MONASH UNIVERSITY FACULTY OF MEDICINE NURSING AND HEALTH

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                                   MONASH UNIVERSITY

              FACULTY OF MEDICINE, NURSING AND HEALTH SCIENCES

                                Extracts from Council Minutes
                               Meeting 3/2003 held on 5 May 2003

6.2    Professor of Nursing, Monash Gippsland, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health
       Sciences

       The Executive Committee of Council, acting under its delegation from Council, met on 3
       April 2003 and approved an offer of appointment to a Chair of Biotechnology, Department of
       Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, and an offer of a five-year appointment as a
       Professor of Nursing, Monash Gippsland, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences,
       as per the reports of the selection committee, be made to the persons named in the documents
       circulated to members of the Executive Committee.

6.3    Proposal to establish and fill the position of Professor of Neurosciences/ Director of
       Neurology

6.4    Professor of Health Services Research and Director, Monash Institute of Health Services
       Research, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

       The Executive Committee of Council, acting under its delegation from Council, met on 15
       April 2003 and approved the proposal to establish and fill the position of Professor of
       Neurosciences/Director of Neurology, as detailed I the document circulated to members of the
       Executive Committee and approved an offer of appointment as a Professor of Health Services
       Research and Director, Monash Institute of Health Services Research, Faculty of Medicine,
       Nursing and Health Sciences as per the report of the selection committee, be made to the
       person named in the document circulated to members of the Executive Committee.

       RESOLUTION

       Council noted the approvals granted by the Executive Committee of Council at its meetings
       held on 3 and 15 April 2003.

11.1.1 Acceptance of Offers

       Council noted that the following had accepted the indicated offers of appointment approved by
       the Special Professorial Appointments Committee of Council:

          •   Professor Colin Gibbs – Emeritus Professor



11.1.4 Professor and Head, School of Rural Health – appointment

       Council approved an offer of appointment as a Professor of Rural Health, including a 5-year
       appointment as Head, School of Rural Health, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health
       Sciences, as per the report of the selection committee, be made to the person named in the
       document presented.

11.1.5.2Professor of Neurosciences and Director of Neurology, Department of Medicine,
        Southern Clinical School, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, and
        Southern Health
                                                                                             2


      Council approved the establishment of the selection committees for appointments to the
      following positions - …. Professor of Neurosciences and Director of Neurology, Faculty of
      Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences – as detailed in the document presented.




26 May 2003
                                                                                                  3

                                   MONASH UNIVERSITY

               FACULTY OF MEDICINE, NURSING AND HEALTH SCIENCES

                           Extracts from Minutes of Academic Board
                              Meeting 2/2003 held on 9 April 2003


14.    REPORT OF THE BOARD OF THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE, NURSING AND
       HEALTH SCIENCES

       14.1    Receipt of Report of Meeting 2/2003

               Academic Board received and noted the Report of Meeting 2/2003 of the Board of the
               Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, held on 12 March 2003.

       14.2    Professor of Neurosciences/Director of Neurology

               Academic Board endorsed for transmission to Council the proposal to fill the position
               of Professor of Neurosciences/Director of Neurology, subject to approval by the
               Committee of Deans.




16 June 2003
                                                                                                      4

Report to Faculty Board on Activities of the Faculty Foundation.

The Faculty Foundation has now been in operation for 18 months and is actively engaged in the
process of building alumni relations and in fundraising for a number of specific projects. The Faculty
employs 2 administrative staff on fixed term appointments to administer these projects. Mr. George
Petridis looks after alumni matters and Ms. Janine Barrett administers the remaining projects. The
Foundation has a working group with representation from each of the Schools and a Board which has
both University and non- University membership. The Foundation works closely with the University
Foundation and Public Affairs. The process of fund raising is difficult and considerable effort goes
into relationship building both with potential individual donors as well as corporate donors. The
demands on these donors are great and the competition for their hearts and minds is fierce. It will
therefore take time before our efforts are seen to bear fruit.

Reports on specific projects


1. Community Relations-Alumni and Parents Groups

     This group has been extremely active:

     •   Over 120 parents attended a welcoming function on Sunday March 23 addressed by the Dean,
         Chris Browne , Adam Braithwaite (President of MUMUS) and Mrs. Wendy Conyers
         (President of the Monash parents group). The parents were shown the developments which are
         taking place including the building of the CMHSE.
     •   A 40th anniversary working group has been formed under the Chairmanship of Professor John
         Murtagh.
     •   The 40th anniversary celebrations were launched with a conference at the Monash Centre in
         Prato in May. Around 110 delegates attended, one third of whom were alumni. The profits of
         the conference are going to the Foundation ( ~ $5000).
     •   The working group is arranging the academic day and gala ball to be held at the Exhibition
         Centre on October 25. They are hoping to attract 1000 Monash medical alumni and staff along
         with partners.
     •   A video production on the “First 40 Years” is underway.
     •   The AMMG has been wound down and funds sitting in their account will be placed in a
         special purpose account in the Foundation to support needy students. All Alumni activities are
         now coordinated by the Monash Medical Alumni.
     •   The Monash parents and alumni have responded positively to a call to provide students with
         part time employment.



2.       Eric Glasgow Appeal

         The inaugural Eric Glasgow lecture was presented by Professor Ernle Young from Stanford on
         “Ethical issues related to stem cell research”. It was extremely well attended and was followed
         by a formal dinner with the Federal Health Minister, Senator Kay Patterson, in attendance.
         Further funds were raised for the appeal as a consequence of these events.

3.       Research Centre for the Study of Child Abuse

         The Faculty Executive has supported the establishment of this Centre which is a joint effort
         between Monash and Australians Against Child Abuse. A business plan has been developed
                                                                                                 5

       and funds are currently being sought from private donors and Government Departments to
       support the running of the Centre.

4.     Vivian Bulwinkel Appeal

       An official launch of the Chair of Palliative Care Nursing took place on April 9 with Appeal
       Patron, Ita Buttrose, in attendance. The appointment of Professor Margaret O’Connor has
       raised the profile of the appeal which is now actively in progress.

5.     Centre for Medical and Health Science Education

       Fund raising through corporate sources is still underway although progress is slow.

6.     Research Scholarships

       Associate Professor Rod Devenish has developed proposals for industry to support
       scholarships for Doctoral and Post-doctoral students. These are currently being presented at
       various functions and fora arranged by the Foundation.

7.     Fundraising to date

       Donations       $108,000
       Bequests        $151,000.



Leon Piterman

July 2003
                                                                                                          6

                                      MONASH UNIVERSITY


FACULTY OF MEDICINE, NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES
                     REPORT OF THE ASSOCIATE DEAN (TEACHING)

The Steering Committee recommends that Faculty Board invite Associate Professor T. Luff to speak
to this report.

1. Faculty Undergraduate Education Committee
   1.1. Matters of Policy
       1.1.1. Assessment Policy (Attachment 1)
              A policy is attached for approval.

       1.1.2.   Unit Evaluation
                Policy on this matter is under development

       1.1.3.   Equitable Examinations for NESB students (revision)
                Feedback is being taken for the revision of this policy, following the initial
                implementation for the Semester 1 examination period.

                Issues to be addressed include:
                    • Improved advertisement of the policy and pro forma
                    • Student perception that there is a stigma attached to using these arrangements
                    • Widespread confusion between (a) international students and (b) students
                         from Non English Speaking Backgrounds. The latter is a much larger group,
                         of which international students are often, but not always, members.
                    • Confusion among students between the role and services of the Language and
                         Learning Service, and of Monash International

                The Steering Committee recommends that Faculty Board note the information.

       1.1.4. Results policies (Attachment 2)
       Results policies for the Bachelor of Social Work and the MUCAPS courses are under
       preparation. The results policy for the Bachelor of Radiography is attached for approval.

       Courses must advertise their policies on the course website, once approved.

             The Steering Committee recommends that Faculty Board note the progress on results
       policies.

   1.2. Staff Development Opportunities
       1.2.1.   Higher Education Development Unit – Secondment
                Faculty academic staff are invited to express their interest in secondment to HEDU for
                part of Semester 2. The aim of the secondment is to facilitate collaborative work
                between faculties and HEDU on projects to enhance the quality of learning and
                teaching in faculties.

                Please contact A/P Valerie.Clifford@celts.monash.edu.au for further information.
       1.2.2.   Higher Education Development Unit - Internationalisation
                Expressions of interest are invited from staff interested in joining an Action Learning
                group to explore the concept of internationalization of the curriculum and its
                implications for their courses and units.
                                                                                                    7

            The group will review the literature and then review one of their own courses or units’
            current orientation to internationalisation. Participants will then be invited to develop
            and evaluate one of the ideas about internationalisation in their own course/unit with
            the support of the group.

            Please contact A/P Valerie.Clifford@celts.monash.edu.au for further information

1.3. Items for Noting
   1.3.1.   University Council (5/5)
       1.3.1.1. Legislation
                CL3/2003/62
               Council made the legislation titled Statute 4.1 - Discipline (Amendment
               No 1 2003) and Faculties Regulations (Amendment No 1 2003).

               (Files RMO1998/0760, 2001/0718)
              For action or noting by: Deans and Faculty Managers/Faculty
              Registrar – Arts, Information Technology and Medicine, Nursing and
              Health Sciences, University Solicitor
   1.3.2.   Academic Board (9/04)
       1.3.2.1. Monash Values
                RMO2002/0263
               Documentation was circulated. (p 121-122)

               Professor Gary Bouma, Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research & Development) spoke
               to this item.

               Members provided a range of suggestions and were requested to forward comments
               / suggestions to Professor Bouma.

              Academic Board received and commented on the draft discussion paper “Monash
       Values”.

1.4. Approvals
   1.4.1. Financial and administrative issues
       1.4.1.1. Teaching percentages: Bachelor of Behavioural Neurosciences (Attachment
               3)
                The attached information is reported to FUEC for entry into Callista. This
                information is required for budget allocation

       1.4.1.2. Convenors
           1.4.1.2.1. BMS3011 Biomedical basis of disease 1
                      The convenor for this unit will now be Dr Marco Bonollo

            1.4.1.2.2.   BNS3041 Brain development and memory
                         The convenor for this unit will now be Dr Nikki Rickard

       1.4.1.3. Offering
           1.4.1.3.1. BME1111 Science, Culture and Origins
                       This unit will not run in 2004, as the convenor will be on leave. Three
                       other elective units remain available to students in semester 1.

            1.4.1.3.2.   BME1122 Human affairs: Health, environment and sexual difference
                                                                                                    8

                          It was approved to add a semester 1 offering to this unit, and to change the
                          code to BME1120 to reflect this change.

      1.4.2.   New courses
               The Bachelor of Biomedical Sciences/Bachelor of Economics was approved subject to
               minor amendments at meeting 3/03. The amended proposal will be forwarded to
               Faculty Board when received.

      1.4.3.   Major Course amendments
               There were no major course amendments proposed at meeting 3/03.

      1.4.4.   Minor Course Amendments
               There were no minor course amendments proposed at meeting 3/03.
   1.5. New Unit Proposals
      1.5.1.   BNS4100 (Attachment 4)
      1.5.2.   BNS4200 (Attachment 5)
               The semesterisation of the BNS honours year was approved at meeting 3/03.
                      The Steering Committee recommends that Faculty Board ratify the new
                      course proposals.
   1.6. Unit Amendments
      There were no unit amendments proposed at meeting 3/03.
   1.7. Disestablishments
       The following requests to disestablish units were approved. These disestablishments
       represent the rationalisation of duplicate units. Under Strategic Cost Management,
       schools will be charged a fee for each unit offered, and associated costs (eg.
       redevelopment)
      1.7.1.   GHS1441/M/S/N/H
      1.7.2.   GHS1443/M/S/N/H
      1.7.3.   GHS2445/M/S/N/H
      1.7.4.   GHS2446/M/S/N/H
      1.7.5.   GHS3541/M/S/N/H
      1.7.6.   GHS3543/M/S/N/H
      1.7.7.   GHS4546/M/S/N/H
      1.7.8.   NUR1441/M/S/N/H
      1.7.9.   NUR2445/M/S/N/H
      1.7.10. NUR2446/M/S/N/H
      1.7.11. NUR3543/M/S/N/H
Disestablishments cont.
      The following units have been replaced, and all students completing these versions
      have now completed the old structure.
      1.7.12. SWK3110 Social Work I
      1.7.13. SWK3130 Social Work Perspectives on Human Development I
                                                                                                9

       1.7.14. SWK3140 Social Work Perspectives on Human Development II
       1.7.15. SWK3150 Social Work Research I
       1.7.16. SWK3160 Social Work Research II
       1.7.17. SWK3200 Social Work and Administration II
       1.7.18. SWK3210 Contexts of Social Work Practice I
       1.7.19. SWK4510 Social Work III
       1.7.20. SWK4520 Social Work IV
       1.7.21. SWK4830 Contexts of Social Work Practice II

2. Report from University Education Committee for information

   The Steering Committee recommends that Faculty Board invite Associate Professor T. Luff to
   speak to this item.

   2.1. Education Committee 3/2003(21 May 2003)
        • The Education Committee will be restructured. Four standing Sub-Committees
           will be established, on Academic Policy, Quality, Flexibility and
           Internationalisation. This structure reflects the issues addressed in the new
           Learning and Teaching Plan. Working Parties will be created to deal with specific
           issues (Graduate Attributes, Assesssment) and disbanded on the delivery of their
           report.
        • The Faculty’s budget proposal for the LTP implementation funding was approved
        • There will be a review of the Exclusion for Unsatisfactory Progress policy and
           procedures

3. Report from CADeT for information

   The Steering Committee recommends that Faculty Board invite Associate Professor T. Luff to
   speak to this item.

   3.1. CADeT 3/2003 (19 June 2003)
        • The University is upgrading to a new version of WebCT. This will be covered by
          the WebCT liaison position outlined in the Faculty LTP budget proposal approved
          at Education Committee on 21 May.
                                                                                                      10

                                     ASSESSMENT POLICY
                         Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

Based on the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education Code of Practice (May 2000)

                                               Introduction
Assessment refers to the processes designed to measure the outcomes of educational activities,
specifically in terms of the level of knowledge acquired, an understanding of and application of course
content, and the acquisition of relevant skills and professional behaviours fundamental to practice.
Well designed assessments allow for students to be graded, most importantly in pass and fail groups,
but specific criteria and procedures can be developed to allow for a more detailed grading of students.
Such assessments are the basis for decisions on progress through a course and as an exit point from the
course with the award of specific degrees.

Assessments can provide students with an evaluation of their performance in meeting the specified
objectives of the course. In addition, assessments can make an important contribution to the teaching
and learning process by signaling the importance of particular course content, concepts and skills.
Assessment can also be designed to provide students feedback on their learning in order to improve
their performance. Finally it can contribute valuable information on the effectiveness of the
course/unit

Section 3 of the Monash University Education Policy (Appendix I) specifies the principles governing
assessment procedures and practices in the university.

Assessment within Monash University is governed by the university’s Statute 6.1.5 – Examinations
and Examination Regulations (Appendix II).


                                     1.      General Principles


The Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences has applied specific procedures for:



        1.1     The design, approval, supervision and revision of the assessment processes for
                academic progression and awards.

        1.2     Determining the balance of knowledge, skills and professional behaviours to be
                demonstrated by students throughout the course.

        1.3     Using a range of assessment methods that best match the course objectives, including
                both formative and summative assessments.



2.      Assessment Procedures


        2.1     Framework

                        2.1.1 The scheduling and amount of assessment is consistent with an
                        effective and appropriate measurement of the students achievement of
                        learning outcomes and course objectives, and effectively supports learning.
                                                                                        11


             2.1.2 The rationale for all assessments used by the faculty should be
             explicit, and such assessments should have demonstrated validity and
             reliability.




2.2   Construction


             2.2.1 All staff members involved in the assessment of students are trained
             and competent to undertake their roles and responsibilities.


             2.2.2 A mechanism is in place to regularly review and further develop
             assessment regulations.


2.3   Marking


             2.3.1 Transparent criteria for the aggregation of marks and grades with the
             rules and regulations for progression, final awards and classifications are
             published.


2.4   Standards


             2.4.1 Rigorous assessment practices are consistently implemented to ensure
             that an academic and professional standard for conferring of awards is
             established and maintained at the appropriate level and student performance is
             consistently measured against this standard.


             2.4.2 The maintenance and development of academic standards is
             periodically evaluated.


      2.5    Quality Assurance



             2.5.1   All assessments are conducted with rigour and fairness, with due

             regard for security.




             2.5.2 The membership, procedures, powers and accountability of
             assessment panels and boards of examiners is clearly defined and consistently
             implemented.
                                                                                                  12



         2.6     Decision Making


                         2.6.1 Mechanisms are in place to deal efficiently with breaches of
                         assessment regulations and to resolve grievances and appeals against
                         assessment decisions.

                         2.6.2 All assessment decisions are systematically recorded, documented
                         and published.


                         2.6.3 Decisions based on assessments are published as quickly as possible,
                         commensurate with the rigour of assessment and accuracy.



3.       Assessment and Learning

     3.1 Appropriate feedback is provided to students in such as way as to promote learning and
     facilitate improvement.
                                                                                                   13

        GUIDELINES FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

                        Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

                                             Introduction

These guidelines follow the broad principles of the faculty assessment policy document and are
designed to support the development of specific assessment procedures in undergraduate and
postgraduate courses.

The guidelines provide a framework to maintain and enhance quality assurance in assessments for the
faculty, students and staff. They can be used to meet the needs and decision-making processes of
those with responsibility for undergraduate and postgraduate course and unit assessments, by
providing guidance on what constitutes good practice. Further it is expected that each course will
develop specific procedures in accordance with these guidelines.



                                     1.       General Principles


The Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences has applied specific procedures for:


   1.1 The design, approval, supervision and revision of the assessment processes for academic
   progression and awards. Such a procedure should include:


                        1.1.1 Details on the format of the proposed assessment method or
                        combination of methods.


                        1.1.2 Consideration of the validity, reliability, educational impact and
                        feasibility of the assessment method(s).


   1.1.3        Demonstrated links to the course objectives.


   1.1.4        Demonstrated links to the teaching and learning opportunities provided.


   1.1.5        Demonstrated links with, and impact on, other current assessments.


   1.1.6        The lines of responsibility for the conduct of the assessments.


   1.1.7        Details of proposed standard setting processes for pass/fail decisions.


   1.1.8        An outline of, and timeline for, evaluation of the assessments.
                                                                                                 14



     1.2   Determining the balance of knowledge, skills and professional behaviours to be
           demonstrated by students throughout the course. This can be achieved by:

           1.2.1   Defining clear objectives in the areas of knowledge, skills and professional
                   behaviours to be demonstrated at each level of the course.

           1.2.2   Using innovative assessment methods (e.g. portfolios) that allow students to
                   demonstrate their knowledge, skills and professional behaviours.

           1.2.3   Exposing students to learning environments and assessment methods that link
                   with their future continuing professional development requirements.



     1.3   Using a range of assessment methods that best match the course objectives, including
           both formative and summative assessments. This involves:

           1.3.1   Defining and adopting an assessment program that incorporates structured
                   formative assessments to provide feedback to students about their progress
                   toward course objectives, but is not used to grade students or effect
                   progression.

           1.3.2   Defining and adopting an assessment program that incorporates summative
                   assessments designed to make decisions about students and their suitability to
                   progress through the course.

           1.3.3   Using a range of summative assessment methodologies throughout the course
                   to collect evidence from a variety of sources about students’ performance in
                   the course objectives to inform faculty judgements about their progression
                   through the course.



2.   Assessment Procedures


     2.2   Framework

                   2.1.1 The scheduling and amount of assessment is consistent with an
                   effective and appropriate measurement of the students achievement of
                   learning outcomes and course objectives, and effectively supports learning.
                   This is achieved by:


                   2.1.1.1         Having demonstrable links between the curriculum, its staged
                                   delivery through teaching and learning opportunities, the
                                   specified outcomes and objectives and the appropriate
                                   scheduling, type and content of assessments.
                                                                                          15

             2.1.1.2        Utilising assessments that support student learning by
                            providing timely and relevant feedback on progress to
                            learning outcomes and objectives.



             2.1.2 The rationale for all assessments used by the faculty should be
             explicit, and such assessments should have demonstrated validity and
             reliability. This is achieved by:

             2.1.2.1        Providing clear, accurate and consistent information on
                            assessments to all staff, students, placement or practice
                            assessors, and examiners.


             2.1.2.2        Demonstrating the content validity and reliability of

                            assessments, including explicit and consistent use of

                            blueprinting and agreed marking and grading schemes.




             2.1.2.3        Publishing and consistently implementing clear criteria for

                            marking and grading of assessments (Appendix III).


             2.1.2.4        Enabling appropriate monitoring of assessments by statistical

                            analysis, and appropriate evaluation of outcomes to

                            demonstrate the fairness of the processes.




             2.1.2.5        Ensuring that the analysis of assessments is fed back to

                            question and case writers to assist in the review process.




             2.1.2.6        Establishing question banks that electronically store

                            assessment items including analysis data and information on

                            item use and modifications.




2.2   Construction
                                                                                                               16



            2.2.1 All staff members involved in the assessment of students are trained
            and competent to undertake their roles and responsibilities. This is achieved
            by:


            2.2.1.1         Establishing a strong link between teaching and assessment in staff position
                            descriptions.


            2.2.1.2         Having staff development programs in place to promote the theory and practice of
                            assessment and its implementation.



            2.2.1.3         Encouraging staff to develop new approaches to assessment
                            as well as implementing current best practices.


            2.2.1.4         Having a formal induction process available for new staff or
                            those with new responsibilities in the area of assessment.


            2.2.1.5         Providing training in assessment procedures and processes for
                            all staff.


            2.2.2 A mechanism is in place to regularly review and further develop
            assessment regulations. This is achieved by:


            2.2.2.1         Having processes in place to discuss any proposed changes
                            with staff, students and external assessors.

            2.2.2.2         Documenting time scales and procedures for implementing
                            changes.



2.3   Marking


            2.3.1 Transparent criteria for the aggregation of marks and grades with the
            rules and regulations for progression, final awards and classifications are
            published. This is achieved by:


            2.3.1.1         All written assignments and examination scripts, as far as
                            possible, being identified only by student number.


            2.3.1.1         Assessment panels and boards of examiners making their
                            determinations on de-identified student assessment results
                                                                                           17

             2.3.1.2         Performing an analysis of all marks and marking trends to
                             allow valid comparisons and provide evidence of consistent
                             standards.




2.4   Standards


             2.4.1 Rigorous assessment practices are consistently implemented to ensure
             that an academic and professional standard for conferring of awards is
             established and maintained at the appropriate level and student performance is
             consistently measured against this standard. This is achieved by:


             2.4.1.1         The use of criterion referencing for all assessments.


             2.4.1.2         The use of validated standard setting methods for pass/fail
                             decisions.


             2.4.1.3         An explicit decision on the use of compensatory standards
                             (where the pass is set on the total performance/score which is
                             the average performance across all assessment components)
                             and/or conjunctive standards (which involves an explicit
                             number of assessments that must be successfully completed
                             in order to pass overall).


             2.4.1.4         A detailed statistical analysis of all assessments every year to
                             assist with decision making and for comparison with previous
                             analyses to ensure consistency within, and across,
                             assessments.


             2.4.1.5         The methods of assessment demonstrate progress toward, or
                             achievement of, the intended learning outcomes and course
                             objectives.


             2.4.1.6         The methods of assessment allow the strengths and
                             weaknesses of the students to be identified.

             2.4.1.7         Where there is an integrated curriculum, assessments are
                             similarly integrated both horizontally and vertically.


             2.4.2 The maintenance and development of academic standards is
             periodically evaluated. This is achieved by:


             2.4.2.1         Maintaining an archive of sample marked scripts in all subject
                             areas.
                                                                                        18


      2.4.2.2           Undertaking an analysis of trends to identify relationship
                        between student entry scores and year-to-year assessment
                        outcomes.




2.5   Quality Assurance


      2.5.1     All assessments are conducted with rigour and fairness, with due

      regard for security. This is achieved by:




      2.5.1.1           Publishing the rules and regulations covering the conduct of

                        assessments (Appendix II).




      2.5.1.2           Having specific measures in place to prevent fraudulent

                        activities by students.




      2.5.1.3           Setting and adhering to guidelines and rules for invigilators

                        and assessors.




      2.5.1.4           Setting and adhering to procedures for the collation and

                        storage of assessment materials for a defined period of time.


      2.5.2 The membership, procedures, powers and accountability of
      assessment panels and boards of examiners is clearly defined and consistently
      implemented. This is achieved by (Appendix II):


      2.5.2.1           Requiring members of assessment panels and boards of
                        examiners to declare personal interest, involvement or
                        relationship with a student being assessed.
                                                                                          19

             2.5.2.2         Defining the minimum number of panel or board members to
                             be present for valid decisions to be made.


             2.5.2.3         Specifying the materials and analyses to be available at panel
                             or board meetings to assist with decisions.


             2.5.2.4         Having clear, previously agreed criteria for pass/fail decisions
                             by the panel or board.


             2.5.2.5         Having clear guidelines on the level of discretion to be
                             exercised in relation to students whose assessment
                             performance may have been adversely affected by
                             extenuating circumstances or special consideration (Appendix
                             IV).


             2.5.2.6         All decisions by the panel or board made without any
                             knowledge of an individual student’s identity..


             2.5.2.7         Having clear guidelines for the documentation of all decisions
                             and rationales to ensure consistent procedures and decisions
                             over time by panels and boards.



2.6   Decision Making


             2.6.1 Mechanisms are in place to deal efficiently with breaches of
             assessment regulations and to resolve grievances and appeals against
             assessment decisions (Appendix V). Specifically:

             2.6.1.1         There are defined criteria that permit students to request
                             remarking of assessments and clearly stated procedures for
                             such remarking.


             2.6.1.2         There are defined procedures in place for hearing concerns
                             over the conduct of assessments (Appendix VI).


             2.6.1.3         There are defined procedures for obtaining the specific
                             evidence required to investigate such matters (Appendix VI).


             2.6.1.4         Clear definitions of academic misconduct (plagiarism,
                             collusion, cheating and impersonation) in respect of
                             assessment (Appendix VI).
                                                                                                       20

                         2.6.1.5         The consequences and penalties of such behaviour are clearly
                                         documented (Appendix VI).


                         2.6.2 All assessment decisions are systematically recorded, documented
                         and published. Specifically:


                         2.6.2.1         There are clear statements of the responsibilities of those staff
                                         involved in the computation, checking and recording of
                                         decisions of assessments.


                         2.6.2.2         Back-up systems are in place for the electronic storage or
                                         transmission of assessment data.


                         2.6.2.3         Policies and procedures are in place for access to information
                                         on individual assessment decisions.



                         2.6.3 Decisions based on assessments are published as quickly as possible,
                         commensurate with the rigour of assessment and accuracy (Appendix II).
                         Specifically:

                         2.6.3.1         Students are notified in advance of the expected delays
                                         between the assessments and the publication of results.

                         2.6.3.2         The nature and timing of supplementary assessments is
                                         published at the beginning of the course/subject and such
                                         assessments would ideally take place within the semester, but
                                         may occur in semester breaks with the agreement of both
                                         student and faculty.

                         2.6.3.3         The period between the conduct of the assessment and
                                         publication of results will allow sufficient time for marking of
                                         scripts (electronically where suitable), the collation of
                                         assessments, analysis of results, and the preparation of reports
                                         for assessment panel or board of examiners.



3.       Assessment and Learning

     3.1 Appropriate feedback is provided to students in such as way as to promote learning and
     facilitate improvement. This is achieved by:


                 3.1.1   Providing timely feedback to students and teachers.

                         3.1.2 Clearly stating the nature and extent of feedback the students can
                         expect in relation to particular assessments.
                                                                          21

3.1.3 Providing feedback to students in the form of oral (individual or
group) or written feedback.
                                                                                                      22

            Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences
              Bachelor of Radiography and Medical Imaging
                           Results and Progression Policy

This policy applies to units offered by the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Science in the
Bachelor of Radiography and Medical Imaging and is effective for units undertaken from March 2003.

                           Requirement to Obtain a Unit Pass
Students must obtain at least 50% overall and at least 45% of the available marks for each component
of assessment in that unit unless otherwise stated in the Unit Manual.

                                   Deferred Examinations
Students may apply for a deferred examination through the special consideration process. The form
available at www.monash/edu.au/exams/special_consid.html
must be completed and submitted according to the instructions.

Supplementary Examination/Assessment
Supplementary examinations will only be offered to students when:

    •   The student has achieved an overall score of 40-49 for end of semester mark for a given unit
    •   The student has failed to achieve 50 % in no more than two units for a given year. The
        exception is year 1 when this rule can apply to three units
    •   If a student fails a deferred examination a supplementary examination will be offered at a time
        to be determined by the Chief Examiner

Unless otherwise notified, supplementary/deferred examinations for Year 1 and Year 2 students will
be held in the official university supplementary examination period which is usually mid January of
the following year. For Year 3 and Year 4 students, supplementary examinations will be held in
November of the same year.

                    Only one deferred examination per unit will be offered.
                  Only one supplementary examination per unit will be offered.

                                       Progression Policy
Students will only progress into the following year if they have obtained a Pass or greater in all
Academic and Clinical Units. Students may not carry an academic unit into the subsequent academic
year unless at the discretion of the Head of Department or the Dean.


A/Professor Marilyn Baird
Head, Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences
                                                                                                      23

Changes to teaching responsibility / contributions for BNS units.
BNS1072 – co-ordinator Dr Dianne Sheppard
This unit is being offered for the first time next semester (semester 2, 2003). Since having the unit
proposal approved by FUEC, a very minor change to the teaching percentages has been incurred due to
another interfaculty lecturer becoming involved. Dr Alfons Lawen of Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology has become involved and will be taking 2 of the 24 lectures for the unit. See changes to the
teaching responsibility below for the resulting percentage changes for each department.

BNS2022 – co-ordinator Professor Dexter Irvine
The changes in this particular unit were quite substantial due to a necessary reshuffling of teaching
load resulting from the withdrawal of Ramesh Rajan from teaching in the unit. This involved no
change of content, as Dexter Irvine took over all of the lectures, labs, and discussion groups previously
taught or co-taught by Ramesh. Consequently, the contribution of the Psychology Department
increased, and the contribution of Physiology decreased, by 18%. The only change in the content of
the course was the elimination of a lab on aspirin elimination taught by the Department of
Pharmacology, as a consequence of the decision not to schedule a prac in the first week of the
semester. This involved a reduction of 2% in the contribution of the Department of Pharmacology.

BNS3031 - co-ordinator A/Prof Alan Lill
There were also some small changes to the teaching contributions of the departments for this particular
unit. There was a slightly increased contribution by Psychology (3%), and the Pharmacology
Department became involved (6%). This was coupled with slightly reduced contributions from
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (2%) and Physiology (7%). As for other 3rd year BNS units, this
year was only the second year that it had been offered, and these changes were made in the interests of
the students in order to better meet the unit criteria. Andrew Lawrence (Pharmacology) became
involved in teaching at this level instead of teaching the material in a second year BNS subject; this
was always planned, but not possible until 2002. His contribution was on neurotransmitters, which was
thought to be more appropriate in 3rd Year. Margaret Niall (Physiology) left the university, which
explains the reduced contribution from that department. Russell Conduit (Psychology) took over all of
her lectures on neural regulation of food intake, metabolism and water balance; there were other minor
reshufflings to cope with this situation too, but none of them changed the unit content very
significantly.


BNS3052 – co-ordinator Dr Shantha Rajaratnam
There have been a few minor changes to the teaching contributions of the Pharmacology department
for this particular unit. These changes together account for the small (5%) increase in contribution
made by the Psychology Department.
Dr Andrew Lawrence (AL) from Pharmacology is a NHMRC Senior Research Fellow and has
indicated that he is no longer able to teach in this course. In 2002, Dr Richard Loiacono (RL) from
Pharmacology took up two of AL’s lectures, and Associate Professor Jenny Redman from Psychology
took up the rest. Professor Philip Beart’s (Pharmacology) actual contribution in 2001 and 2002
remained the same. In 2001, he ‘supervised’ lab classes, which were run by AL. This year these lab
classes were run by RL. Dr David Taylor from Pharmacy College still gave a single lecture during the
semester, however it was decided to treat him as a guest lecturer and provide a gift voucher as we do
for other guest lecturers.

Some changes were made to the laboratory programme/assessment for this subject. The major research
paper (laboratory report) was separated into one long report and two short reports. It was decided that
this would distribute the workload more evenly across the semester. The overall subject matter of the
research paper did not change.
The content of the remaining pieces of assessment did not change. However, some minor changes
were made to the weighting of individual pieces of assessment, based on comments from students and
                                                                                                       24

a re-assessment of the work involved. The smaller pieces of assessment were generally done in class
and did not warrant significant weighting. Therefore, their weighting was reduced from 10% to 5%.

BNS3062 – co-ordinator Dr Dianne Sheppard
This particular unit was run for the first time in 2001. Therefore, the changes to the contributions
reflect the ‘fine tuning’ of the content in order to better meet the unit criteria and do not involve any
appreciable changes in content. The percentage contribution of the Van Cleef Centre for
Neurosciences increased slightly because of the increased student numbers in third year. The site visit
to the Alfred Hospital involves dividing students into small groups for tours of the EEG/CT facilities.
The changes reflect the fact that there were 2 additional groups this year, and therefore more time and
effort required by Professor Elsdon Storey and the staff at the VCC.
                                                                         25

                  BNS TEACHING RESPONSIBILITY BY PERCENTAGE

BNS1072
                                               % (predicted) % (2003)
Psychology                                     93.00         87.00
Materials Engineering                           7.00          9.00
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology              0.00          4.00

BNS2011
                                               % (2001)       %(≥2002)
Psychology                                     55.00          55.00
Anatomy and Cell Biology                       45.00          45.00

BNS2022
                                               % (2001)       %(≥2002)
Psychology                                     56.00          76.00
Physiology                                     31.00          13.00
Van Cleef Centre for Nervous Diseases   9.00           9.00
Pharmacology                                    4.00          2.00

BNS3031
                                               % (2001)       %(≥2002)
Psychology                                     68.00          71.00
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology             19.00          17.00
Physiology                                     13.00           6.00
Pharmacology                                    0.00           6.00

BNS3041
                                               % (2001)       %(≥2002)
Psychology                                     82.00          82.00
Anatomy and Cell Biology                       9.00            9.00
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology             9.00            9.00

BNS3052
                                               % (2001)       %(≥2002)
Psychology                                     86.00          91.00
Pharmacology                                   12.00           9.00
Faculty of Pharmacy                            2.00            0.00

BNS3062
                                               % (2001)       %(≥2002)
Psychology                                     64.00          62.00
Physics                               16.00          16.00
Van Cleef Centre for Nervous Diseases 14.00          16.00
Pharmacology                                   4.00           4.00
Medicine                                       2.00           2.00
                                                                                                     26
                                                                                                           Comment:
                    Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

                               Subject/Unit Proposal Proforma
TO:                                  Secretary, Undergraduate Education Committee
                                      Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Clayton
                                     Campus
FROM:                                Dr Dianne Sheppard
                                     Department of Psychology
                                     School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine
DATE:                                16 July 2003
RE:                                   Subject/Unit proposal –
                                     BNS4100 Psychology Honours research project
The Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Undergraduate Education Committee at its
Meeting [Click here to insert meeting number and date] has endorsed for transmission to the Faculty
Board, the proposal to establish the subject/unit BNS4100 Behavioural Neuroscience Honours
Research Project.
The Faculty proposes to offer this subject/unit beginning in Semester 1, 2004 as an on-campus
subject/unit offered from the Clayton Campus.
The signatures following are confirmation that all procedures have been complied with in this matter,
and that the subject/unit complies with University academic policies.
I certify that all resource issues have been considered.


                  Dean (or Dean’s Nominee)                           Signature, Name and Date

I certify that:
• the academic issues relating to the introduction and adequate teaching of this unit have been fully
  considered by this Faculty,
• this proposed unit conforms to the Monash University academic policies and Education Committee
  policies and procedures and that,
• this version of the unit proposal is the version agreed to by the Faculty Board


            Head of School (Managing Faculty) or                     Signature, Name and Date
          Chair of Curriculum Committee (MBBS)

I certify that:
• the academic issues relating to the introduction and adequate teaching of this subject/unit have been
  fully considered by this Faculty,
• this proposed subject/unit conforms to Monash University academic policies and Education
  Committee policies and procedures,
• this version of the subject/unit proposal is the version agreed to by the Faculty Board.


     Associate Dean (Teaching) (Managing Faculty)                    Signature, Name and Date

This subject/unit proposal has implications for [Click here to insert name of other Faculty] . I certify
that consultation has occurred with respect to those implications and that agreement has been reached
between the relevant academic units.
                                                                              27

N/A

  Associate Dean (Teaching) (Associated Faculty)   Signature, Name and Date
                                                                                                    28



REASONS FOR INTRODUCTION OF SUBJECT/UNIT:


       This unit is introduced, along with its partner unit BNS4200, to bring Behavioural
       Neuroscience Honours studies into line with the Education Committee’s recommendation that
       the individual components within an honours program should be identified as separate
       subjects/units and allocated points (ECM 6/01). Thus, BNS4100 does not represent the
       introduction of a “new” unit in the sense that it introduces new content. Rather, it is one part
       of the partitioning of the existing 48-point Behavioural Neuroscience Honours course
       (BNS4000) into two units. BNS4100 takes on the major research project and literature review
       component of the existing BBNSc Honours course.


SUBJECT/UNIT NAME:

       Behavioural Neuroscience Honours: Research Project


SUBJECT/UNIT CODE:

       BNS4100


ALIAS TITLES AND CODES:

       None


SHORT TITLE:

       Maximum length of short title is forty characters.

       Behav Neurosci Hons Research Project


ABBREVIATION:

       Research Project


LEVEL:

       Level 4


COURSE LINKS:



       Behavioural Neuroscience Honours – Core units

       Note: Behavioural Neuroscience honours can only be taken by students studying the
       Behavioural Neuroscience degree.
                                                                                                      29

PROPOSED DATE OF INTRODUCTION AND REGULARITY OF OFFERING:



        Date of introduction: March 2004

        Regularity: Full-year unit offered every year, from the beginning of semester 1.


Is the unit for offer to International Students?   YES


ANTICIPATED TOTAL ENROLMENT:

         Up to 10 students (no more due to supervisory limitations).


LOCATION & MODE OF ENROLMENT:

        Offered at Clayton campus in on-campus mode only


RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS AND STUDENT SUPPORT:

        The required resources will vary greatly depending on the nature of the research projects
        students are engaged in.
        Essential equipment: The essential equipment required might include: access to animal house
        facilities, a chemical-based laboratory, single-cell recording facilities, dedicated computing
        equipment, and psychological tests. A requirement of all student research projects is that they
        must be designed around existing equipment within the department.
        Teaching Space: Teaching space related to students’ research projects would be provided in
        the supervisor’s laboratory. A small IT equipped lecture theatre is required for approximately
        40 hours of the unit (mainly 1st semester) for class meetings and student presentations. This
        can be accommodated within the Department’s facilities.
        Computing and IT Resources: All students will require access to student and staff computer
        networks for access to email, newsgroup, internet and electronic library facilities, and for word
        processing, statistical analysis, data storage and preparation of presentations. These resources
        are available within the Department of Psychology.
        Other Support Facilities: Access to library facilities at Clayton campus, and photocopying /
        printing services for the preparation of course materials.


INTER-FACULTY INVOLVEMENT:

        There is no inter-faculty involvement in the teaching/supervision of students.


INTER-DEPARTMENTAL INVOLVEMENT:

        No regular inter-departmental involvement is anticipated. However, on occasion, staff
        members from the Department of Psychological Medicine or external / affiliated research
        institutions (e.g. Howard Florey, Alfred Hospital) may offer to co-supervise a research project.
                                                                                                                                      30

DEPARTMENT LOADING:

     100% from Department of Psychology


LIBRARY APPROVAL:


     No impact beyond that which exists for the current course. Library impact statement pending.


CREDIT POINTS:

     42 points


WORKLOAD REQUIREMENT:

     On average, across the two semesters, students would be expected to commit an average of 42
     hours per week (38 to 44 in any given week) to activities related their research project. These
     hours will vary across the unit in accordance with the progress of the research. Formal contact
     is limited to regular meetings with the research supervisor(s) and series of six 2-3 hours
     seminars/workshops on generic skills required for conducting a research project. The majority
     of the students’ time will be spent in the design and implementation of the research, data
     collection and analyses. The remainder of the time would be spent in library searches, reading
     and preparation of the literature review, research papers and presentation material.


PREREQUISITES:

     Completed Bachelor of Behavioural Neuroscience Degree. There will be a minimum standard
     for entry given limited places of a mean of 70 across the four 3rd year BNS units.


COREQUISITES:

     BNS4200


PROHIBITED COMBINATIONS:

     This unit and its partner unit BNS4200 will replace BNS4000.

SUBJECT/UNIT SUMMARY:
      The Honours year in behavioural neuroscience aims to increase students' understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects
      of research, develop their analytic, research and communication skills, as well as provide students with advanced knowledge in
      specific areas of the discipline including laboratory techniques and other research-related skills. The unit is also designed to
      prepare students for higher degree studies. The relatively high weighting of this unit reflects the intensity of taking on a major
      research project in this field. Students will need to spend on average around 38-44 hours per week in the lab, initially developing
      the necessary laboratory skills required, then preparing and carrying out their research. In this unit students undertake two
      separate, though typically closely-related, research projects in a behavioural neuroscience area of their choosing from within the
      research strengths of the department. These projects will be conducted under the supervision of a member of academic staff with
      expertise in the area of the research. Under guidance from the supervisor, students will examine the research literature relevant to
      the area of the research, formulate two research questions, design and implement the experiments, collect and analyse the data
      and report the outcomes in either two separate research papers (5 – 7,000 words each) or a combined and somewhat larger single
      research paper (8 - 10,000 words), and a separate review of the literature (4,000 – 5,000 words). To aid in the design of the
      research and the analysis of the outcomes, students will have access to: a range of purpose built on-line resources, advice from a
      team of staff members with expertise in research design and analysis, and general feedback from staff on oral presentation of the
      research proposal. In addition, students will participate in a series of seminars and workshops designed to equip them with skills
                                                                                                                                    31

        in the use of various forms of electronic communication, advanced library skills, statistical and bibliographic software,
        presentation skills and the preparation of manuscripts of publishable quality.




SUBJECT/UNIT OBJECTIVES:

       On successful completion of BNS4100 Behavioural Neuroscience Honours Research Project
       students will:

        1. be able to critically review the scientific literature in their domain of behavioural
           neuroscience research,

        2. have acquired sound knowledge of the processes involved in research design,
           development and implementation through the completion of a research project,

        3. be able to execute and analyse the outcomes of a laboratory-based and/or field-based
           study,

        4. be proficient in the use of computer-based analysis, data-base, presentation, word
           processing and data-base/internet search engine software,

        5. be able to prepare a report of a research project in potentially publishable way,

        6. show communication skills in both oral and written presentation to audiences who are
           either specialists or non-specialists in the student’s field of research,

        7. have acquired a range of technical skills appropriate to their research area,

        8. have the capability to perform a variety of scientific procedures and techniques that are
           essential to the satisfactory completion and reporting of a research project,

        9. have gained the skills useful in pursuing a higher degree by research in behavioural
           neuroscience1.
1
Note that this objective is somewhat mark-dependent, i.e. students achieving a mark of H2B or lower
may not have achieved this objective.


LEARNING/TEACHING METHODS AND RELATIONSHIP TO OBJECTIVES:

       Where a subject/unit is taught off campus, please explain how students will be provided access

       to resources (including staff). Where it is taught both on and off campus, please show how the

       teaching strategies will achieve the subject objectives for both groups of students.

       Students will conduct two research projects under the guidance and supervision of a member
       of the academic staff of the Department of Psychology at locations including all campuses of
       the department and research centers affiliated with the Department. The research project will
       be carried out according to the conventions of the chosen discipline within Behavioural
       Neuroscience and in an established academic/research environment. Students will receive
       regular advice from their supervisor(s) on the rationale and design of the research project,
       instruction in the relevant experimental techniques, feedback on the outcomes of their
       investigations, guidance in the presentation of their research findings, and ongoing assistance
                                                                                                      32

      in learning methodologies. At the conclusion of the research project the findings will be
      presented in a research paper that meets the requirement of the Publication Manual of the
      American Psychological Society (note though that this unit is not intended for students
      wishing to gain registration as a psychologist, as it is not accredited by the APS). Students
      will receive advice and guidance, within specified guidelines, from their supervisors on the
      preparation and presentation of the research paper.
      Objectives 1 - 9

      The students will also prepare a literature review based on the literature relevant to their
      research topic and setting out the background and rationale behind their project. It is expected
      that supervisors and research colleagues will give guidance in searching and evaluating
      literature in the appropriate discipline and will discuss such literature with the student.
      Objectives 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 & 9


  Students will orally present a paper based upon their research project proposal to the staff, graduate
  students and their fellow honours students. This presentation will include the background to, and
  significance of, the proposed research, its design, and the means by which it is to be implemented
  and the data analysed. It is expected that the students’ preparation would include a rehearsal of
  their presentations with colleagues, thus providing them with two sources of feedback on their
  understanding of the research project, their interpretation of the work, and their skills in its
  presentation (one source from with their discipline area, the other more general in scope).

      Objectives 1, 2, 4, 6 & 9



METHODS OF ASSESSMENT AND RELATIONSHIP TO OBJECTIVES:

      The students’ work will be assessed by:

      •    An oral presentation based upon their research project in which students will present the
           background to and significance of their proposed research, its design, and the means by
           which it is to be implemented and the data analysed. The presentation is assessed as a
           hurdle requirement. (Objectives 1, 2, 4, 6 & 9)1

      •    A written review of 4,000 to 5,000 words of the relevant literature that forms the
           background to their research project. This will contribute 20% to the final assessment.
           (Objectives 1, 2, 4 – 6, 9)

      •    Two written research papers of 5,000 to 7,000 words, or one of 8,000 – 10,000 words, in
           the form of a manuscript for publication, prepared in accordance with the requirements of
           the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Society. This will contribute 80%
           to the final assessment. (Objectives 1 – 9)

      Two independent markers will mark the Literature Review and Research Papers, with a third
      marker appointed where a significant discrepancy (i.e. a discrepancy of 9 marks or over,
      and/or marks that do not both fall within a given classification, e.g. H1, H2A, etc.) between
      markers occurs. The 4th year committee will identify such cases and send the thesis out to a
      third marker.

       1
        Should the student not satisfactorily complete the oral presentation, they will be given an
       opportunity address the significant issues and report back to their supervisor and Head of
                                                                                                   33

      Department once they have done. These issues will need to be dealt with before the student
      can continue with the research project.


METHODS OF EVALUATION AND RELATIONSHIP TO OBJECTIVES: (ie: How often and what
method will be utilized to review the subject/unit)

      A range of evaluation procedures will be employed:

     •    Annual student evaluations of the program using a mixture of questions developed by
          Monquest and those developed by the Department. The evaluation form will be made
          available on the web to ensure anonymity of response. (Objectives 1 - 5, 7 – 9).

     •    Staff reviews of the BNS4100 program. This would be less formal than the above
          methods taking place within the quarterly Department staff meetings. A report from the
          Chair of the 4th year committee is a standing item on the agenda for these meetings. This
          provides the opportunity for the 4th year coordinators committee to present for discussion
          and approval proposed changes to the Honours course (or any of the other 4th year courses)
          and also for staff to raise matters of concern they may have about the course. All
          discussions are recorded in the minutes of these meetings (Objectives 1 – 8).

     The results of all evaluations are received by the 4th Year Coordinator’s Committee and the
     Head of the Department.



      •   HANDBOOK ENTRY:

      •   Subject Code    BNS4100

      •   Credit Points   42 points

      •   Subject Name     Behavioural Neuroscience Honours: Research Project

      •   Semester offered   Full-year beginning in semester 1

      •   Offered Every year

      •   Campus offered     Clayton.

      •   Publish (in handbook – Yes/No) Yes

      •   Mode of enrolment On campus

      •   Distance Education Handbook N/A

      •   Workload requirement: Across the two semesters, students would be expected to commit
          42 hours per week to activities related their research project. These hours will vary across
          the unit in accordance with the progress of the research. Formal contact hours consist of
          regular meetings with the research supervisor(s) and a series of six 2-3 hours
          seminars/workshops on generic skills required for conducting a research project. The
          majority of the students’ time will be spent in the design and implementation of the
          research, data collection and analyses. The remainder of the time would spent in library
          searches, reading and preparation of the literature review, research papers and presentation
          material
                                                                                                                                          34

       •    Subject Leader Dr Dianne Sheppard

       •    Prerequisites (if any)

       Completed Bachelor of Behavioural Neuroscience Degree. There will be a minimum standard
       for entry given limited places of a mean of 70 across the four 3rd year BNS units.



       •    Preamble

            42 points • Seminars, workshops and research project • full-year (S1-S2) • Clayton
            Campus • Prohibitions: Nil. Co-requisite: BNS4200

       •    Synopsis (maximum 700 characters, including spaces)
The Honours year in behavioural neuroscience aims to increases students understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects of
research, develop their analytic, research and communication skills, as well as provide students with advanced knowledge in specific
areas of the discipline including laboratory techniques and other research-related skills. The unit is also designed to prepare students for
higher degree studies. The relatively high weighting of this unit reflects the intensity of taking on a major research project in this field.
In this unit students undertake two separate, though typically closely-related, research projects in an area within behavioural
neuroscience that aim to provide training in both discipline specific and generic research skills. Their research projects form the basis of
a literature review and research paper(s) presented at the end of the year.



       •    Prohibited combinations (if any) Nil

       •    Assessment

             Oral presentation of research (hurdle) • 4,000-5,000 word literature review (20%) • Two
             5,000-7,000 word separate research papers, or one combined research paper of 8,000 –
             10,000 words (80%)

       •    Objectives

       On completion of BNS4100 Behavioural Neuroscience Honours Research Project students
       will:

 1.          be able to critically review the scientific literature in their domain of behavioural
             neuroscience research,

 2.          have acquired sound knowledge of the processes involved in research design,
             development and implementation through the completion of a research project,

 3.          be able to execute and analyse the outcomes of a laboratory-based and/or field-based
             study,

 4.          be proficient in the use of computer-based analysis, data-base, presentation, word
             processing and data-base/internet search engine software,

 5.          be able to prepare a report of a research project in potentially publishable way,

 6.          show communication skills in both oral and written presentations to both audiences who
             are specialists in the student’s field of research and non-specialist scientific audience,

 7.          have acquired a range of technical skills appropriate to their research area,
                                                                                           35

8.   have the capability to perform a variety of scientific procedures and techniques that are
     essential to the satisfactory completion and reporting of a research project,

9.   have gained the skills useful in pursuing a higher degree by research in behavioural
     neuroscience.
                                                                                                    36

                    Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences

                               Subject/Unit Proposal Proforma
TO:                                  Secretary, Undergraduate Education Committee
                                     Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Clayton
                                     Campus
FROM:                                Dr Dianne Sheppard
                                     Department of Psychology
                                     School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological Medicine
DATE:                                16 July 2003
RE:                                   Subject/Unit proposal –
                                     BNS4200 Behavioural Neuroscience Honours : Research Design
                                     & Analysis
The Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Undergraduate Education Committee at its
Meeting [Click here to insert meeting number and date] has endorsed for transmission to the Faculty
Board, the proposal to establish the subject/unit BNS4200 Behavioural Neuroscience Honours :
Research Design & Analysis.
The Faculty proposes to offer this subject/unit beginning in Semester 1, 2004 as an on-campus
subject/unit offered from the Clayton campus.
The signatures following are confirmation that all procedures have been complied with in this matter,
and that the subject/unit complies with University academic policies.
I certify that all resource issues have been considered.


                  Dean (or Dean’s Nominee)                          Signature, Name and Date

I certify that:
• the academic issues relating to the introduction and adequate teaching of this unit have been fully
  considered by this Faculty,
• this proposed unit conforms to the Monash University academic policies and Education Committee
  policies and procedures and that,
• this version of the unit proposal is the version agreed to by the Faculty Board


            Head of School (Managing Faculty) or                    Signature, Name and Date
          Chair of Curriculum Committee (MBBS)

I certify that:
• the academic issues relating to the introduction and adequate teaching of this subject/unit have been
  fully considered by this Faculty,
• this proposed subject/unit conforms to Monash University academic policies and Education
  Committee policies and procedures,
• this version of the subject/unit proposal is the version agreed to by the Faculty Board.


     Associate Dean (Teaching) (Managing Faculty)                   Signature, Name and Date
                                                                                                     37

This subject/unit proposal has implications for [Click here to insert name of other Faculty] . I certify
that consultation has occurred with respect to those implications and that agreement has been reached
between the relevant academic units.
N/A

   Associate Dean (Teaching) (Associated Faculty)                    Signature, Name and Date
                                                                                                    38



REASONS FOR INTRODUCTION OF SUBJECT/UNIT:


       This unit is introduced, along with its partner unit BNS4100, to bring Behavioural
       Neuroscience Honours studies into line with the Education Committee’s recommendation that
       the individual components within an honours program should be identified as separate
       subjects/units and allocated points (ECM 6/01). Thus, BNS4200 does not represent the
       introduction of a “new” unit in the sense that it introduces new content. Rather, it is one part
       of the partitioning of the existing 48-point Behavioural Neuroscience Honours course
       (BNS4000) into two units. BNS4200 is a relatively minor component of the Behavioural
       Neuroscience Honours course involving training in research design and analysis techniques.


SUBJECT/UNIT NAME:

       Behavioural Neuroscience Honours: Research Design and Analysis


SUBJECT/UNIT CODE:

       BNS4200


ALIAS TITLES AND CODES:

       None


SHORT TITLE:

       Maximum length of short title is forty characters.

       Behav Neurosci Hons: RDA


ABBREVIATION:

       RDA


LEVEL:

       Level 4


COURSE LINKS:



       Behavioural Neuroscience Honours – Core units

       Note: Behavioural Neuroscience honours can only be taken by students studying the
       Behavioural Neuroscience degree.
                                                                                                  39

PROPOSED DATE OF INTRODUCTION AND REGULARITY OF OFFERING:



        Date of introduction: March 2004

        Regularity: First semester unit offered every year, from the beginning of semester 1.


Is the unit for offer to International Students?   YES


ANTICIPATED TOTAL ENROLMENT:

         Up to 10 students (no more due to supervisory limitations).



LOCATION & MODE OF ENROLMENT:

        Offered at Clayton campus in on-campus mode only


RESOURCE REQUIREMENTS AND STUDENT SUPPORT:

        This component of Behavioural Neuroscience Honours is also a component of the PSY4200
        unit taken by Psychology Honours students. As the number of students anticipated per year for
        BNS4200 is relatively small, the students will attend the same classes as the PSY4200
        students. The description of the resource requirements below refers to the requirements for
        both BNS4200 and PSY4200 units (note also that the PSY4200 unit has a lot more
        coursework other than the RDA unit).

        Teaching space: a small IT equipped lecture theatre is required for approximately 2
        hours/week for the first 16 weeks of the course; a large tutorial room (to accommodate 40
        students) for 2 hours/week for the weeks 1-6 of Semester 1; three small tutorial rooms (to
        accommodate ~15 students) for 2 hours every second week of first semester. All of this is
        available within the Department of Psychology.
        Computing/IT resources: All students will require access to student and staff computer
        networks for access to email, newsgroups, internet and electronic library facilities, and for
        word processing, statistical analysis, and preparation of presentations. These resources are
        available within the Department of Psychology.
        Other Support Facilities: Access to library facilities at Clayton campus, and photocopying /
        printing services for the preparation of course materials.



INTER-FACULTY INVOLVEMENT:

        There is no inter-faculty involvement in the teaching/supervision of students.


INTER-DEPARTMENTAL INVOLVEMENT:

        None
                                                                                                                                   40

DEPARTMENT LOADING:

     100% from Department of Psychology


LIBRARY APPROVAL:


     No impact beyond that which exists for the current course. Library impact statement pending.


CREDIT POINTS:

     6 points


WORKLOAD REQUIREMENT:

     Contact hours: 2 hours/week of lectures (for 13 weeks in semester 1); 10 hours SPSS
     (statistics software package) computer workshops mid year (2 hours per day for 5 consecutive
     days).
     Private Study: Reading and statistics exercises in support of lectures (~2 hr/week).

PREREQUISITES:

     Completed Bachelor of Behavioural Neuroscience Degree. There will be a minimum standard
     for entry given limited places of a mean of 70 across the four 3rd year BNS units.


COREQUISITES:

     BNS4100


PROHIBITED COMBINATIONS:

     This unit and its partner unit BNS4100 replace BNS4000.

SUBJECT/UNIT SUMMARY:
      The Honours year in behavioural neuroscience aims to increase students' understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects
      of research, develop their analytic, research and communication skills, as well as provide students with advanced knowledge in
      specific areas of the discipline including laboratory techniques and other research-related skills. The combination of the
      BNS4100 and BNS4200 units is also designed to prepare students for higher degree studies. In this unit (as opposed to
      BNS4100), students complete the RDA coursework component. It involves attending a lecture series and associated workshops
      that are designed to expand the students’ knowledge of univariate and multivariate statistical procedures used by neuroscientists
      and psychologists in research. The content is assessed using a formal examination.




SUBJECT/UNIT OBJECTIVES:

     On completion of BNS4200 Behavioural Neuroscience Honours Research Design and
     Analysis unit, students will:

      10. understand the processes involved in the design, development and implementation of                                              Formatted: Bullets and
          research project.                                                                                                               Numbering
                                                                                                   41

      11. be proficient in the use of advanced univariate and multivariate statistical procedures
          relevant to psychology.

      12. be proficient in the use of the SPSS software package for statistical analysis and data-base
          storage and manipulation.

      13. have the capability to pursue research-related postgraduate studies in behavioural
          neuroscience.


LEARNING/TEACHING METHODS AND RELATIONSHIP TO OBJECTIVES:

      Where a subject/unit is taught off campus, please explain how students will be provided access

      to resources (including staff). Where it is taught both on and off campus, please show how the

      teaching strategies will achieve the subject objectives for both groups of students.


METHODS OF ASSESSMENT AND RELATIONSHIP TO OBJECTIVES:

           A 2-hour short answer and multiple choice exam (100%). Satisfactory participation in
           the SPSS workshop (a hurdle requirement). (Objectives 1-4)


METHODS OF EVALUATION AND RELATIONSHIP TO OBJECTIVES: (ie: How often and what
method will be utilized to review the subject/unit)

      A range of evaluation procedures will be employed:

     •    Annual student evaluations of the program using a mixture of questions developed by
          Monquest and those developed by the Department. The evaluation form will be made
          available on the web to ensure anonymity of response. (Objectives 1 - 4).

     •    Staff reviews of the BNS4200 (and PSY4200) program. This would be less formal than
          the above methods taking place within the quarterly Department staff meetings. A report
          from the Chair of the 4th year committee is a standing item on the agenda for these
          meetings. This provides the opportunity for the 4th year coordinators committee to present
          for discussion and approval proposed changes to the Honours course (or any of the other
          4th year courses) and also for staff to raise matters of concern they may have about the
          course. All discussions are recorded in the minutes of these meetings (Objectives 1 – 4)

     The results of all evaluations are received by the 4th Year Coordinator’s Committee and the
     Head of the Department.



      HANDBOOK ENTRY:

      •   Subject Code    BNS4200

      •   Credit Points   6 points

      •   Subject Name     Behavioural Neuroscience Honours: Research, Design & Analysis
                                                                                                                                       42

      •     Semester offered Semester 1

      •     Offered Every year

      •     Campus offered Clayton

      •     Publish (in handbook – Yes/No) YES

      •     Mode of enrolment On campus

      •     Distance Education Handbook

       •    Workload requirement 2 hours/week of lectures (for 13 weeks in semester 1); 10 hours
            SPSS computer workshops mid year.

      •     Subject Leader Dr Dianne Sheppard

      •     Prerequisites (if any)

      Completed Bachelor Behavioural Neuroscience Degree. There will be a minimum standard for
      entry given limited places of a mean of 70 across the four 3rd year BNS units.

      •     Preamble

            6 points • Lectures and workshops • 1st semester only (S1) • Clayton Campus •
            Prohibitions: Nil • Co-requisite: BNS4100

      •     Synopsis (maximum 700 characters, including spaces)
The Honours year in behavioural neuroscience aims to increase students' understanding of theoretical and methodological aspects of
research, develop their analytic, research and communication skills, as well as provide students with advanced knowledge in specific
areas of the discipline including laboratory techniques and other research-related skills. In this unit students complete the RDA
coursework component. It involves attending a lecture series and associated workshops that are designed to expand the students’
knowledge of univariate and multivariate statistical procedures used by neuroscientists and psychologists in research.




      •     Prohibited combinations (if any) Nil

      •     Assessment

            One short answer and multiple choice exam (100%). Satisfactory participation in the
            SPSS workshop (a hurdle requirement).

      •     Objectives

      On completion of BNS4200 Behavioural Neuroscience Honours Research Design and
      Analysis unit, students will:

      1. understand the processes involved in the design, development and implementation of
         research project.

      2. be proficient in the use of advanced univariate and multivariate statistical procedures
         relevant to psychology.
                                                                                            43

3. be proficient in the use of the SPSS software package for statistical analysis and data-base
   storage and manipulation.

4. have the capability to pursue research-related postgraduate studies in behavioural
   neuroscience.
                                                                                                         44

                                      MONASH UNIVERSITY


FACULTY OF MEDICINE, NURSING & HEALTH SCIENCES

                    REPORT OF THE QUALITY MANAGEMENT GROUP


1. Self-reviews
   1.1. Postgraduate Coursework Degrees
       The report on viability of courses is being returned to the Heads of School for final
       confirmation, and will then be sent to Faculty Executive and the Quality Management Group.
   1.2. Undergraduate Course reviews
       1.2.1. Generic Terms of Reference (Attachment 1)
             A generic set of TORs for Undergraduate course review in 2003 has been distributed
             after consultation with the courses involved. These enlarge upon the standard Terms of
             Reference suggested by CHEQ.

             It was agreed by QMG and CHEQ that the faculty requires a tailored approach to
             Quality management, owing to its large, diverse nature, the number of relatively new
             courses, and the contribution of multiple schools to the delivery of most courses. In all
             other respects, the QMG advises that courses adhere closely to the Course Review
             Guidelines provided by CHEQ.

             Further information has been provided to the undergraduate course review teams
             regarding the financial term of reference, distinguishing faculty from course
             responsibility.

        1.2.2. B. Nutrition and Dietetics
               The BND course management committee has named a quality self-review team. It will
               work to the generic TORs developed with the QMG. The timing of the review is aligned
               with the external accreditation process for the Bachelor of Nutrition and Dietetics.

              The self review group is identifying suitable members for the external review panel,
              which it expects to meet in December. The self-review document is expected to be
              finished in October.
        1.2.3. Offshore Quality Assurance Self-Review
              The University has requested that the faculty review its offshore activities in preparation
              for the university-wide review of offshore operations. The Faculty will review the
              teaching of PSY units in partnership with TMC in Singapore. The self-review will be led
              by Ms Jan Clohessy, Manager, International.

        Other current reviews will report to the next QMG.

2. Policy
   2.1. Centres
        A policy will be developed on the establishment, governance and review of centres. This will
        be put forward to Executive for approval.
                                                                                                       45


3. AUQF
   Relevant staff from several review panels attended the AUQF forum in Melbourne, 11-13 June.
   The opportunity to exchange ideas with representatives from other universities was very helpful.

    The conference included several sessions on faculty matters, including that by A/P Tony Luff and
    Yolande Mc Nicoll, entitled Coming to Grips with Quality: Fifteen months in the life of a faculty
    quality management group. This refereed paper will be forthcoming in the conference
    proceedings.

    Key themes of the conference were:
    3.1. Fitness of Purpose

        There was an excellent plenary presentation by DVC Stephen Parker titled Quality
        Judgements. In this he addressed several issues, including comparing the AUQA (and
        Monash) approach of quality as "fitness for purpose" with "fitness of purpose" - meaning a
        standards-based approach.

        He then discussed what type of exercise an institutional audit was; how judgements are
        formed including the burden of proof and the standard of proof. Extrapolating from the legal
        argument Parker argued that a more serious outcome requires a higher standard of proof, and
        that a review must ensure that natural justice is done.

        He concluded by emphasising that quality starts with self-reflection and the necessity for a
        clear set of questions.

    3.2. Drop dead issues in audit:
        The identification of important issues which are merging from the AUQA audits conducted at
        other institutions is crucial information. These issues include:
        3.2.1. Unit Evaluation
        3.2.2. Offshore Operations
            3.2.2.1. Whole of country audit
        3.2.3. Course and Unit approval processes
        3.2.4. Grievance Handling
    3.3. Quality and the Teaching/Research nexus

        At the recent Australian Universities Quality Forum (Melbourne - June 2003), Angela Brew
        of the Institute for Teaching and Learning at the University of Sydney presented a
        challenging paper on Integrating quality practices in research led teaching and institutional
        priorities.

        In this she stated that:

                "Research-led teaching in a research-intensive environment is teaching
                carried out in the atmosphere of imaginative inquiry that arises from
                leading-edge scholarship; teaching that stimulates reflective learning
                and critical, creative thinking and at all levels. Ideally, students
                and academics are engaged in a partnership, working together in a
                community of learners".

        Brew indicated the strategies that had been put in place at the University of Sydney to achieve
        these aims and how this had been done within a quality process, including the use of
        benchmarking and appropriate performance indicators.

    3.4. DEST funding tied to audit performance
                                                                                                         46


4. CHEQ
   4.1. Representation
        The new CHEQ representative on QMG is Dr Jennifer Weir, who has joined CHEQ as
        Quality Advisor, Academic Programs. Jennifer replaces Helen Edwards in this role.

5. Review Schedule (Attachment 2)
   QMG has made adjustments to the faculty Review Schedule in light of new information from
   CHEQ. The resulting schedule ensures comprehensive coverage of faculty activities.

6. Research
   A poster is under development for the ANZAME conference in Melbourne, 4-7 July. Relevant
   staff will attend this meeting of the Association for Health Professional Education.

7. Report from Quality Co-ordinators’ Network for information
   7.1. Restructure of Education Committee (Attachment 3)
        The restructure of Education Committee will include the establishment of a Quality Sub-
        Committee. The faculty Quality Co-ordinator’s Network is broader in scope than this S/C,
        which will focus on matters pertaining to Undergraduate and Postgraduate coursework.

        The Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Science will be represented on the Quality S/C of
        Education Committee.
   7.2. Employer survey
        CHEQ is recruiting employers to respond to this questionnaire until the end of June. The
        Graduate Destination Survey database has proven not to be very accurate. Monash is also
        considering sharing the workload of employer surveys with the University of Melbourne.
        This will provide an opportunity for benchmarking.

        Details of the survey are available at:
        http://www.adm.monash.edu.au/cheq/support/fqcn/fqcn_docs/Employer%20survey%20-
        %20outline.pdf


   7.3. Process for implementing review recommendations (Attachment 4)
        Draft guidelines were circulated. These were prepared by the Faculty of Science Quality
        Management group, which found that the Course Review Guidelines did not cover the issue
        in depth.
   7.4. MEQ administration
        CHEQ has scheduled the Monash-wide, full cohort Monash Experience Questionnaire to take
        place between Weeks 2 and 6 of Semester 2 (28 July-30 Aug).

        Owing to the exigencies of administering 50,000 questionnaires, faculties have been asked to
        develop a process which suits their needs and provide staff to distribute and collect
        questionnaires. This process is underway.

        CeLTS has been approached to mail out questionnaires to Distance Education students.

        According to the questionnaire pro forma, this survey is

            “designed to obtain feedback on the quality and overall experience of students at Monash
            University.
                Responses in this survey will be collated by the Centre for Higher Education Quality (CHEQ)
            and the overall result of this survey will be placed on the CHEQ website
            (http://www.adm.monash.edu/cheq/). The results from this survey will be used to identify good
            practices, and to provide constructive suggestions for improvement.”
                                                                                                 47


      According to Dr Sid Nair, Quality Advisor for Research and Evaluation at CHEQ, a trial
      undertaken at Caulfield campus has yielded very powerful data, and the survey is expected to
      be very useful. The survey may be viewed at:

http://www.adm.monash.edu.au/cheq/support/fqcn/fqcn_docs/MEQ%20v4.1%20for%20mockup.pdf
                                                                                                               48


                                 QUALITY MANAGEMENT GROUP

                                    Standard Terms of Reference

                          for Self-Review of Undergraduate Courses

                                                     2003*


Introduction:
These Terms of Reference were developed from the Guidelines for Course Review,1 in
conjunction with the self-review teams for B. Biomedical Science, B. Behavioural Sciences
and B. Nutrition and Dietetics.

Course self review groups may interpret the following generic Terms of Reference in ways
which are meaningful to their course. For advice, contact
Yolande.Mcnicoll@med.monash.edu.au.

Additional, specific Terms of Reference may be added to reflect circumstances and
emphases in particular courses. A rationale for the inclusion of each extra term must be
presented to the QMG. Self review groups will be required to justify the omission of any of
these Terms of Reference.

Standard Terms of Reference for Course Reviews
The course review panel is asked to prepare a report to fulfill the following terms of
Reference.

1. Course Rationale and Objectives
    1.1. To review the course philosophy and objectives
    1.2. To examine the alignment of the course with faculty and university strategic
          directions2 and plans, and with market demand
    1.3. To comment on course flexibility, including modes of entry, instruction and
          assessment
    1.4. To examine the adequacy, and appropriateness of course regulations




* Changes to TORs appear in italics, for ease of identification. Most change to this document is in the resources
provided in the footnotes.
1
  Centre for Higher Education, Guidelines for Course Review, Monash University, October 2002, pp. 8-10. See
http://www.adm.monash.edu.au/cheq/documents/Guidelines%20for%20Course%20Review.pdf
2
  These are: Innovation, Engagement and Internationalisation. For more detail see Leading the Way: Monash
2020, http://www.monash.edu.au/monashplan/
                                                                                                          49



2. Course Management, Planning, Quality Assurance and
   Improvement
    2.1. To review the processes and procedures for ensuring effective course co-ordination
         and monitoring across contributing faculties, schools and departments
    2.2. To examine processes for identifying, reviewing and remedying problems
    2.3. To determine the appropriateness, effectiveness and equity of course delivery
         including delivery across campuses (where applicable), and use of flexible learning
         methods
    2.4. To comment on the adequacy of processes and procedures for ensuring sound
         financial management and appropriate strategic cost management (See Appendix A
         for advice)
    2.5. To examine the processes and procedures for liaising with support services including
         the library, bookshop, IT, and learning support staff3
    2.6. To comment on the processes and procedures for monitoring the continued
         relevance of the course to all stakeholders4 including students, professional bodies,
         employers and other interested parties
    2.7. To determine the adequacy of mechanisms for incorporating feedback from
         stakeholders including students, graduates, professional bodies, employers and
         other interested parties into course structure, design and delivery
    2.8. To determine the degree to which, and comment on the manner in which equity
         objectives5 are addressed
    2.9. To identify the extent and comment on the appropriateness of staff training and staff
         development for staff contributing to the course




3. Course Structure and Procedures
    3.1. To examine the overall coherence of course structure
    3.2. To comment on the appropriateness of the range and scope of units offered
    3.3. To review the appropriateness and range of units, including electives where
         applicable;


3
  For links to the support services see: http://www.monash.edu.au/groups/hepcit/organizations.html
4
  A sample list of potential stakeholder groups for undergraduate courses is available from the Quality
Management Office. Contact Yolande.Mcnicoll@med.monash.edu.au Available soon online (with other
resources) at the Quality website http://www.med.monash.edu.au/committees/quality/
5
  The student equity objectives set by DEST are available at:
http://www.adm.monash.edu.au/sss/pc/equity/stu_equity/about.html
Equal Employment Opportunity and Affirmative Action guidelines are available at:
http://www.adm.monash.edu.au/sss/pc/equity/eo/eo_faq.htm#1
                                                                                               50

    3.4. To comment on processes and procedures for ensuring the continuous improvement
         of units, including alignment with the objectives of the course, in order to ensure
         effective and efficient use of resources
    3.5. To determine the appropriateness of processes and procedures for ensuring that
         students acquire Monash graduate attributes,6 including intellectual independence
         and lifelong learning skills, during their course
4. Student Profiles
    4.1. To examine the effectiveness of the promotional material and promotional strategy in
         recruiting appropriate students from local, international and equity groups
    4.2. To comment on the appropriateness and effectiveness of course advising
5. Teaching Learning and Assessment
    5.1. To identify the opportunities and impediments to Teaching, Learning and
         Assessment
    5.2. To review the mechanisms for encouraging, monitoring and sustaining excellence,
         innovation and the appropriate use of technology in teaching, learning and
         assessment within the course
    5.3. To determine the adequacy of the processes and procedures for ensuring effective
         monitoring of student progress and achievement




6
  Information on the Monash Graduate Attributes is available at :
http://www.adm.monash.edu/unisec/academicpolicies/policy/gradattributes.html
                                                                                                   51



Teaching Learning and Assessment cont.
    5.4. To comment on the adequacy and appropriateness of processes and procedures for
         providing students with appropriate learning support including regular and effective
         feedback7
    5.5. To determine the adequacy of processes and procedures for ensuring comparable
         experiences and resources for students on different campuses and in different
         delivery modes, where applicable
    5.6. To examine the appropriateness of teaching and assessment methods to meet
         course objectives
6. Human, Physical, IT Resources and Health and Safety Issues
    6.1. To comment on the adequacy of academic, administrative, professional and
         technical staffing profile in relation to course objectives, teaching methods and
         desired learning outcomes
    6.2. To comment on the adequacy of provision of teaching and laboratory
         accommodation and equipment
    6.3. To determine the adequacy of provision and identify the extent of utilization of
         support services including library services, bookshop, IT services and learning
         support services8
    6.4. To review the processes and procedures for addressing health and safety9
7. Professional and Community Relations
    7.1. To determine the extent and comment on the appropriateness of staff and student
         participation in appropriate community and professional activities




7
  University procedures relating to feedback on student coursework is at:
http://www.adm.monash.edu.au/unisec/academicpolicies/procedures/assessment.html under “Providing
Feedback to Students”
8
  See footnote 3.
9
  Monash University OHSE guidelines are available from
http://www.adm.monash.edu.au/ohse/documents/Docum.htm
                                                                                           52



8. Any Additional Terms of Reference
Additional, specific Terms of Reference may be added to reflect circumstances and
emphases in particular courses. A rationale for the inclusion of each extra term must be
presented to the QMG.

   8.1. Additional Term:
       8.1.1. Rationale:
   8.2. Additional Term:
       8.2.1. Rationale:


Appendix A: Financial matters
                            QUALITY MANAGEMENT GROUP

                         STANDARD TERMS OF REFERENCE
                     For Self-Review of Undergraduate Courses




Point 2.4 requests self-review teams:
   “To comment on the adequacy of processes and procedures for ensuring sound financial
                management and appropriate strategic cost management”.



The Issues involved in this Term of Reference are:
       (i) Determination of the teaching revenue attributable to the course.

       (ii) Allocation of the teaching revenue between Schools.

       (ii) Expenditure of the teaching allocation by Schools.


Responsibility for each component:

       (i) Determination of Teaching Revenue – Faculty Office

       (ii) Allocation of Teaching Revenue – Faculty Office

       (iii) Expenditure of Teaching Allocation – Schools
                                                                                                       53



Determination of Teaching Revenue
       Gross Teaching Revenue = DEST Revenue + Fee Income
       = Course Unit x number of           + Fee for Course x number of Students
       Students x Weight per unit,
       summed for all units within
       the course.

   •   From the Gross Teaching Revenue is deducted the contribution this course makes to:

             -   specific course costs
             -   central support charges
             -   Faculty off-the-tops

   •   Net Teaching Revenue = Gross Teaching Revenue less the above “contributions”.


Allocation of Teaching Revenue
   •   The above Net Teaching Revenue is divided between Schools on a pro rata basis, depending
       on each School’s contribution to the teaching of that course.


Expenditure of Teaching Revenue
   • This is a School decision.


Costs of Course Delivery
   •   Determine all staff involved in delivery of course.
   •   Determine percentage of time contributed by each staff member.
   •   Aggregate total contributions on basis of individual salaries and on-costs, and percentage of
       staff members’ time.

   •   Add non salary costs of conducting the course, which will include rental of lecture theatres and
       tutorial rooms.

   •   To the total direct costs add contribution towards Central School costs.
   •   Compare total cost of delivering the course with the teaching allocation received from the
       Faculty’s total revenue.



Information prepared by
Janet Kemp
9 June 200
                                                                                                                                                         54

Quality Review Schedule V
Advice from CHEQ (March 2003) indicates that self review and panel review are expected to take no more than 6 months each, and that the whole review of
an organizational unit should be wrapped up in less than one year. A review planner is available indicating the expected steps in review and suggested
timelines.

The main guidelines are as follows:
   1. Self-review should normally be completed, from organisation to delivery of report in approximately 4 months
   2. Panel Review should be completed, from organisation to delivery of report in approximately 4 months
   3. QDC will require a progress report on implementation of review recommendations 6 months after delivery of Panel review report

This information has necessitated a revision of the faculty review schedule, which incorporates this timescale as well as:
    1. The Dean’s request to extend the cycle to 2007
    2. Inclusion of areas of the faculty that were not on the original schedule.

        Categories have been slightly revised to include:
            • Teaching & Learning
                    o Undergraduate Courses
                    o Postgraduate Courses
            • Research
            • Research training
            • Organisational activities: these reviews will cover any areas not already covered by the areas above
                    o School organization: School level organizational and administrative procedures
                    o Faculty organization: Faculty level administrative procedures and Faculty/School relationships

The faculty schedule has been revised as follows, to acknowledge the reduced scale of self- and external review activities.
                           2002                      2003                   2004                      2005                    2006                  2007
Research
Research Training
Postgraduate               Academic review           Financial viability    Course review
Undergraduate                                        BMS, BNS, BND          MBBS, NUR, SWK,
                                                                            RAD
School organization                                                                                   1 Clin Sch              1 Clin Sch
                                                                                                      3 other schools         2 other schools
Faculty organization                                                                                                          Faculty-funded activites
                                                                                                        55
             FACULTY OF MEDICINE, NURSING AND HEALTH SCIENCES
                              ASSOCIATE DEAN (RESEARCH)
                               REPORT TO FACULTY BOARD

Professor Berndt will report on the following matters.
   1.     RESEARCH QUALITY WORKING PARTY
   The Quality Working Party met again in June. The report of the QWP has been slightly
   delayed due to time constraints and other commitments. All background data has been
   collected and the process of analysing the data is continuing.
   2.     SUPPORT GRANTS FOR NHMRC TRAINING FELLOWS

   On Monday 2 June 2003, Faculty Executive endorsed a proposal from the Faculty Research
   Committee to support NHMRC Fellowship funded early career researchers.
   The NHMRC currently provides a number of training fellowships and awards specifically
   aimed at early career researchers returning to Australian institutions after a period of time
   overseas or in industry. The Faculty Research Committee is pleased to announce the
   establishment of a support grant to complement the NHMRC Training Fellowship schemes.
   Holders of 6 specific NHMRC Training Fellowships (CJ Martin, Neil Hamilton Fairley, Sidney
   Sax, INSERM, Howard Florey Fellowships and Industry Fellowships) will be eligible to
   receive a $50,000 per annum support grant for the period of the fellowship spent in a
   department or centre of the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences at Monash
   University. For 2003 the support grant will be fully funded by the Research Committee. From
   2004 onwards the support grant will be funded 50% Faculty funds and 50% department funds.
   The support grant is only available for the 2 year period of the Fellowship spent at Monash.
   Fellowship holders transferring from another institution will be able to access the funds only for
   the period of time spent in a department or centre of the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and
   Health Sciences at Monash University. The support grant provided will be pro-rata the time
   spent at Monash (i.e. 9 months of Fellowship spent at Monash = 0.75 of year =$37,500)
   As a condition of the support grant Fellows are expected to participate fully in the academic
   activities of the academic unit to which they return. All Fellows will be encouraged to
   complete the Supervision Training Workshops provided by the Faculty Research Degrees
   Committee.
   3.     MIDYEAR 2003 POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS
   A subcommittee of the Research Management Committee recently assessed applications for
   midyear Faculty postdoctoral fellowships.
   Thirteen applications were received, with at least one application from each of the seven
   Schools of the Faculty. For the 2003 budget, funds were allocated to cover the award of 2
   fellowships for the midyear round. As standard of applications was particularly high, it was
   decided that an additional 2 fellowships would be funded from the Research Committee
   discretionary fund. The total number of 1 year Postdoctoral Fellowships awarded was four.
   Details of the Postdoctoral Fellows are provided below.
   MIDYEAR 2003 FACULTY POSTDOCTORAL FELLOWSHIPS
        Fellow          Dept                   Sponsor                 Title
        Dr Jennifer     Biochemistry and       Professor Christina     To investigate the role of SH2-domian
        DYSON           Molecular Biology      Mitchell                containing inositol polyphosphate 5-
                                                                       phosphatase-2 (SHIP-2) in the regulation
                                                                       of insulin signalling
        Dr Kate         Biochemistry and       Dr James Whisstock      The mechanism of chromatin
        FULTON          Molecular Biology                              condensation by the Myeloid and
                                                                       Erthyoid Stage Specific serpin
                                                                                                  56
     Fellow      Dept                         Sponsor               Title
     Ms Jennifer Medicine, MMC                Associate Professor   The role of mast cells and stem cell
     TIMOSHANKO                               Peter Tipping         factor in anti-GBM Ab
                                                                    glomerulonephritis
     Dr Michelle         Pharmacology         Professor Roger       Pharmacological implications of
     PORRITT                                  Summers               interactions between G protein-coupled
                                                                    receptors and Gα subunits in living cells




4.     TRAVEL GRANTS – ROUND 2, 2003
The Faculty received 25 applications for travel grant support that were assessed applications
were received. Four applications were deemed to be ineligible (three applications from level A
academic staff and 1 application from a level E member of academic staff). Fourteen
applications were funded a total of $20,000 as detailed below. Of the successful applicants, 6
are level B academic staff, 6 are Level C and 2 are level D staff.
                              Monash Travel Grants, Round 2, 2003
                                        Successful Applicants

     Name                           Dept                                            $s
                                                                                    awarded
     Ms Mary Lawson                 Centre for Medical and Health Sciences          1,500
                                    Education
     Dr Debra Nestel                Centre for Medical and Health Sciences          1,500
                                    Education
     Dr Mark Nelson                 Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine            1,500
     Dr Peter Crack                 Monash Institute of Reproduction and            1,500
                                    Development
     Honorary Associate Professor   Monash Institute of Reproduction and            1,500
     Henry Sathananthan             Development
     Dr Brian M Cooke               Microbiology                                    1,500
     Dr Wayne Hodgson               Pharmacology                                    1,500
     Dr Suzanne Miller              Physiology                                      1,500
     Dr James G. Phillips           Psychology                                      1,500
     Associate Professor Jenny      Psychology                                      1,500
     Redman
     Dr Gavin B Sullivan            Psychology                                      500
     Dr Elisabeth Wilson-Evered     Psychology                                      1,500
     Ms Lesley Dawne Hewitt         Social Work                                     1,500
     Dr Rosemary Sheehan            Social Work                                     1,500
5.     RESEARCH PUBLICATIONS – INTERNAL AUDIT
The Faculty submitted information on 749 publications for the DEST collection of research
publications data. This data was subject to an internal audit, which involved the review of 23 of
the Faculty’s publications (2 book chapters, 20 journal articles and 1 conference publication). One
of the book chapters selected for audit was deemed to be an error.
The Research Grants and Ethics Branch have advised that as there were only two publications with
errors in the whole audit sample (264 items across the university) a recommendation will be made
to the CADRES Steering Committee that no penalties be applied this year.
57
                                                                                                  58
           FACULTY OF MEDICINE, NURSING AND HEALTH SCIENCES

                             RESEARCH DEGREES COMMITTEE

                                REPORT TO FACULTY BOARD

               Report of meeting 3/2003 of the Research Degrees Committee held 16 June 2003.


RECOMMENDATIONS

1.      RECOMMENDATIONS ON AWARD OF DEGREE

The Research Degrees Committee recommend award of the following degrees:

        1.1 Bachelor of Medical Science
                Ms Monica Cooper
                Thesis: “Revised standards of aortic size from an Australian Population”.

        1.2 Degree of Master of Reproductive Sciences
                Sivachelvi Kanagasabi
                Thesis: “Mouse IVF and ICSI using different culture media”.


PROCEEDINGS

2. SUPERVISOR TRAINING – TIMING OF NEXT ROUND OF WORKSHOPS
The Faculty Supervisor Training Workshops for new supervisors were held on Wednesday May 7th and
Wednesday May 14th. 2pm- 5:30pm at the Alfred Campus. Demand for this training is still high and we
anticipate running another round of training in September 2003.


3. DOCTORAL DEGREES AWARDED

The Monash Research Graduate School Committee recently approved the award of degree to the following
candidates (meeting 04/2003 and 05/2003):

        Name                      Department                                                ID

Dyson , Jennifer                Biochemistry & Molecular                               11787848
Lim , Maria                     Biochemistry & Molecular                               11753870
Russo , Leileata                Biochemistry & Molecular                               11931124
Allen , Natalie                 Biochemistry & Molecular                               10709401
Chu , Mark                      Forensic Medicine                                      11579722
Mellor , Sally                  Institute of Reproduction & Development                11580879
Mittaz-Cretol , Laureane        Institute of Reproduction & Development                12759767
Patella , Shane                 Medicine (MMCC)                                        11453826
Adams , Victoria                Microbiology                                           11903309
Parslow , Peter                 Paediatrics                                            12761656
Sutherland , Michael            Pathology & Immunology                                 12764639
Gill , Jason                    Pathology & Immunology                                 11632372
Louey , Samantha                Physiology                                             11897589
Xu , Ru-Wei                     Physiology                                             12491624
Williams , Mark Psychology                                          11944153
                                                                                                      59
                  POSTGRADUATE COURSEWORK DEGREES COMMITTEE
                                  REPORT TO FACULTY BOARD
This reports on the Postgraduate Coursework Committee Meeting No 4/2003, held Friday 20 June 2003.

Course and unit proposals which are referred to in this document are available as a separate attachment,
                                         Attachments 4/2003

    1.      RECOMMENDATIONS
            The Committee recommends that the Faculty Board approve the following:




            1.1         NEW COURSE

                        The Committee recommend that Faculty Board ratify the following request for a

                        new course, details are below.




                        1.1.1    Master of International Research Bioethics

                        The Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine have submitted a new

                        course proposal to offer the Master of International Research Bioethics in

                        semester 1, 2004, via on-campus mode. The proposal and costing model is

                        attached for consideration and approval.




            1.2         NEW UNITS

                        The Committee recommend that Faculty Board approve the following

                        requests for new units, details are below.




                        1.2.1 MPM1005 Psychiatry in physical health and illness
                        The Department of Psychological Medicine have submitted a new unit proposal

                        to offer MPM1005 Psychiatry in physical health and illness in semester 2, 2004,

                        on-campus at the Department of Psychiatry, Melbourne University. The request

                        is attached for consideration and approval.




                        1.2.2    EPM5020 Comparative moral theory and ethics
                                                                               60
The Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine have submitted a

new unit proposal to offer EPM5020 Comparative moral theory and ethics in

semester 1, 2004, via on-campus mode. The request is attached for consideration

and approval.




1.2.3 EPM5021 Research in vulnerable populations
The Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine have submitted a

new unit proposal to offer EPM5021 Research in vulnerable populations in

semester 2, 2004, via on-campus mode. The request is attached for consideration

and approval.




1.2.4 EPM5022 Critical appraisal skills
The Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine have submitted a

new unit proposal to offer EPM5022 Critical appraisal skills in semester 2, 2004,

via on-campus mode. The request is attached for consideration and approval.




1.2.5 EPM5023 International research bioethics
The Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine have submitted a

new unit proposal to offer EPM5023 International research bioethics in semester

2, 2004, via on-campus mode. The request is attached for consideration and

approval.




1.2.6 EPM5024 Research, bioethics and law
The Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine have submitted a

new unit proposal to offer EPM5024 Research, bioethics and law in semester 2,

2004, via on-campus mode. The request is attached for consideration and

approval.




1.2.7 EPM5025 Research ethics practicum
The Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine have submitted a

new unit proposal to offer EPM5025 Research ethics practicum in summer
                                                                                   61
      semester, 2005, via on-campus mode. The request is attached for consideration

      and approval.




      1.2.8 GAW3050 Animal welfare in a global community
      The Department of Psychology have submitted a minor course amendment to

      include GAW3050 Animal welfare in a global community in the Graduate

      Certificate in Animal Welfare. The new unit proposal is attached for

      consideration and approval.




1.3   AMENDMENT TO EXISTING COURSE

      The Committee recommends that Faculty Board approve the following requests

      for minor amendments to existing courses, details are below.




      1.3.1   Graduate Certificate in Animal Welfare
      The Department of Psychology have submitted a minor course amendment to
      amend the existing Graduate Certificate in Animal Welfare to include, GAW3050
      Animal welfare in a global community and to amend the existing GAW3040
      Research project: Observing behaviour to become an elective unit in the course.
      The new unit proposal (GAW3050), and unit amendment (GAW3040) can be
      found under the relevant items in this report.

      1.3.2 Master of Organisational Psychology
      The Department of Psychology have submitted a minor course amendment to
      amend the existing Master of Organisational Psychology to change the sequence
      of the existing units. The request is attached for consideration and approval.

      1.3.3 Master of Medical Ultrasound
      The Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Sciences have submitted a
      minor course amendment to amend nine aspects of the Master of Medical
      Ultrasound. The request is attached for consideration and approval.



1.4   AMENDMENT TO EXISTING UNIT

      The Committee recommends that Faculty Board approve the following requests

      to amend existing units, details are below.




      1.4.1 GAW3040 Research project: observing behaviour
      The Department of Psychology have submitted a minor unit amendment to

      amend GAW3040 Research project: Observing behaviour to become an elective
                                                                                                     62
                   unit in the Graduate Certificate in Animal Welfare. The request is attached for

                   consideration and approval.




                   1.4.2 CMA1004 Clinical practice
                   The Department of General Practice have submitted a minor unit amendment to

                   amend CMA1004 Clinical practice to be offered in semester 1 and 2, rather than

                   the full-year. The request is attached for consideration and approval.




                   1.4.3 MHP5072 Psychological assessment
                   The Department of Psychology have submitted a minor unit amendment to

                   amend the assessment of MHP5072 Psychological assessment. The request is

                   attached for consideration and approval.




2. FOR INFORMATION
   2.1       AMENDMENT TO OFFERING OPTIONS
              The following offering options, which have previously been approved for

                   offering, have been re-activated on the student database, Callista.




                   GAW3010 Ethics and welfare, offered through the Department of Psychology,

                   will now be offered in semester 2.




                   MOP6042 Thesis - Literature review, offered through the Department of

                   Psychology, will now be offered in semester 1 and 2.




   2.2            QUALITY
                  Financial Viability of Postgraduate Courses and Units

                   Feedback provided by the Head’s of Schools on the financial viability of

                   postgraduate courses and units has now been collated. A draft report will be

                   returned to Head’s of Schools for final confirmation, before submission to the

                   Postgraduate Coursework Degrees Committee, Faculty Executive and the
                                                                                                            63
                           Faculty’s Quality Management Committee. Appropriate action such as

                           disestablishment, will be taken through the Postgraduate Coursework Degrees

                           Committee, and finally Faculty Board.




                           Standard Unit Evaluation

                           The Postgraduate Standard Unit Evaluation has now been implemented into the

                           postgraduate coursework degree area. The area is currently looking into the

                           possibility of students completing the evaluation on-line. For on-campus units

                           on-campus coordinators are advised to distribute the evaluation in class.




                           Unit Evaluations 2002

                           The Postgraduate Quality Steering Committee is currently reviewing the reports

                           for units evaluated in 2002. Feedback and further direction for the 2003

                           evaluations will be provided to coordinators shortly.




2.3        POSTGRADUATE INFORMATION EXPO

                           The Postgraduate Information Expo will be held on 14 October 2003 between

                           12-7.30pm in the Melbourne Town Hall. Academic areas interested in attending

                           the Expo should advise Ms Amanda Jackson, as soon as possible. Further

                           information will be distributed shortly.




      3.   NEW UNIT/COURSE PROPOSALS – STATUS REPORT

           Pending further information by Faculty Executive

           Master of Emergency Health (MICA Paramedical)




           Summary approved by Executive, awaiting full course proposal

           Graduate Certificate of Social Work
                                                                           64
Graduate Diploma in Forensic Pathology




Under consideration by the Postgraduate Coursework Degrees Committee

DFMXXXX Cardiovascular health

Graduate Certificate in Evidence Based Practice (minor course amendment)
                                                                                                 65




Financial Summary:
Master of International Research Bioethics


                                       2004          2005         2006       2007        2008
                                           $           $            $            $           $

Eftsu                              5.0         5.0          5.0          6.0         6.0

FTE Staff                          1.6         1.6          1.6          1.7         1.7


Fee   (Commencing students only)   35,000      36,050       37,132       38,245      39,393

Fee Income                         175,000     180,250      185,658      229,473     236,357

Less GST                           -           -            -            -           -

Total Income                       175,000     180,250      185,658      229,473     236,357
Costs
 Fixed

   Development Cost                19,000      19,000       19,000       19,000      19,000

   Other Fixed Costs               105,630     107,707      109,790      111,879     113,975

 Variable Costs                    19,503      19,885       20,268       24,781      25,241
 Overheads

   Faculty Overhead @ 15.0%        21,620      21,989       22,359       23,349      23,732

   Departmental Overhead @ 6.0%    8,648       8,796        8,943        9,340       9,493

                                   -           -            -            -           -
   University Overhead
                                                                                                                                          66


                                       -             -                    -                  -              -

Total Cost                             174,401       177,377              180,360            188,349        191,441




Surplus (Deficit)                      599           2,873                5,297              41,123         44,916




Analysis:
                                           2004              2005                 2006           2007           2008
Return:
 Return on Costs                              0.3%              1.6%                 2.9%          21.8%          23.5%
 Minimum required Return on Costs            12.0%             12.0%                12.0%          12.0%          12.0%
Eftsu:

 Change in Eftsu (on previous year)                                   -                  -        1.0                    -
Fees:
                                              $                 $                                   $              $
 Avg Course Fee Income per Eftsu           35,000            36,050           $     37,132       38,245         39,393
                                                                                     $              $              $
 Avg. Fee to achieve Required Return                     $     39,066             39,732         40,401         35,159       $   35,736
                                                                $                                   $              $
 Change in Commencing Fee                                    1,050            $      1,082       1,114          1,147
                                                                $                                   $              $
 Change in Avg Fee                                           1,050            $      1,082       1,114          1,147
 Change in Commencing Fee (%)                                     3.0%                3.0%           3.0%           3.0%
 Change in Avg Fee (%)                                            3.0%                3.0%           3.0%           3.0%
Costs:
                                              $                 $                                   $              $
 Average Cost/Eftsu                        34,880            35,475           $     36,072       31,392         31,907
                                              $                 $                                   $              $
 Fixed Cost/Eftsu                          24,926            25,341           $     25,758       21,813         22,162
                                                                $                                  -$              $
 Change in Fixed Costs/Eftsu                                  415             $       417        3,945           349
                                                                                                       67




Comments Regarding Financial Analysis: (Optional)




                                                                                           Bebe Loff
                               --------------------   End Section   --------------------
                                                                                                68


                                            Proposal
                               for the establishment of a
                 Centre for Obesity Research and Education (CORE)
             within the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences.



The Department of Surgery at The Alfred Hospital has had a longstanding interest in the
problems of obesity and the effects of weight loss on health. With the introduction of the
procedure of Lap-Band placement we have been able to provide, for the first time, a safe and
acceptable method for achieving substantial weight loss in the severely obese. Through the use of
this procedure we have had extensive opportunity for studying the problem of obesity and its
effects on health and quality of life and we have been able to measure the benefits that weight
loss brings for a broad range of the comorbidities of obesity. Most of these studies have been
reported and a list of the publications by our group since 1999 is attached (attachment 1).

We now wish to create a structure within which the various interests and expertise of the faculty
can be brought together to provide broadening of the research focus, greater depth of research
expertise, improved postgraduate educational opportunities, wider funding sources and a
management structure which will provide for optimal growth and a durable program.

The Centre would initially be based at and managed by the Dept of Surgery, Alfred Hospital and
initially would be funded from the substantial obesity research funding available to the
Department.
The areas of research interest which we are pursuing currently include :-

1. The Problems of Obesity and the Benefits of Weight Loss on:-
              Type 2 diabetes – ongoing randomised control trial
               The diseases of the metabolic syndrome:-
                Insulin resistance
                Hyperlididaemia
                Hypertension
                Steatohepatitis
                Polycystic ovary syndrome
                 Increased risk of cardiovacular events
       Obstructive sleep apnoea and sleep disordered breathing
       Asthma
       Gastro oesophageal reflux disease
       Gallstones
       Urinary incontinence
       Osteoarthritis
       Low back pain
       Depression
       Obstetric complications

In general, we have completed most of the observational studies in these areas and are now
moving to the use of RCT format as the defining studies where ever possible.

2. Optimizing the technique of Lap-Band placement and follow-up care :-
                                                                                                  69


        Pars flaccida versus perigastric – ongoing randomised controlled trial
        The eating and exercise rules after Lap-Band
        Optimising the adjustment schedule
        Anaesthesia in the morbidly obese
        The assessment of obesity – clinical, laboratory, special techniques

3. Optimal treatment for the obese :-
        Medical or surgical treatment – ongoing randomised controlled trial
        The obese adolescent – randomised controlled trial commencing soon
        Eating behaviour and outcomes
        Levels of obesity and outcomes
        Predicting outcomes after treatment

4. Endoscopic treaments for obesity
       Intragastric balloon
       RF energy – induced gastric reduction

5. Mechanisms of satiety/appetite
       Clinical / laboratory studies of ghrelin, leptin, insulin

6. Quality of Life :-
        Changes in validated QOL measures with weight loss
         Appearance orientation/evaluation

We have sought expressions of interest from others in the faculty who would like to be involved
in the activities of the centre. An email was sent to all academic members of the faculty and a
meeting was held on Tuesday 8th April. A great deal of interest has been shown to the proposal.
Thus far we have had expressions of interest from 24 individuals who would like to be involved.
They represent a total of 15 departments or research institutes of the faculty.

The criteria for the establishment of a research centre within Monash University are set out in the
Education and Research Policies of the university. Section 4 of the Research Policy lists the
criteria which should be satified. A copy of these criteria is attached (Attachment 2). The
proposal appears to fulfill these criteria very well. I would be happy to provide more detail of the
plans in relation to any of these criteria if requested.

The proposed administrative structure, as presented in the initial letter to the Faculty executive,
consists of myself as administrative head and responsible for the educational role and for a co-
director to be appointed to be head of research. Both would report to the Head of the Central and
Eastern Clinical School. An Advisory Committee would be established by the Deputy Vice
Chancellor on advice from the Dean and with the approval of the external funding agency, as
recommended in the Research Policy statement of the University

The Faculty Executive had previously endorsed the proposal for establishing the centre and for
the appointment of a Director of Research at the level of Associate Professor. We now request
the support of the executive to present the proposal to the Faculty Board for its endorsement

Paul O’Brien
Head, Department of Surgery
Central and Eastern Clinical School
                                                                            70


A new PVC for Monash Malaysia

Professor Merilyn Liddell, an expert in family medicine and professor of
general practice education at Monash, will take up the position of pro
vice-chancellor at Monash University Malaysia (MUM) later this year.

Current pro vice-chancellor
Professor Bob Bignall is returning
to Monash in Australia.

Vice-chancellor Professor Peter
Darvall said Professor Liddell was
going to MUM at a time when it
was moving out of its
establishment phase.

"Within only five years, our
campus has become recognised
as a leading provider of university
education in Malaysia," Professor
Darvall said.

"Its increasing popularity with
students seeking a rigorous,
internationalised education has
meant that Monash now has a
range of plans for new courses,
new research fields and new
teaching facilities.                  Professor Merilyn Liddell.
"Professor Bignall, during his three
years at the campus, has positioned Monash Malaysia as a long-term
and respected higher education institution. Professor Liddell has all the
attributes to now lead Monash University Malaysia into this very
exciting future."

Professor Liddell is an experienced general practitioner both in
Australia and the UK and has been instrumental in promoting medical
education at Monash since 1992.

She is already familiar with the campus and the Malaysian higher
education system, having spent 20 months as director of Monash
Medical Education at MUM in 1999 and 2000.

Professor Liddell said she was looking forward to returning to MUM
with a broader role. "I see an important role for the pro vice-chancellor
in promoting the campus throughout Malaysia and other countries in
the region," she said.

"We already have good links into the business community and with
other academic institutions, and I expect to spend much time nurturing
these and developing new opportunities where appropriate. "The
campus is now in a position to develop a wider range of courses, both
at the undergraduate and postgraduate level. I also hope to attract
more research students and increase research collaborations,
particularly with colleagues at other Monash campuses."
                                                                                                71


Rural Health's loss is Canada's gain

Congratulations and Bon Voyage to Associate Professor Elaine Duffy

Associate Professor Elaine Duffy from the Monash School of Rural Health has been appointed
Professor and Dean of the Faculty of Nursing, University of Windsor, in Southern Ontario,
Canada.

Elaine will head a faculty that has 400 full-time and part-time undergraduate nursing students,
over 40 graduate students and 21 tenure-track faculty positions. At the heart of the University of
Windsor’s future plans is the new $18-million Health Education and Learning Centre. Due
to open in Summer 2003, the facility will include new accommodation for both the Faculty of
Nursing and the Southwestern Ontario Medical Education Network (SWOMEN), a rural and
regional training network.

Elaine leaves the School of Rural Health after 15 years with Monash University. Founding
member of the Caroline Chisholm School of Nursing at Peninsula campus in 1987, Elaine joined
the School of Rural Health in 1995 and went on to establish and head the School's Centre for
Multidiscipline Studies as well as becoming Deputy Head of School. On the departure of
Professor Roger Strasser, Elaine took on the challenging role of Acting Head of School.

In her various and demanding roles within the School, Elaine has led by example, providing
guidance and leadership to meet with determination the many challenges facing rural health in the
21st century. Elaine is one of those unique individuals capable of providing direction and focus at
the highest levels of University administration while never losing sight of the importance of the
rural health practitioners "on the ground", such as the Bush Nurses, Indigenous health workers
and contributions made by administrative as well as academic staff, ensuring rural health remains
at the forefront of University, State and Federal government agendas.

Elaine is wished every success in her new role as Professor and Dean of Nursing at the University
of Windsor. She will be sorely missed by all of us, and the School of Rural Health's loss is indeed
Canada's great gain.


E-BULLETIN
Issue #34 June 16th 2003
                                                                                              72



ID          NAME                               COURSE      COURSE
NUMBER                                         CODE

13002864    Mr David Sandic                    2255        Graduate Certificate in Health
                                                           Informatics

12620548    Ms Cassie Marsden                  0101        Graduate Diploma in Reproductive
                                                           Science

92586481    Dr Sing Cheung                     1759        Graduate Diploma in Family Medicine

91821835    Ms Mary James                      3508        Postgraduate Diploma of Psychology
                                                           (External) Psychology

18242723    Dr Humphrey Randiki                2879        Graduate Certificate in Family Medicine


18424171    Mr Bin Xue                         2314        Graduate Diploma in Health Services
                                                           Management Epidemiology

18450563    Ms Zhong Yu Yuan                   2314        Graduate Diploma in Health Services
                                                           Management Epidemiology

18216668    Ms Adele Campbell                  3508        Postgraduate Diploma of Psychology
                                                           (External) Psychology

12727954    Ms Cheryn Palmer                   2279        Graduate Diploma in Forensic Medicine


13105965    Mrs Shelley McCarron               1749        Postgraduate Diploma in Psychology

10527095    Mr Stephen MacFarlane              0045        Master of Psychological Medicine

10508694    Mr Michael Jefford                 2872        Master of Health Services Management

11640391    Ms Olivia Prodan                   0495        Master of Organisational Psychology

91866855    Ms Patricia Lyons                  0019        Master of Social Work


The above students course completions have been processed by the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing
and Health Sciences after May 01 2003 ceremony and prior to Faculty Board Report Meeting
Scheduled for Wednesday July 02 2003, for the upcoming ceremony in December 2003.
                                                                             73



$22 million for Monash researchers

Monash University will receive almost half of $44 million awarded to
Victorian researchers under the National Health and Medical Research
Council (NHMRC) Program Grants Scheme.

The university will receive just under $22 million to investigate the role
of bacteria in human disease and the molecular basis of several
important degenerative diseases including dementia and arthritis.

A Monash team led by Professor Julian Rood, head of the Department
of Microbiology, and including researchers from the universities of
Melbourne, Adelaide and Queensland, received $15.25 million over
five years to investigate how bacteria causes many killer diseases.

"Bacterial infectious diseases, which account for more than 10 million
deaths worldwide each year, are a serious threat to human health,"
Professor Rood said.

"This grant brings together the leading Australian researchers in the
field of bacterial diseases so that we can work together rather than in
competition."

Dr James Whisstock, research fellow in the Department of
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, heads the team that received
$6.5 million over five years to investigate degenerative diseases.

"The funding will enable us to understand the biochemical basis of
some of the most important diseases like osteoporosis, dementia and
thrombosis that affect our ageing population," Dr Whisstock said.

Vice-chancellor Professor Peter Darvall said the grants were a
wonderful result for Monash and its research partners.

"Monash medical researchers have performed extremely well in this
round of NHMRC program grants, receiving nearly half the Victorian
funding allocation," Professor Darvall said. "We congratulate our
researchers on their achievements."
                                                                            74



Funding boost for blood disorders
research

Monash University research on blood diseases has received more than
A$1.4 million from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in the US.

The research, on improvements to
treatments of sickle cell anaemia
and beta-thalassemia, is a
collaboration between Dr Andrew
Perkins from Monash's
Department of Physiology, and
Associate Professor Merlin
Crossley and Dr Joel Mackay from
the School of Molecular and
Microbial Biosciences at the
University of Sydney. It has been
funded for four years.

Dr Perkins said the NIH grant was
a welcome acknowledgement that
Australian scientists produced
quality research with implications
for improving human health
worldwide.

"It also provides a tremendous       Associate Professor Merlin
opportunity to build on the          Crossley (left) and Dr Andrew
collaboration between Monash         Perkins.
and the University of Sydney," he
said.

The research will also provide an opportunity to interact with already
established clinical expertise at Monash University.

Associate Professor Don Bowden, from the Department of Anatomy
and Cell Biology, coordinates diagnostic and clinical services for globin
gene disorders at Monash Medical Centre, a major tertiary referral
centre in Australasia.
                                                                          75



$1 million to stop abuse of children

A campaign to prevent child abuse developed by Monash's Child
Abuse and Family Violence Research Unit and Australians Against
Child Abuse (AACA) will be implemented following a $1 million federal
government grant.

Associate Professor Chris Goddard from the Department of Social
Work liaised with advertising agency Storm Image Design and AACA
to develop the 'Every Child is Important' campaign which focuses on
parenting education.

"The first step to prevent child abuse is to create a community that is
willing to respect children and give them priority," Dr Goddard said.
"The government funding commitment will enable this important
campaign to be extended nationally."

The funding was made available through the office of the Minister for
Children and Youth Affairs, the Hon Larry Anthony, and announced by
the Prime Minister in May as part of the government's Stronger
Families and Communities Strategy.

The 'Every Child is Important' campaign works to affirm the value and
significance of children to adults, families and society as a whole.

It uses multi-faceted strategies to educate parents to:

    •   understand the developmental vulnerabilities of children;

    •   respect the meaning children give to their experiences;

    •   develop safe and non-abusive relationships with children;

    •   engage positively with the principles of children's rights; and

    •   appreciate more fully the capacities and contribution of
        children to the cultural and emotional life of families and
        communities.

"Recent events have demonstrated that people would often prefer to
ignore child abuse," Dr Goddard said. "With this campaign, we hope to
make sure that our commitment to children by all sectors of the
community is heightened."
                                                                          76



Monash wins $900,000 to research
depression

Monash University has featured strongly in $2 million worth of research
grants awarded by the Victorian Centre of Excellence in Depression.

Victoria's Health Minister, Ms Bronwyn Pike, announced the inaugural
grants on 9 May. Monash received more than $900,000 across seven
projects, including projects that attracted two of the three largest
grants.

They include a study to evaluate psychological treatments for
teenagers with depression, headed by Professor Bruce Tonge
($369,628), and the use of internet-based treatment for panic disorder
in general medical practice, headed by Professor Jeff Richards
($264,000).

"Depression is a leading cause of disability, and for young people the
major factor associated with suicide," said Professor Tonge, head of
Monash's School of Psychology, Psychiatry and Psychological
Medicine.

"This grant will give us the opportunity to demonstrate the
effectiveness of both psychological and pharmacological treatments on
depressed youth in real-life community settings with the assistance of
both rural and metropolitan GPs."

Professor Richards, director of Primary Health Care Research at
Monash, said the grants acknowledged Monash's leading role in the
study of depression.

"The Department of General Practice at Monash is now considered
one of the leaders in Australia in primary mental health care research,
particularly in the application of information technology."

The Centre of Excellence in Depression and Related Disorders is a
collaborative project between Victoria's Department of Human Services
and beyondblue, the national depression initiative. The centre
supported three large and 23 smaller projects from 120 applications.
                                                                     77


Depression research grant recipients, from left, Professor Merilyn
Liddell and Professor Jeff Richards (Monash Department of
General Practice), Dr Jennifer Torr (Centre for Developmental
Disability Health Victoria), Dr Michael Gordon (Frankston Child
and Adolescent Mental Health) and Associate Professor David
Clarke (Monash Department of Psychological Medicine) meet with
beyondblue chairman Mr Jeff Kennett.
                                                                              78



Grant to check up on medicines
information

Ms Tracey Bessell from the Monash Institute of Health Services
Research, in consultation with market research group Taylor Nelson
Sofres, has been awarded $399,500 to evaluate the Pharmacy Guild of
Australia's Medicines Information to Consumers program.

The grant has been provided through the guild's Third Community
Pharmacy Agreement Research and Development Grants Program.

The Medicines Information to Consumers program provides
participating pharmacists with incentive payments to encourage them
to use consumer medicine information (CMI) to inform consumers
about their medicines.

A total of $75 million has been allocated for these payment incentives
between 2002 and 2005.

CMI is written information designed to inform consumers about
prescription and pharmacist-only medicines.

CMI computer print outs are produced by the pharmaceutical company
that makes the particular medicine. They are designed to support
information exchange and foster informed decision-making, leading to
better compliance, reduced adverse events and improved health
outcomes.

Ms Bessell and the project team will identify the barriers and facilitators
for delivery of CMI and evaluate the usefulness of CMI to consumers.

The Medicines Information to Consumers program evaluation will be
conducted between May 2003 and August 2004.
                                                                          79



Australasian medal for Monash
pharmacologist

Professor Roger Summers, professor of pharmacology in the Faculty
of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, has been awarded the
Michael Rand Medal for his research into adrenoceptors – the natural
targets of adrenalin in the body.

                          The medal is awarded biennially by the
                          Australasian Society of Clinical and
                          Experimental Pharmacologists and
                          Toxicologists (ASCEPT) to a member whose
                          research has had national and international
                          impact.

                          Professor Summers is internationally
                          recognised in the field of adrenoceptor
                          research.

                          "By stimulating or blocking individual
                          receptors with drugs, it is possible to treat
Professor Roger           conditions ranging from hypertension and
Summers.                  cardiac failure to asthma," he said.

                           "My current studies test the hypothesis that
particular drugs can determine the signalling pathway utilised by a
particular receptor, and thus determine the effect the drug has in the
body."

He will receive his award at ASCEPT's annual meeting in Sydney in
December.
                                                                          80



Premier's award goes to protein scientist

Research by Dr James Irving into a family of proteins called serpins
and their role in controlling cell growth has earned him the 2003
Victorian Premier's Award for Medical Research.

The annual award recognises outstanding work by young Victorian
scientists and provides some practical help to encourage them to
continue their careers.

Dr Irving, a research fellow in the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
department, was presented with his award by the Premier Mr Steve
Bracks at a recent Government House ceremony.

He received a trophy, a certificate and $16,000 to help continue his
work.

Dr Irving studied a protein called MENT, part of the serpin family,
capable of switching off large sections of DNA.

He employed a variety of techniques from fields including biochemistry,
structural biology and bioinformatics.

"The breadth of expertise of my supervisors, Dr James Whisstock and
Dr Rob Pike, and key facilities within the department such as the
Structural Biology Unit, played a critical role in the success of my
project," Dr Irving said.

Mr Bracks also announced that the Jack and Robert Smorgon Families
Foundation had partnered with the government to award an additional
trophy and $16,000 to the department or institute in which the winning
research project was undertaken.

Foundation chairman Mr Jack Smorgon presented the inaugural award
to Professor Christina Mitchell, head of the Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology department.

The Premier also issued a commendation to Dr Jason Gill from the
Department of Pathology and Immunology for his research into
development of the human thymus, a crucial part of the immune
system.
                                                                     81



Paramedic emergency drill

Monash paramedic students took part in a mock emergency at the
Bosch plant in Clayton recently.

In a scenario designed to help
prepare the students for handling
major accidents, nine patients
were 'seriously injured' after an
'explosion'.

The paramedics had to prioritise
patients for treatment and address
some key issues such as which
patients should be transported by
air to hospital.

Ms Leanne Sheen, lecturer at the
Centre for Ambulance and
Paramedic Studies in the Faculty
of Medicine, Nursing and Health
Sciences, said the emergency
exercise was one of four that
students would participate in        Monash paramedic students
during their course.                 take part in a mock emergency
                                     situation.
                                                                            82



Monash invests in immunity project

Monash has taken a further stake in the fight against a range of
diseases by entering into a full licensing agreement with Norwood
Immunology, a subsidiary of Melbourne-based medical technologies
commercialisation company Norwood Abbey.

The commercial arm of Monash University – Monash Commercial Pty
Ltd – has taken equity in Norwood Immunology in an agreement
covering all aspects of the intellectual property associated with
Norwood's immunology project. The project is based on research from
Monash's Department of Pathology and Immunology and involves kick-
starting the thymus – the organ central to creating T cells, an important
part of the immune system.

The treatment also boosts the bone marrow, the producer of stem cells
for the thymus and all other blood cells.

This research is seen as a possible means for the treatment of cancer,
viral infections such as HIV/AIDS, herpes and human papilloma virus
and auto-immune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple
sclerosis and type I diabetes. It also has the potential to address
difficulties relating to rejection in transplantation procedures.

Deputy vice-chancellor (Research and Development) Professor Gary
Bouma said Monash's decision to move from being a research partner
to a commercial partner by taking an equity position represented a
model for a university to realise long-term commercial returns from
medical research.

"This equity partnership recognises Monash's belief in Norwood's
ability to translate these scientific discoveries into a commercially
viable project," Professor Bouma said.

The initial Monash equity position is 3.125 per cent.

Monash Commercial Business Development manager Dr David Lyster
said entering into the licensing agreement was a great opportunity for
Monash to collaborate with one of Victoria's leading medical
technologies commercialisation companies.
                                                               83




Finalising the equity partnership between Monash and Norwood
Immunology, from left: Norwood Abbey executive chairman Mr
Peter Hansen; Dr David Lyster; deputy vice-chancellor
(Resources) Ms Alison Crook; Norwood Abbey chief financial
officer Mr Jeffrey Bell; Professor Gary Bouma; and Monash
Commercial chief operating officer Mr Jonathan Sanders.
                                                                          84



Monash Institute of Health Services
Research Seminar

Relevant to: VICTORIAN STAFF

'Why aren't we preventing functional decline of the elderly in the
acute hospital setting?'

When: Monday 28 July, 1.30 - 5 pm.
Where: Monash Medical Centre, lecture theatre 2

The Monash Institute of Health Services Research and the Clinical
Epidemiology Unit at Melbourne Health invites you to hear Professor
Jane McCusker, Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McGill
University, Montreal. She will be speaking on 'delirium in the
hospitalised elderly' and will look at its recognition and consequences
for both patients and their carers.

Professor McCusker will be joined by several local experts to share
their views on this important area of aged care. Our newly appointed
director, Professor Don Campbell, will also be present.

Registration is free and numbers are strictly limited to 80, so please
respond quickly if you wish to attend. To register see
www.med.monash.edu.au/healthservices/. For further information
contact Meredith Cameron, Monash Institute of Health Services
Research on 9594 7527 or email
meredith.cameron@med.monash.edu.au
                                                                           85



Centre for Brain and Behaviour - public
lecture and symposium

Relevant to: VICTORIAN STAFF

A free public lecture and symposium to mark the opening of the new
Monash University Centre for Brain and Behaviour will be held at the
Sofitel Hotel, Melbourne on 4 September 2003.

Baroness Susan Greenfield, Director of the Royal Institution of Great
Britain and Fullerian Professor of Physiology, University of Oxford will
deliver a lecture titled: 'Tomorrow's People: how 21st century
technology is changing the way we think and feel'. She has written
several books including 'The Human Brain: A Guided Tour' (1997),
which ranked in the best seller list.

Symposium speakers include Professor Perry Bartlett (University of
Queensland), Professor Jeffrey Rosenfeld (Alfred Hospital/Monash
University), Professor Paul Martin (National Vision Research Institute
of Australia), Professor Jayashri Kulkarni (Alfred Hospital/Monash
University), and Associate Professor Stephen Robinson (Monash
University). Bookings are essential: contact Dr Michelle Kett on extn
59456.

				
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