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					                                                        Unit 3
          Our Study and Learning Service: Socially engaged neighborhood research
                                By Aimee Riechel, JR Houston, and Jocyl Sacramento

                                                      Unit Overview

A. What does my neighborhood look like? What do we know about our neighborhoods?

DEFINING THE ISSUE
1. "Every Ghetto, Every City" - Lauryn Hill (50 min) [AIMEE]
          a. Neighborhood Survey - what do you think a neighborhood needs?
2. KQED Neighborhood Series (100 min) [AIMEE]
         a. Chinatown
         b. The Fillmore
3. Introduction to Project [AIMEE]
4. Mapping Our Local Community: Field Trip (2 days) - [JR]
          a. Field Trip Prep - cultural geography
          b. Field Trip: Introduce students to community organizations (potential)


ANALYZING THE ISSUE: Neighborhood Research
1. Building Community in the Classroom (50 min) [AIMEE]
        a. Team Building Activities
        b. Split in groups, assign roles, agreements
        c. Find community organizations that address issue in particular neighborhood
2. Computer/Library lab: Teach Research Skills (90 min) [AIMEE]
3. American Factfinder Research (90 min) [AIMEE]

PRESENTING THE ISSUE
1. Computer/Library lab (100 min) [AIMEE]
2. Media/Powerpoint presentations (95 min) [AIMEE]
        a. Worksheet - Community Comparison Matrix
        b. Reflection on differences and similarities

B. What do we want our neighborhoods to look like? How can we serve our communities?

CREATING A PLAN OF ACTION
1. The Problem Tree (50 min) [JOCYL]
2. Community Case Study (Two Days) [JOCYL]
        a. day 1: introduce case study and assign roles; work with group to frame argument and plan of action
        b. day 2: "community meeting"
3. Community Guest Speaker (Ideally an organization with a youth component) (90 min) [JOCYL]


CREATING A PLAN OF ACTION
1. Redlining (50 min) [JR & AIMEE]
        a. Fillmore/Bayview Comparison
        b. Clips from Boyz n the Hood and Be Kind Rewind

2. Media (The House We Live In Video; or community video projects) (50 min) [AIMEE]
3. Community Guest Speaker/Panel (50 min) [JR]

IMPLEMENTING PLAN OF ACTION and REFLECTION
1. Intro to Fundraising (100 min) [JR]
2. Grants Presentations: Mock Budget Proposal Hearings (50 min) [JR]
3. Reflection (50 min) [JR]




                                                       Unit Purpose
PROBLEM

                 A. History of racial and ethnic migration patterns and settlement in San Francisco communities
TOPIC(s)            over the past 200 years.
                 B. Community Mapping
                 C. Community Based Research
                 D. Learning Service


CONTENT          1. Students will identify racial and ethnic patterns of migration and settlement in the
Learning Goals      neighborhood around their school and/or where they live.
                 2. Students will identify an array of political, economic, and social issues that may contribute
                    to the alteration of neighborhoods, including racial and ethnic tension, discrimination,
                    relocation, suburbanization, urban redevelopment, gentrification, environmental racism, and
                    employment and transportation issues.
                 3. Students will learn an overview of national immigration policy since the 1800's and the
                    affects of immigration policy on the evolution of neighborhoods in San Francisco.
                 4. Students will understand how neighborhoods provide community networks that aid in
                    retaining and sustaining their ethnic, racial, and cultural identities.




SKILL            1. Historical Literacy: Students will develop research skills by conducting a Community
Learning Goals      Based Research (CBR) project.
                 2. Geographic Literacy: Students will learn geography skills through a mapping of migration
                    patterns and settlement in their neighborhood.
                 3. Language Literacy: Students will develop writing skills by developing a community-
                    accessible report on the history of racial and ethnic relations in the neighborhood of where
                    they live and/or attend school.
                 4. Social Literacy: Students will learn how to become more civically and community engaged
                    by collaborating with community-based organizations in their research projects.




LEADERSHIP       Students will understand the ways that community organizations provide leadership in the
Learning Goals   communities they serve.


UNIT CONCEPTS    Definition, Description, and/or History of the Concept               Activity/Project that
                                                                                      Highlights the Concept

Migration        When people move from one place to another; traveling for a long     Research on Immigration
(JR)             distance or from one country to another as individuals or in         policies and migration
                 groups. (From http://wikipedia.org; American Heritage                patterns to San Francisco.
                 Dictionary, 3rd edition, Haughton Mifflin Co., Boston, New
                 York).


Settlement       A new and permanent small community.n (From American                 Research that will help
(JR)             Dictionary, 3rd edition, Haughton Mifflin Co., Boston, New           students identify racial
                 York)                                                                and ethnic patterns of
                                                                                      migration and settlement.


Race             Refer to Unit 1                                                      All


Community        A community does not have to be a place where a person lives; it     Mapping our local
                      can be spread out over a city, a country, or even the world. A         community, service
                      community is a place that people build and a place they interact-      learning project, case
                      sometimes physically and sometimes virtually. Sometimes a 'real'       study, guest speaker,
                      community does not even exist, but is 'imagined': a commonly           community comparison
                      shared historical or cultural belief bonds its members                 matrix
                      together...The concept of community and the reasons why people
                      choose to identify themselves with a particular community is tied
                      in with complex issues of identity: how we define ourselves, how
                      we define and interact with others and how others define us…It
                      also defines who we are, supports our beliefs, gives us friends,
                      and helps us to belong. (From http://www.youthlinks.org,
                      accessed 8-23-06).

Discrimination        Negative treatment or opportunity based on race, color, sex,           case study, the house we
(JR)                  national origin, age disabilities or religion. (From                   live in, guest speaker,
                      http://wikipedia.org; American Heritage Dictionary, 3rd edition,       service learning project
                      Haughton Mifflin Co., Boston, New York).


Displacement          The act of uprooting someone or community from their home.             case study, the house we
                                                                                             live in


Relocation            the movement of a large group of people from one region to             case study, the house we
(Aimee)               another by state policy or international authority, most frequently    live in, neighborhood
                      on the basis of ethnicity or religion. (wikipedia.org)                 series


Suburbanization       Suburbanization (or suburbanisation) is a term used to describe        the house we live in
(Aimee)               the process of population movement from within towns and cities
                      to the rural-urban fringe. It is one of the many causes of the
                      increase in urban sprawl. Many residents of metropolitan areas no
                      longer live and work within the central urban area, choosing
                      instead to live in satellite communities called suburbsUnited
                      States, which is believed to be the first country in which the
                      majority of the population lives in the suburbs, rather than in the
                      cities or in rural areas. Proponents of containing urban sprawl
                      argue that sprawl leads to urban decay and a concentration of
                      lower income residents in the inner city.[1] and commute to work
                      via automobile or mass transit. Others have taken advantage of
                      technological advances to work from their homes, and chose to do
                      so in an environment they consider more pleasant than the city.
                      These processes often occur in more economically developed
                      countries, especially in the




                      wikipedia.org: "Slow Growth and Urban Sprawl: Support for a
                      New Regional Agenda?," Juliet F. Gainsborough, Urban Affairs
                      Review, vol. 37, no. 5 (2002): 728-744.


Urban Redevelopment   After World War II, as middle and upper class whites fled the          case study, the house we
                      cities to live in suburbs, many American city planners, politicians,   live in
                      developers and housing advocates believed that demolishing
                      aging and working-class areas of the city would bring more
                      economic activity to downtowns. The Housing and Slum
                      Clearance Act, passed by Congress in 1949, provided federal
                      funds to clear downtown neighborhoods considered “blighted.”
                      But the definition of “blighted” could also be conflated with “non-
                      white,” “ethnic” or “working class.” The working class
                          neighborhoods that were demolished from the 1940s to the 1990s
                          included such ethnic enclaves as Chinatowns, Japantowns, Little
                          Manilas, and Little Italys, black neighborhoods, Latina/o
                          neighborhoods, and poor and working class neighborhoods. Since
                          1949, millions of residents have been displaced, and
                          neighborhoods were replaced with expensive housing, shopping
                          malls, freeways, high-rises, parking lots, and other businesses.
                          Cities today still use the practice of eminent domain, in which
                          cities take over private property, and urban redevelopment funds
                          to displace residents and businesses in order to develop
                          supposedly more attractive and/or profitable residences and
                          business districts. (PEP BOOK)



Gentrification            The process of transforming a working class or supposedly            mapping our local
                          deteriorating neighborhood into one that is more economically        community
                          profitable, and one that brings in more tax revenue for the city.
                          For example, bringing in Starbucks and upscale clothing
                          boutiques, art galleries and condo projects into a working class
                          neighborhood transforms the neighborhood, both positively and
                          negatively. Gentrification may bring in more money, tourists and
                          residents, but it often pushes out established residents and
                          businesses, and makes the neighborhood unaffordable. Urban
                          redevelopment can sometimes trigger gentrification. (PEP BOOK)



Environmental Racism      Environmental racism refers to intentional or unintentional          case study
(Aimee)                   racial discrimination in the enforcement of environmental rules
                          and regulations, the intentional or unintentional targeting of
                          minority communities[1] for the siting of polluting industries, or
                          the exclusion of minority groups from public and private boards,
                          commissions, and regulatory bodies. (wikipedia)


Redlining                 Redlining is the practice of denying or increasing the cost of       mapping our local
(Aimee)                   services, such as banking, insurance, access to jobs,[2] access to   community
                          health care,[3] or even supermarkets[4] to residents in certain,
                          often racially determined,[5] areas. The most devastating form of
                          redlining, and the most common use of the term, refers to
                          mortgage discrimination, in which middle-income black and
                          Hispanic residents are denied loans that are made available to
                          lower-income whites. The term "redlining" was coined in the late
                          1960s by community activists in Chicago. It describes the practice
                          of marking a red line on a map to delineate the area where banks
                          would not invest; later the term was applied to discrimination
                          against a particular group of people (usually by race or sex), no
                          matter the geography. During the heyday of redlining these areas
                          were most frequently black inner city
                          neighborhoods. Later, through at least the 1990s, this
                          discrimination involved lending to lower-income whites, but not
                          to middle- or upper-income blacks. (ref: Immergluck, Dedman.)
                          (wikipedia)


                                          Unit 3.A
       What does my neighborhood look like? What do we know about our neighborhoods?
                                            Neighborhood Research Project

Description: This culminating group project will help students understand the history of San Francisco neighborhoods
 through primary and secondary sources, oral interviews, and statistical analysis. In addition, students will be asked to
 identify an issue that has affected their community. Each group will be assigned a focus neighborhood in San Francisco and
 will be asked to identify an issue they see as a problem within that community. Students will then find and contact a
 community organization that is attempting to solve the problem. By exploring the connections between the interviewee’s
 experiences and the social, political, and economic issues addressed in recent history, you will better understand how
 historical events have affected the people living in your community.

Lesson Plan Materials:

         Neighborhood Research Handouts
         LCD Projectors (Student examples)
         Research materials: Books, periodicals, library time and or computer lab time


Day 1: Neighborhood Project Introduction

Description: Students will be introduced to the goals, process and expectations of the neighborhood research project.
Students will choose/be assigned to a neighborhood: Pacific Heights, Bay View/Hunter's Point, Excelsior, Mission, Potrero
Hill, Sunset/ Richmond, and the Marina, Fillmore, for example. In addition, students will choose/be assigned to a role:
Graphic Designer, Neighborhood researcher, Oral History interviewer, Statistician or Community Outreach Coordinator.
Then students will review the rubric for the project and will be given student samples in order to know the expectations of the
project.



 Step 1         Introduce the neighborhood project by handing out a project guide and review its purpose/description.


 Step 2         Assign five students to a neighborhood group based on varied skill levels. Neighborhoods: Pacific
                Heights, Bay View/Hunter's Point, Excelsior, Mission, Potrero Hill, Sunset/ Richmond, and the Marina,
                Fillmore for example. Note: you may choose alternative neighborhoods based on your student population
                and their interest level.

 Step 3         Assign/have students choose each student a role, distribute role sheets with descriptions of their role:

                 Graphic designer will be responsible for putting the project together in an artistic, creative Power
                  Point presentation including visuals and text.

                 Neighborhood Researcher will need to research a detailed history of the group’s neighborhood.
                  This will include the contemporary cultural make-up of the neighborhood and the historical
                  background of immigration to the neighborhood.

                 Oral History Interview will find two community members to interview and write an analysis to
                  document how their life and the community have been affected by a significant event in American
                  history. I will be giving you guidelines for conducting an oral history interview.

                 Researcher of Statistical Neighborhood Demographics will need to find certain statistics about the
                  assigned district using the Internet. Then students will analyze that data by comparing the
                  demographics to other San Francisco neighborhoods and make conclusions around their statistical
                  findings.

                 Community Outreach Coordinator will become the lesion between the group and a chosen
                  community organization. Student will contact and communicate with the organization members in
                  order to better understand their vision and goal for community action.


 Step 4         Once students have their assigned groups they should review the assigned rubric and teacher should
                answer any questions concerning the final project.


 Step 5         Show an example of a student project and have students grade it according to the rubric so they are
               introduced to the expectations of the project. Answer any questions concerning the final project.




Day 2: Research Lesson

Description: Students will visit the school library, local library, and or computer lab and teacher will facilitate a lesson
around research techniques appropriate to the resources available. Students will learn how to critically use a variety of
research techniques employing traditional library databases and an array of on line resources.



 Step 1        Students will spend in the library/local library/computer lab to learn how to critically use a variety of
               research techniques. Teacher facilitates a lesson on using on-line search mechanisms focusing on:

               How to focus on a broad research topic; Search for a narrow topic; Search for then largest amount of
               Internet (meta-search engines); Search only reviewed sites; browse educational topics and resources;
               Search specific types of databases; Search for educational materials and reviews. (See Power-Point
               presentation)

               If time is available, students will have the ability to start finding resources on their focus neighborhood.
               Note: Remember that books at the school library should not be checked out so that other classes can
               have accessibility to the same resources.

 Step 2        Alternative lesson if teacher has access to an interactive computer lab where students can view a teacher
               operated computer while working at their own stations.

               Teacher will lead a lesson on searching the internet: “Searching the Internet: How to find information you
               really want without looking at 20,000,000 sites.” (See Power-Point)


 Step 3        Teacher gives instructions on how to use a directory and gives examples of directories. Students are
               assigned to conduct their own search on Yahoo through focus questions.


 Step 4        Teacher gives instructions on how to use search engines and gives examples of them. Students are then
               assigned to conduct their own search on google through focus topics.


 Step 5        Teacher gives instructions on how to use mega search engines. Mega search engines are used to search
               multiple databases for answers to difficult to find questions. Students to use these search engines if they
               have a specific question for which they want the answer. Students are then assigned to conduct their own
               search. Students are then assigned to conduct their own search using AskJeeves!


 Step 6        Teacher checks research findings of students to check for understanding of each search method.



Field Trip – Mapping Our Local Community
Description: In this part of the unit, students will be able to read primary and secondary map sources that will assist them in
mapping San Francisco neighborhoods and its districts. Students will be issued political maps that will identify San
Francisco borderlines in the following years:


 Map of San Francisco Circa 1906
 Map of San Francisco Circa 1926
 Map of San Francisco Circa 1946
 Map of San Francisco Circa 1966
 Map of San Francisco Circa 1986
Map of San Francisco Circa 2006
Students will be able to draw maps of San Francisco neighborhoods and their districts in twenty-year increments. Maps
will be drawn showing specific points of interest. These points of interests can and/or will be assigned by the teacher or
students in the Ethnic Studies class.

Students will be introduced to the founding fathers for the city of San Francisco since 1900.

Journal and discussion: are the needs of your community met?

Students will first discuss their perceived needs for their own community. Discussions will focus on what they personally
feel needs to be given attention both socially, as well as legislatively. The discussions can focus on current event topics.
Examples should include sanitation services and urban environmental conservation, and green peace initiatives. Other
areas of concentration should include the following but are not limited to additional concerns developed by the students
during their investigative research:

Redlining – the deliberate exclusion of minority groups to buy houses in specific neighborhoods.

Business – the types of businesses found in their communities determining types of businesses that may or may not be more
prevalent in their neighborhoods when compared to others.

Housing – types of homes that are available for purchase, to include the following: Cost of two, three and four bedroom
homes. The cost for renting a one, two or three bedroom apartment. Time period that the homes were built in, and the
architectural style of the homes.

Socioeconomic status – an understanding of the differences between good credit and bad credit; an understanding of what it
means to save money to include actually setting up a savings account at a local bank; an understanding of ones credit score
(FICO). An understanding of the need to invest in various stock and bond option; an understanding of the Dow Jones and
New York Stock Exchange.

Drugs and Alcohol – The use of drugs and alcohol in their individual communities is paramount in the understanding of
their effects not only on the individual but also as it applies to social and civic organization for the betterment of their
communities. Investigation /research must be based on the resources for treatment of drug and alcohol and alcohol
addiction.

Lesson Plan Materials:
       “The Fillmore” Movie
       Individual maps of San Francisco circa 1900
       Handout on the History of San Francisco
       Poster Paper
       Markers


Lesson Plan              Definition and Rationale for choosing this word,                       Idea for pre-
                         phrase, or concept                                                     teaching or front-
VOCABULARY                                                                                      loading the concept.




REDLINING                The deliberate exclusion of minority groups to buy houses in           Written data. video
                         specific neighborhoods.
                                                                                                Writing Assignments

BUSINESSES               The types of businesses found in their communities                     Small group
                         determining types of businesses that may or may not be more            collaboration,
                         prevalent in their neighborhoods when compared to others.              discussion.



HOUSING                  Types of homes that are available for purchase, to include the         Real Estate
                         following: Cost of two, three and four bedroom homes. The              advertisements using
                         cost for renting a one, two or three bedroom apartment. Time           newspapers, magazines
                         period that the homes were built in, and the architectural style       and the internet for
                         of the homes.                                                          various neighborhoods.
SOCIOECONOMIC            An understanding of the differences between good credit and          Writing Assignments
STATUS                  bad credit; an understanding of what it means to save money           evaluating simulated
                        to include actually setting up a savings account at a local bank;     credit reports from the
                        an understanding of ones credit score (FICO). An                      credit bureaus
                        understanding of the need to invest in various stock and bond
                        option; an understanding of the Dow Jones and New York
                        Stock Exchange.



DRUGS AND               The use of drugs and alcohol in their individual communities          Internet research on
ALCOHOLS                is paramount in the understanding of their effects not only on        local hospital records
                        the individual but also as it applies to social and civic             that describe and or
                        organization for the betterment of their communities.                 identify treatment data
                        Investigation /research must be based on the resources for            for drugs and alcohol
                        treatment of drug and alcohol and alcohol addiction.                  addiction.



(Each lesson plan should have vocabulary words. Some of the words will come directly from the main concepts of the Unit
but their might also be additional words that are highlighted in the lesson plan. The vocabulary words should be taught
through the activities.)

PART 1: THE CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO 1900/1906

Poster Gallery: Students will be asked to view the 1900/1906 map of San Francisco and to identify as many
streets and avenues that they have been on since living in the city. This will be done through a replication of the
1900/1906 map by hand simply by copying or tracing the outline of the original.
Step 1       As the students walk in, ask students to write down as many street names or avenues that they know
             of in the city. This can be done for 5-10 minutes.



Step 2       Distribute 1900/1906 maps and ask students to place a star next to the streets that they have listed on
             their maps. This can be done for 10-15 minutes.



Step 3       Students will then be asked to identify specific points of interest (Tourist attractions). These points
             of interest can be issued by the Ethnic studies instructor or the students themselves. Time used: 15-
             20 minutes.



Step 4       Lecture using resources from the bibliography about the 1906 San Francisco Earth Quake and Fire
             that destroyed the city. Along with actual recording or internet/video for visual and auditory
             comprehension. 30-40

Step 5       At the end of the lecture students will then write in their journals using a prompt such as the
             following: Identify on your map and write in your journal the areas of San Francisco that were
             destroyed in the 1906 Earthquake and Fire.




PART 2: INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS AND FUNDRAISING

Determining Needs: Students will be able to discuss their perceived needs for their community on small
groups for collaborative learning. Students will write their findings on poster board paper to present to the entire
class in 3-5 minute group presentation sessions. Discussions can focus on current event topics. Examples should
include sanitation services and urban environmental conservation, and green peace initiatives. Other areas of
concentration should include the following but are not limited to additional concerns developed by the students
during their investigative research: Redlining, Businesses, Housing, Socioeconomic status, Drugs and Alcohol.
Step 1      Students would be placed into groups then assigned to one of the following positions in their group.

            Students would also rotate these positions daily so that each member gets the opportunity to
            participate in the group process.



            Facilitator

            Manager

            Timekeeper

            Recorder

            Participant(s)

            Handouts explaining the responsibility for their position as a member of the group will be provided.
            Give them about 10 minutes to read the information.



Step 2      Identification of Neighborhood Community Organizations to write grants for would be the next step
            for students. Ethnic Studies teachers will access the Community Based Organizations found on
            the Unit 3 resource page. This page can be accessed at www.wikispaces.com. Click on SFUSD then
            under my spaces navigate to Unit 3 Resources. Groups will choose two of the community based
            organizations found on that list. This assignment is ideal for the computer lab so students can use the
            internet to research the many community/neighborhood organizations. 30-40 minutes.

Step 3      Teacher lecture and teacher/student discussions that will focus on current event topics. Examples
            should include sanitation services and urban environmental conservation, and green peace
            initiatives. Other areas of concentration should include the following but are not limited to
            additional concerns developed by the students during their investigative research: Redlining,
            Businesses, Housing, Socioeconomic status, Drugs and Alcohol. 15-20 minutes.



Step 4      Students in their groups would then present their number one and number two community based
            organizations that they would like to write a grant proposal for. The presentation should include the
            origin, founders, importance, completed work and available resources of the organization. Current
            programs and objectives should also be noted. 40 minutes.

Step 5      Students would again complete this assignment in the computer lab:

            List of Activities


               1.   Each student or group (Teachers discretion) Finally identifies one community organization
                    that they would like to advocate for.
               2.   They would be responsible for gathering a portfolio that would include but is not limited to
                    the following:
                         a. Neighborhood community business card,
                         b. Pamphlet or flyer about the organization
                         c. Magazine, catalog,
                         d. Persuasive Essay as to why the writing of a grant to assist the organization would is
                              so important to the community. 40-50 minutes.


Step 6      After they have typed and printed their persuasive essay’s students will be asked to share what they
            have written in order to clarify the importance and future impact that the grant proposal for the
            organization will have on the neighborhood. 20-30 minutes.

Step 7      Once all of the students have presented, a discussion on questions raised and persuasive arguments
            that were debated can take place for further reinforcement as to the importance of the argument. 20-
              30 minutes.



 PART 3: CONCLUSIVE DIALOGUE/CRITICAL CIRCULAR EXCHANGE

 Conclude with having the students write a journal about what they learned in this lesson plan with regard to the
 mapping of their community and the Introduction to community/neighborhood organizations and fund Raising.
 Problems/Questions of the Day: What were determining factors in the early establishment of San Francisco
 community’s? Why is it important to identify community/neighborhood organizations and learn how to do fund
 raising?
 Connection: How is the connection made between the ever changing socioeconomic, racial and ethnic
 communities that are found in our San Francisco neighborhoods relevant to our lives? Have the students create
 individual or group posters and/or with a statement describing their interpretation of how there is a connection
 between socioeconomic, racial and ethnic communities that are found in our San Francisco neighborhoods are
 relevant to their lives.
 Assessment: What were the effective parts of this lesson plan and why? What parts could be improved and how?


Day 3-5: Neighborhood Research

Description: Students will be given their role instructions and will begin working on their specific assignment.


 Step 1        Teacher separates students into groups based on assigned roles so that teacher can assist students and
               students can support each other with similar questions. For example, graphic designers will all sit
               together to help with creative ideas; Oral History Interviewers will sit together to help each other
               formulate questions.


 Step 2        Students start working on their assignment and are reminded of due dates at the end of each
               library/computer lab day in order to keep the project on track. (See assignment list)


 Step 3         Graphic designer will be responsible for creating a Power Point presentation with at least 12 slides,
                 no more than 15. The graphic designer collects and organizes each member’s work.
                  1. Slide 1: Introduction of the neighborhood
                  2. Slide 2: Map of the Neighborhood
                  3. Slide 3-6: Statistics of the neighborhood
                          a. Education levels
                          b. Household income
                          c. Racial make-up
                          d. Population
                  4. Slide 7-9: History of the neighborhood
                          a. Immigration history
                          b. Modern history (1916-1960)
                          c. Neighborhood now (1960-Present)
                  5. Slide 10: Oral Interview/Neighborhood experience
                  6. Slide 11: Spotlight Community Organization
                  7. Slide 12: Bibliography

                Neighborhood Researcher will research the history of the neighborhood and will help the Graphic
                 Designer complete these slides with proper citations (Handout provided):
                   1.   Immigration history
                   2.   Modern history (1900-1960)
                   3.   *Neighborhood now (1960-Present)
                   4.   Bibliography: with at least 3 books or articles, 2 primary source and 1 periodical.

                Oral History Interview will find one community member to interview who is at least one
                  generation older and who has lived in the neighborhood for at least 10 years. *In addition, the Oral
                  History Interviewer will help the neighborhood researcher conduct research on the neighborhood in
                  order to ask educated questions about the interviewer’s experience in the neighborhood.

                  After researching the current history of the neighborhood through newspaper articles, periodicals and
                  other resources, the oral history interviewer should compile at least 15 questions directed at the
                  interviewer about the current condition of the neighborhood, focusing on at least two issues that the
                  group sees as ways to improve the neighborhood. Teacher checks off questions before the interview.
                  (See Unit 1 for lesson on Oral History Interview)

               Researcher of Statistical Neighborhood Demographics
          
               Community Outreach Coordinator will compile a list of all the useful non-profit, volunteer,
                community outreach programs or other relevant programs that assists the neighborhood. In addition,
                they will research information about a community “maverick”, someone who is well known for
                community activism.

                  They will contact at least one community organization that is currently active in the neighborhood
                  focusing on improving an issue that the group has identified as an important issue within the
                  neighborhood.

                  The community outreach coordinator will contact the organization and learn how they are active in
                  the community. They will help the graphic designer present:

                  1. History of community organization in the neighborhood including information about a
                     community maverick
                  2. The chosen organization’s vision statement
                  3. Current Work
                  4. Contact Information


 Sep 6        Teacher monitors each group by walking to each workstation and checks for progress.


 Step 7       Each student should email their portion of their presentation to the graphic designer as an attachment
              saved as a word document.


 Step 8       Teacher checks each presentation and saves them appropriate to each school site. For example, save them
              all of a flash-drive to load onto a lap top computer attached to an LCD for presentations the following
              day.



Day 6-7: Neighborhood Project Final Presentations

Description: Students will present their projects while making comparisons about each neighborhood and analyze common
issues that affect San Francisco.


 Step 1       Teacher reviews presentation expectations and rubric with students and organizes resources needed for
              presentations. (LCD, lap-top etc.)

 Step 2        Student groups present for no longer than 15 minutes each. Each group member presents their own
              research and explains their process.


 Step 3       While groups are presenting, students complete a neighborhood comparison matrix. The comparison
              matrix provides for a detailed approach to comparing the characteristics of each neighborhood. (See
              attachment)
               Students find the similarities between 7 neighborhoods through 6 characteristics presented by the
               presenters

               1.   Statistics of the neighborhood
                         a. Education levels
                         b. Household income
                         c. Racial make-up
                         d. Population
               2.   History of the neighborhood
                         a. Then and Now
               3.   Needs in the community (needs being addressed/needs to be addressed)

 Step 4        After all groups have presented, the teacher leads a discussion about the similarities and differences
               between San Francisco neighborhoods focusing on those that students found through their comparison
               matrix.


 Step 5        Revisit the list created the first day of the unit from the question “What a neighborhood needs” and ask
               students if all 7 neighborhoods are getting their needs met. Compare the needs that each neighborhood
               has and what is being done in those neighborhoods through active community support.



Reflection: Conclusive Dialogue/Critical Circular Exchange

End with having the students write a journal about what connections they see between each neighborhood.

Problems/Questions of the Day: What do the neighborhoods in San Francisco need? Are the needs of San Francisco being
met? How do community organizations provide support for San Francisco neighborhoods?
Connection: How do community organizations affect your daily lives; directly or indirectly? What did you learn about the
focus neigborhoods that you did not know before? Does this information change your outlook on San Francisco?
Assessment: What were your parts of this lesson plan and why? What parts could be improved and how?

Resources and Notes

         Resources

         Notes
         This unit outline is a guide. Feel free to adjust lesson plans according to your section.



Include Handouts and Worksheets.
                                                        Unit 3.B
    What Do We Want Our Neighborhoods to Look Like? How Can We Serve Our Communities?


                                                   Outline of Lesson Plans

Creating a Plan of Action
1. The Problem Tree (50 min)
2. Community Case Study (100 min)
3. Community Guest Speaker (90 min)



                                               The Problem Tree

Description: In this part of the unit, we will continue our study about neighborhoods and get students thinking about their
role in serving their communities. They will contextualize their neighborhood projects with how issues are/are not currently
being addressed by community organizations. Students will brainstorm possible projects that can address the problems and
learn how organizations go about funding their projects.

Lesson Plan Materials:
      large paper tree
      green pieces of paper to symbolize leaves
      paper to symbolize roots
      markers
      tape



Lesson Plan          Definition and Rationale for choosing this word, phrase, or               Idea for pre-teaching of
VOCABULARY           concept                                                                   front-loading the concept
                     A collective issue that requires a solution. With regards to
Problem
                     neighborhoods, problems are tied to systematic forms of oppression.

Part 1: Cultural Energizer

The Problem Tree: We will revisit the neighborhood research that was presented the previous week. This
energizer will help students identify the root causes for a particular problem.

 Step 1        Before class, tape up a big piece of paper on the wall that resembles a tree. There should be roots, a
               trunk, and branches. Once students have settled in, pass out 3-5 green pieces of paper that look like
               leaves and instruct students to think about the presentations from the previous week.

 Step 2        Ask them to silently write down a different issue/problem on each leaf. Give them an example: i.e. gang
               violence. Make sure they are using markers so that each issue is visible. Give students at least 5 minutes
               for this. While students are writing, prepare tape for them to paste their leaves onto the tree.

 Step 3        Ask students to come up and tape their leaves on the tree.


 Step 4        Ask volunteers to identify the concerns or problems that appear most frequently on the tree. Have
               volunteers reorganize leaves so that there are clusters of problems that are similar (for example: put all
               the education-related problems in one cluster)


 Step 5        Have another volunteer write down the general cluster themes on the (dry-erase/chalk) board. Now you
              have identified problems that directly affects communities in San Francisco.




Part 2: Community Collaboration and Cultural Production

Roots: Students will be divided into pairs to brainstorm root causes to the problems. They will question
"why" these problems exist and discuss ways that these problems are being addressed.

 Step 1       Depending on how many clusters were created in the cultural energizer, break students up into groups.*
              (i.e. if the class identified 5 problems, have them count to 5 so that there will be 5 groups.)

              *These groups can be the groups they work with for the rest of the semester.If you'd like, you can have
              students choose the problem that they feel resonates with them the most. This way, students will be
              working on an issue that they feel strongly about.

 Step 2       Once they have broken up into their groups, have them choose roles: facilitator, scribe (take notes), time-
              keeper, and presenter.




              Instruct students to come up with a group name and discuss why their assigned problem exists:




              Using there Community Comparison Matrix from the week before, have them ask "why?" Why does this
              problem exist?




              Have them think about and answer the following questions as well: What are the symptoms of the
              problem? How widespread is the problem? What is the effect of the problem on students, teachers, and
              community? How long has this problem been around? How did it begin?


 Step 3       Ask if any groups want to present first. Once a group volunteers and presents the root causes to their
              issue, have them choose the next group to present.



Part 3: Conclusive Dialogue/Critical Circular Exchange

Problems/Questions of the Day: How can we address community problems/issues?
Connection: What is our role in alleviating these issues?
Assessment: What was effective about your lesson plan

Resources and Notes

         Resources
 Youth Leadership Institute's Youth Initiated Project: Planning for Action! Workbook
 http://www.yli.org/about/resources.php [accessed 06 August 2008]

         Notes


Include Handouts and Worksheets.


                                     Community Case Study
Description: In this part of the unit, we will learn about different forms of social change work. Students will participate
in a community simulation where they will represent different groups that address a particular issue in different ways.
The objective of this lesson plan is to learn how to apply social change concepts to a community issue and to have
students see themselves playing a role in making change as everyday people.

Lesson Plan Materials:
      case study prompt
      construction paper
      markers
      tape



                                                                                                  Idea for pre-teaching
Lesson Plan           Definition and Rationale for choosing this word, phrase, or
                                                                                                  of front-loading the
VOCABULARY            concept
                                                                                                  concept
                      The long-term process of everyday people coming together to
                      improve the quality of life in people's lives and challenge the power
                      structure. (Bartolome)

                      Work done to change the nature, the social institutions, the social
Social Change
                      behavior or the social relations of a soceity, community of people, or
                      other social structures. This includes any event or action that affects a
                      group of individuals that have shared values or characteristics. Social
                      change is also acts of advocacy for the cause of changing society in a
                      normative way. (Shackman 2005)




DAY ONE

Part 1: Cultural Energizer

Step Up, Step Back: Students will step up to statements that demonstrate the impact of social
change work.


 Step 1        Ask everyone to stand in a line. Read:

               Step up if you have ever...

               1. ridden the bus
               2. worked at a living wage job
               3. ate breakfast or lunch at your school
               4. taken an ethnic studies class
               5. worn anything that is Nike, Gap, Old Navy, Reebok, Esprit, Banana Republic, or Levi's
               6. been evicted without any cause
               7. voted in an election
               8. worn clothing traditionally considered worn by the opposite gender clothing
               9. participated in a youth program in San Francisco or Oakland
               10. were ever harassed in Juvenile Hall because you identified as gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer, or
               transgender

 Step 2        Invite students to site and explain to them that these statements relate to victories that have been as a
               result of everyday people fighting for change through organizing. Before reading out the victories, ask if
               anyone can guess the victory.

 Step 3        Go over each statement again to review what victories they are associated with.
             1. ridden the bus
             Black community organizers led a city-wide bus boycott in Montgomery, Alabama which successfully
             desegregated public transportation in 1956.

             2. worked at a minimum wage job
             California's hourly minimum wage is $6.75, and the minimum required under federal law is $5.15, far
             below the federal poverty level for a full-time minimum wage earner with a family. Two years ago, San
             Francisco organized and won the vote to raise minimum wage to $9.36 (as of January 1, 2008). Workers
             in some cities have succeeded in getting a living wage-this is the wage that is considered to give workers
             enough money to comfortably survive-$15/hr. In Oakland, state contracted employees fought and won a
             living wage in 1999.

             3. ate breakfast or lunch at your school
             As part of their Serve the People campaign, The Black Panther Party pioneered the Free Breakfast
             Program for Oakland youth so that poor and low-income youth could have the proper nutrition for
             learning. Breakfast and lunch programs have since become institutionalized nationwide.

             4. taken an ethnic studies class
             Black, Chicano, Puerto Rican, Native American and Asian American youth fought and led school
             walkouts in the 1960s to demand more community control over our schools. These strikes led to the
             creation of ethnic studies programs in several high schools and colleges.

             5. worn anything that is Nike, Gap, Old Navy, Guess, Reebok, Esprit, Banana Republic or Levi’s.
             All these companies use sweatshop labor-exploit their workers to make a bigger profit. In 1995, Asian
             American Immigrant Advocates led a successful campaign against Jessica McClintock, whose sweatshop
             workers manufacture party dresses. The workers won back wages for laid off garment workers, money
             for an education fund for garment workers, state literature to inform garment workers of their rights and a
             hotline for garment workers to report abuse by employers.

             6. been evicted without any cause
             In 2002, Just Cause, an Oakland tenant rights organization successfully campaigned and passed a city
             ballot measure that would give Oakland renters more protection from landlord eviction. Previously,
             landlords did not need any reason whatsoever to evict a tenant.

             7. voted in an election
             Women and Black people organized for the right to vote. Women were granted the vote in1921. African
             Americans were granted the right to vote, first after the Civil War and then again in 1964 with the
             passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

             8. worn clothing traditionally considered to be worn by the opposite gender
             In many parts of the United States, it was illegal for a person to wear more than three articles of clothing
             meant for the opposite sex. Persons who defied this law would repeatedly be beaten and even raped by
             police officers with no protection from the law or the general public. Through breaking laws and
             organizing to change the existing laws, transgender and queer activists fought for the right for everyone
             to wear clothes of their choosing, regardless of gender.

             9. participated in a youth program in San Francisco or Oakland
             Youth advocates successfully fought for both cities to set aside a percentage of the budget every year
             solely for youth programs, particularly after-school programs. These funds cannot be diverted to other
             areas of the budget for any reason.

             10.were ever harassed in Juvenile Hall because you identified as gay, lesbian, bisexual, queer or
             transgender
             CYWD (Center for young women's developement) advocated for an anti-discrimination policy
             specifically to protect queer youth locked up at juvenile hall. Juvenile Hall staff must now have specific
             training around queer issues and a task force is being set up to make sure the policy is actively being put
             into place.



Part 2: Community Collaboration and Cultural Production
Case Study in the Bayview: Students will participate in a simulation that will illustrate different ways to
make change in our communities based on a real situation.

 Step 1      Pass out a copy of Case Study: Bayview and Breast Cancer


 Step 2      Ask for volunteers to read paragraphs out loud.


 Step 3      Break students up into their groups from the day before. (this activity is ideal for 5 groups each
             representing different interest groups: San Francisco Department of Health, Lawyers for Health Equity,
             School of Breast Cancer Prevention, People Organized to Save our Hood and the Power Plants.)

 Step 4      Give each group a questions handout. Make sure to offer help to the small group if they need it.

             Handouts:

             Group 1

             Your group represents the San Francisco Department of Health Department.
             “The San Francisco Department of Health sets up a Breast Cancer clinic in the neighborhood to help treat
             the growing numbers of patients. When one of the power plants has a leakage, the SF Dept of Health sets
             up a shelter for the neighbors whose homes were affected. People in the neighborhood begin volunteering
             at the clinic and shelter to help.”
             1. What are your groups goals?
             2. What are your methods of achieving them?
             3. Would your group’s methods be successful in stopping the rocks? Why or why not?
             4. Does your group’s methods change the power relations in the community?

             Pick one spokesperson who can explain your answers to the larger group.

             Group 2
             Your group represents the Lawyers for Health Equity.
             “Lawyers in the hood think the villagers should sue the power plants. They set up an organization, called
             the Lawyers for Health Equity, to give legal advice to victims of breast cancer and figure out how to sue
             for damages.”
             1. What are your groups goals?
             2. What are your methods of achieving them?
             3. Would your group’s methods be successful in stopping the rocks? Why or why not?
             4. Does your group’s methods change the power relations in the community?

             Pick one spokesperson who can explain your answers to the larger group.

             Group 3
             Your group represents the School of Breast Cancer Prevention.
             “Other neighbors decide to educate girls and women about how to conduct breast exams, what to do if
             you get breast cancer and the link between toxic environments and breast cancer. They set up a school
             called School of Breast Cancer Prevention.”
             1. What are your groups goals?
             2. What are your methods of achieving them?
             3. Would your group’s methods be successful in stopping the rocks? Why or why not?
             4. Does your group’s methods change the power relations in the community?
             Pick one spokesperson who can explain your answers to the larger group.

             Group 4
             Your group represents the People Organized to Save our Hood.
             “Finally, at a town meeting, a group of neighbors get together to make a proposal. They are sick and tired
             of losing family and friends to breast cancer and they want to change the situation. They do not think the
             SF Dept of Health, Lawyers for Health Equity or the School of Breast Cancer Prevention will end the
             number of breast cancer victims. They propose that the hood unite and go up to the power plants to
             demand that they shut down. They form an organization called People Organized to Save our Hood.”
             1. What are your groups goals?
             2. What are your methods of achieving them?
             3. Would your group’s methods be successful in stopping the rocks? Why or why not?
             4. Does your group’s methods change the power relations in the community?

             Pick one spokesperson who can explain your answers to the larger group.

             Group 5
             Your group represents the Power Plants.
             This community also has two existing power plants and a naval shipyard which all contain and emit tons
             of toxic waste and substances like asbestos, lead and radioactive materials. The San Francisco Energy
             Company (SFEC) is in the middle of building a third power plant in the Bayview Hunters Point district.
             When finished, the plant would be located 1.6 miles from a local school and make Bayview Hunters
             Point the district with more power plants than any area its size in the nation. The SFEC claims that it
             can’t be proved that the power plants are linked to the breast cancer rates. They suggest that it’s because
             of increased poverty and inadequate gynecological care rather than toxic waste and pollution… The
             mayor and other politicians say Bayview needs the power plants because they provide jobs and that
             there’s no proof that the power plants cause cancer.”
             1. Which group is the most threatening to you and your goal to build and maintain the power plants?
             2. What is your strategy in dealing with the groups?

             Pick one spokesperson who can explain your answers to the larger group.


 Step 5      Inform students that there will be a "community meeting" at "city hall" in class tomorrow.
             Representatives from the power plants have been invited to the meeting and will be in attendance. They
             must each present a statement that reflects their organizations concern for what is happening in the
             community.


 Step 6      Let students use the rest of the period to work in their groups.



DAY TWO

Part 1: Cultural Energizer

Change it up!: Students will match different forms of social change with it's definition. The objective of


 Step 1      Before class, have the following on pieces of paper:
             -Service
             -Advocacy
             -Community Organizing
             -Electoral
             -Radical Formations
             -Economic Development
             -Education
             -Provide basic services (food, shelter, etc)
             -Work within the system to impact laws and policies
             -Win improvements in people's lives through using collective power
             -Uses voting power to impact change
             -Develops analysis uses tactics outside the system
             -Self-sufficiency or build alternative institutions
             -Raises knowledge about issues so people affected can be informed

             As students are walking into the classroom, hand them a piece of paper. (Not everyone will receive a
             piece of paper). Instruct students to match the word with the type of impact that its trying to make in
             society. Have student tape these pieces of paper on the wall so that its visible for all students to see.
 Step 2       Go over the matches on the wall and ask students why they placed the words with a specific impact. Ask
              them to give examples of how each form of social change is used in their neighborhoods. Make any
              connections if you need to.

 Step 3       Conclude cultural energizer by asking questions:

              Can any of these forms of social change be used together?

              What type of social change work does your group (the group from the previous day) provide?




Part 2: Community Collaboration and Cultural Production

Community Meeting: Students will participate in a community meeting simulation where they represent
different organizations working on a similar issue.

 Step 1       You will facilitate the meeting. Start the meeting by thanking everyone for attending to discuss this very
              important issue that's been affecting the community. Let everyone know that there is a speaker's list going
              around and that if anyone wishes to speak on the issue at hand, they must sign up. Let them know that the
              meeting will begin in two minutes. (this allows students to sign up)

 Step 2       Once students have filled in the speaker's list, introduce the first speaker.


 Step 3       After the speaker is through with her/his statement, allow the audience to ask questions.


 Step 4       Repeat steps 2 and 3 until all the speakers have had their time. Make sure the power plant representatives
              go last.


 Step 5       After the simulation point out that there are many ways to fight for better conditions in our communities
              and they are all necessary. We need healing for the sick, education to prepare people to survive, laws to
              protect us, but if we want to make long-term lasting change, we have to address problems at their root and
              understand the bigger picture.




Part 3: Conclusive Dialogue/Critical Circular Exchange

End this section with a discussion on the issues they discussed during "the problem tree." Ask them what type of
social change work is needed to address the particular issue that they are working on?

Problems/Questions of the Day: How can we address community problems/issues?
Connection: What is our role in alleviating these issues?
Assessment: What was effective about your lesson plan

Resources and Notes

         Resources
 Gene Shackman, Ya-Lin Liu and Xun Wang. Measuring quality of life using free and public domain data. Social
 Research Update, Issue 47, Autumn, 2005. Available at http://sru.soc.surrey.ac.uk/
 Tina Bartolome, Social Change 101, for Sisters Rising Program modified from Yuri Kochiyama Leadership Institute

       Notes
 This lesson is designed for group work.
 You may adjust the case study according to your student population. Also, you may change up to the story to current
 studies. For example, recent studies on Bay View show that rates of residents (including youth) with asthma has been
 increasing.



Include Handouts and Worksheets.
                 CASE STUDY: BAY VIEW & BREAST CANCER
                      *This is a fictional story based on real facts.


      Once upon a time there was a neighborhood called Bay View Hunter’s Point.
One winter, during her routine physical check-up, longtime resident, Mrs. Jackson,
was told she had a lump in her breast. Mrs. Jackson was well-known in the
community because her sons were stars of [insert your high school here] basketball
team. After doing some more tests, she found out that she had developed breast
cancer. If she didn’t begin treatment immediately, the cancer would surely spread to
other parts of her body.
      By early spring, four more Black women under the age of 50 were diagnosed
with breast cancer. Come summertime, five more Black women develop breast
cancer. By the following winter, Bay View Hunter’s Point becomes known as a
breeding ground for breast cancer victims, particularly for Black women. Because
most people don’t have health insurance, many people don’t get regular physical
exams and by the time breast cancer is detected, it’s already in a late stage.
      A few concerned family members start asking some questions and find out some
interesting information. Breast cancer and cervical cancer rates in Bay View are 20%
higher than the rest of the city. This community also has two existing power plants
and a naval shipyard which all contain and emit tons of toxic waste and substances
like asbestos, lead, and radioactive materials. The San Francisco Energy Company
(SFEC) is in the middle of building a third power plant in the Bay View Hunters Point
district. When finished, the plant would be located 1.6 miles from a local school and
make Bay View Hunter’s Point the district with more power plants than any area its
size in the nation. The SFEC claims that it can’t be proved that the power plants are
linked to the breast cancer rates. They suggest that it’s because of increased poverty
and inadequate gynecological care rather than toxic waste and pollution.
      The San Francisco Department of Health sets up a Breast Cancer clinic in the
neighborhood to help treat the growing numbers of patients. When one of the power
plants has a leakage, the SF Dept of Health sets up a shelter for the neighbors whose
homes were affected. People in the neighborhood begin volunteering at the clinic and
shelter to help. Most people know someone who has developed breast or cervical
cancer.
        Several other organizations start to form as neighbors become more and more
concerned and angry about what is happening. Lawyers in the hood think the villagers
should sue the power plants. They set up an organization, called Lawyers for Health
Equity, to give legal advice to victims of breast cancer and figure out how to sue for
damages. Other neighbors decide to educate girls and women about how to conduct
breast exams, what to do if you get breast cancer and the link between toxic
environments and breast cancer. They set up a school called School of Breast Cancer
Prevention.
        Finally, at a town meeting, a group of neighbors get together to make a
proposal. They are sick and tired of losing family and friends to breast cancer and
they want to change the situation. They do not think the SF Dept of Health, Lawyers
for Health Equity or the School of Breast Cancer Prevention will end the number of
breast cancer victims. They propose that the hood unit and go up to the power plants
to demand that they shut down. They form an organization called People Organized
to Save our Hood.
        The mayor and other politicians disagree, saying Bay View needs the power
plants because they provide jobs and that there’s no proof that the power plants cause
cancer.
        The hood is split – those who want to maintain the clinics, those who want to
sue the power plants, those who want to educate women and girls about the problem
and those who want to march up to the power plants and confront the owners.


*The Bay View & Breast Cancer was modified by Tina Bartolome from “Raining Rocks Story” developed by People
Organized to Win Employment Rights   Group 1 Handout

Your group represents the San Francisco Department of Health
Department.
“The San Francisco Department of Health sets up a Breast Cancer clinic
in the neighborhood to help treat the growing numbers of patients.
When one of the power plants has a leakage, the SF Dept of Health sets
up a shelter for the neighbors whose homes were affected. People in the
neighborhood begin volunteering at the clinic and shelter to help.”

1. What are your groups goals?
2. What are your methods of achieving them?
3. Would your group’s methods be successful in stopping the rocks?
Why or why not?
4. Does your group’s methods change the power relations in the
community?

Pick one spokesperson who can explain your answers to the larger
group.
Group 2 Handout


Your group represents the Lawyers for Health Equity.


“Lawyers in the hood think the villagers should sue the power plants. They
set up an organization, called the Lawyers for Health Equity, to give legal
advice to victims of breast cancer and figure out how to sue for damages.”

1. What are your groups goals?
2. What are your methods of achieving them?
3. Would your group’s methods be successful in stopping the rocks? Why
or why not?
4. Does your group’s methods change the power relations in the
community?

Pick one spokesperson who can explain your answers to the larger group.
Group 3 Handout


Your group represents the School of Breast Cancer Prevention.


“Other neighbors decide to educate girls and women about how to conduct
breast exams, what to do if you get breast cancer and the link between toxic
environments and breast cancer. They set up a school called School of
Breast Cancer Prevention.”

1. What are your groups goals?
2. What are your methods of achieving them?
3. Would your group’s methods be successful in stopping the rocks? Why
or why not?
4. Does your group’s methods change the power relations in the
community?

Pick one spokesperson who can explain your answers to the larger group.
Group 4 Handout
Your group represents the People Organized to Save our Hood.


“Finally, at a town meeting, a group of neighbors get together to make a
proposal. They are sick and tired of losing family and friends to breast
cancer and they want to change the situation. They do not think the SF
Dept of Health, Lawyers for Health Equity or the School of Breast Cancer
Prevention will end the number of breast cancer victims. They propose that
the hood unite and go up to the power plants to demand that they shut
down. They form an organization called People Organized to Save our
Hood.”

1. What are your groups goals?
2. What are your methods of achieving them?
3. Would your group’s methods be successful in stopping the rocks? Why
or why not?
4. Does your group’s methods change the power relations in the
community?

Pick one spokesperson who can explain your answers to the larger group.
Group 5 Handout


Your group represents the Power Plants.


  This community also has two existing power plants and a naval shipyard
which all contain and emit tons of toxic waste and substances like asbestos,
    lead and radioactive materials. The San Francisco Energy Company
   (SFEC) is in the middle of building a third power plant in the Bayview
Hunters Point district. When finished, the plant would be located 1.6 miles
from a local school and make Bayview Hunters Point the district with more
  power plants than any area its size in the nation. The SFEC claims that it
 can’t be proved that the power plants are linked to the breast cancer rates.
     They suggest that it’s because of increased poverty and inadequate
 gynecological care rather than toxic waste and pollution… The mayor and
other politicians say Bayview needs the power plants because they provide
     jobs and that there’s no proof that the power plants cause cancer.”

1. Which group is the most threatening to you and your goal to build and
                             maintain the power plants?
                 2. What is your strategy in dealing with the groups?

       Pick one spokesperson who can explain your answers to the larger
                    group.Community Guest Speaker
Description: After learning about social change work and how it affects our daily lives, students will have a chance to
meet a member of an organization. Ideally, the organization will be local (in terms of where the school is located).

Lesson Plan Materials:
      questions handout



Lesson Plan          Definition and Rationale for choosing this word, phrase, or             Idea for pre-teaching of
VOCABULARY           concept                                                                 front-loading the concept



Part 1: Cultural Energizer

Tell Me Your Name: Students will be sitting in a circular formation (or as close as a circle as possible) and
we will help our guests learn everyone's names by introducing ourselves. The objective of this cultural
energizer is to get folks comfortable with their classmates and the guest speakers.

 Step 1        Pass out name tags to everyone.


 Step 2        Instruct students and teachers to write down the name of the person to their write. In addition, they have
               to write down something they appreciate about that person.

 Step 3        Ask for a volunteer to begin and go counter-clockwise (the direction of who is being introduced).




Part 2: Community Collaboration and Cultural Production

Community Presentation: Ask guest speaker to send an outline of their presentation two weeks prior.

 Step 1        Pass out questions handout so that students can write down questions while presentation is going on.




Part 3: Conclusive Dialogue/Critical Circular Exchange

Allow students the opportunity to ask questions.

Problems/Questions of the Day: What are community organizations doing to address the problems/issues/needs of the
neighborhood? What kind of social change work are they engaged in?
Connection: Students will begin to think about how they can serve their neighborhoods. What role do we play in social
change work?
Assessment: Are students able to make connections with today's presentation and the social change 101 and problem
tree done previously this week?
Resources and Notes

           Resources

       Notes
 Teachers should make arrangements with organization two weeks prior to presentation day. Also, organizations
 should be working on a current campaign that is hopefully addressing one of the issues/problems that the group is
 working on.



Include Handouts and Worksheets.

                                  Introduction to Fundraising
Description: Students will be introduced to different Fundraising techniques and strategies.

Lesson Plan Materials:



Lesson Plan          Definition and Rationale for choosing this word, phrase, or               Idea for pre-teaching of
VOCABULARY           concept                                                                   front-loading the concept
Grant
Fundraising

Part 1: Cultural Energizer

Tell Me Your Name: Students will be sitting in a circular formation (or as close as a circle as
possible) and we will help our guests learn everyone's names by introducing ourselves. The
objective of this cultural energizer is to get folks comfortable with their classmates and the guest
speakers.

 Step 1        Pass out name tags to everyone.


 Step 2        Instruct students and teachers to write down the name of the person to their write. In addition, they have to
               write down something they appreciate about that person.

 Step 3        Ask for a volunteer to begin and go counter-clockwise (the direction of who is being introduced).




Part 2: Community Collaboration and Cultural Production

Community Presentation: Ask guest speaker to send an outline of their presentation two weeks prior.

 Step 1        Pass out questions handout so that students can write down questions while presentation is going on.




Part 3: Conclusive Dialogue/Critical Circular Exchange


Problems/Questions of the Day: How do organizations find funding? How do we find the money?
Connection: Throughout this unit, students have learned about their neighborhoods, how their neighborhoods have
transformed, how organizations have worked to address particular needs and issues, and the impact that social change
work has on the lives of people. How does this project allow students to contribute to social change work that is being
done?
Assessment: Do students realize the impact of their work in the community?

Resources and Notes

         Resources

         Notes


Include Handouts and Worksheets.

				
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