SITE CONSTRUCTION .......................................................................................................................................................... 3
       Web Server File Architecture.......................................................................................................................................................................... 3
       Site Architecture the Visitor Sees.................................................................................................................................................................... 3
       BSA National Web Site Architecture............................................................................................................................................................... 3
       Web Site Policy................................................................................................................................................................................................ 4
   THE BASICS OF WEB PAGE DESIGN ...................................................................................................................................................................... 4
       What To Include .............................................................................................................................................................................................. 4
       What Not To Include ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
       Design Tips...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5
       Attracting and Keeping Visitors...................................................................................................................................................................... 5
       Make A Site Template...................................................................................................................................................................................... 6
   HOW TO CREATE A WEB SITE .............................................................................................................................................................................. 7
       HTML Basics................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
       Writing the HTML ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 8
       Tutorials .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 8
           Web based tutorials ................................................................................................................................................................................... 8
       HTML & Web Authoring Programs ............................................................................................................................................................... 9
       Web Graphic Programs .................................................................................................................................................................................. 9
       Shareware and 30/90 day trial “tryware” versions of HTML editors........................................................................................................... 9
       Upper level help resources ............................................................................................................................................................................. 9
       How To It....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 10
APPENDIX .............................................................................................................................................................................................................. 11
  APPENDIX A – LINGO OF THE WEB .................................................................................................................................................................... 12
     Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................................................................................ 12
     Some Jargon You May See............................................................................................................................................................................ 13
     Acronyms ....................................................................................................................................................................................................... 13



J.W. Zeszutek                                                                                          i                                                                   jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                           5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002




                                                 Introduction
The Internet has changed all. Its influence on our culture is strong and growing. The Web is by far the most exciting
development of the Internet, as it is the fastest growing communication medium in history. Scouting’s presence on
the web is growing at a very fast rate. The Web is becoming a vast resource for general Scouter communications
along with the transmittal of BSA policy and scouting “tribal knowledge.” There is goodness on the web, and there is
the dark side. Knowing how to use the Web to further the aims of scouting is our challenge as leaders.

World Wide Web
The World Wide Web combines graphics, images, sounds, video, and text to present information in "hypertext"
format. The World Wide Web is all of the information and multimedia content available on the Internet. The World
Wide Web is known as "WWW" "3W," or "W3," but you'll most often see it referred to simply as "the Web" or just
"Web." Those with slow connections call it the “World Wide Wait.” The World Wide Web is appealing and powerful
because it allows many people to share resources at the same time. What makes the Web unique is the ability to jump
from one document to another with the simple click of a mouse. The documents, and the links between, form a "web"
of information. These links are called "hypertext links."

The World Wide Web is a part of the Internet that allows clients to publish and consume information quickly,
efficiently and easily. The Web defines and assumes a simple, standard communications protocol that allows clients to
share a wide variety of data types, such as text, sounds, pictures and even video. The Web is composed of millions of
documents that contain special links which point to other documents. These links are known as uniform resource
locators or URLs and can point to documents stored on the local computer or any other computer connected to the
Internet. There are two types of programs that make the Web work, web servers and web browsers. A web server runs
on a computer and accepts and services requests from web browsers. Web servers don’t provide any user interfaces
for users, they are the plumbing code that loads documents and hands them off to web browsers. A web browser is a
program run by users on their local computer. The web browser interprets URLs within a web document and contacts
the web server that stores that document. The browser asks the server for the document and then draws it on the screen
for the user.
Let's establish what the World Wide Web is not: contrary to popular belief, the World Wide Web and the Internet are
not the same thing. The Web is part of the Internet, and the two are not synonymous. These terms are often used
interchangeably, but this is incorrect. The "World Wide Web" is a body of text and "multimedia" content, and it is a
global, interactive, graphical system that runs over the Internet. "The Internet" refers to the physical side -- a global
network of interconnected computers intertwined in a network. The Internet consists of computers, hardware,
protocols; everything necessary to exchange information. The early exchange of information via the Internet was
sometimes difficult to master, and the presentation of the information was often dry and static. This is where the
World Wide Web comes into play. The Web not only allows easier access to the information found on the Internet, it
takes it a step further: the Web provides a user-friendly "translation" of the Internet by illustrating its information in
vibrant, dynamic ways.

Think of the World Wide Web as an orange peel, and the Internet as the actual orange beneath the peel. The
orange is the juicy, nutritive, meaty information that you want to get to. The orange consists of FTP, Telnet, e-
mail, and other electronic media tools. This is where all the "good stuff" resides. This part of the orange is why
you buy the orange in the first place – to get to the meat and the juice. The orange peel, however, is what holds
the orange together. The peel allows you to transport the orange with ease, it protects the orange from dirt and
dust, and it keeps it moist and flavorful. The orange without the peel is dry, strange looking, and perhaps not
initially very appetizing. The peel without the orange is a sweet-smelling, tough husk that is virtually useless.
Together however, the orange (the Internet) and the orange peel (the Web) make a great team!

Then again, one can consider the Internet to not be of the physical world as professed by Dr Joe Burns, original
webmaster of http://www.htmlgoodies.com

                “The Internet is not wires and computers.
                The Web is communication in its more pure form.”
                                                                                           Joe Burns Ph.D.

J.W. Zeszutek                                          1                                   jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                           5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002

Why Invest in a Web Site?
Why invest in a unit Web site? It simply is another way to communicate to your Scouters. The Web is:
   • Open 24 hours a day, seven days a week
   • Relatively inexpensive way to supplement normal communication channels.
   • The net is becoming the place to obtain information in preference to other media
   • Can easily use pictures, graphics, and color to present information
   • The online scouting community is growing by leaps and bounds which provides a growing body of
       knowledge

Nirvana?
Is it a perfect medium? Certainly not. There is a dark side to the net. Hazards include: Net Stalkers, Computer
Viruses and Virus, Hoaxes, Scams, Cons, Disinformation/Rumors and pornography. These are the reasons that your
BSA Webmaster should be an experienced individual with good judgment and a demonstrated ability to use common
sense while following established BSA rules.

Know Your Volunteer’s Internet Experience Level
Are we all Web Savy? Not yet. Use the Web to supplement your program, not all of
your Scouters have the same level of Web experience. A November 2001 survey by               U.S. Adults Online
Harris Interactive is interesting not for what it found, but for what it didn't find --                  Adults
specifically, no sizeable increase in the U.S. adult Internet population for the first       Year
                                                                                                         Online
time since 1994. The proportion of all adults who are online at work, at home or
from any other location such as school, library or cyber café has remained virtually         1995                  9%
unchanged at 64% for the last 12 months. This translates into approximately 127              1997                30%
million adults aged 18 and over, up from 121 million in the previous year. These are
the results of The Harris Poll® of over 2,000 adults surveyed by telephone in                1998                56%
September and October 2001 by Harris InteractiveSM                                           2000                63%
(http://www.harrisinteractive.com/ )
What is remarkable about these results is that this is the first time since the rapid        2001                64%
growth of Internet use began in 1994 that we have not seen sizeable increases in             Source: Harris Interactive
Internet penetration over a twelve month period. The proportion of all adults online
was 9% in 1995, rose to 30% by 1997, to 56% by 1998 and 63% by this time last
year. The one percentage point increase from last year to 64% this year is not
statistically significant.

So what you say? If you are lucky if half of your volunteers are web savy enough to use the web on a regular
basis to help the program. Know your audience and do not rely totally on the web to provide the promise!




J.W. Zeszutek                                         2                                   jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                             5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                                S502—Scouting And The Internet, Where To Begin



                S502 – Scouting And The Internet, Where To Begin
Some basics. Once you get the following you can tap the internet and use it to deliver the promise:
   1. Computer, PC or Mac. No need to have the latest technology, 486 will do.
   2. Web browser. Internet Explorer or Netscape
   3. Internet connection, telephone line, cable modem, DSL
   4. Internet Service Provider (ISP)

Now we need somewhere to go.

Scouting Sites
BSA’s Web Site
The BSA Web site (http://www.bsa.scouting.org/) is the perfect starting point. A comprehensive list of BSA sites
is at http://www.scouting.org/site/sites.html .

The BSA site is growing quickly. It currently consists of four separate, self-contained Web sites:

     •    Information for the general public
          See “Sign Up For Scouting” at http://www.scouting.org/nav/signup.html
     •    Information and resources for program participants
          See “Youth Participants” at http://www.scouting.org/nav/scouts.html
     •    Information and resources for adult volunteers and resources for professional Scouters. See “Adult Volunteers”
          at http://www.scouting.org/nav/volunteers.html
     •    Recruiting-oriented information for individuals interested in joining or supporting a unit See “About The BSA”
          at http://www.scouting.org/nav/about.html
     •    Web based database for locating councils
          See ‘local Councils” at http://www.scouting.org/councils/index.html


How To Find Stuff In The BSA Site
The search area for the BSA site is in the site map found in the adult volunteers area at
http://www.scouting.org/sitemap.html Note that if you use this url you lose the frame

Hard To Find Stuff in the BSA Site
If you access the BSA site map you can use their search engine at http://www.scouting.org/sitemap.html . Try
typing in "Internet". Got Stuff? Not really. But the BSA has guidance on the web, right? The Internet guidance is in a
folder that is not linked from the main site. See http://www.scouting.org/site/

So what is this? It is a directory that is open to the browser that is not indexed by the search engine.
   • First off there is http://www.bsa.scouting.org/site/faststart.html This is computer-based Cub Scout
          Fast Start Leader Training that has been developed and is now available for councils to include in their Web
          sites. This training does not replace the current video-based Fast Start, but provides an additional method of
          delivering this important information to new leaders.

          This interactive training experience takes leaders through a "What Every Cub Scout Leader Should Know"
          section, then allows them to choose the training appropriate to their position. Specific sessions for new Cub
          Scout den leaders, Webelos Den leaders, Cubmasters, pack committee members, and Tiger Cub coaches are
          included.



J.W. Zeszutek                                          1                                  jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                             5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                                S502—Scouting And The Internet, Where To Begin

     •    The BSA forms are accessible from the site search engine through a “forms” search. So what is this link at
          http://www.bsa.scouting.org/site/forms.html . This is guidance on the use of BSA Web forms. But
          there are no forms here, only verbage! Listed inside this html file is a "menu" hot link at
          http://www.bsa.scouting.org/forms/index.html that gets you to the forms. This is what you need to
          follow for the directory of forms and this is what you would put on your unit Web page so the forms are
          accessible to your leaders.

     •    Guidance to Webmasters is at http://www.bsa.scouting.org/site/frames.html and
          http://www.bsa.scouting.org/site/links.html

     •    Guidance to the use of the Web site ScoutStuff at http://www.scoutstuff.org is provided at
          http://www.bsa.scouting.org/site/scoutstuff.html The National Supply Division’s Web site features
          products from the Official Catalog. The site does not have e-commerce capabilities—instead, visitors browse the
          site and assemble items on a shopping list that, when completed, provides the addresses of scouting retailers near
          the customer's ZIP code area.

     •    The folder for the Internet standards is at http://www.bsa.scouting.org/site/standards/

     •    The BSA national council has issued the "Guidance for Unit Web Sites." These guidelines address a few vital
          items pertaining to unit Web sites and is at http://www.bsa.scouting.org/site/units.html

     •    A list of BSA sites is at http://www.scouting.org/site/sites.html

     •    Recruiting-oriented information for individuals interested in joining or supporting a unit See “About The BSA”
          at http://www.scouting.org/nav/about.html
     •
     •    Web based database for locating councils
          See ‘local Councils” at http://www.scouting.org/councils/index.html

Additional BSA Sites
Boys' Life magazine (http://www.boyslife.org) This URL was registered to facilitate promotion. It points to the
same destination as http://www.scouting.org/mags/boyslife

Scouting magazine (http://www.scoutingmagazine.org) This URL was registered to facilitate promotion. It points
to the same destination as http://www.scouting.org/mags/scouting

Give 2 BSA (http://www.give2bsa.org) This URL was registered to facilitate promotion. It points to the same
destination as http://www.scouting.org/fsd/give2bsa

Supply Division, BSA (http://www.scoutstuff.org) A separate stand-alone site for Supply Division

Direct Service BSA (http://www.directservicebsa.org) A separate stand-alone site operated by Direct Service to
communicate with their members

Learning for Life (http://www.learning-for-life.org) A separate stand-alone site for Learning for Life and
Exploring programs.

Finance Support Division (http://www.fsd.org) A separate stand-alone site operated by FSD. Note: this site is
meant for finance support personnel in the field, and does not provide material of general interest




J.W. Zeszutek                                         2                                  jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                            5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                               S502—Scouting And The Internet, Where To Begin

Volunteer Scouting Sites
The best begnning point volunteer site is at http://usscouts.org/ Here a group of volunteers have set up a portal site
with areas for all the venues of scouting. The site map at http://usscouts.org/findit/ussspsitemap.html indicates
how large the site is.

The search engine is at http://usscouts.org/GoScouting/ .

http://usscouts.org/usscouts/start.asp
    • http://usscouts.org/internet.asp Internet information
    • http://clipart.usscouts.org/
    • http://www.macscouter.com/
    • http://www.netcommish.com/
    • http://www.scoutmaster.org/
    • http://www.cubmaster.org/
    • http://www.scoutcamp.org/
    • http://www.jambo2001.org/
    • http://www.worldscouting.org/
Commercial Scouting Sites
The scouter.com site is at http://www.scouter.com/ . This site has several valuable areas to link to. They will give
you free web space such as that at http://host.scouter.com/wi/jwzeszutek/ .

Finding Information On The Web Using Traditional Search Engines
     •    http://www.altavista.digital.com Alta Vista
     •    http://www.google.com/ Google
     •    http://www.excite.com Excite
     •    http://www.hotbot.com HotBot
     •    http://lycos.cs.cmu.edu/ Lycos Search Engine
     •    http://www.mckinley.com/ Overture
     •    http://www.metacrawler.com Metacrawler
     •    http://home.netscape.com Netscape Search Site
     •    http://www.webcrawler.com/ Webcrawler
     •    http://www.yahoo.com Yahoo

Email
As the Net evolves many units and districts are using e-mail to supplement telephone-calling trees as a method of
communication. Email is cheaper and faster than a letter, less intrusive than a phone call, less hassle than a FAX.
Remember that it should only supplement traditional communication methods, many Scouters do not have email. Less
than half of the households in any given community have computers with Internet service and less in economically
challenged areas. For that reason, e-mail does not serve well as a primary means of communication to all Scouters. If you
rely too heavily on email you will risk alienating those who are not Internet savvy. Although it does not reach all
Scouters, it does give online Scouters the opportunity to exchange ideas with other Scouters from around the country and
around the world through discussion groups and discussion forums.

What Makes Email Different?
Electronic communication, because of its speed and broadcasting ability, is fundamentally different from paper-based
communication. Because the turnaround time can be so fast, email is more conversational than traditional paper-based
media. In a paper document, it is absolutely essential to make everything completely clear and unambiguous because
your audience may not have a chance to ask for clarification. With email documents, your recipient can ask questions


J.W. Zeszutek                                       3                                  jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                             5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                                S502—Scouting And The Internet, Where To Begin

immediately. Email thus tends, like conversational speech, to be sloppier than communications on paper. This is not
always bad. It makes little sense to slave over a message for hours, making sure that your spelling is faultless, your words
eloquent, and your grammar beyond reproach, if the point of the message is to remind everyone to attend roundtable.

However, your correspondent also won't have normal status cues such as dress, diction, or dialect, so may make
assumptions based on your name, address, and - above all - facility with language. You need to be aware of when you can
be sloppy and when you have to be meticulous.
Email also does not convey emotions nearly as well as face-to-face or even telephone conversations. It lacks vocal
inflection, gestures, and a shared environment. Your correspondent may have difficulty telling if you are serious or
kidding, happy or sad, frustrated or euphoric. Sarcasm is particularly dangerous to use in email. Another difference
between email and older media is that what the sender sees when composing a message might not look like what the
reader sees. Your vocal cords make sound waves that are perceived basically the same by both your ears as your
audience's. The paper that you write your love note on is the same paper that the object of your affection sees. But with
email, the software and hardware that you use for composing, sending, storing, downloading, and reading may be
completely different from what your correspondent uses. Your message's visual qualities may be quite different by the
time it gets to someone else's screen.
Free email
Web mail accounts are free and easy. You can get a free account to handle all your Web newsletters. Provide this
account when signing up for all of that free stuff on the Web.

     •    Yahoo provides a Web mail at http://login.yahoo.com/config/mail?.intl=us&.lg=us
     •    Hotmail is at http://lc1.law13.hotmail.passport.com/cgi-bin/login
     •    A free email address directory can be found at http://www.emailaddresses.com/ where there are listings
          for over 1,100 free email services, articles about free email, resources to help you find the email
          address of family or friends, plus 100s of other free resources from calendars to free internet access
          providers.
ISP Email
Your ISP will usually give you an email to use. Usually this is the email server that you must use to send mail. For
example, if Road Runner is your primary service, you need to send email out through smtp-server.wi.rr.com . An
example of an ISP email is jwzeszutek@earthlink.net
Domain Name Email
All email has a domain name attached to it. In the above example the domain name is “earthlink.net“ . If you purchase
your own domain name you will then use that name in your email. An example of this would be
jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com . The gateway district of SEWC has purchased the domain name “gatewaybsa.org” . We
then can use email addresses such as webmaster@gatewaybsa.org .

Email Lists
Scouts and Scouters frequently share common interests through e-mail based discussion groups. These groups are great
for sharing information on cooking, camping, Eagle projects, community service projects, trips, and much more. With
email the messages from the group are sent to your email account. There may or may not be a copy on the server that is
controlling the group. You typically “subscribe” to the list and then the emails members of the list send to the list are also
sent to you. When your interests change you then “unsubscribe.” A good list is at
http://usscouts.org/netresources/netresources5.asp .

Scouts-L
Large email lists such as Scouts-L are maintained by organizations and typically have thousands of members. SCOUTS-
L is the "Electronic Roundtable that Never Ends". SCOUTS-L provides opportunities for members of youth groups
world-wide to interact, compare notes on their programs, discuss organizational problems and concerns, and communicate
with members all over the world! While the groups discussed may be heavily weighted towards the programs of the Boy
Scouts of America (BSA), it also includes Girl Scouts and Girl Guides, Boys' and Girls' Clubs, and other world-wide
scouting and youth organizations.


J.W. Zeszutek                                          4                                   jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                             5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                                S502—Scouting And The Internet, Where To Begin


The act of SUBSCRIBING to the SCOUTS-L list is to place your name on the list that will allow you to receive all
postings to the SCOUTS-L list, as well as to be able to post messages to SCOUTS-L. To subscribe you should send a 1-
line email message to LISTSERV@LISTSERV.TCU.EDU without any extra headings or signature lines. This message
should be as follows: SUBSCRIBE SCOUTS-L your name. You should use your REAL NAME in place of "your name".
Name “Handles” are not accepted on SCOUTS-L. Your email address is taken from the "FROM" line of your email
heading.

The list owner generally will send you a set of guidelines for using the list. Members then send a message to the list and
the message is relayed to each member of the list. Scout-L is set to send a maximum of 50 messages a day. Check this
mail account often! You can delete items that are not of interest to you and read the helpful ones. There is also an option
to receive one single “digest” of all messages posted that day.

If you find something interesting you should respond back directly to the person that sent the e-mail or to the group.
Please do not respond to the list unless you are directing the message to the list. Use the BCC option (Blind Carbon
Copy) to avoid distributing names and emails to unwanted sources or hackers. See
http://www.engr.tcu.edu/~eidson/scouts-l/swelcome.html

Newsgroups
With newsgroups the messages from the group resides on the server and you use a tool to view the subject line of the
message. You then select and download the content as necessary. No individual message is sent to your email account.
The following is from http://usscouts.org/netresources/usenet.html
     UseNet News Groups
     Usenet is a global compendium of discussion forums on several thousand topics. Many computers that employ the
     UNIX operating system can provide their users access to the flows of conversations that include people from all over
     the globe. Some Usenet newsgroups focuses on BSA, GSUSA, WAGGGS, WOSM and other scouting organizations
     around the world or other topics of interest to Scouters.

     •    rec.scouting.issues Newsgroups for disccusion of political issues related to Scouting
     •    rec.scouting.misc. General discussion about Scouting outside the USA.
     •    rec.scouting.usa Newsgroup for Scouting issues specific to the USA.
     •    uk.rec.scouting. Discussion of Scouting within the United Kingdom.


Email Group Lists
Email groups allow you to send email messages to a group of people using just ONE email address. No more typing in a
list of addresses! They are often called Opt-in lists since users apply to be included in the list.
      • http://www.yahoogroups.com/ provides a good list service with minimal advertising Yahoo! Groups is a
          free service that allows you to bring together family, friends, and associates through a web site and email group.
          You don't need to know HTML to create your own site. Yahoo! Groups offer a convenient way to connect with
          others who share the same interests and ideas. Units and districts have used this service to create electronic lists
          to distribute unit information. A search of this service for the keyword “boy scouts” yields over three hundred
          established groups!
      • The Microsoft list service at http://www.listbot.com/ has been discontinued.




J.W. Zeszutek                                          5                                   jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                            5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                               S502—Scouting And The Internet, Where To Begin


Netiquette

     "Etiquette" - the forms of behavior required by good breeding or prescribed by authority in social or
                                                   official life.

         "Netiquette" - etiquette on the network or Internet; the conventions of politeness recognized on the
                                     Internet prescribed by nobody but your mother.


There are many sources for netiquette on the Web. In general do not put anything in an email that you would not like
your mother to read. Messages in all CAPITAL LETTERS are regarded as shouting and generally frowned upon. The
sparing use of all capitals for emphasizing a particular word in an appropriate context may be appropriate to express a
strong feeling, but you need to be careful not to offend others unknowingly.
Be considerate of the email addresses of your contacts. Use the BCC option (Blind Carbon Copy) to avoid distributing
names and emails to unwanted sources or hackers.
Likewise you will find that flaming (personally attacking an individual rather than an idea) is not acceptable in most
forums and lists. Rude conduct is neither necessary nor acceptable. Remember to live the Scout law online. Be courteous
and kind.

Core Rules of Netiquette
The Web has several guides to netiquette. AOL has one at http://webmaster.info.aol.com/netiquette/ . Another
good source is at http://www.webfoot.com/advice/email.top.html#intro .

The following are “Core Rules of Netiquette” and are from the book Netiquette by Virginia Shea. See
http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html for the complete site.

     •    Introduction
     •    Rule 1: Remember the Human
     •    Rule 2: Adhere to the same standards of behavior online that you follow in real life
     •    Rule 3: Know where you are in cyberspace
     •    Rule 4: Respect other people's time and bandwidth
     •    Rule 5: Make yourself look good online
     •    Rule 6: Share expert knowledge
     •    Rule 7: Help keep flame wars under control
     •    Rule 8: Respect other people's privacy
     •    Rule 9: Don't abuse your power
     •    Rule 10: Be forgiving of other people's mistakes


Other Resources On Netiquette
     •    http://db.tidbits.com/getbits.acgi?tbser=1141

Ways Of Expressing Feelings/Emotions
You may also run across hieroglyphic-like punctuation marks that look like :-) . These are called smiley faces. If you turn
your head to the left, you see that the colon makes up the eyes; the nose is a hyphen; and the mouth is a parenthesis.
Substituting a semicolon for the colon ;-), gives you a winking smiley face. There are many other variations on the smiley
face, but most of the others are not used very often.


J.W. Zeszutek                                         6                                  jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                            5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                               S502—Scouting And The Internet, Where To Begin

Also see:

     •     http://www.xs4all.nl/~ernstmul/emoticon.html
     •     http://www.randomhouse.com/features/davebarry/emoticon.html
     •     http://www.geocities.com/SouthBeach/Marina/2492/layout.html
     •     http://www.won.nl/dsp/usr/mvketel/Internet/emoticon.html

Smiley Examples
     :-)   The basic smiley. This smiley is used to inflect a sarcastic or joking statement since we can't hear voice
           inflection over the net.
     ;-)   Winky smiley. User just made a flirtatious and/or sarcastic remark. More of a "don't hit me for what I just
           said" smiley
     :-(   Frowning smiley. User did not like that last statement or is upset or depressed about something.
     :-I   Indifferent smiley. Better than a Frowning smiley but not quite as good as a happy smiley
     :->   User just made a really biting sarcastic remark. Worse than a :-).
     >:-> User just made a really devilish remark.


Internet Hoaxes
Viruses and hoaxes are part of the darkside of the web. Symantec is the best source for information on viruses. See
http://www.symantec.com/
Investing in a firewall and virus program is an important addition to your computer setup.




J.W. Zeszutek                                        7                                  jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                        5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                     S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit Webmaster




          S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit
                             Webmaster
BSA Rules And Regulations Pertaining To "Official" Council Web
Sites
The council can have a site, the District and units have their sites. If you follow BSA guidance you will help to
standardize the movement’s presence on the web.

See “Standards and Guidelines for Internet Publishing and Maintaining Local Council Web Sites” at
http://www.bsa.scouting.org/site/standards/ for the current BSA guidance on Council sites.

To have a council link from the BSA site you must adhere to the guidance at
http://www.scouting.org/site/links.html

Guidance for unit websites is at http://www.scouting.org/site/units.html

Order Of The Arrow Guidance
The OA guidelines were adapted from the guidelines that the BSA electronic publishing division has established
for council Web sites. The OA guidelines were approved at the May 1999 National OA Committee meeting.
They were publicized at the 1999 National Leadership Summit.
The guidelines are at URL http://www.oa-bsa.org/resources/wsguide.htm

Youth Protection
The U.S. Department of Education has provided a “Parents Guide to the Internet” which can be found at
http://www.ed.gov/pubs/parents/internet/ .

The BSA guide to safe scouting is on the Web at http://www.scouting.org/pubs/gss/index.html

Official BSA Council Sites
Councils who are known to operate official Web sites are linked from the council locator. To determine whether a
council has a Web site, access the following program:
          http://www.scouting.org/cgi/councils/number.pl?###
          replacing "###" with the council number.

To see a list of all council Web sites (rather than checking one council at a time), see:
http://www.scouting.org/cgi/councils/all.
If a council site exists, but is not linked from the locator, the National Office is unaware of its existence.
Guidelines and procedures for informing National of the site's existence are provided at
http://www.scouting.org/site/links.html

Web Site Hosting
To pay or not to pay for space on the Web? Some are free, some are not. Remember that you always pay for your
Web site. Usually server space is free with an email account with your Internet Service Provider (ISP). If you
have an AOL account you have personal Web server space to use. New PCs can come with a year of free ISP
service that includes email and personal web server space. Typically an ISP should provide you with all of the


J.W. Zeszutek                                           1                                    jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                        5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                     S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit Webmaster

necessary software to access e-mail, surf the Web, and use FTP sites. Often they will provide you with "lite"
freeware/shareware versions of software.

If you are thinking about selecting a new ISP, use:

     •    ZDnet's Anchor Desk at http://www.zdnet.com/products/ispuser/isp.html to review some
          critical summaries of what ISPs offer. This web site will also give you some suggestions on things you
          should look for when selecting an ISP.
     •    The ISP Meta List at http://www.herbison.com/herbison/iap_meta_list.html is a listing of
          ISPs by locality.
     •    The Library of Congress List of ISPs is at http://www.loc.gov/global/internet/access-
          providers.html
Personal ISP Account Web Hosting
You should consult the agreement you entered into with your ISP to get access to the Internet. Most providers
offer a limited amount of personal Web server space as a feature of your account. For example, AOL offers
members Web sites for up to seven screen names. Usually the provider has relatively simple programs available
that allow you to upload your files.

America Online
AOL provides a very simple interface with robust tutorials on HTML. You can setup your page in minutes. See
http://hometown.aol.com/jwzeszutek/myhomepage/business.html as an example.
More advanced information on HTML programming from AOL is at http://webmaster.info.aol.com/

MSN
Again free space comes with the ISP. See http://communities.msn.com/ZeszutekHomeSite/homepage as an
example.
Free Web Hosts
There are several “free” hosting services available and you pay for them by seeing various forms of Web
advertising. You can visit usscouts.org where there are lists of ISPs that provide free Web site hosting. See
http://usscouts.org/netresources/freeweb.asp http://usscouts.org/netresources/netresources.asp
, and http://www.usscouts.org/usscouts/internet.asp

Service Name                      Comments
Scouter Magazine                  http://www.scouter.com/hosting/ 1 meg, Qualification: Described as
                                  available to Scout Units Limited assistance. File manager. No FrontPage
                                  extensions http://host.scouter.com/wi/jwzeszutek/

Tripod.com                        http://www.tripod.lycos.com/ Part of the Lycos.com network, 50 meg free.
                                  Features are described at:
                                  http://www.tripod.lycos.com/bin/membership/gateway?redirect_url
                                  =http%3A%2F%2Fbuild.tripod.com%2Fhpstudio%2Ffmframeset%
                                  2Findex.jsp
                                  See http://members.tripod.lycos.com/jwzeszutek/

Lycos.com                         http://www.lycos.com/jump/build.html

AngelFire                         http://angelfire.lycos.com/
                                  http://angelfire.lycos.com/doc/about.html
                                  Part of the Lycos network, 5 meg free, upgrade to 50
FortuneCity                    http://www.fortunecity.com/


J.W. Zeszutek                                         2                                  jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                         5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                      S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit Webmaster


The Basics Of Web Site Construction
First plan and diagram out how you want your Web site organized. Your Web files are located on the Web host
company computer called a server. You design, code, test, and upload the files to the ISP server.
Web Server File Architecture
Your files for the Web are in folders on the server like those on your PC. The top directory is called the root
directory. The html file called “index.htm” file is in your root directory. The index file is referred to as the home
page and it is the main page for the entire site. The home page then has links to the other pages (html files) in the
root directory.

                •   Web site address is:       http://www.gatewaybsa.org/
                            This is also your root directory. The Index.htm file will go here along with any other
                            html files. For example you might have calendar.htm, about.htm, new.htm,
                            activity.htm, community.htm, and admin.htm.
                •   Subdirectory #1 http://www.gatewaybsa.org/pict/
                            All your graphics will go here.
                •   Subdirectory #2 http://www.gatewaybsa.org/library/
                            All your handouts and graphics will go here.
                •   Subdirectory #X        http://www.gatewaybsa.org/X/
                            Any other folder needed.
Site Architecture the Visitor Sees
     •    Home Page
     •    Calendar of Events
     •    About our Troop
              o Meetings
              o Leaders
              o How to Join
     •    What's New
     •    Activities
              o Summer Camp
                           Getting Ready for Camp Checklist
                           Emergency Information
              o Cub Scout Day Camp
                           What Clothes To Bring
                           Emergency Information
     •    Community Activities
              o Scouting for Food
              o Clothing drive
     •    Administration
              o Roundtable handouts
              o Council forms


BSA National Web Site Architecture
The BSA National Web site has modules that function as self-contained Web sites. For example, the International
Division's site (http://www.bsa.scouting.org/international/) functions as a self-contained site, as do the
Venturing Division's pages, Boys' Life and Scouting magazine pages, and the Supply Division's promotions
module. It is important to emphasize that, while these modules function like self-contained sites, their primary
purpose is to provide content in the context of the National Council site.

The "splash screen," i.e., the first page viewed when the user arrives at http://www.scouting.org/, divides the
audience into sections. No links to content are presented at the splash entry screen. This is similar to the concept
that is used at the SEWC Gateway district entry portal at http://www.gatewaybsa.org

J.W. Zeszutek                                          3                                  jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                         5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                      S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit Webmaster


The first page of each content area serves as a menu for that content area, which should be considered as the
"home page" for that specific audience. It contains no links to individual content areas except for a small number
of "featured" selections, which receive a graphic and link at the top of the page.

Navigation pages provide menus of links to content pages. The navigation interfaces are a table of contents, hence
no informational verbiage is placed there.

Web Site Policy
Check to see whether there any laws restricting what you can place on your Web site or any rules from your
Scouting Association on Web content. Incorporate your Council's and District’s Web policy, if there is one. These
may include avoiding links to commercial Web sites to avoid giving the appearance of a Scouting endorsement of
a particular commercial product. Typically there are Web link restrictions to only local Scouting units, your
District, and your Council. Each of the policies should address privacy and youth protection issues such as:
    • No pictures of Scouts that identify the Scout by first and last name
    • Contact information should lead to an adult, avoid e-mail links to a youth member
    • Do not include personal information about anyone without the individual's permission
    • Include BSA Recommendations

The Basics Of Web Page Design
Keep it simple. Three clicks to the good stuff. No songs upon loading of the page. Try not to have one large
“Laundry list” home page. These are “long” pages filled with graphics and text. They take a long time to load and
have vertical and horizontal scroll bars. Most successful Web sites have a hierarchy of pages and then link to the
sub-pages.

     1.   The top level is the home page. Usually it is best to have a simple home page that only gives the most
          important information in very brief form to a visitor and links to the rest of your Web site. The home
          page is not only the first impression that you will convey to visitors, it is also the page that those visitors
          will see most often, whether re-orienting themselves during a single visit or returning to your site for
          repeat visits. When considering Web design, it is essential to first consider your visitors. Who they are,
          and what they hope to accomplish by visiting your page.
     2.   The next levels of pages are tables of contents arranged by subject area.
     3.   Finally the bulk of pages are at the third level where most of your information is presented. Be careful not
          to have too many levels. Most users will not go beyond four levels.
What To Include
Review the hosting arrangement to make sure you do not have to include content from the host that might be
inconsistent with the aims and objectives of Scouting; e.g., you do not want to have a banner add that changes to
advertisements for alcoholic beverages or adult content. Consider the following:
    • What is your purpose in having a Web site?
    • What do you want to accomplish?
    • What information do you want to make available?
    • What policies should you have for content?
    • What policies does your chartered organization have?
    • Who will maintain the content to keep it fresh and current?
    • Who will answer e-mail generated by the Web site or screen e-mail?
    • Where will you host the Web site and how will you fund it?
What Not To Include
     •    Information that would adversely impact the privacy of Scouts
     •    Many units do not disclose the names of youth members
     •    Addresses and telephone numbers of youth members unless the page is at least password protected
     •    Personal information about individual Scouts; e.g., sports, hobbies, activities, schools - keep the focus on
          what the unit does and adult contacts
     •    Photo captions that link the youth to their picture

J.W. Zeszutek                                           4                                   jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                        5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                     S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit Webmaster

Design Tips
Consider these ideas:
   • Start simple with a single page
   • Tell who you are, how to find out about meetings, and how to join.
   • Use graphics sparingly - text loads faster. A half dozen small graphics, including one or two animated
        pictures (Animated GIFs) are plenty. The better Web editors will give download times for your pages.
   • Avoid too many gimmicks in favor of getting information on the screen quickly
   • Put the most important stuff at the top of the page - some people will not scroll down
   • Update regularly and keep content fresh
   • Notify your audience that you have a Web page and how to get to it
   • Use e-mail and flyers to let folks know that new information is on the site
   • Register your Web site with major search engines to help people find you
   • Visit other Web sites and borrow successful ideas and ways of presenting information
   • Let the Scouts have a hand in building the Web site or take over as Webmasters
   • Make sure that it is easy to navigate from page to page and back to your home page (links to the home
        page on every page help)
   • Use the same style and headings on each page.
   • Monitor content to make sure that it reflects the goals and purposes of Scouting - this is a very public
        window on Scouting. Make it a good window.
   • If you use an image map for your navigation, make sure to also include text links. Otherwise, some
        people may not be able to get beyond your front door because their browser doesn't support image map
        links. Redundant navigation isn't bad.
   • At the bottom of each page include information about copyrights and contact information. Each page
        should provide a method of contacting the Web page owner to make suggestions or alert you to problems.
        Generally including a hyperlink to an e-mail address is sufficient. If you can include a link to a
        suggestion form that is better.

These are some common worst practices in Web site design. The negative impact of these practices has been
validated in satisfaction surveys of existing Web sites. Some of the most common pitfalls that should be avoided
include the following:
     • Use of sounds or musical themes while a home page loads, which are annoying.
     • Use of pop-up windows, which rapidly become annoying to return visitors.
     • Unnecessarily redirecting the home page, often making it impossible for the user to use their browser's
         "Back" button to leave the site.
     • Using animation as page introduction, then automatically redirecting the browser to the "real" home page,
         which becomes a tedious barrier for the user.
     • Overuse of animation, slowing the loading of a home page to a crawl. Many users quit instantly on seeing
         your "Loading, Please Wait" message.
Attracting and Keeping Visitors
     •    Register your Web site with popular search engines
     •    E-mail an announcement about your Web site to online Scouting groups like Scouts-L
     •    E-mail local Scouters about the opening of your Web site
     •    Notify public service Web sites for your community and ask for a link
     •    Put an announcement in your local Scouting newsletter
     •    Update your content regularly, stale content will suggest to a visitor that one visit is enough
     •    If available from your host, use Web site statistics to help you decide what pages are being used and
          which ones are not. This may help you figure out what needs work, what needs to go and what needs to
          be expanded. Free Statistics are available on the Web for the cost of an ad banner.
     •    Respond to customer needs and suggestions
     •    Use suggestions and credit the source when you have a success
     •    Make your content valuable - offer what customers want




J.W. Zeszutek                                        5                                 jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                       5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                    S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit Webmaster

Make A Site Template
Plan a template for each of your Web pages that includes:
    • Title Tags - make sure that each page is identified with a title that describes the page. This is what search
         engine robots will use to index your Web site. Include key words related to the page including the word
         "Scout" and the name of your organization. The name of your city and state may also be helpful.
         Remember that when someone bookmarks your page the information in this tag will become the
         bookmark's name. Titles like "home page" are not very helpful. Instead try something like "Gateway
         District BSA - Home Page"
    • Identify Your Site - Use A Masthead or something that identifies your Web site on each page. You want
         visitors to know when they are on your Web site and when they have reached someone else's Web site.
    • Make It Easy to Navigate Navigation links - Always make sure you have links on each page that lead
         visitors back to your home page.




J.W. Zeszutek                                        6                                  jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                          5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                       S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit Webmaster


How To Create A Web Site
For the best Web pages, you need to use an HTML editor. Windows Notepad can be used but you need to know
code extremely well. If you use Netscape Communicator, it comes with a simple built in program called
Composer. Some versions of Windows come with FrontPage Lite. FrontPage 2000 is the most robust program
available for windows devotees. Shareware and 30 day evaluation programs can be found at
http://download.cnet.com/downloads/0-4003349.html?tag=dir .
HTML Basics
HTML is the language of the Web. The formal standard can be found at http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-
html40/
HTML stands for HyperText Markup Language.
To understand this one we have to go back in time to the early days of publishing. An editor would often write
notes in the margin about text size, page layout, etc. The publisher would see the notes and setup the press
accordingly. When you create a Web page using HTML, you're writing a simple text file with "tags" that explain
how the text is supposed to look or what it should be linked to. Since it's just a text file, you can write HTML in a
text editor such as Windows NotePad or Mac SimpleText.

HYPER
You may have heard the expression "hyper" in describing someone. In simplest terms, it means active, kind of "all
over the place". The word "Hyper" as part of HTML is similar in context. It simply means that when you are on
the Internet using a browser such as Netscape Navigator or Internet Explorer, you can in fact, go "all over the
place". In browsing through the World Wide Web (WWW), if you see something you like, you can go
immediately to it. There is no set order to do things in. Hyper is the opposite of "linear". Linear means that there is
a certain order you must follow such as "you must do this before you can do that". Programming languages such as
BASIC and FORTRAN are linear. HTML does not hold to linear rules and allows you to jump to any page on the
WWW and at any time.

TEXT
We are working with text only files to create the HTML.

MARKUP
"Markup" comes from the fact that in order to create Web pages, we will be typing in the text and then "marking
up" the text. If you are familiar with WordPerfect, consider this example. Suppose you just typed a document in
WordPerfect. If you choose REVEAL CODES from the VIEW menu, the monitor screen or Window splits into
two parts. The top half of the screen shows the text you typed in and the bottom half shows the same text but with
the words marked up with "codes" or "tags". For example, suppose you typed the following three lines in
WordPerfect:

          Hi, this is bold

          This is italic

                                                  These words are centered

If you choose REVEAL CODES, you would see the following on the bottom half of your screen in one version of
WordPerfect:

          [Bold On]Hi, this is bold[Bold off][HRt]
          [HRt]
          [Italic On]This is italic[Italic Off][HRt]
          [HRt]
          [Just:Center]These words are centered[HRt]



J.W. Zeszutek                                          7                                   jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                         5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                      S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit Webmaster

In other words, the text has been marked up with codes or tags as indicated between the [ ] symbols. Each [HRt]
indicates that the ENTER key was pressed. [Bold On] means that everything after this tag is bolded. The [Bold
Off] tag simply says that bolding is to end here. Unless you choose REVEAL CODES, you won't see these tags.
All word processors have codes that tell the computer how to display the document.

HTML has its own set of tags to mark up text. If you want something bolded or centered, you have to indicate so
with HTML tags. WordPerfect automatically puts the tags in for you. In HTML, you must put in the tags yourself.
If you want to see the tags for an html page, just choose VIEW from the menu bar of your browser and then
choose SOURCE or DOCUMENT SOURCE.

LANGUAGE
"Language" means that we are using a language with all its syntax. Note that HTML is not a programming
language such as BASIC or FORTRAN. These are linear programming languages and are based on a whole
different set of rules and are far more complicated to learn.

Writing the HTML
     •    Look at How Others Do It: It's a good idea to look at other pages and view the HTML source to find out
          how a certain effect can be achieved. Select “View/Source” in IE5
     •    Keep your background light and simple - a busy background will make it difficult to read your content.
          Also make sure that your text has good contrast values with your background. Maize on blue is excellent.
          Grey on silver is not.
     •    Don't overdo the bells and whistles - if you use java applets, javascripts, heavy graphics, etc. all on one
          page, it may take forever to load for a modem user and obscure the message you are trying to get across.
          While the page may look really neat to the author, most visitors will move on to another page, if it doesn't
          load in 15-30 seconds. Keep It Simple.
     •    Use graphics to enhance your pages and help tell your story, but remember that the larger the graphic the
          slower your page will be to load. Try using only a few graphics for each page and keep them as small as
          possible.
     •    Preferred graphic formats include Graphics Interchange Format (GIF) and Joint Photographic Experts
          Group (JPEG). All browsers may not support other formats.
     •    GIF works best for small objects, line art, and lower resolution images.
     •    JPEG is preferred for complex images, such as photographs. JPEGs are typically large.
     •    Decreasing the number of colors in your graphics will decrease the file size that will allow it to load
          faster.
     •    Be careful to not use fancy fonts on your pages. There are about only 4 fonts that are supported
          universally.
     •    Keep with the simple colors. Older browsers may not support colors available from your fancy new
          monitor.
     •    Use 640x480 as the base size for universal acceptance of all viewing screens. Your site will look
          excellent with no scroll bars on a 14 in monitor and just as nice on a 19 in monitor.
Tutorials
The Web has several good spots for getting simple HTML tutorials.

Web based tutorials
     •    Go to AOL Keyword ”web tutorials”, “build your web page” and Uniform Resource Locator (URL)
          http://members.aol.com/websupport/basic/index.html
     •    http://htmlgoodies.earthweb.com/tutors/basics.html
     •    http://www.geocities.com/~annabella/basics.html and
          http://www.geocities.com/~annabella/print/pbasics.html
     •    http://davesite.com/webstation/html/
     •    http://www.bfree.on.ca/HTML/
     •     http://www.make-a-web-site.com/


J.W. Zeszutek                                          8                                  jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                        5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                     S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit Webmaster


HTML & Web Authoring Programs
If you have Internet Explorer you probably have a program called FrontPage Lite which is available for free with
IE 5 and Above. Check the CD that came with your ISP package for the setup files.

At most major shareware Web sites you can download full-featured versions of commonly provided software.
Usually these are called “Try Ware.” They stop working after a trail period. See
http://download.cnet.com/downloads/0,10151,0-4003353-106-0-1-0,00.html?tag=dir that has a complete listing of
30 day try ware and shareware.

     • Homesite V4.5 Web Page Maker
          One of the newest and hottest Web page makers, HomeSite is an HTML design tool for professional Web
          developers. HomeSite includes support for managing projects, extended search and replace capabilities,
          an inline browser preview, and extensive support for leading scripting technologies and Active Server
          Pages. http://www.macromedia.com/v1/products/homesite/index.cfm
     • Arachnophilia V4.0 HTML Editor
          Arachnophilia is a complete Web project organizer. Arachnophilia will help you get started if you are a
          beginner, and it will help you organize larger projects as you acquire more experience. Arachnophilia will
          automatically copy resource files to your working directory as you select them, and will alert you if there
          are resources that are no longer being used. http://www.arachnoid.com/arachnophilia/
     •    Adobe PageMill
          Newer version no longer available. Adobe® PageMill™ has the tools you'll need to create and deliver an
          attention grabbing, well-designed site.
          ftp://ftp.adobe.com/pub/adobe/pagemill/win/3.x/pml3try.exe
     •    Claris HomePage
          ftp://ftp.claris.com/pub/USA-Windows/Trial_Software/Chp3_Trial30.exe
     •    HTMLPad 2000
          A very powerful and extremely handy Web document editor designed to help webmasters to edit their
          documents faster and easier. Its user-friendly interface will help you learn HTML.
          http://www.ltn.lv/~kblums/download/hpad2k.exe
Web Graphic Programs
     •    Graphic Workshop Professional™ 2.0a
          Batch convert between over fifty popular image formats; view, crop, resize, rotate, print and process your
          graphics; create thumbnails; in an intuitive and easy to learn user environment.
          http://www.mindworkshop.com/alchemy/gwspro.html
     •    GIF Construction Set Professional™ 2.0a
          The state of the art in GIF animators. Features Animation Wizard to create sophisticated animations,
          Supercompressor to squeeze your GIF files down to size, and extensive documentation and tutorials.
          http://www.mindworkshop.com/alchemy/gifcon.html
Shareware and 30/90 day trial “tryware” versions of HTML editors
     •    http://download.cnet.com/downloads/?tag=hdrgf has the most complete listing of 30 day try
          ware and shareware.
     •    http://htmlgoodies.earthweb.com/downloads/freeware/tutorials.html
     •    http://www.tucows.com/
Upper level help resources
     •    http://www.webdevelopersjournal.com/
     •    http://htmlgoodies.earthweb.com/




J.W. Zeszutek                                         9                                   jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                        5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                     S508 – Scouting And The Internet, Tips For The Unit Webmaster


How To It
Here are the basic parts of an HTML page:
         1. <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
         2. <HTML>
         3. <HEAD>
         4.<TITLE>The title of the documents</TITLE>
         5.<META NAME="description" CONTENT="This is the description of the page">
         6. </HEAD>
         7. <BODY>
         8. ... document body
         9. </BODY>
         10.</HTML>

DOCTYPE Tag <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 3.2//EN">
This tag allows detection of what kind of document the browser is going to process. The editor program usually
provides it automatically.

HTML Tag <HTML>
This tag goes around the entire document. Basically, it states that the rest is all HTML, as opposed to some other
language that may use tags within < and > brackets. In theory, it can also be used by servers to see that the
document they want to send is actually HTML and not plain text.

HEAD Tag <HEAD>
The head of your document contains information about the document itself. Nothing within the HEAD section
should be displayed in the document window. The head section must include the TITLE of the document. It can
optionally contain things like a description, a list of keywords for search engines, and the name of the program
used to create the HTML document.

TITLE Tag <TITLE>
The TITLE tag is the only required tag for the head section. It is typically displayed in the browser's window title
bar, and used in bookmark files and search engine result listings. For the last two situations, you should make sure
the title is descriptive for the document - "Homepage" or "Index" doesn't say much in a bookmark file.

META Tag <META NAME="
META tags provide "meta information" about the document. For example: it can give a description of the
document, indicate when the document will have expired, or what program was used to generate it. There are
many possible META constructs. This particular META tag provides a description of the document, which is used
by search engines such as Alta Vista and InfoSeek.

BODY Tag <BODY>
The BODY of the document contains the actual information. There may be only one BODY statement in the
document. Some editors incorrectly insert another BODY statement for each new attribute you want to add to the
body, but this can have unexpected side-effects (such as some of the attributes getting ignored completely).




J.W. Zeszutek                                        10                                  jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                5 Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                                       Appendix A




                                    Appendix




J.W. Zeszutek                          11                             jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                         5 Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                                                Appendix A



Appendix A – Lingo Of The Web

Abbreviations
The net has it’s own set of shorthand such as these normally accepted terms:

                24/7            24 Hours, 7 Days/Week, Full Time
                AFAIK           As Far As I Know
                BTW             By The Way
                FAQ             Frequently Asked Question(s)
                FWIW            For What It's Worth
                FYI             For Your Information
                HTH             Hope This Helps
                IBACS           In Brotherhood And Cheerful Service
                IMO             In My Opinion
                IMHO            In My Humble Opinion
                IMNSHO          In My Not-So-Humble Opinion
                IANAL           I Am Not A Lawyer
                HAGO            Have A Good One
                AFAIN           As Far As I Know
                IMX             In My Experience
                IRC             Internet Relay Chat
                LOL             Laughing Out Loud
                OTOH            On The Other Hand
                RL              Real Life
                ROTFL           Rolling On The Floor Laughing
                RTM             Read The Manual
                RTFM            Read The Fine Manual
                SO              Significant Other
                WIITWD          What It Is That We Do
                WTH             What The Heck
                WRT             With Respect To
                TIA             Thanks In Advance
                TTFN            Ta Ta For Now
                L8R             Later
                YiS             Yours In Scouting
                YMMV            Your Mileage May Vary




J.W. Zeszutek                                       12                         jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                         5 Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                                                Appendix A




Some Jargon You May See
     •    Flame        A vicious attack in response to a written message, generally on a personal level.
     •    Lurker       Someone who reads the messages in a group, but doesn't post responses or join in the
                       discussion.
     •    Spam         An e-mail message (almost always an ad or personal) posted to a group of e-mail addresses
                       or several groups that is clearly irrelevant to the group, unsolicited, and undesired.

Acronyms

     •    WWW (World Wide Web) - allows us to dynamically present and update information in an online
          fashion.
     •    HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) - the protocol that designates how data is transported over the
          Web.
     •    URL (Uniform Resource Locator) - draft standard for specifying an object on the Web.
     •    HTML (HyperText Markup Language) - the specification language for how information is formatted
          in a Web browser, be it graphical or text-based.
     •    ISP (Internet Service Provider) – Company that provides internet access
     •    FTP (File Transfer Protocol) - allows us to transfer files, in either ASCII or BINARY format from one
          machine to another.
     •    GOPHER - text based information gathering. Arranged by sites, but sites appear as folders and the
          information is arranged in a hierarchical fashion.
     •    TELNET (Terminal Emulation) - allows us to make our computers act as though we are directly
          connected to a machine, as a “terminal” would be connected.
     •    TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) - connection oriented transport protocol
     •    IP (Internet Protocol) - internet addressing protocol
     •    SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol) - manages the transfer of mail from one host computer mail
          system to another.
     •    FTP (File Transfer Protocol) manages remote file transfer and administration
     •    DNS (Domain Name System) - used primarily for hostname to IP resolution. Hierarchical in nature.
          (.com, .edu, .net, .org, .gov, .mil)
     •    GIF (Graphics Interchange Format ) – File format used for Web graphics
     •    JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group) - File format used for Web pictures




J.W. Zeszutek                                       13                                 jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com
                         5-Star University of Commissioner Science - January 2002
                                                Appendix B




Appendix B – Course Synopsis
Five Star Class S502; Scouting and the Internet, Where To Begin

Course Synopsis:

This session will provide a survey of Internet scouting resources. Discussion will include; use of individual email,
email lists, netiquette, official scouting information, volunteer scouting web site resources, commercial resources,
and Internet hoaxes. Students are invited to contact Jim Zeszutek at email address jzfivestar@yahoo.com with
additional specific topics to discuss.


Five Star Class S508; Scouting and the Internet, Tips for the Unit Webmaster

Course Synopsis:

This session will provide the Unit Webmaster with a various tips and tools. Discussion will include; BSA web site
“rules,” how to obtain a web site host, basics of web page construction and design, and how to create a web site.
Students are invited to use the form located at http://www.gatewaybsa.org/fivestar.htm to contact Jim
Zeszutek with any additional specific topics to discuss.




J.W. Zeszutek                                        14                                 jwzeszutek@zeszutek.com

				
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