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7364_3269_4633_001_syllabus

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									                                             University of North Texas
                                 Department of Teacher Education and Administration



                                   EDEC 4633
                     Nurturing Children’s Social Competence

Course Catalog Description:
4633. Nurturing Children’s Social Competence. 3 hours. Facilitating the social and emotional skills of young
children. Incorporates an ecological approach to significant influences on self-esteem and self-concept including
diversity, family, creativity and individual differences. Includes analysis of play theory and research. Field experience
required. Prerequisite(s): EDEC 3613.

Course Objectives:
 Dominant theoretical views of social development as they pertain to EC-6th grade children, recognizing the wide
  range of individual differences in children.
 The diverse influences on the social and emotional development of children.
 The role of play in the social development of children.
 Components of social development, such as self-esteem, aggression, the formation of friendships, compliance with
  rules, expectations, and consequences.
 Issues related to cultural diversity and how to evaluate strategies that promote an anti-bias curriculum.
 Effective procedures for promoting prosocial behaviors in EC-6th grade children.
 The importance of classroom routines and procedures on the social development of children, as well as how
  children function in groups and collaborate with peers.
 Diverse beliefs of parenting practices, as well as ethical strategies to use with colleagues.

Course Materials:
 Turning Technology Clicker
 Textbook. Kostelnik, M. J., Whiren, A. P., Soderman, A. K., & Gregory, K. M. (2009). Guiding children’s social
  development and learning. (6th ed.). Clifton Park, NY: Delmar.
 Additional Required Readings (located on Blackboard)

Course Evaluation:
On-Line Assignments
       Part 1 Assessments (5 @ 20 points each)                100 points
       Part 2 Assignments (5 @ 20 points each)                100 points
Midterm Exam                                                  100 points
Final Exam                                                    100 points
Clicker Participation/On-Line Discussions                     100 points
UNT CDL Observations (3 @ 30 points each)                     90 points
Getting to Know You Form                                      10 points

Total class points                                            600 points

Course Requirements:
On-Line Assignments. Five assignments will be given during the semester. Each assignment consists of two parts, (1)
a 20-question multiple choice and true/false portion and (2) a short answer portion.
Exams. The Midterm and Final Exams will consist of multiple choice and true/false questions that will test student’s
factual, conceptual, and applied knowledge of the information presented in class. Both exams will be comprehensive
in nature and will take place on Blackboard.
Clicker Participation. Attendance will be verified during each class meeting through use of the student’s Turning
Technology Clicker. Course participation, both in class and on-line, is a key component of student’s grades.
Discussions. Five times throughout the semester, students are expected to log onto Blackboard and participate in a
discussion related to the assigned reading(s). Students are expected to post an original comment or question related
to the article(s) and reply to one classmate’s post.
Observations. Three times throughout the semester, students are expected to observe at the UNT Child Development
Laboratory. Specific observation assignments and their respective due dates are posted on Blackboard.

                                                      EDEC 4633 page 1
Course Grading Scale:

A = 540-600 points      (90%-100%)
B = 480-539 points      (80%-89%)
C = 420-479 points      (70%-79%)
D = 360-419 points      (60%-69%)
F = 359-0 points        (<59%)

Course Calendar:

           Date                 Discussion Topic             Reading Assignment         On-Line Assignment
          Week 1                Course Orientation
                              Making a Difference in
          Week 2                                                    Chapter 1
                                  Children’s Lives
                                 Building Positive
                              Relationships Through                 Chapter 3
                            Nonverbal Communication
                               Promoting Children’s
                             Developing Sense of Self                                   Getting to Know You
          Week 3                                                    Chapter 4
                                  Through Verbal                                             Form Due
                                  Communication
                              Supporting Children’s
                                                                    Chapter 5
                             Emotional Development
                              Supporting Children in
          Week 4                                                    Chapter 6
                                Stressful Situations
                                                           Meece & Soderman (2010)
                                                                                         Discussion 1 Due
                             CLASS MEETS ON-LINE           Mindness, Chen, & Brenner
                                                                                         Assignment 1 Due
                                                                    (2008)
          Week 5                 Enhancing Play                     Chapter 7
                                 Enhancing Play                     Chapter 7
                            Supporting Children’s Peer
          Week 6                Relationships and                   Chapter 8            Observation 1 Due
                                   Friendships
                                                             Hemmeter et al. (2008)
                                                           Jarrett & Waite-Stupiansky    Discussion 2 Due
                             CLASS MEETS ON-LINE
                                                                     (2009)              Assignment 2 Due
                                                           Ostrosky & Meadan (2010)
                            Supporting Children’s Peer
                                                                                          CPE Conference
          Week 7                Relationships and                   Chapter 8
                                                                                          Extra Credit Due
                                    Friendships
                              Influencing Children’s
                              Social Development By
                                                                    Chapter 9
                             Structuring the Physical
                                   Environment
                              Influencing Children’s
                              Social Development By
          Week 8                                                    Chapter 9
                             Structuring the Physical
                                   Environment
                             CLASS DOES NOT MEET                                        Midterm Exam Due
                                  Communicating
          Week 9                                                    Chapter 10
                              Expectations and Rules
                                  Communicating
                                                                    Chapter 10
                              Expectations and Rules
                             Implementing Solutions
         Week 10                                                    Chapter 11           Observation 2 Due
                                and Consequences
                                                                                         Discussion 3 Due
                             CLASS MEETS ON-LINE           Bordova & Leong (2008)
                                                                                         Assignment 3 Due
                             Implementing Solutions
         Week 11                                                    Chapter 11
                               and Consequences


                                                 EDEC 4633 page 2
                                     Handling Children’s
                                                                             Chapter 12
                                     Aggressive Behavior
                                     Handling Children’s
           Week 12                                                           Chapter 12
                                     Aggressive Behavior
                                                                                                        Discussion 4 Due
                                    CLASS MEETS ON-LINE                      Goss (2009)
                                                                                                        Assignment 4 Due
                                    Promoting Pro-Social
           Week 13                                                           Chapter 13
                                          Behavior
                                    Promoting Pro-Social
                                                                             Chapter 13
                                          Behavior
                                   Sexuality, Ethnicity, and
           Week 14                                                           Chapter 14                 Observation 3 Due
                                     Exceptional Needs
                                                                    Cho, Chen, & Shin (2010)
                                                                     Derman-Sparks (2009)               Discussion 5 Due
                                    CLASS MEETS ON-LINE
                                                                    Lee, Ramsey, & Sweeney              Assignment 5 Due
                                                                            (2008)
                                   Sexuality, Ethnicity, and                                         Children’s Book Review
           Week 15                                                           Chapter 14
                                     Exceptional Needs                                                  Extra Credit Due
                                  Making Ethical Judgments
                                                                             Chapter 15                  Final Exam Due
                                       and Decisions

Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS):
The following TEKS for Elementary Social Studies correspond to the information presented in this course.

Kindergarten:
(7) Economics. The student understands the importance of jobs. The student is expected to: (A) identify jobs in the home,
school, and community; and (B) explain why people have jobs.
(8) Government. The student understands the purpose of rules. The student is expected to: (A) identify purposes for having
rules; and (B) identify rules that provide order, security, and safety in the home and school.
(9) Government. The student understands the role of authority figures. The student is expected to: (A) identify authority
figures in the home, school, and community; and (B) explain how authority figures make and enforce rules.
(11) Culture. The student understands similarities and differences among people. The student is expected to: (A) identify
personal attributes common to all people such as physical characteristics; and (B) identify differences among people.
(12) Culture. The student understands how people learn about themselves through family customs and traditions. The
student is expected to: (A) identify family customs and traditions and explain their importance; and (B) compare family
customs and traditions; and (C) describe customs of the local community.

1st Grade:
(9) Economics. The student understands the value of work. The student is expected to: (A) describe the requirements of
various jobs and the characteristics of a job well performed; and (B) describe how specialized jobs contribute to the
production of goods and services.
(10) Government. The student understands the purpose of rules and laws. The student is expected to: (A) explain the need
for rules and laws in the home, school, and community; and (B) give examples of rules or laws that establish order, provide
security, and manage conflict.
(11) Government. The student understands the role of authority figures and public officials. The student is expected to: (A)
identify leaders in the community, state, and nation; and (B) describe the roles of public officials including mayor, governor,
and president; and (C) identify the responsibilities of authority figures in the home, school, and community.
(12) Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historic figures and ordinary
people. The student is expected to: (A) identify characteristics of good citizenship such as a belief in justice, truth, equality,
and responsibility for the common good.
(14) Culture. The student understands how families meet basic human needs. The student is expected to: (A) describe ways
that families meet basic human needs; and (B) describe similarities and differences in ways families meet basic human
needs.
(15) Culture. The student understands the importance of family beliefs, customs, language, and traditions. The student is
expected to: (A) describe various beliefs, customs, and traditions of families and explain their importance.

2nd Grade:
(13) Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historic figures and ordinary
people. The student is expected to: (A) identify characteristics of good citizenship such as a belief in justice, truth, equality,
and responsibility for the common good; and (C) identify ordinary people who exemplify good citizenship.

3rd Grade:
(10) Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historic figures and ordinary
                                                          EDEC 4633 page 3
people. The student is expected to: (A) identify characteristics of good citizenship such as a belief in justice, truth, equality,
and responsibility for the common good; and (C) identify and explain the importance of acts of civic responsibility, including
obeying laws and voting; and (D) identify ordinary people who exemplify good citizenship.
(11) Citizenship. The student understands the impact of individual and group decisions on communities in a democratic
society. The student is expected to: (A) give examples of community changes that result from individual or group decisions;
and (B) identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community.
(12) Culture. The student understands ethnic and/or cultural celebrations of the United States and other nations. The
student is expected to: (A) explain the significance of selected ethnic and/or cultural celebrations in Texas, the United States,
and other nations such as St. Patrick's Day, Cinco de Mayo, and Kwanzaa; and (B) compare ethnic and/or cultural
celebrations in Texas, the United States, and other nations.

4th Grade:
(20) Culture. The student understands the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to Texas.
The student is expected to: (A) identify the similarities and differences within and among selected racial, ethnic, and
religious groups in Texas; and (B) identify customs, celebrations, and traditions of various culture groups in Texas; and (C)
summarize the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups in the development of Texas.

5th Grade:
(23) Culture. The student understands the contributions of people of various racial, ethnic, and religious groups to the
United States. The student is expected to: (A) identify the similarities and differences within and among selected racial,
ethnic, and religious groups in the United States; and (B) describe customs, celebrations, and traditions of selected racial,
ethnic, and religious groups in the United States.

6th Grade:
(12) Government. The student understands alternative ways of organizing governments. The student is expected to: (A)
identify alternative ways of organizing governments such as rule by one, few, or many.
(13) Citizenship. The student understands that the nature of citizenship varies among societies. The student is expected to:
(A) describe roles and responsibilities of citizens in selected contemporary societies including the United States; and (B)
explain how opportunities for citizens to participate in and influence the political process vary among selected
contemporary societies; and (C) compare the role of citizens in the United States with the role of citizens from selected
democratic and nondemocratic contemporary societies.
(14) Citizenship. The student understands the relationship among individual rights, responsibilities, and freedoms in
democratic societies. The student is expected to: (A) identify and explain the importance of voluntary civic participation in
democratic societies; and (B) explain relationships among rights and responsibilities in democratic societies.
(15) Culture. The student understands the similarities and differences within and among cultures in different societies. The
student is expected to: (A) define the concepts of culture and culture region; and (B) describe some traits that define
cultures; and (C) analyze the similarities and differences among selected world societies.

Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities (PPR):
The following PPR domains, competencies, and skills correspond to the information presented in this course.

Domain 2, Creating a Positive, Productive Classroom Environment:
Competency 005, THE TEACHER KNOWS HOW TO ESTABLISH A CLASSROOM CLIMATE THAT FOSTERS LEARNING, EQUITY
AND EXCELLENCE AND USES THIS KNOWLEDGE TO CREATE A PHYSICAL AND EMOTIONAL ENVIRONMENT THAT IS SAFE
AND PRODUCTIVE, Letters A, B, C, D, E, F, G.

Competency 006, THE TEACHER UNDERSTANDS STRATEGIES FOR CREATING AN ORGANIZED AND PRODUCTIVE
LEARNING ENVIRONMENT AND FOR MANAGING STUDENT BEHAVIOR, Letters A, B, C, D, E, F, G, H, I, J.

Domain 4, Fulfilling Professional Roles and Responsibilities:
Competency 011, THE TEACHER UNDERSTANDS THE IMPORTANCE OF FAMILY INVOLVEMENT IN CHILDREN’S
EDUCATION AND KNOWS HOW TO INTERACT AND COMMUNICATE EFFECTIVELY WITH FAMILIES, Letters A, B, C, D, E, F.

Class Policies:
Disabilities Accommodation. “The University of North Texas complies with Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act and
with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. The University of North Texas provides academic adjustments and
auxiliary aids to individuals with disabilities, as defined under the law. Among other things, this legislation requires that all
students with disabilities be guaranteed a learning environment that provides for reasonable accommodation of their
disabilities. If you believe you have a disability requiring accommodation, please see the instructor and/or contact the Office
of Disability Accommodation at 940-565-4323 during the first week of class.”
Academic Integrity. Students are encouraged to become familiar with UNT’s policy on academic integrity:
http://www.unt.edu/policy/UNT_Policy/volume3/18_1_16.pdf. Academic dishonesty, in the form of plagiarism, cheating. or
fabrication, will not be tolerated in this class. Any act of academic dishonesty will be reported, and a penalty determined,
which may be probation, suspension, or expulsion from the university.
                                                         EDEC 4633 page 4
Student Conduct. Expectations for behavior in this class accord with the Code of Student Conduct: “Student behavior that
interferes with an instructor’s ability to conduct a class or other students' opportunity to learn is unacceptable and
disruptive and will not be tolerated in any instructional forum at UNT. Students engaging in unacceptable behavior will be
directed to leave the classroom and the instructor may refer the student to the Center for Student Rights and
Responsibilities to consider whether the student's conduct violated the Code of Student Conduct. The university's
expectations for student conduct apply to all instructional forums, including university and electronic classroom, labs,
discussion groups, field trips, etc.” See www.unt.edu/csrr.
Cell Phones and Laptop. Students should turn off cell phones when they are in class. This means vibrate as well as ring
modes. Also, there should be no texting during class. Laptops may be used in class for taking notes and for engaging in
learning activities for the course.
SETE. The Student Evaluation of Teaching Effectiveness (SETE) is expected for all organized classes at UNT. This brief online
survey will be made available to you at the end of the semester, providing you a chance to comment on how this class is
taught. I am very interested in the feedback I get from students, as I work to continually improve my teaching. I consider the
SETE to be an important part of your participation in this class.
Collection of Student Work. In order to monitor students' achievement, improve instructional programs, and publish
research findings, the Department of Teacher Education and Administration collects anonymous student work samples,
student demographic information, test scores, and GPAs to be analyzed by internal and external reviewers.
TK20. Some undergraduate and graduate education courses require assignments that must be uploaded and assessed in the
UNT TK20 Assessment System. This requires a one-time purchase of TK20, and student subscriptions are effective for seven
years from the date of purchase. Please go to the following link for directions on how to purchase TK20:
http://www.coe.unt.edu/tk20. Announcements regarding TK20 will also be posted on this website.
F-1 Students and Online Courses. To read INS regulations for F-1 students taking online courses, please go to
http://www.immigration.gov/graphics/services/visas.htm and select the link to "8 CFR 214.2(f)" in the table next to "F-1."
Paragraph (f)(6)(i)(G) A final rule with clarifications on the restriction can be found in a pdf file located at
http://www.immigration.gov/graphics/lawsregs/fr121102.pdf Within this document, refer to Section IX on page 9 with the
subject header "Online and Distance Education Courses." To comply with immigration regulations, an F-1 visa holder within
the United States may need to engage in an on-campus experiential component for this course. This component (which must
be approved in advance by the instructor) can include activities such as taking an on-campus exam, participating in an on-
campus lecture or lab activity, or other on-campus experience integral to the completion of this course. If such an on-campus
activity is required, it is the student's responsibility to do the following: 1) Submit a written request to the instructor for an
on-campus experiential component within one week of the start of the course. (2) Ensure that the activity on campus takes
place and the instructor documents it in writing with a notice sent to the International Advising Office. The UNT
International Advising Office has a form available that you may use for this purpose. Because the decision may have serious
immigration consequences, if an F-1 student is unsure about his or her need to participate in an on-campus experiential
component for this course, s/he should contact the UNT International Advising Office (telephone 940-565-2195 or email
international@unt.edu) to get clarification before the one-week deadline.

                          Conceptual Framework: The Educator as Agent of Engaged Learning




Improving the quality of education in Texas schools and elsewhere is the goal of programs for the education of educators at
the University of North Texas. To achieve this goal, programs leading to teacher certification and advanced programs for
educators at the University of North Texas 1) emphasize content, curricular, and pedagogical knowledge acquired through
research and informed practice of the academic disciplines, 2) incorporate the Texas Teacher Proficiencies for learner-
centered education, 3) feature collaboration across the university and with schools and other agencies in the design and
delivery of programs, and 4) respond to the rapid demographic, social, and technological change in the United States and the
world.

The educator as agent of engaged learning summarizes the conceptual framework for UNT's basic and advanced programs.
This phrase reflects the directed action that arises from simultaneous commitment to academic knowledge bases and to
learner centered practice. "Engaged learning" signifies the deep interaction with worthwhile and appropriate content that
occurs for each student in the classrooms of caring and competent educators. "Engaged learning" features the on-going
interchange between teacher and student about knowledge and between school and community about what is worth
knowing. This conceptual framework recognizes the relationship between UNT and the larger community in promoting the
commitment of a diverse citizenry to life-long learning. In our work of developing educators as agents of engaged learning,
                                                         EDEC 4633 page 5
we value the contributions of professional development schools and other partners and seek collaborations which advance
active, meaningful, and continuous learning.

Seeing the engaged learner at the heart of a community that includes educators in various roles, we have chosen to describe
each program of educator preparation at UNT with reference to the following key concepts, which are briefly defined below.

1. Content and curricular knowledge refer to the grounding of the educator in content knowledge and knowledge
construction and in making meaningful to learners the content of the PreK-16 curriculum.
2. Knowledge of teaching and assessment refers to the ability of the educator to plan, implement, and assess instruction in
ways that consistently engage learners or, in advanced programs, to provide leadership for development of programs that
promote engagement of learners.
3. Promotion of equity for all learners refers to the skills and attitudes that enable the educator to advocate for all students
within the framework of the school program.
4. Encouragement of diversity refers to the ability of the educator to appreciate and affirm formally and informally the
various cultural heritages, unique endowments, learning styles, interests, and needs of learners.
5. Professional communication refers to effective interpersonal and professional oral and written communication that
includes appropriate applications of information technology.
6. Engaged professional learning refers to the educator's commitment to ethical practice and to continued learning and
professional development.

Through the experiences required in each UNT program of study, we expect that basic and advanced students will acquire
the knowledge, skills, and dispositions appropriate to the educational role for which they are preparing or in which they are
developing expertise.

A broad community stands behind and accepts responsibility for every engaged learner. UNT supports the work of PreK-16
communities through basic and advanced programs for professional educators and by promoting public understanding of
issues in education.

        The instructor reserves the right to change, revise, modify, or delete any portion of this syllabus.
                         Any changes will be announced in class and/or via Blackboard.




                                                          EDEC 4633 page 6

								
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