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					Healthy Youth, Healthy Future   Tennessee
                                Child Health Week
                                2009

                                Project Summary




                                       The Governor’s Office of
                                       Children’s Care Coordination

                                       Bob Duncan, Director
    Tennessee
Child Health Week
       2009

 “Healthy Youth,
 Healthy Future”

Project Summary




     Prepared by staff in
  The Governor’s Office of
Children’s Care Coordination
Table of Contents


  Background Information
Background ..................................................................................................... Page 4

Official Child Health Week Proclamation by Governor Phil Bredesen ............. Page 6

National Child Health Day Proclamation by President Barack Obama ............ Page 7

Child Health Week State Agency & Department Partners ............................... Page 8

Child Health Week Community Partners ......................................................... Page 9

List of Participating Counties ......................................................................... Page 18

Map of Participating Counties........................................................................ Page 19

Counties Participating for the First Time in 2009 ........................................... Page 20


  Resources

Official Child Health Week Web Site ............................................................. Page 22

Resources and Tools Developed for Child Health Week ............................... Page 23


  Appendix


Master List of Child Health Week Activities ................................................... Page 26

Media Placements ......................................................................................... Page 51

Resources and Tools .................................................................................... Page 52
Background
Child Health Day
Nationally, Child Health Day is celebrated each year on the first Monday in October.
President Calvin Coolidge first set aside this special day in 1928 to focus the nation’s
attention on the health of its children. Now in its 81st year, Child Health Day is coordi-
nated annually by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the Health Resources and
Services Administration (HRSA).


Child Health Week in Tennessee
Tennessee celebrated Child Health Week for the first time in 2008. Based on the suc-
cess of the inaugural year, the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination
worked with numerous partners to plan Child Health Week 2009. The theme for the
week was “Healthy Youth, Healthy Future,” underscoring the fact that the future of our
state depends on the health and well-being of our children.

There are no specific budget appropriations for Child Health Week in Tennessee. The
approach of the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination has been to work
collaboratively with partner agencies (at the state and local level) and encourage them
to spotlight the work they are already doing that is related to child health and well-
                                                                                                4
being. In this way, no new programs were created and no additional budget appropria-
tions were required.



                                               Left: Children and families learned about the
                                               importance of yearly checkups during the
                                               Memphis and Shelby County Community Infor-
                                               mational Health Fair, held at the Benjamin
                                               Hooks Library.

                                               Below: Staff from the Monroe Carell, Jr. Chil-
                                               dren’s Hospital at Vanderbilt promoted safety
                                               at a Car Seat check during Child Health Week.
The Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination
The Governor's Office of Children's Care Coordination (GOCCC) was established by
Governor Bredesen in May 2004 to coordinate a wide range of services available to
children through state departments and the private sector, with an emphasis on the de-
livery of children's physical and behavioral health services. The Office collaborates
with numerous government, business and community partners to ensure state depart-
ments are meeting requirements of state and federal laws and of court orders relating
to health care services for children. The office places a particular emphasis on chil-
dren at risk of custody due to health-related matters, reducing infant mortality and
achieving programmatic and financial efficiencies in systems serving children and their
families. The Office spearheads efforts to translate science into public policy and to
implement evidence-based practices throughout the system in an effort to elevate the
quality of all services to Tennessee's children.




                                                        Left: The “Healthy Youth Child
                                                        Health Celebration” was held in
                                                        Putnam County. Participants en-
                                                        gaged in exercise activities,        5
                                                        played educational games, made
                                                        healthy snacks, and learned about
                                                        ways to stay healthy.

                                                        Below: Jackson Mayor Jerry Gist,
                                                        joined by special guest “Elmo,”
                                                        reads to students about the impor-
                                                        tance of handwashing.
Proclamation by Governor Bredesen




                                    6
Proclamation by President Obama




                                  7
State Agency & Department Partners
The statewide celebration of Child Health Week was a collaborative effort between
many state and local entities. At the state level, involved departments and agencies
included:

          Governor’s Office of Children’s Care
          Coordination

          Office of the Governor

          Office of the First Lady

          Bureau of TennCare

          CoverKids

          Department of Education
            -Coordinated School Health            First Lady Andrea Conte participates in
            -School Nutrition Program             “Walk to School Day” at Caldwell Enhanced
                                                  Option School.
                                                                                              8
          Department of Health
            -Get Fit TN Program
            -HUGS Program
            -Maternal & Child Health
            -Nutrition and Wellness
            -County and Regional Health Departments

          Department of Mental Health & Developmental Disabilities
            -Alcohol and Drug Prevention
            -Tobacco Use Prevention

          TENNderCare Outreach Program

          TennCare Managed Care Organizations:
             -AmeriChoice
             -AMERIGROUP
             -Blue Cross Blue Shield Volunteer State Health Plan
             -Doral Dental
Community Partners (By County)
Much of the work done in planning and implementing activities for Child Health Week
occurs at the local level. Listed here (grouped by county) are community partners who
were integral to the success of Child Health Week 2009 in Tennessee.

Note: Great efforts were made to ensure the accuracy of this list. Names of partner
groups/agencies were submitted by the individuals responsible for planning the activi-
ties.
Anderson                                     Bledsoe
Anderson County Coordinated School Health    Bledsoe County Advisory Board
Anderson County Head Start                   Bledsoe County Juvenile Court
Anderson County Health Department            Bledsoe County Sheriff's Office
Anderson County Sherriff's Department—DARE   Coordinated School Health
Clinton Police Department                    UT Extension
Community Action Coalition                   Volunteer State Health Plan
CoverTN                                      Many others
Oak Ridge Solid Waste Management
Take Charge Fitness                          Blount
TENNderCare                                  Blount County Community Health Initiative--
UT Ag Extension
Volunteer State Health Plan
                                               Substance Abuse Prevention Team
                                             Blount County Health Department                             9
                                             Blount County, Maryville City, & Alcoa City Schools
Benton                                         Coordinated School Health
Benton County Anti-Drug Coalition            Blount Memorial Hospital
Chilhowee Middle School                      TENNderCare
Community Advisory Board
Coordinated School Health
Family Resource
TENNderCare
Tennessee Department of Health

                                                                          Students at the Richard
                                                                          Hardy Memorial School in
                                                                          South Pittsburg, TN work
                                                                          up a sweat during a spe-
                                                                          cial health fair held during
                                                                          Child Health Week.
Bradley                                         Cocke
Boys & Girls Club of Bradley County             Cocke County Health Department
Cleveland Apple Festival                        Cocke County Coordinated School Health
Numerous Cleveland Tennessee Area Business      Mercy Health Partners
  Sponsors
Starfish Project                                Coffee
TENNderCare                                     Child Care Resource and Referral
                                                TENNderCare
Cannon
Busy Kids Learning Center                       Crockett
Cannon County Coordinated School Health         Crockett County Health Department
Cannon County Health Department                 LeBonheur Children's Medical Center
Cannon County Pre K & Head Start
REACH After School Program                      Cumberland
TENNderCare                                     AmeriChoice
TNCEP                                           AMERIGROUP
                                                Cumberland County Government
Carroll                                         Cumberland County Health Department
Carroll County Coordinated School Health        Cumberland Mountain Mental Health Center
CoverKids                                       Gateway Educational Center
McKenzie Elementary School                      Teens Against Drugs Center
Milan Family YMCA                               TENNderCare
                                                Volunteer State Health Plan
Carter
Boys & Girls Club                               Davidson
Carter County Health Department                 AmeriChoice by United Healthcare
Coordinated School Health
TENNderCare
                                                Baptist Sports Medicine Commit to Get Fit
                                                Caldwell Enhanced Options School
                                                                                                10
UT Extension Agency                             Community Health and Wellness Team
                                                CoverKids
Cheatham                                        Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee
AmeriChoice                                     Grace M. Eaton Child Care Center
AMERIGROUP                                      Kohl’s Cares for Kids Foundation
Cheatham County Fire/Police                     Matthew Walker CHC
Cheatham County Health Department               Metro Action Commission
Cheatham County Lions Club                      Metro Nashville Davidson County Public Health
Cheatham County School System                     Department
Local doctors/dentists
  (TennCare providers)
Local hospital
TENNderCare
UT Extension

Chester
Coordinated School Health

Claiborne
Clinch-Powell Head Start
  Programs
TENNderCare




                             Students at the YMCA Fun Company at Goodlettsville Elementary
                             School take turns leading their peers in fun exercises.
Davidson County,                                                                   Carroll County
 cont.                                                                             students learned
Metro Nashville Public                                                             how to tell the dif-
 Schools                                                                           ference between
Monroe Carell Jr. Chil-                                                            poisons and eve-
 dren's Hospital at                                                                ryday items dur-
 Vanderbilt                                                                        ing Child Health
Nashville Predators                                                                Week. The
Nashville Rotary Club                                                              “Poison Proof”
Oasis Center                                                                       program was
Office of the First Lady                                                           sponsored by Car-
Safe Kids Cumberland                                                               roll County Coor-
 Valley                                                                            dinated School
SunTrust Bank                                                                      Health.
Vanderbilt Athletics
YMCA of Middle Ten-
 nessee
Yoganastics

Decatur                                        UT Extension
Decatur County Health Department               Volunteer Behavioral Healthcare System
Parsons Elementary Extended School Care         (Cumberland Mountain Mental Health Center)
                                               Volunteer State Health Plan
Dekalb
Coordinated School Health                      Gibson
Dekalb County Health Department                CoverKids
DeKalb EMS
TENNderCare
                                               Milan Family YMCA                                          11
Well Child Inc                                 Giles
                                               American Heart Association
Dickson                                        First National Bank
Dickson County Health Department               Frito Lay
Dickson County UT Extension                    Giles County Health Department
Dickson Housing Authority                      Giles County Office of Coordinated School Health
TENNderCare                                    Hillside Hospital
                                               Richland School Peer Educators
Dyer
Coordinated School Health                      Grainger
TENNderCare                                    Douglas Cherokee Afterschool Program
                                               TENNderCare
Fayette
Fayette County Schools                         Greene
Well Child Inc                                 Boys and Girls Club
                                               Coordinated School Health
Fentress                                       Greene County Youth Subcommittee Chair
AmeriChoice                                    Greene County Health Department
Children's Center of the Cumberlands           Rural Resources
Coordinated School Health                      TENNderCare program
Fentress County Health Department              VSHP
Jamestown Regional Medical Center
Plateau Mental Health                          Grundy
Plateau Pregnancy Services                     CoverTN
South Fentress Elementary 21st Century Grant   Grundy County Health Council
TENNderCare                                    Grundy County Health Department
TN Highway Patrol                              Volunteer State Health Plan
TN National Guard (Counter Drug Division)
Hamblen                                           Shepherd's Corner (Of One Accord Ministry)
Boy Scouts                                        TENNderCare
Hamblen County Health Department
Hamblen Substance Abuse Coalition                 Hardeman
Morristown Fire Department                        LeBonheur Children's Medical Center
Morristown Hamblen Hospital
Morristown Parks and Recreation                   Hardin
Morristown Police Department                      Department of Human Services
Morristown-Hamblen Child Care Centers             District Attorney's Office
TENNderCare                                       Hardin County Coordinated School Health
Tennessee Department of Health                    Hardin County Health Council
UT Hamblen County Extension                       Hardin County Health Department
                                                  Hardin Medical Center
Hamilton                                          LifeSpan Health Center
Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department     UT Extension
Chattanooga Parks and Recreation                  Volunteer State Health Plan
Coordinated School Health
Hamilton County                                   Hawkins
Hamilton County Department of Education           AmeriChoice
Hamilton County Step 1                            Boys & Girls Club of Hawkins County
La Paz de Dios                                    Coordinated School Health
Parents Are First Teachers                        East Tennessee Child Passenger Safety Center
Ronald McDonald House Charities                   Hawkins County Health Department
Salvation Army                                    Hawkins County Schools
TENNderCare                                       Hawkins County TNCEP Coalition
Tennessee Dietetic Association                    Head Start
Tennessee Multicultural Chamber of Commerce
TNCEP
                                                  Shepherd's Corner (Of One Accord Ministry)
                                                  TENNderCare
                                                                                                   12
Volunteer State Health Plan                       UT Extension Hawkins County

Hancock                                           Haywood
Coordinated School Health                         Family Resource Center
Hancock County Health Council Adolescent Issues   Haywood County Health Department
 Subcommittee                                     LeBonheur Children's Medical Center
Hancock County Health Department                  SunnyHill School System
School Based Health Center                        UT Extension
School Nutritionist

                                                                      Students and faculty at
                                                                      South Polk Elementary
                                                                      School learned about the
                                                                      importance of healthy
                                                                      snacks during Child Health
                                                                      Week. Students received
                                                                      apples to help encourage
                                                                      them to make healthy
                                                                      choices.
Henderson                                                                              Youngsters
Henderson County Health De-                                                            attending the
 partment                                                                              Grace M.
UT Extension                                                                           Eaton Child
                                                                                       Health Week
Henry                                                                                  Block Party
Coordinated School Health                                                              were able to
Grove School--Drama Club                                                               enjoy inflat-
Grove School--Healthy School                                                           able games
  Team                                                                                 that pro-
Grove School--Wellness Class                                                           moted fun
Harrelson School--Healthy                                                              physical ac-
  School Team                                                                          tivity.
Henry Cafeteria Staff
Henry County High School--
  Broadcasting class
Henry County High School--Healthy School Team     Knox
Henry County High School--HOSA students           AmeriChoice
Henry County Medical Center                       CoverKids
Henry County Safe and Drug Free Task Force        CoverTN
Henry Elementary--Healthy School Team             Doral Dental
Lakewood Schools--Healthy School Team             East Tennessee Children's Hospital
Movie Center                                      Fountain City Connections
Paris Family Fun Center                           Knox Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Initiative
School board member                                 (KAPPI)
UT Extension                                      Knox County Health Department

Houston
                                                  Knox County Parks and Recreation
                                                  Knox County Schools
                                                                                                       13
Houston County UT Extension                       Knox County Schools Coordinated School Health
Stewart County Health Department                  Knox County Sheriff's Office
TENNderCare                                       Knoxville Police Department
                                                  Safe Haven
Humphreys                                         Safe Kids Coalition of Greater Knox Area
Humphreys County Public Library                   TENNderCare
TENNderCare                                       The Literacy Imperative
                                                  Transportation Planning Organization
Jefferson                                         UT Athletics
Dandridge Christian Learning Center               UT Extension-(EFNEP)-Expanded Food and Nutri-
Jefferson County Coordinated School Health Pro-     tion Education Program
  gram                                            Volunteer State Health Plan
Jefferson County Schools
Jefferson County Schools (Service Learning Pro-   Lake
  gram, Nursing Supervisor)                       Coordinated School Health
Tennessee Department of Health                    Lake County Schools

Johnson                                           Lawrence
Coordinated School Health                         American Academy of Family Physicians
Johnson County Community Center                   Coordinated School Health
Johnson County Health Department                  Ethridge Elementary School
Johnson County High School                        Lawrence County School System
Johnson County School System                      Tennessee Technology Center of Pulaski
Laurel Elementary School                          USDA
Mountain Fitness
TENNderCare Program                               Lewis
UT Extension                                      Coordinated School Health
Loudon                                           Meigs
Coordinated School Health Lenoir City Schools    Meigs County and City of Decatur
Inter-Agency Council of Loudon County            Meigs County-Decatur Chamber of Commerce

Macon                                            Monroe
AmeriChoice                                      Coordinated School Health
AMERIGROUP                                       Food Service Department
Coordinated School Health                        Health Advisory Council
Department of Safety                             Health Department
Health Department                                Members of local community
Interact Club                                    UT Extension Service
Macon County Government
TENNderCare                                      Montgomery
Volunteer State Health Plan                      Clarksville Montgomery County Coordinated
                                                   School Health
Madison                                          Montgomery County Health Department
Boys & Girls Club of JMC                         Special Olympics
City of Jackson - Recreation & Parks             TENNderCare
Coordinated School Health                        YMCA of Middle Tennessee
Jackson-Madison County Regional Health Depart-
  ment                                           Moore
Jackson Madison County School System             Coordinated School Health
JMC Health Promotions
JMC TENNderCare Outreach Program                 Morgan
Jumpstart Jackson                                Coordinated School Health
UT Extension                                     Sunbright Student Council

Marion                                           Pickett
                                                                                                          14
Coordinated School Health                        Pickett County Coordinated School Health
CoverTN                                          Pickett County Health Council
Marion Co Health Council                         TENNderCare
Marion County Schools

Marshall
Coordinated School                                                                      Staff from the
 Health                                                                                 Milan Family
Well Child Inc                                                                          YMCA held a
                                                                                        Jr. Olympics
McMinn                                                                                  for students in
Coordinated School                                                                      the YMCA
 Health                                                                                 program at
Daily Post Athenian                                                                     McKenzie
                                                                                        Elementary
McNairy                                                                                 School.
Coordinated School
  Health
District Attorney's Office
McNairy County Health
  Council
McNairy County Health
  Department
McNairy Regional Hos-
  pital
UT Extension
Volunteer State Health
  Plan
Women's Resource
  Center
                                                                          Students at The Lit-
                                                                          eracy Imperative in
                                                                          Knoxville listened to
                                                                          a story about the im-
                                                                          portance of milk and
                                                                          then had the oppor-
                                                                          tunity to prepare a
                                                                          healthy snack.




Polk                                            Jr. League of Murfreesboro
Copper Basin High School                        MTSU
Copper Basin Medical Center                     Murfreesboro City Schools
South Polk Elementary                           Murfreesboro Parks & Recreation
South Polk PE Department                        Publix

Putnam
                                                Rutherford County Health Department
                                                Rutherford County Schools
                                                                                                  15
Brighter Paths                                  Rutherford County TENNderCare & Health Educa-
Cookeville Leisure Services                       tion
Putnam County Health Department                 United Way
TENNderCare                                     YMCA of Middle Tennessee
YMCA of Middle Tennessee
                                                Scott
Roane                                           Scott County Head Start
Coordinated School Health                       Scott County Health Department
Roane County Health Department                  Scott County Schools
TENNderCare                                     TENNderCare
UT Extension
UT Extension: TNCEP                             Sequatchie
Volunteer State Health Plan                     Department of Health
                                                TENNderCare
Robertson
Child Advocacy Center                           Sevier
Coordinated School Health                       CoverKids
Ollie Otter Booster Seat & Seatbelt Awareness   Sevier County Family Resource Center
  Program                                       Sevier County Health Department
Robertson County Health Department              Sevier County School Food Service
TENNderCare
Well Child Inc                                  Shelby
                                                Child Safety Seat Program
Rutherford                                      Children's Special Services
AmeriChoice                                     Healthy Kids & Teens
AMERIGROUP                                      Healthy Memphis Common Table
City of Murfreesboro                            Immunization and Community Development
Shelby County, cont.                                                   Knox County
Memphis and Shelby County                                              School Health
 Health Department                                                     Coordinator
Memphis City Schools                                                   Aneisa McDonald
Newborn Outreach                                                       gets teachers at
Porter Leath Head Start                                                Halls Elementary
Shelby County                                                          moving during a
Shelby County Schools                                                  Take 10! training.
TENNderCare
The Urban Child Institute
Well Child Inc

Smith
TENNderCare

Stewart
Stewart County Health Depart-
  ment
TENNderCare

Sullivan
Coordinated School Health
Doral Dental
SCAPPI
Sullivan County Health Depart-
 ment
TAPPP
TENNderCare
                                                                                            16
VSHP
YMCA                                      Tipton
                                          Coordinated School Health
Sumner
American Heart Association                Trousdale
Centerstone                               Coordinated School Health
Children are People, Inc.                 TENNderCare
Clyde Riggs PTO                           UT Extension
Cumberland Mental Health
Gallatin High School                      Unicoi
H. B. Williams Elementary                 AmeriChoice
Home Safe                                 Telamon Migrant Headstart
Jason Foundation                          TENNderCare
Mental Health Cooperative                 Unicoi County Health Department
Oasis Center                              Unicoi County Health Department Health Educator
Pathfinders, Inc.                         Unicoi Elementary School
RTF Sumner County Schools                 YMCA
Sumner County Schools
Sumner County YMCA                        Union
TENNderCare                               Douglas Cherokee Afterschool Program
Tennessee Technology Schools              Maynardville Public Library
University of Tennessee Health Outreach
Watt Hardison Elementary                  Van Buren
Work Force Essentials                     Coordinated School Health
YMCA of Middle Tennessee                  TENNderCare
Youth Tobacco Coalition                   UT Extension/TNCEP
                                          Van Buren County Health Department
Washington
AmeriChoice
Boone’s Creek Elementary
Boone's Creek Middle School
Coalition for Kids
Coordinated School Health
ETSU
KinderCare
Mountain States Health Alliance
Ridgview School
South Central
TENNderCare
Washington County Health Council
Washington County Health Council Child
  Health Subcommittee
Washington County Health Department
Washington County Health Department
  Health Educators
West View Elementary

Weakley
Community Advisory Board
CoverKids
Department of Mental Health
Interagency Council
NW Council on Children and Youth
TENNderCare
UTM
                                                                                                      17
Weakley County Health Department
Weakley County Imagination Library
Weakley County Schools
Weakley Interagency Council

White
Sparta Fire Department
Sparta Police Department
TENNderCare
TNCEP
TTI Nursing Students
White County Coordinated School Health

Williamson
Bowie Nature Park
District Coordinated School Health Coordina-
  tor                                          Top: Students at South Fentress Elementary School
FSSD Coordinated School Health                 participated in a Health Fair. Troopers from the TN
Hillsboro Elementary School Team Nutrition     Highway Patrol were on hand with goggles to simu-
Moore Elementary School                        late the effects of alcohol on movement and coordi-
Nashville Predators Amateur & Youth            nation.
  Hockey Development
Williamson Co Health Department                Middle: Children and families at the Autumn Chil-
YMCA of Middle Tennessee                       dren’s Festival in Hamilton County enjoy a sunny af-
                                               ternoon of fun and games while learning about
                                               healthy habits.

                                               Bottom: Students at Bowers Elementary in Roane
                                               County received blood pressure, hearing, and vision
                                               screens as part of Child health Week.
Participating Counties
Listed below are the 79 counties that participated in Child Health Week 2009. Coun-
ties that also participated in 2008 are marked with an asterisk (*). The following page
contains a map of all participating counties for 2009.

Anderson                                        Knox*
Benton                                          Lake*
Bledsoe*                                        Lawrence
Blount                                          Lewis*
Bradley*                                        Loudon
Cannon                                          Macon*
Carroll*                                        Madison*
Carter*                                         Marion*
Cheatham                                        Marshall*
Chester                                         McMinn*
Claiborne*                                      McNairy*
Cocke*                                          Meigs
Coffee*                                         Monroe*
Crockett*                                       Montgomery*                               18
Cumberland*                                     Moore
Davidson*                                       Morgan
Decatur                                         Pickett*
Dekalb*                                         Polk
Dickson*                                        Putnam*
Dyer                                            Roane*
Fayette                                         Robertson*
Fentress*                                       Rutherford*
Gibson*                                         Scott*
Giles*                                          Sequatchie
Grainger*                                       Sevier*
Greene*                                         Shelby*
Grundy                                          Smith
Hamblen*                                        Stewart*
Hamilton*                                       Sullivan*
Hancock*                                        Sumner*
Hardeman                                        Tipton
Hardin*                                         Trousdale*
Hawkins*                                        Unicoi*
Haywood*                                        Union*
Henderson*                                      Van Buren*
Henry*                                          Washington*
Houston                                         Weakley*
Humphreys                                       White*
Jefferson                                       Williamson*
Johnson*
Child Health Week 2009




      Participating Counties
                 19
New Counties in 2009
Twenty-three counties participated in Child Health Week for the first time in 2009.
Those counties are listed below.

          Anderson
          Benton
          Blount
          Cannon
          Cheatham
          Chester
          Decatur
          Dyer
          Fayette
          Grundy
                                                                                             20
          Hardeman
          Houston
          Humphreys
          Jefferson                                                    Above: A variety
                                                                       of educational
          Lawrence                                                     booths await atten-
                                                                       dees at the
          Loudon
                                                                       Cheatham County
          Meigs                                                        Health Fair.

          Moore                                                        Left: Children and
                                                                       families attending
          Morgan                                                       the “It’s a Small
                                                                       World” event in
          Polk                                                         Grundy County
                                                                       helped design the
          Sequatchie
                                                                       caterpillar body
          Smith                                                        while listening to
                                                                       volunteers read
          Tipton                                                       “The Very Hungry
                                                                       Caterpillar.”
Resources




Child Health Week Web Site ......................................................................... Page 22

Resources & Tools Developed for Child Health Week .................................. Page 23




                                                                                                               21




Left: UT Extension Agent Wendy Warner races with students during a Child Health Week cele-
bration in Van Buren County.

Right: Elementary students in Hawkins County created artwork to display health themes during
Child Health Week. This poster depicts the importance of avoiding the “T zone” (eyes, nose, and
mouth) in preventing the spread of germs.
Child Health Week Website
In response to suggestions made by community partners involved in Child Health
Week 2008, the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination worked to establish
a website for Child Health Week 2009.

The website contained
general information
about Child Health
Week, including date,
theme, and contact infor-
mation. There was also
a section for download-
able resources; this sec-
tion featured resources
developed by the
GOCCC and other Child
Health Week partners.

For community partners                                                                    22
who were planning
events, the website fea-
tured a “Submit Your Ac-
tivity” form through which
partners could enter data
about their event.
Events designated as
public were listed on the
main Child Health Week
calendar, available to
website visitors. The calendar was created using Google Calendar, which was avail-
able for free and was easily incorporated into the web page. This exciting addition to
the site allowed visitors to look for Child Health Week events in their county or city.

A link to the website was included in all Child Health Week promotional materials. In
addition, a banner on the state’s main website (www.tn.gov) directed visitors to the
Child Health Week site during the week of October 5-11.

The GOCCC is indebted to Kelly Berg for her hard work in designing and maintaining
the Child Health Week website.
Resources and Tools
In an effort to provide communities with tools to promote the health and well-being of
children, a number of resources and tools were developed by state and local Child
Health Week partners. The materials listed here were made available for free public
download on the Child Health Week web site. All materials are included in the appen-
dix.

Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination
The Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination (GOCCC) developed materials
for use by community partners in planning Child Health Week Activities. (Pages 53-64)

      Child Health Week—Facts for Parents
      Online Resources for Parents, Schools, and Communities
      Child Health Week—Facts for Schools
      Sample Article (Target Audience: Parents)
      Sample Article 2 (Target Audience: Parents)
      Sample Article 3 (Target Audience: General)
      Child Health Week—Information for Faith-Based Communities
                                                                                                23
Maternal & Child Health
The Tennessee Department of Health, Division of Maternal and Child Health, devel-
oped a toolkit for use during Child Health Week. The toolkit was developed by a com-
mittee including representatives of the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordina-
tion, Maternal and Child Health, Office of Nutrition and Wellness, Mental Health and
Developmental Disabilities, Tobacco Use Prevention, Alcohol and Drug Prevention,
and TENNderCare. (Pages 65-87)

      CHW Resources & Ideas for Activities
      Fact Sheet—Childhood Obesity
      Fact Sheet—Depression in Children
      Fact Sheet—How Smoking Harms My Baby
      Fact Sheet—Immunizations
      Fact Sheet—Prescription Drug Use
      Fact Sheet—Teen Smoking
      Fact Sheet—Teens Be A Leader
      Fact Sheet—TENNderCare Directors
      Fact Sheet—Word Search and Teen Quiz
      Fact Sheet—Youth Suicide
      Flyer—Suicide
      Press Release—TN WIC
      Press Release—Tobacco Use Prevention            Youngsters at the South Central CCRR in
                                                      Tullahoma enjoy the monkey bars during
                                                      Child Health Week 2009.
Chattanooga-Hamilton Region Child Health Week Committee
This is an educational kit created by a Child Health Week Committee in the Chatta-
nooga-Hamilton Region. This committee was composed of community and agency
members, including: Tennessee Dietetic Association, Coordinated School Health,
Chattanooga Parks and Recreation, TENNderCare, Parents are First Teachers,
TNCEP, Hamilton County Step 1, and Hamilton County. This toolkit was circulated
within the community during Child Health Week. (Pages 88-100)

       Child Health Week Background Information
       Helpful Ways to Reduce Screen Time
       Cyber Safety for Children
       Healthy Info for New Parents
       Nutrition You Can Use!
       Halloween Games That Keep Kids Moving!
       Flu Prevention

Tennessee Dietetic Association
The Tennessee Dietetic Association developed a flier outlining child health statistics in
Tennessee. (Page 101)



                                                                                             24


                                                         Left: Mayor Brock Hill signed a
                                                         proclamation declaring October 5-
                                                         11 as Child Health Week in Cum-
                                                         berland County.

                                                         Below: Students in Lawrence
                                                         County had the opportunity to
                                                         learn basic CPR during Child
                                                         Health Week 2009.
Appendix




Master List of Child Health Week Activities ................................................... Page 26

Media Placements ......................................................................................... Page 51

Resources and Tools Developed for Child Health Week ............................... Page 52




                                                                                                                        25




                                                                                                          Marquee signs
                                                                                                          proclaimed Child
                                                                                                          Health Week
                                                                                                          throughout the
                                                                                                          state. Shown
                                                                                                          clockwise from
                                                                                                          top left: Van Bu-
                                                                                                          ren County,
                                                                                                          Macon County,
                                                                                                          Fentress County,
                                                                                                          and White County.
Master List of Activities
Anderson County                                       Bledsoe County
Clinton Family Night Out                              Give A Child A Chance Day
This event provided the Clinton community with an     The purpose of this activity was to promote health
opportunity to join in community celebration focus-   and wellness for children in Bledsoe County and to
ing on family safety and preventive health. This      provide needed school supplies and clothing for
event provided educational material, fun and          children in need of those items. This day was de-
games for the entire family. The target audience      signed to help children with school supplies and
was family members of all ages (especially kids).     other basic needs, at no cost to them. This event
Planned activities included: National Guard's Mo-     targeted low income children and their parents.
bile Drug Task Force Unit viewing, Clinton Police     Many organizations were available to offer services
K-9 Unit demonstration, live music, food, games,      to the children. Some of the goods and services
information booths (including TENNderCare and         provided were: school supplies, backpacks, hair
the Anderson County Health Dept., door prizes,        cuts, vision and hearing screenings, and lunch for
etc.)                                                 the children. There were also snacks, balloons,
                                                      games, the Tennessee Highway Patrol with the
Handwashing Class                                     Roll-Over Car, TWRA with the wildlife trailer, and
Teachers and staff at the Anderson County Head        the TN Army National Guard with the Meth trailer.
Start Center were given information about the
H1N1 flu. A follow-up activity taught children how  Blount County
to safely and effectively wash hands using an age-  Health Behaviors Survey
appropriate lesson.                                 Blount County 6th, 8th, 10th, & 12th grade students
                                                    were surveyed to learn more about their health be-      26
Anderson County - Children's Health Fair Event      haviors regarding alcohol, tobacco, and substance
Parents and families learned how they can help our use and abuse.
children be healthier! Planned activities included:
a family-friendly exercise class, 1 mile fun walk,  Blount Takes on Child Health Week
information booths and special prize giveaways.     TENNderCare programs and handwashing tech-
                                                    niques were presented to youth at 10 day care
Benton County                                       sites in Blount County.
Child Health Week Kick-Off Event
A county-wide wellness day kicked off the week      Bradley County
with parenting sessions and educational sessions    Blythe Avenue Boys & Girls Club, LLC
for children and teens. In addition, School Health  Health education booths and food were presented
Teams promoted various healthy facts throughout at the Boys and Girls Club.
the county, "Lunchroom Ladies" wore promotional
stickers each day, and the PTO emailed tips to par- The Cleveland Apple Festival
ents on the PTO distribution list.                  The Cleveland Apple Festival is a 501(c)(3) public
                                                    charity that donates all proceeds to other non-profit
Healthy Recipe Contest                              organizations. Activities at the festival included:
To encourage healthy eating, students and faculty arts & crafts booths, home & community informa-
at Chilhowee Middle School in Benton, TN, com-      tion booths, and food booths. Entertainment in-
peted in a Healthy Recipe Contest. The contest      cluded the Little Miss Apple Blossom & Junior Miss
was open to anyone interested in submitting a       Apple Blossom Contests, the Apple Dessert Con-
healthy recipe. When the winning recipe was cho- test and Pie Eating Contest. In addition, there was
sen, the Advanced Teen Living class prepared the a Trailhead Bike Giveaway.
recipe. The winning recipe received a prize.
Cannon County                                          CoverKids presentation
Cannon County Child Health Week Declaration            A presentation on CoverKids was given at the
and Health Screening Kickoff                           Northwest TN Regional Headstart workshop.
Several local agencies gathered for a photo oppor-
tunity with County Mayor, Mike Gannon, to declare      McKenzie Elementary After-School Jr. Olympics
Child Health Week in Cannon County. A press re-        Kids were able to compete in basketball, track and
lease highlighting child health and the school sys-    field, soccer and tennis.
tem's upcoming health screenings accompanied
this picture in the weekly edition of the Cannon       Carter County
Courier.                                               Food Fiesta
                                                       The Public Health Educator partnered with the UT
Health Rocks DVD                                       Extension Agency and the Coordinated School
The “Health Rocks” DVD was played at the local         Health Team to hold a presentation called “Food
health department in Cannon County.                    Fiesta.” This presentation introduced the food
                                                       pyramid and taught portion control and recognition
Carroll County                                         of fruits and vegetables. The targeted audience
Poison Prevention Awareness Program                    was students in grades 3-5.
Coordinated School Health staff created a "Poison
Proof" visual aid board using popular candy and        Hand Wash Against the Flu!
over-the-counter medications that children may         The Public Health Educator partnered with the
come in contact with in their own homes. The vis-      Carter County Coordinated School Health Team to
ual aid board was used to show the children the        offer a handwashing class to 1st-5th grade stu-
similarities in the candy and medications and to       dents at Range Elementary School. In this class,
illustrate how younger siblings may mistake these      students learned the importance of handwashing
items for things they are able to eat. Items used      and had the chance to learn about the flu and how
included: "Hershey's" bite size bars / Exlax, "Red     to stay healthy during flu season.
Hots" / Sudafed, and other candy/medications
which resemble each other. Jars were used to dis-      BMI Measurement
                                                                                                              27
play similar substances such as liquid medications,    The Public Health educator partnered with the
cleaners, drinks such as Kool-Aid, glitter tooth-      Carter County Coordinated School Health Team to
paste/glitter glue, and other liquids. The students    provide BMI checks to the 4th and 6th grade stu-
were "tested" by being asked which liquid they         dents at Hunter Elementary.
would think is safe to drink between the two similar
looking liquids contained in the jars. Students ac-    Stay Healthy For a Better You
tively participated by raising their hands and an-     The Public Health Educator partnered with the staff
nouncing the correct answers for each "safe" and       at the Boys & Girls Club, the UT Extension Agency,
"unsafe" liquid. Students viewed age-appropriate       and the TENNderCare program to present a series
videos geared toward helping them recognize            of classes for the afterschool students in grades 3-
harmful chemical substances and teaching how to        8. These classes covered a number of topics that
properly store them "out of site and out of reach."    included good nutrition, hygiene, and personal ac-
One video used for elementary student viewing          tivity.
was from the Texas Poison Center Network enti-
tled "The Poison Patrol: Inspector Nick Carson,        TENNderCare Information Distribution
You Can Make a Difference." This 20-minute video       A booth was set up in the lobby of the health de-
explained how many items from household plants         partment with programmatic information emphasiz-
to cleaning supplies can be poisonous and should       ing the importance of EPSDT screenings and im-
be stored out of reach and out of site. The other      munizations. Coloring pages were also provided.
video used for Pre-K student viewing was "Spike's
Poison Prevention Adventure." Spike concentrated
on letting his quills alert him to danger when he
encountered dangerous items or poisons. A total
of 830 students at three different primary and ele-
mentary schools in Carroll County were reached
through this program.
Fight the Germ                                         Healthy Lifestyles
The purpose of this program was to educate pre-        This activity encouraged students to develop
school children on how to fight germs to prevent       healthy lifestyles on a regular basis. A local regis-
illness. The book "Germs are Not For Sharing"          tered dietician spoke to the freshmen class at one
was read, followed by a coloring activity with chil-   of the high schools.
dren's coloring pages that presented proper hand-
washing practices. Coordinated School Health and       Importance of Good Hygiene
UT Extension assisted in teaching illness preven-      Staff from the local health department came to the
tion.                                                  school and stressed the importance of good hand-
                                                       washing practices in order to prevent the spread of
Cheatham County                                        germs. This was for grades K-2.
Children's Health Fair
The purpose of this event was to educate middle        Coffee County
school students on the importance of getting their     Newspaper Article
yearly EPSDT checkup. Students were made               The Resource and Referral Specialist for the Child
aware of good eating habits and ways of protecting     Care Resource & Referral Service wrote an article
their safety. The Mayor of the Town of Ashland City    for the local newspaper about children's physical
proclaimed Children's Health Day and asked fami-       activity in child care facilities and Child Health
lies to continue to educate their children.            Week.

Chester County                                         Adoption Tour 09
When I Get Big....                                     This activity included a parade and booths with
The High School Student Health Council visited the     child activities on the square. All children from
elementary school. They read books (Berenstein         Manchester and Coffee County were invited.
Bears/Junk Food) and talked with students about
what it takes to be healthy and how it makes you       Crockett County
grow big and strong. The council also served them
exotic fruits at lunchtime. All students went home
                                                       Child Health at Green Frog Fun Fest
                                                       The community was invited to visit the Child Health
                                                                                                               28
with "Just Say No" coloring books, jump ropes, and     Week activity center at the Green Frog Fun Fest.
healthy eating stickers.                               The fun fest also included a petting zoo, hay ride,
                                                       corn maze, and pumpkin picking.
Claiborne County
H1N1 Presentations for Child Health Week               LeBonheur Mobile Unit
The purpose of these presentations was to inform       The mobile unit from LeBonheur Children's Medical
the faculty, staff, and Head Start parents about the   Center visited the county and took the opportunity
H1N1 virus. These presentations took place during      to educate patients using educational materials
the parent meetings. These presentations also          and demonstrations on the mobile units. Hand
helped to prepare the teachers for instructing stu-    sanitizer was also distributed.
dents about the flu and handwashing during Child
Health Week. During Child Health Week, the stu-     Cumberland County
dents received instruction on the importance of     Healthy Youth October Fest
hygiene and proper handwashing. The teachers        The purpose of this event was to provide children
were offered the opportunity to have the hand-      and teens with valuable preventive health informa-
washing instruction for the students provided by    tion about the importance of daily exercising,
the health department's health educator.            healthy eating choices, the importance of preven-
                                                    tive checkups and the importance of positive ac-
Cocke County                                        tions. Well checkups were encouraged by a special
An Apple a Day                                      drawing for gift cards for proof of a well check, an
This activity encouraged students to eat fruits and appointment scheduled for a well checkup, or if
include them in their daily diet. Apples were ob-   help is needed with scheduling a well checkup ei-
tained from a local orchard and passed out to three ther for a medical checkup or a dental checkup.
of the elementary schools.                          Participants had a time for exercise and a time for
                                                    education. Educational materials were provided to
                                                    each child to promote healthy choices.
Health Rocks DVD                                          Community Conversation on "High School Drop
The “Health Rocks” DVD was played at the local            Out Issues"
health department in Cumberland County.                   Oasis Center's Youth United (an alternative to
                                                          youth violence group) hosted a Community Con-
Child Health Week Proclamation                            versation on "High School Drop Out Issues."
A Child Health Week Proclamation was signed by
the Cumberland County Mayor, Brock Hill.                  Drop Out Prevention Summit
                                                          America's Promise Alliance Drop Out Prevention
Davidson                                                  Initiative hosted a summit.
Grace M. Eaton Child Health Week Block Party
A community "Block Party" was hosted by the               Girl Scout Fit Club
Grace M. Eaton Child Care and Early Learning              Girls in 4th, 5th and 6th grade participated in
Center. The event included Governor's office rep-         twelve weeks of fitness and badge-earning activi-
resentatives, members of the Tennessee Legisla-           ties led by Girl Scouts of Middle Tennessee and
ture, radio stations, state and Metro services, facili-   Baptist Sports Medicine “Commit to Get Fit” train-
ties to provide health screenings, food, and enter-       ers. This program is sponsored by the Nashville
tainment.                                                 Rotary Club.

International Walk To School Day                          TENNderCare Outreach at Matthew Walker CHC
International Walk To School Day was sponsored            WIC and Primary Care Clinics
nationally by Safe Kids Worldwide and FedEx. In           Nashville Davidson County set up a booth inside
Nashville, many local schools participated in the         Matthew Walker CHC and provided TENNderCare
event by joining together and celebrating their walk      outreach and information to families visiting WIC,
to school. Glengarry Elementary was the lead              Pediatrics, and OBGYN clinics to inform and edu-
school for Walk to School Day in Nashville and            cate them about TENNderCare and the importance
hosted a walk and assembly for students and fami-         of preventive care for their health.
lies. Nashville Mayor Karl Dean and Tennessee
Department of Health Commissioner Susan Coo-              Teen Clinic
                                                                                                                29
per were among those in attendance.                       United Neighborhood Health Services, a partner to
                                                          the Youth Opportunity Center, staffed a teen clinic
Walk to School Day                                        within the Youth Opportunity center.
Tennessee First Lady Andrea Conte joined stu-
dents from Caldwell Enhanced Options School in            Driving Skills for Life
their "Walk to School Event." The First Lady also         Oasis Center partnered with the Ford Foundation
joined students in reciting the Pledge of Allegiance      in an effort to improve teen driving safety.
and School Pledge and she read the school's
morning announcements.                                    Scoreboard Announcement at Vanderbilt Football
                                                          Game
Kohl's Cares for Kids Car Seat Check                      The Vanderbilt Athletic Department agreed to
This car seat check was open to all families of the       make a public service announcement during the
Metro Action Commission Head Start program in             football game held during Child Health Week with
Nashville. Studies have shown that 85% of all chil-       the following message: "Governor Bredesen re-
dren in TN are improperly restrained. Certified           minds Commodore fans that October fifth through
technicians were available to check car seats at          the eleventh is Child Health Week in Tennessee.
this event for proper installation and fit to ensure      As a team, let's make a difference by making
that all children are riding safely.                      healthy food choices and encouraging active life-
                                                          styles. Together, we can ensure a healthier future
Mid-Cumberland Council on Children & Youth                for our youth and a healthier Tennessee."
CoverKids provided a booth at this event.

Shade Tree Clinic Health Fair
CoverTN provided a booth at this event.
Scoreboard Announcement at Nashville Predators         the nutritional information for the dish as well as
Game                                                   the recipe. There was also a healthy snack mix
The Nashville Predators administration agreed to       station for children to be able to mix up their own
make a public service announcement during the          healthy snacks. All nutritional information was pro-
hockey game held during Child Health Week with         vided for all ingredients. A story time was held with
the following message: "Governor Bredesen re-          a focus on how to stay healthy. A “Fruit & Veggie”
minds Predator fans that October fifth through the     snack tray was brought in for children to sample
eleventh is Child Health Week in Tennessee. As a       and broaden their horizon in the nutrition world. At
team, let's make a difference by making healthy        one center, a local chef came in to provide a
food choices and encouraging active lifestyles.        healthy food demonstration for members.
Together, we can ensure a healthier future for our
youth and a healthier Tennessee."                     YMCA—Be Active
                                                      YMCA centers throughout Davidson County cele-
TEENS UNITED!                                         brated Child Health Week with a variety of activities
Oasis Center hosted the Celebration of Cultures.      focused on the importance of being active. Activi-
New to the festival this year was an area exclu-      ties included jump ropes, hula hoops, parachute
sively for teens called TEENS UNITED! In partner- games, youth strength classes, “Run for Fun,” mu-
ship with the Oasis Center, TEENS UNITED! was         sical chairs, and youth Zumba. Youth were also
organized by a group of local teens from 10 differ- able to roll the “Fitness Dice.” Parents and kids
ent countries, including Palestine, Ethiopia, Haiti,  rolled a dice to see how long they would do a spe-
and Sudan.                                            cific exercise. The parents and the kids were able
                                                      to challenge each other by rolling a high number
YMCA—Water as the Primary Drink                       and making it difficult to finish the specific exercise.
YMCA centers throughout Davidson County cele-         They were taught how to calculate their targeted
brated Child Health Week with a variety of activities heart rate, so at the end of the circuit they could
focused on water as the primary drink. Water was check their pulse and see how high their heart rate
served during Hang Time hours and afternoon
YPlay hours. Hang Time played Water Bingo
                                                      reached. Other activities included: Kids H2O
                                                      Cardio with Parents, Youth Fit Camp, and Kids
                                                                                                                 30
(children answer questions pertaining to water, with Zumba.
information taken from the YNew books) and Water
Jeopardy. Water games were offered outside.           YMCA—Family Health Practices
Children also participated in a “Water Scavenger      YMCA centers throughout Davidson County cele-
Hunt.” They were given a sheet with information       brated Child Health Week with a variety of activities
about water to fill in. They went to designated sta- focused on the role of families in keeping children
tions around the facility to gather the answers for   healthy. Activities included a Family Fit Class,
their sheet. They ended up in Wellness where they Family Zumba, a Healthy Family Cooking session,
were rewarded with water. Along the way, they         and group fitness classes that were “family
learned the health benefits of drinking water. A      friendly.” A “Family Obstacle Course” was also
“Say No to Soda” Activity demonstrated the            available. Families were able to create a family
amount of sugar in soda.                              recipe card that was compiled into a Healthy Fam-
                                                      ily Y-Play Cookbook.
YMCA—Healthy Food Choices
YMCA centers throughout Davidson County cele-         Decatur County
brated Child Health Week with a variety of activities Child Health Week Community Fun Walk
focused on healthy food choices. Nutrition Bingo      The entire community was invited to come walk in
(information taken from YNew books) was played        observance of Child Health Week.
in Hang Time & offered to kids within the building.
Each department had answers either posted in an Dekalb County
obvious place or staff members helped the children Health Rocks DVD
answer questions to complete the Nutrition Bingo. The “Health Rocks” DVD was played at the local
During Hang Time the kids played Nutrition Jeop-      health department in Dekalb County.
ardy with information taken from the YNew books.
A “Healthy Cooking Class” was also offered, in        EPSDT Exams
which the kids were able to watch the dish (dinner Comprehensive health screens were provided to
meal) get created, taste the food, and take away      students in Dekalb County.
Fire Safety                                               Dyer County
The DeKalb county EMS provided fire safety                Child Health Week Art Contest
classes for all elementary students in DeKalb             The Dyersburg City and the Dyer County Schools
County during Child Health and Safety Week.               participated in school-wide art contests. The Ten-
                                                          derCare employee for the county coordinated the
Dickson County                                            contest. The younger students used the theme of
In-Service for Child Care Providers                       Child Health Week for their entries. The middle
A health-related in-service for child care providers      and high school students used the "I Get It" theme
addressed the Gold Sneaker Initiative, Flu Preven-        for their entries. Winners received WalMart gift
tion, and H1N1. The first topic featured an effort        cards provided by MedSouth Health Clinic of
that encourages child care centers to enhance ac-         Dyersburg. Selected entries were duplicated and
tive play and good nutrition. Attendees were up-          used as flyers on pizza boxes across the county.
dated about the Gold Sneaker Initiative and re-           Local mayors also signed a proclamation.
ceived some educational resources for physical
activity and nutrition to use for the children in their   Fayette County
care. The second topic session reviewed general           EPSDT Health Screening
flu prevention protocols and Dr. Lori MacDonald,          Annual EPSDT screening was provided to school
the Regional Medical Director, provided an H1N1           children.
update and also assisted with a Q&A Session. The
Question and Answer Session addressed specific        Fentress County
audience questions.                                   South Fentress Elementary Health Fair
                                                      This event for approximately 150 middle school
FARM Fun Day at J&J Farms                             students promoted healthy choices such as exer-
In order to encourage physical activity and familiar- cising, healthy eating, preventive well checkups,
ity with fruits and vegetables and how they are       handwashing. This event provided elementary stu-
grown, low-income youth and adults were intro-        dents valuable information to help them make
duced to a local farm where they were able to play healthier life choices. Area agencies collaborated
and learn.                                            to provide this essential education for these stu-
                                                                                                               31
                                                      dents.
TENNderCare Display
A TENNderCare display was set up in the lobby of Marquee Displays
the Dickson location of the Dickson County Health The Child Health Week theme and dates were dis-
Department providing education in the areas of        played on marquees of various business sites
germs & handwashing, eating healthy, children's       throughout the county.
health, immunizations and TENNderCare bro-
chures.                                               Gibson County
                                                      Jr. Olympics
TENNderCare Display                                   Children were able to play “Run for Fun,” racquet-
A TENNderCare display was set up in the lobby of ball, and musical chairs as well as participate in
the White Bluff location of the Dickson County        track and field, soccer, basketball, and tennis.
Health Department providing education in the ar-
eas of germs & handwashing, importance of             YMCA 10-Year Celebration
EPSDT screenings, pamphlets on children's health, CoverTN provided a booth at the YMCA 10-Year
and TENNderCare brochures. A goody bag was            celebration.
provided for children along with coloring pages.

A Healthy You J-I-N-G-O
In order to familiarize children of all ages with
words and pictures used in the health care field,
participants played the game “A Healthy You J-I-N
-G-O,” a BINGO-style game for all ages. There
were prizes for the winners. Educational materials,
pamphlets, coloring pages and TENNderCare bro-
chures were distributed.
Giles County                                           TENNderCare Booth at the Farm Arts Festival
Heart Healthy Walk                                     TENNderCare staff provided a booth at the 2009
This event was held to promote physical activity       Farm Arts Festival at Rural Resources in Greene-
and help reintroduce the American Heart Associa-       ville. The booth provided information on the impor-
tion's missions and goals to the Giles County com-     tance of EPSDT screenings.
munity. This event was made possible by commu-
nity-wide partnerships between the American Heart  Healthy Eating and Physical Fitness
Association, Giles County Coordinated School       The Public Health Educator partnered with the
Health, Hillside Hospital, First National Bank, andBoys and Girls Club to plan and promote Child
Frito Lay. Activities included a 2-mile Heart Walk Health Week through after school activities at the
around the community-accessible walking trail in   club each day. On Monday, children ages 6-12
conjunction with Bicentennial Activities. Coordi-  were given instructions on healthy snack foods by
nated School Health offered a mini-grant for the   the Nutrition Educator from the Greene County
school with most walking participation. One hun-   Health Department. On Tuesday, an aerobics in-
                                                   structor from the local YMCA came to the club to
dred seventy five people participated in this event,
raising $6,384 for the American Heart Association. teach basic aerobic and yoga skills. On Wednes-
                                                   day, a local professional storyteller came to the
Hand Hygeine                                       club to tell stories that complement making healthy
Richland School Peer Educators taught hand hyge- choices. On Thursday, Volunteer State Health
ine to PreK-4th graders at Richland Elementary     Plan conducted the program "Get Fit Kids," and on
School.                                            Friday, the Public Health Educator from the Health
                                                   Department led the children and youth on a hike
Grainger County                                    along the newly-developed Tusculum Walking
"Germs, Hygeine, and Handwashing"                  Trail.
The purpose of this presentation was to educate
Rutledge Primary after school students about the   Daily Health Information Announcement Spots
importance of hygiene and handwashing.             The Public Health Educator developed daily an-
                                                   nouncement spots on various child/youth health
                                                                                                             32
Handwashing Instruction for Head Start Students    issues to be used during the week at all Greene-
The purpose of these presentations was to educate ville City/Greene County Schools. Topics for the
Head Start students about germs and proper hand- spots included healthy nutrition choices, the impor-
washing.                                           tance of physical fitness, tobacco prevention, stu-
                                                   dent stress factors, and sexual violence prevention
Greene County                                      for the high school level. Announcement spots
Press Release on Child Health Issues               were provided for elementary, middle, and high
The Public Health Educator provided information    school levels. These announcement spots were
on child health issues through a media release to  read by selected students during the daily an-
the local newspaper, the Greeneville Sun. Local    nouncements or on televised announcements. The
information for this press release was merged with Public Health Educator partnered with the two Co-
the press release that was issued from the Com-    ordinated School Health Directors to develop and
missioner's Office on Child Health Week.           implement the announcements.

Quick WIC Treat Bags                                   TENNderCare Display at the Greene County
Treat bags were provided to all Quick WIC partici-     Health Department
pants during Child Health Week. The bags con-          The Public Health Educator provided an informa-
tained new toothbrushes, coloring books, TENN-         tional display throughout the week in the lobby of
derCare information, and various health-related        the Greene County Health Department. The dis-
brochures and tip sheets.                              play included pamphlets on various child health
                                                       issues such as nutrition, physical fitness, tobacco
Greene Co. "Get Fit Kids"                              prevention, and the TENNderCare program. The
Children were educated on healthy eating habits,       display booth was centrally located within the
completed an exercise program that could also be       health department.
done at home, and received jump ropes to take
home to encourage physical activity.
Grundy County                                           was to provide important health screenings and
Grundy County Back to School Event                      educate Hispanic families about the importance of
The event encouraged students in the community          preventive health and the value of staying healthy.
to stay in school, stay out of trouble, and be pro-
ductive and healthy students. Students at the event   Autumn Children's Festival
received free school supplies. The mission was to     The Annual Autumn Children's Festival was held
promote well child check ups, offer H1N1 educa-       during the second weekend in October at the Ten-
tion, and provide school supplies in a fun and inter- nessee Riverpark. It is the largest festival in the
active environment.                                   area entirely devoted to children. The festival fea-
                                                      tured more than 100 fun-filled games and activities
It's a Small World                                    including: giant inflatables, pony rides, arts and
The Young Child Health Expo was a free, fun, fam- crafts, magic shows, carnival games, a petting zoo,
ily event for everyone with a baby/young child in     and free Mayfield ice cream plus health, wellness
their life now or in the future--parents, expecting   and EPSDT and H1N1 education.
parents, grandparents, children, and friends! The
event provided an opportunity for interested indi-    Hancock County
viduals and families to learn about maternal/child    Child Health Week Packets
community resources. The event featured educa-        Packets were disseminated to 5th grade parents
tional sessions, health institutions, H1N1 informa-   and included information on violence prevention,
tion, Well Child Check ups, social service agencies keeping kids tobacco-free, and physical activity/
and other community organizations exhibiting. Ad- nutrition.
ditionally, information was available on EPSDT ex-
ams, healthy eating, proper use of child safety       Child Health Week Educational Booth
seats, reading to children, breastfeeding, fire       The Public Health Educator set up an educational
safety, and other topics of importance to young       booth in the health department lobby to reach re-
children.                                             cipients of the WIC and CHAD/HUGS programs.

Hamblen County
                                                      Information was available on smoking during preg-
                                                      nancy, immunizations, child safety, nutrition, and
                                                                                                              33
Touch A Truck                                         physical activity.
This program was designed to allow children to
touch, climb, and explore utility vehicles, cars,     Walk to School Day
trucks, and heavy machinery and to learn what pur- The purpose of this event was to encourage kids
pose these vehicles serve in the community.           and parents to increase physical activity. Partici-
                                                      pants received certificates, a healthy snack, and
Presentation to Local Child Care Facility             incentives.
A presentation was given to local child care facility
staff regarding germs/disease prevention, flu, and    Treat Bags for Children Seen for EPSDT at Clinic
the importance of handwashing.                        Treat bags were provided to children during clinic
                                                      visits that week. The bags contained toothbrushes,
Boo Fest                                              coloring books, TENNderCare information, various
This event was for children ages 2 to 12 at the       health-related brochures and tip sheets for parents.
Fred Miller Park Trick or Treat Trail. Vendors were
present with booths, contests, and health and         TENNderCare display at Hancock County Health
safety information.                                   Department
                                                      A TENNderCare display was set up in the lobby of
Handwashing                                           the Hancock County Health Department. The dis-
This event was held to teach the correct way to       play featured programmatic information emphasiz-
wash hands to Pre-K, Kindergarten & first grade       ing the importance of EPSDT screenings.
students. Staff used “glitter bug lotion” & black
lights to show kids the correct way to wash hands. Fruit and Vegetable Taste Party
                                                      The Public Health Educator partnered with Coordi-
Hamilton County                                       nated School Health, the School Based Health
Latino Health Fair                                    Center, and the school nutritionist to provide fresh
The target audience for this event was Hispanic       fruits and vegetables (provided by grant money) to
families in Chattanooga. The purpose of this event encourage healthy eating habits.
TENNderCare Display at Shepherd's Corner Thrift         Carter's Valley Elementary "Healthy Day"
Store (Of One Accord Ministry) in Sneedville            This activity provided education in the area of
A TENNderCare display was set up in the lobby of        germs, nutrition, and first aid. In addition, a TENN-
the Shepherd's Corner thrift store. The display fea-    derCare display was set up at the elementary
tured programmatic information emphasizing the          school. TENNderCare information was given to the
importance of EPSDT screenings.                         students prior to activities provided by the TNCEP
                                                        coalition.
Tobacco Letter-Writing Campaign
The Public Health Educator disseminated letters         A Safe and Healthy Ride
signed by fourth grade students to thank busi-          The East Tennessee Child Passenger Safety Cen-
nesses for being smoke free.                            ter conducted car seat safety checks during Quick
                                                        WIC classes at the Rogersville Office of the Haw-
Parenting Class                                         kins County Health Department. The Hawkins
The Public Health Educator disseminated packets         County Health Department also provided informa-
to parents containing child health information and      tion about tobacco-free cars and second hand to-
provided an opportunity for group discussions.          bacco smoke. Other collaborators included the UT
                                                        Extension office and the TENNderCare program.
Hardeman County
LeBonheur Mobile Unit                                   Quick WIC Treat Bags
The mobile unit from LeBonheur Children's Medical       Treat bags were provided to all Quick WIC partici-
Center visited the county and took the opportunity      pants during Child Health Week. The bags con-
to educate patients using educational materials         tained new toothbrushes, coloring books, TENN-
and demonstrations on the mobile units. Hand            derCare information, and various health-related
sanitizer was also distributed.                         brochures and tip sheets.

Hardin County                                           Head Start Parent Meeting Packets
Hardin County ExtraOrdinary Baby Shower
The target population was prenatal women. The
                                                        TENNderCare staff partnered with the Health Edu-
                                                        cator in providing parent packets for a Head Start
                                                                                                                34
baby shower consisted of educational displays,          parent meeting. Packets included TENNderCare
guest speakers, and a light, healthy snack. Goody       information, age-appropriate snacking, health de-
bags were given to the prenatal participants.           partment services, food pyramid information, and
                                                        tobacco use prevention tip sheets for parents.
Mini Health Fair
The purpose of this event was to give the students      Health Rocks
of West Hardin elementary a small experience of a       Packets were distributed to parents which included
health fair. Local community organizations were         information about how to talk to your child about
present to give educational information and incen-      sensitive issues, basic hygiene, nutrition, and pu-
tives related to health.                                berty.

Healthy Children Rock!                                  Handwashing Art Project Competition
This activity included nutrition education, informa-    Elementary students in Hawkins County Schools
tion on internet safety, and information on the         participated in handwashing-oriented art projects
Cover Kids program. A mini health fair was held         that were judged locally. The handwashing educa-
for students to hear a brief presentation by agen-      tion coincided with ongoing measures to decrease
cies and to obtain free goodies to carry home to        the spread of illness as flu season approaches.
their parents.                                          Areas of emphasis included: Wash for 20 seconds;
                                                        Sneeze into your sleeve; Keep your hands away
Hawkins County                                          from your T zone (eyes, nose, and mouth); Wash
Heads Up with Head Start                                after: using the restroom, playing outside, touching
Packets were distributed to parents which included      animals, blowing your nose, etc; and Wash before
information about TENNderCare, childhood nutri-         meals.
tion, dealing with picky eaters, portion control, and
physical activities for rainy days.
TENNderCare Display at Hawkins County Health           Henry Elementary—Child Health Week Activity
Department (Church Hill)                               A poster contest was held for sixth grade students.
A TENNderCare display was set up in the lobby of
the Church Hill Health Department. The display         Henry Elementary—Alpha Man
featured programmatic information emphasizing          Students received a lesson on how germs are
the importance of EPSDT screenings.                    spread using glitter. Students had to figure out
                                                       how the germs got on them. Students noticed how
TENNderCare Display at Shepherd's Corner Thrift        germs were spread. Proper handwashing was also
Store (Of One Accord Ministry) in Rogersville, TN      discussed.
A TENNderCare display was set up in the lobby of
the Shepherd's Corner thrift store. The display fea-   Henry Elementary—Child Health Week Activity
tured programmatic information emphasizing the         Brochures on diabetes and junk food were distrib-
importance of EPSDT screenings.                        uted at the football game.

TENNderCare Display at Hawkins County Health           Grove School—Health Tip
Department (Rogersville)                               A health tip was read during morning announce-
A TENNderCare display was set up in the lobby of       ments by Healthy School Team students.
the Rogersville Health Department. The display
featured programmatic information emphasizing          Grove School—Health Display
the importance of EPSDT screenings.                    A health display was set up in the lunch room.

Haywood County                                         Grove School—Child Health Week Activity
Haywood County Book Jam                                Students made posters on proper handwashing
This event was designed to bring awareness to          and displayed them throughout the school.
Child Health and encourage reading by providing
free books. It was open to the general population      Grove School—Handwashing Video
and students received a book. A self-esteem skit
was performed by UT Extension.
                                                       The drama club made a video on proper hand-
                                                       washing and showed it to the whole school. They
                                                                                                              35
                                                       also made a video on Zumba dancing to be shown
LeBonheur Mobile Unit                                  later.
The mobile unit from LeBonheur Children's Medical
Center visited the county and took the opportunity     Harrelson School—Coloring Contest
to educate patients using educational materials        A coloring contest with a theme of nutrition and
and demonstrations on the mobile units. Hand           physical activity was held for students in grades K-
sanitizer was also distributed.                        2.

Henderson County                                       Harrelson School—Poster Contest
Child Health Week Community Fun Walk                   A poster contest promoting healthy eating and
The entire community was invited to walk in obser-     physical activity was held for students in grades 3-
vance of Child Health Week.                            5.

Henry County                                           Harrelson School—Door Decorating Contest
Henry Elementary—Milk Campaign                         A door decorating contest was held for students in
Pictures were taken of staff and students with milk    grades 6-8.
moustaches. Milk nutritional posters were dis-
played. A contest was held for students who could      Harrelson School—Morning Health Tip
correctly guess the staff moustache.                   A morning health tip was read by Healthy School
                                                       Team student members.
Henry Elementary—Child Health Week Activity
Students led a morning health announcement and         Harrelson School—Child Health Week Activity
boost up exercise.                                     Brochures on diabetes and junk food were distrib-
                                                       uted at the football game.
Henry Elementary—Child Health Week Activity
A coloring contest focused on “germs” was held for
grades K-5.
Henry County High School—Morning Walk                 Humphreys County
A morning walk was held for students starting at 8    Healthy Reading Rainbow
AM until 8:25 AM, with daily prizes--one pedome-      This event provided health education to pre-school
ter, one Subway card, and one grand prize at end      and school aged children and parents visiting the
of week.                                              library. TENNderCare shared in the Healthy story
                                                      time and provided other activities such as games to
Henry County High School—Morning Broadcast            help promote: Healthy Youth, Healthy Future!
On the morning broadcast, a student on the
Healthy School Team shared a health tip.              Jefferson County
                                                      Presentation to Local Child Care Facility
Henry County High School—Health Tip                   Staff gave a presentation to a local child care facil-
A different health tip was announced daily over the   ity staff regarding germs/disease prevention, flu,
intercom by an administrator.                         and the importance of handwashing.

Lakewood Schools—Coloring Contest                    Child Health Month Activity
A coloring contest using the themes of nutrition and A “Milk Moustache Campaign” was held to cele-
physical activity was held for students in grades K- brate Child Health Week.
2.
                                                     Child Health Month Activity
Lakewood Schools—Poster Contest                      Promotion of dental, vision, and hearing screening
A poster contest promoting healthy eating and        occurred throughout the month.
physical activity was held for students in grades 3-
8.                                                   Johnson County
                                                     Classroom Health Lessons—Extended Service
Lakewood Schools—Morning Health Tip                  Center
A morning health tip was read by Healthy School      Child Health Week activities provided health infor-
Team student members.                                mation regarding TENNderCare benefits and advo-
                                                     cated to teens that they get their physical and im-
                                                                                                               36
Lakewood Schools—Child Health Week Activity          munizations up to date. Three health lessons were
Healthy School Team members demonstrated             provided on topics including: covering coughs/
physical activity for the entire school.             sneezes, proper handwashing, and stopping
                                                     spread of germs. Information packets were given
Go Green Assembly                                    to participants; the packets included tooth brushes,
A “Go Green” assembly was held, with physical        tooth paste and various health-related brochures
activity boost up and a handwashing rap.             and health tip sheets for teens and parents. The
                                                     “Health Rocks” video was shown in the classroom
Lakewood Schools—Morning Walking Program             as well.
A morning walking program was held throughout
the month of October.                                Johnson County Community Center After School
                                                     Program
Lakewood Schools—Child Health Week Activity          Child Health Week activities provided health infor-
Brochures on diabetes and junk food were distrib- mation regarding TENNderCare benefits and advo-
uted at the football game.                           cated to teens that they get their physical and im-
                                                     munizations up to date. Three health lessons were
Houston County                                       provided on topics including: covering coughs/
Food and Fun                                         sneezes, proper handwashing, and stopping
This activity was designed to educate children in    spread of germs. Information packets were given
the local housing authority about how to eat         to participants; the packets included tooth brushes,
healthy and to get them involved in physical activ- tooth paste and various health-related brochures
ity. A food demonstration and physical activity      and health tip sheets for teens and parents. The
game was part of the event.                          “Health Rocks” video was shown in the classroom
                                                     as well.
Graduate on Time                                         health information and community resources that
Weekly health lessons were conducted at Johnson          they can use to help build a healthier life style.
County High School on each Friday. Lessons were
taught on the “Graduate on Time” program. Part-          Take 10! Training with Halls Elementary
ners included Coordinated School Health, Johnson         Coordinated School Health staff worked with the
County High School, and Johnson County Health            faculty and staff at Halls Elementary to provide the
Department.                                              “Take 10!” curriculum tool. The purpose of the
                                                         Take 10! curriculum is to increase physical activity
Classroom Health Lessons—Johnson County High during the school day.
School
Child Health Week activities provided health infor- Day Cares and Parent Outreach
mation regarding TENNderCare benefits and advo- This activity was held to assist day cares and par-
cated to teens that they get their physical and im-      ents in their efforts to teach their children preven-
munizations up to date. Three health lessons were tive health habits that can positively impact their
provided on topics including: covering coughs/           well being in the future.
sneezes, proper handwashing, and stopping
spread of germs. Information packets were given          Smart Choices
to participants; the packets included tooth brushes, Children 2-5 years of age had a storytime with local
tooth paste and various health-related brochures         author Margaret Holt followed by a session by
and health tip sheets for teens and parents. The         EFNEP-UT Extension. This program was designed
“Health Rocks” video was shown in the classroom to provide families and children information and
as well.                                                 skills to make healthy food choices on a limited
                                                         budget. Kids helped to make a healthy snack & do
TN Shapes Up Kick-Off                                    fun physical activities.
Each day there was a general “health topic of the
day,” “nutrition tip of the day,” and “physical activity Walk to School Day
of the day.” This served as a kick-off for the 8-
week TN Shapes Up program offered through UT
                                                         This event was held to encourage parents to par-
                                                         ticipate in physical activity with their child, to raise
                                                                                                                    37
Extension. Partners included UT Extension, John- the level of awareness in the community for the
son County Health Department, Mountain Fitness, importance of safe routes and sidewalks for chil-
and Laurel Elementary School.                            dren, and to promote walking and riding bicycles as
                                                         great physical activities that parents and children
Knox County                                              can to do together.
High School Tailgate Contest
KAPPI, TENNderCare-Knox County, Ameri-                   Teacher Workshop to Increase Physical Activity in
Choice,and Volunteer State Health Plan sponsored Elementary Classrooms
a contest to select the best tailgate decorations        Coordinated School Health staff provided re-
during the Powell/Hardin Valley football game.           sources and training on physical activity in the
Information on a variety of health topics and com-       classroom. The workshop was open to all teachers
munication tips was provided for parents and chil-       in Knox and surrounding counties.
dren. Tents were located outside the gate for fans
from both schools to visit. Booster clubs from the       Teen Health Fair
schools promoted the event, in addition to teen          A Teen Health Fair was held at a local high school
groups within the schools. Each school was invited to provide health information for the freshman
to compete in two competitions: 1) the best-             class. Participating agencies provided an exhibit
decorated vehicle and 2) the school with the most        with short interactive activities for a take-home
registered participants. Each school had to visit the message to encourage teens to take responsibility
various preventive health vendors set up and regis- for their health and promote the message that
ter to compete in the competition.                       practicing good preventive health now can posi-
                                                         tively affect their future.
Healthy Youth, Healthy Future Fair
The “Healthy Youth, Healthy Future Fair” focused
on encouraging youth to make positive health
changes in their everyday routine. Area organiza-
tions provided children and their parents with
Community Day                                           Daily Physical Activity and Health Announcements
This event, as part of Mental Health Awareness          All elementary and middle school students partici-
Week, promoted healthy minds and bodies for chil-       pated in physical activity and heard healthy mes-
dren and teens. Health information was available        sages during the daily morning announcements.
to parents and children.
                                                        Free Healthy Desserts
Covenant Health Check                                   All students and faculty received free healthy des-
CoverTN provided a booth at the Covenant Health         serts (fruit pizza and fruit parfaits).
Check.
                                                        Healthy Snacks
Scout and Community Day                                 School nurses helped all K-5 grade students make
This event focused on elementary school-age chil-       a healthy snack during classroom health education
dren and parents/caregivers. The goal was to "get       time.
the word out" that good eating habits and physical
activities will help you grow up strong and live a      Ciggy Butts Greeting Students
long, healthy life.                                     Ciggy Butts greeted all elementary students as
                                                        they entered school in the morning and handed out
Lunch and Learn                                         healthy-themed stickers, which were worn through-
A workshop was held for parents on how to talk to       out the day.
their children about sensitive issues.
                                                        Lawrence
Lunch and Learn                                         Tar Wars
A workshop was held for parents on "Children and        Tar Wars is the tobacco-free education program for
Social Media."                                          4th and 5th grade students owned & operated by
                                                        the American Academy of Family Physicians. Law-
Central High School Teen Health Fair                    rence County Coordinated School Health spon-
The purpose of this fair was to provide teen stu-
dents with health information that will improve their
                                                        sored this program for 5th grade students in all
                                                        Lawrence County private & parochial schools dur-
                                                                                                                38
overall health. Area organizations were on hand to      ing Child Health Week.
share information on services that are available to
the community. The students were able to learn          Healthy Snacks
more about healthy changes that they can make in        During this activity for grades K-8, students learned
their everyday routine.                                 what healthy snacks are and were also able to
                                                        make and eat a healthy snack.
Knox County School Recognition of Child Health
Week                                               Personal Health
Schools displayed the Child Health Week message Blood pressure, height and weight were measured
on school marquees.                                on all students, who were then given a form to take
                                                   home so that parents are aware of current health
Scoreboard Announcement at University of Ten-      status.
nessee Football Game
The University of Tennessee Athletic Department    Food Pyramid
agreed to make a public service announcement       This event taught children in grades 2-8 about the
during the football game held during Child Health  food pyramid.
Week with the following message: "Governor Bre-
desen reminds Vols fans that October fifth through Physical Activity
the eleventh is Child Health Week in Tennessee.    Personal trainer Marilyn McCormick conducted
As a team, let's make a difference by making       different strategies on physical activity for all stu-
healthy food choices and encouraging active life-  dents K-8th grade.
styles. Together, we can ensure a healthier future
for our youth and a healthier Tennessee."

Lake County
Out and About Run/Walk Program
Child Health Week kicked off a new Run/Walk Pro-
gram for the community. The Run/Walk program
will take place 2 days a week and continue for a
minimum of 8 weeks.
Proper Handwashing                                National School Lunch Week
Students in grades K-2 learned about proper hand- Lewis County Schools celebrated National School
washing techniques.                               Lunch Week.

P.A.C.K.                                               Loudon County
Pack Assorted Colors for Kids Week. This simple 5      Healthy Eating Skit—Lenoir City Elementary
-day program promoted eating more fruits and           School
vegetables as well as a wider color variety.           The high school child development class wrote and
                                                       produced a skit on healthy eating and presented it
CPR                                                    to all students at Lenoir City Elementary School.
A local paramedic/American Red Cross Instructor
taught the basics of CPR to all 6th to 8th grade       Lenoir City National Night Out/ Street Festival
students. Mannequins were also available for           This festival allowed the total population of Lenoir
hands-on training as well.                             City to receive information on health, fitness, coun-
                                                       seling and referral sources.
Say NO to Drugs and Alcohol
During Child Health Week, art students promoted        Macon
the message of “Say NO to Drugs and Alcohol” by        Child Health Week Proclamation
drawing posters during art time.                       Macon County Mayor, Shelvy Linville, signed a
                                                       Child Health Week proclamation.
National School Lunch Week
To promote healthy eating during breakfast and       Child Health Celebration in Macon County
lunch, a variety of fruits, vegetables, and other    The purpose of this activity was to educate young
healthy foods were served during the week.           mothers-to-be on the importance of healthy
                                                     choices while pregnant and healthy choices while
TAKE 10!                                             caring for a newborn with emphasis on immuniza-
The purpose of this training session was to pro-
mote 10 minutes of some kind of physical activity
                                                     tions, well checkups, car seat safety, healthy eating
                                                     to avoid obesity and a healthy environment. The
                                                                                                               39
on a daily basis. This is done some time during the targeted audience was pregnant women under the
day by the classroom teacher.                        age of 21 years and mothers of newborns. This
                                                     event was an educational baby shower. An infor-
P.A.C.E /Physically Active Choices to Enjoy          mational scavenger hunt encouraged the partici-
The purpose is to add more physical activity and     pants to search for information from displays
promote wellness for chidren in grades 3-8. This     throughout the room which included information on
activity takes place every Tues., Wed., and Thurs. tobacco use, immunizations, TENNderCare, Chil-
morning before 8 a.m.                                dren Special Services Program, and child develop-
                                                     ment. A speaker from Doral Dental discussed
Noodle Hockey                                        good oral hygiene for the women and newborns.
This was a physical activity event for students in   The Department of Safety Department discussed
grades 2-8.                                          and demonstrated appropriate car seat safety.
                                                     Various health department staff gave presentations
Nutritional Activities/Computer Lab                  on immunizations, diabetes, baby spacing, exer-
The purpose of the nutritional activites on the web cise, healthy eating and WIC. Refreshments were
is for all students to learn about different ways to served and door prizes given (including a stroller,
remain healthy. During students' computer lab time baby monitor, baby thermometer, and a car seat.)
they looked up information online about healthy      Each expectant and new mother was given a
eating.                                              "goodie bag" to take home.

Students Promoting Drug Free Awareness                 Child Health Week Marquee Displays
This activity promoted drug free awareness for all     Child Health Week messages were displayed on
students in the school. The Summertown High Stu-       marquees of various business sites throughout the
dents on the Advisory Board presented this activity.   county.

Lewis County
Bully-Free Week
Lewis County Schools celebrated Bully-Free Week.
Madison County                                            Fitness and Fun
JMC Library Story Time                                    Students participated in the timed 1 Mile Run,
TENNderCare staff read "It's Check Up Time,               danced the Cha Cha Slide and learned a new
Elmo" to school-age children.                             game called “Frisbee Hoops.”

TENNderCare Mini Health Fair                              Calories Count
TENNderCare staff, in collaboration with JMC              The PE teachers discussed nutrition and the role
Health Promotions staff, targeted teens with educa-       calories play in fueling your body. Students partici-
tional booths during lunch periods to provide infor-      pated in activities using fitness cards and then
mation on well check-ups, handwashing, and hy-            measured the energy level used for each activity.
giene.
                                                          Healthy Teen Initiative
Jumpstart Jackson Child Health Week                       Teachers started after school activities for the stu-
A week-long celebration of health-related events          dents that focused on active, fun lifestyles. In-
and activities were held in all JMC Schools and           cluded activities were dancing, tennis, kickball,
after-school facilities. Monday’s theme was “Give         walking/running to build up to a 3K run, and aero-
Hygiene a Hand.” Elmo from Sesame Street vis-             bics.
ited pre-K and K classes to teach handwashing
techniques. "Germ City" was set up at several             Marshall County
schools and Boys & Girls Clubs. Tuesday’s theme           EPSDT Examinations
was “Total Health Tuesday.” TENNderCare pro-              As part of Child Health Week, comprehensive
grams were presented in the schools. On                   health screenings were provided to students.
Wednesday, the theme was “Walking Wednesday”
and walking marathons were held in the schools.           Walking the Talk!
Thursday’s theme was “5,2,1 Almost None.” “Fruit          The purpose of "Walking the Talk!" was to get each
& Veggie Tasting Parties” were held at selected           of the nine Marshall County Schools students,
schools. Friday’s theme was “Fit For Friday,” and
special PE fitness activities were held, with local
                                                          staff, faculty, and administration physically active
                                                          and excited about healthy choices. Art exhibits of
                                                                                                                  40
officials & personalities visiting schools to partici-    healthy foods and activities were displayed
pate in PE classes. The week concluded on Satur-          throughout the schools. Student math, graphs, and
day with a Grand Opening walk with the Mayor at           essays pertaining to health were also displayed on
the city’s newest walking trail.                          centralized bulletin boards within each school. All
                                                          participants walked a mile or more each day. "Give
Marion County                                             Me 5" was the mile-a-day program for Child Health
Healthy Youth Health Fair                                 Week. Participants during Child Health Week were
Jump rope activities, nutrition activities, and fitness   also encouraged to wear athletic shoes during the
centers were provided to actively engage students         week of October 5-11.
in Pre-K through 6th grades in vigorous activities
and to provide information about nutrition to stu-        McMinn County
dents.                                                    Healthy School Children Display
                                                          A 52" X 100" pictorial display featuring local stu-
Richard Hardy Memorial School Health Fair                 dents in activities that promote healthy lifestyles
Twelve vendors provided educational information           was displayed at the McMinn County Board of Edu-
to students ages Pre-K through 12 on topics rang-         cation during Child Health Week.
ing from handwashing to diabetes, and heart prob-
lems to risky behavior. Also, health screenings           Play Hard, Eat Smart, Live Well Essay Contest
(with hearing and vision screening) were com-             Coordinated School Health sponsored an essay
pleted.                                                   contest for 7th and 8th grade Language Arts stu-
                                                          dents. The winning essay was published in the
Wellness Walk                                             local newspaper during Child Health Week.
Students participated in a 3 mile run/walk. The stu-
dents had been learning about health and wellness
during their PE classes and they finished the week
walking for wellness.
McNairy County                                        YMCA—“Be Active”
ExtraOrdinary Baby Shower                             The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
This event targeted pregnant women. There were        variety of activities focused on encouraging youth
table displays, guest speakers and light, healthy     to be active 5 days a week. There were many ac-
snacks. Each prenatal woman received a goody          tivities for the youth to be involved in, encouraging
bag.                                                  them to be active and have fun. Activities included
                                                      the Plinko Board with exercise information, Jump
Meigs County                                          Rope Relay, and educational handouts.
Decatur Fall Festival
This event featured crafts, food, information          YMCA—Water as the Primary Drink
booths, children’s activities, and entertainment.      The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
                                                       variety of activities focused on water as the primary
Monroe County                                          drink. Staff handed out bottles of water. Children
Healthy Youth, Healthy Future                          in the Center and YPlay were asked questions
These activities focused on nutrition education and about water (information taken from the YNew
involved students at: Sweetwater Primary, Sweet- books). Children in the YPlay area had inside water
water Elementary, Brown Intermediate, and Sweet- play.
water Jr. High School. A UT Health Educator pre-
sented nutrition education to all classes. Coordi-     YMCA—Healthy Food Choices
nated School Health, the Food Service Depart-          The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
ment, and other partners joined together to provide variety of activities focused on making healthy food
samples of different fruits and vegetables for a tast- choices. Tennessee Nutrition and Consumer Edu-
ing party. This was followed by a poster contest       cation Program (TNCEP) and Expanded Food and
with one entry from each classroom. The objective Nutrition Program (EFNEP) provided information to
of the poster contest was to encourage students to participants. Yplay kids also put together a healthy
learn about good nutrition and display their knowl- snack.
edge in an attractive poster. Outside judges se-
lected a winning poster from each grade level.         YMCA—Family Health Practices
                                                                                                               41
Winning classrooms received a "healthy snack           The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
party” from Coordinated School Health.                 variety of activities focused on the role of families
                                                       in keeping children healthy. Activities included
Montgomery County                                      Family Boot Camp Class Gym and Family Zumba.
Special Olympics Bowling
This event was for children with special health care Moore County
needs at a local bowling alley. TENNderCare was Jumpstart Program with The Very Hungry Caterpil-
present with a table and an outreach representa-       lar
tive to talk to participants and caregivers.           Students in grades Pre-K through 3 were read “The
                                                       Very Hungry Caterpillar” in conjunction with the
Healthy Choices Program                                "Read for the Record" program. Students received
On October 7th, a Healthy Choices program was          apples for snacks and used apples for artwork.
held at the Learning Center North. Patti Hill, Mont-
gomery County Health Educator, and Mesina Bul- Morgan County
lock, CMCSS Student Wellness Coordinator were          Pass the Plate
on-site to provide information on how to promote       The Sunbright Student Council was very proud to
healthy living in the home. Patti provided a pro-      present "Pass the Plate" to the students of Sun-
gram on nutrition, focusing on "How to Read Food bright School during National Health Week.
Labels", while Mesina provided a program on            Healthy recipes with the theme of tomatoes were
"Ways to Get your Family Active".                      cleverly displayed during the "We are the World"
                                                       homecoming week activities. Announcements
Prenatal Fair                                          were made each day describing the display and
The target audience was WIC prenatal patients.         encouraging healthy foods and healthy living. The
The main topic was breast feeding. Representa-         Sunbright tiger held the plate while being dressed
tives from TENNderCare were available to talk to       up like the country the food was from in the lobby
the expecting parents.                                 of the school each day. To top the week off, at the
                                                       homecoming game, healthy tailgating recipes were
                                                       collected and a winner was drawn at the game.
Pickett County                                          Putnam County
Children's Safety Day                                   Healthy Youth Child Health Celebration Day
The Pickett County Health Council and Coordi-           At this health celebration, children participated in
nated School Health sponsored "Safety Day." Local       exercise activities, played educational games,
health providers were present to teach K-8 stu-         watched a video, made a healthy snack to eat, and
dents lessons about what they do in their jobs and      took educational materials home with them.
what people should do when they need their help.
                                                        Fitness Day
Marquee Display for Child Health Week                   Cookeville Leisure Services celebrated Child
Child Health Week messages were displayed on            Health Week by offering activities that promoted
marquees of various business sites throughout the       healthy behavior and ways for the whole family to
county.                                                 make healthier eating choices and to engage in
                                                        physical activity. Activities included: Volleyball
Polk County                                             Day, Basketball Day, Soccer Day, Fun Day (ping
Dance Day                                               pong, corn toss, four-square), Toddler Time, and
All 4 pull-out classes went to the gym each period      Bring a Child to Fitness Class.
and were introduced to different dances. The pur-
pose of this activity was to learn, to exercise, and    YMCA—Water as the Primary Drink
to celebrate Child Health Week                          The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
                                                        variety of activities focused on water as the primary
Copper Basin Medical Center Health Fair                 drink. Activities at YPlay included: water play, wa-
This event included crafts, food, information           ter experiments, and water bottles for kids. In addi-
booths, and a Halloween costume contest for chil-       tion, parents received a copy of “Quenchers.”
dren.
                                                        YMCA—Healthy Food Choices
Intramural Competitions                                 The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
Students did team-oriented, nontraditional, intra-
mural activities to give non-athlete students a
                                                        variety of activities focused on the importance of
                                                        making healthy food choices. Participants were
                                                                                                                42
chance to participate in sports. The goal was to        able to make healthy snack mixes. Other activities
emphasize being active and expose students to           included a healthy food chart game and healthy
sporting activities besides the normal school-          food puzzles. Parents received a “Healthy Eating
sponsored athletics.                                    Food Pyramid” handout.

“Kids On The Block” Nutrition Show from Cleve-          YMCA—Be Active
land, TN                                                The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
This activity was offered for students in grades Pre-   variety of activities focused on the importance of
K through 5 and was a nutrition and exercise pro-       being active. YPlay featured a group fitness class,
gram to target obesity.                                 and parents received an “Exercise for Children”
                                                        handout.
Walking for Health
Students at South Polk Elementary were outside,    YMCA—Family Healthy Practices
walking the track throughout the day. This was the The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
culmination of a week-long walking contest.        variety of activities focused on the role of families
                                                   in keeping children healthy. Activities included a
Healthy Snacks for Healthy Kids                    Family Class and Partner Exercise Classes
Students learned about making healthy choices for (stretching and exercising). In addition, partici-
their snacks. Students received an apple (donated pants received a handout on ideas for “Family Ac-
by Apple Valley Orchards) on one day and a Nutri- tivities.”
Grain bar on another.

Food, Glorious Food
A musical review discussing food and nutrition was
presented by the students at South Polk Elemen-
tary.
Roane County                                          Rutherford County
Tasty Tuesday                                         Bippity Bobbity Boo Baby Fair
Coordinated School Health staff visited elementary    This was a Baby Fair for expecting mothers and
schools and provided a "taste" of a new or unique     young families.
fruit or vegetable. During lunch, staff wore chef's
hats and offered samples to students. The tasting     BAM (Body & Mind) Parent Night
was followed up with literature and games in the      This activity promoted health education and TENN-
classroom highlighting the new item. The “Tasty       derCare with parents of the BAM program at
Tuesday” program is in partnership with TNCEP,        Scales Elementary.
the Roane County Health Department, and the Co-
ordinated School Health Program of Roane              YMCA—Water as the Primary Drink
County. Department of Health Commissioner             The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
Susan Cooper visited Midtown Elementary School        variety of activities focused on water as the primary
in Roane County. Commissioner Cooper also             drink. Water was served to participants at Y-Play,
watched the school's physical activity program in     Hang Time and the Teen Center. Departmental
progress and dined in the school cafeteria with the   staff distributed handouts on the importance of
students.                                             drinking water and discussed information contained
                                                      in the Y-New booklet with children in all areas. A
BMI Screenings in Roane County                        variety of games were played with the children.
The Roane County Coordinated School Health            There was a relay challenge for ages 7-12 and the
Program partnered with the Health Department and children who completed the challenge received a
the Volunteer State Health Plan to do BMI screen- bottle of water. There was also a water trivia game
ings. Along with that, the students received a pres- which taught students about water, the human
entation on healthy eating, and the importance of     body, and why water is so important.
at least 10 minutes of vigorous activity each day.
Students also received personal jump ropes to mo- YMCA—Healthy Food Choices
tivate them to exercise regularly.                    The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
                                                      variety of activities focused on the importance of
                                                                                                              43
High School Poster Contest                            making healthy food choices. Healthy food choices
High School students participated in the TennCare and options were displayed in the Y-Play, Hang
poster contest.                                       Time & Teen Center areas. Staff helped the chil-
                                                      dren make fruit kabobs and talked with the children
Robertson County                                      about the importance of healthy food choices. A
TENNderCare Health & Safety                           variety of games centered around nutrition were
This activity was designed to provide health/safety utilized as well. “Healthy Heroes” and “Running
education to pre-school youth (age 2-5) and school Wild” classes were offered in the evening. A local
aged youth (grades 4-6). The activities were spon- business came in the evening and showed the chil-
sored by the Robertson County TENNderCare             dren how to prepare a simple, healthy snack/meal.
Outreach Program.                                     Throughout the day, there were games involving
                                                      healthy food choices—Healthy Food Bingo (ages 7
Seatbelt Satety w/ Ollie the Otter                    -12) and Hungry Harry (ages 3-6). The children
This activity educated pre-schoolers on the impor- also learned which foods are healthy and why it’s
tance of seatbelt safety to share with their parents. important to eat these foods everyday. The chil-
                                                      dren received easy, healthy food recipes that they
Stop the Bullying                                     can make at home with their parents. The recipes
This program educated and encouraged positive         included nutritional information so that parents and
safe behavior to 6th graders.                         children can learn about what they’re eating.

Health Screenings
As part of Child Health Week, vision, hearing, and
BMI screenings were offered to students.

Healthy Child Week Robertson!
Safety information was distributed throughout
Robertson County Schools. Additionally, informa-
tion was provided on: staying healthy through
handwashing, wearing seatbelts, and eating.
YMCA—Be Active                                        Sevier County
The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a          Child Health Fair
variety of activities focused on the importance of    Sevier County Schools, along with the Sevier
being active. Kidfit exercise classes were offered    County Health Dept. and Sevier County Family
to the Y-Play participants in the morning and eve-    Resource Center, focuses on two primary/
ning. In the evening, multiple Healthy Heroes         elementary schools every year in October. The
classes were offered to the youth. All departments    first one this year was October 2nd at Pigeon
discussed the importance of daily exercise/activity   Forge Primary School, and the second one was on
with the children and youth. An exercise chart for    October 9th at Pittman Center School. Eight
the youth was distributed. YPlay took the children    booths were set up in the gym on topics such as
outside and played with hula hoops, jump ropes,       Nutrition, Personal Hygiene, Dangers in Smoking,
and balls. Youth Activity Center took the children    Dental Care, Lice & Scabies Prevention, Water vs
outside and did obstacle courses, relay races, and    Cola, Exercise Fun, and Safety Issues (Fire Safety
played some large group games (kickball, basket-      or Halloween Safety).The students stayed with
ball, etc.). Staff talked about being involved in the their class and received a 5 to 7 minute talk on one
youth fitness classes that take place at the center   of the topics and then a whistle was blown and the
during the week.                                      class rotated to the next table. After they com-
                                                      pleted the rotation of all 8 tables (along with a fun
YMCA—Family Healthy Practices                         exercise), then each student received a gift bag
The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a          filled with information along with health-related
variety of activities focused on the role of families items to reinforce the message that was just
in keeping children healthy. Family swim was pro- shared with them at the health fair. A Halloween
moted and the evenings featured family cardio         bag, donated by the local hospital, included items
time, Healthy Heroes, and Running Wild. Family        such as toothpaste, toothbrush, shampoo, soap,
kickball and waffle ball games were also offered.     coloring books on Nutrition and Smoking, crayons,
Additional activities included: family fitness        pencils, exercise stickers, key chains, and nutri-
classes, Zumba, Yoga, and H2O Cardio. Staff also tious snacks like a box of raisins along with a pam-
encouraged families to play and be active together. phlet for their parent. The gym was decorated with
                                                                                                              44
                                                      balloons and the students felt as if they were hav-
Child Health Week Poster Contest                      ing a party while receiving some important health-
Rutherford County Schools Child Health Week           related information. This was the 12th successful
Poster Contest winners were posted in Stones          year in doing this and the community as well as the
River Mall.                                           school system have really contributed to that suc-
                                                      cess.
Scott County
Handwashing Class                                     CoverKids Booth
The Head Start students learned how proper hand- CoverKids provided a booth to share information
washing can keep germs away and how important on CoverTN programs.
handwashing is for health.
                                                      Shelby County
TENNderCare Poster Contest                            Walking School Bus Day
High school students participated in this project to This day symbolized the combined efforts of adults
help promote awareness of annual health exams in and youth to increase physical activity. To continue
a positive message. Students worked to create         efforts to reverse the trend of high obesity rates
posters that support annual health exams for stu-     and diabetes in the Memphis community, all adults
dents.                                                throughout Memphis and the surrounding areas
                                                      were encouraged to walk with a student or a group
Sequatchie County                                     of students to school on October 7th.
Griffith Elementary Fall Carnival/Health Expo
The purpose of this event was to combine the          EPSDT Health screening
Health Expo with the school Fall Carnival to target As part of Child Health Week, annual EPSDT
school age children and their parents. In addition to health screenings were provided for elementary
the PTO Fall Carnival, the Health Expo provided       school children.
health screening and health education.
Health Department Lobby Display                      Flu Prevention through Proper Handwashing
A lobby display was hosted by the Memphis and        This event was held for children, families, and staff
Shelby County Health Department--Children's Spe-     of Lil' Treehouse Childcare. Children and adults
cial Services. Information was provided regarding    were given guidelines on proper handwashing, flu
services offered by the program. Incentives were     vaccines, and tips on staying healthy from the
also available.                                      health educator. The children were given the op-
                                                     portunity to use the Glitter Bug to observe their
“Ask First Is It Good For The Children" Column       hands under the UV light to see how clean they
The Memphis Commercial Appeal newspaper pub- were.
lished a column on "Child Health Week" featuring
Ashley Barbee (of the Governor’s Office of Chil-     Flu Prevention through Proper Handwashing
dren’s Care Coordination) as the guest columnist.    This event was held for children, families, and staff
                                                     of The Village. Children and adults were given
Memphis and Shelby County's Community Infor-         guidelines on proper handwashing, flu vaccines,
mational Health Fair                                 and tips on staying healthy from the health educa-
Information was provided regarding nutrition,        tor. The children were given the opportunity to use
healthy lifestyles, H1N1, and child health matters.  the Glitter Bug to observe their hands under the UV
Additionally, there were pamphlets and various       light to see how clean they were.
educational flyers/brochures available on child
health issues such as physical fitness, tobacco pre- Sullivan County
vention, and other topics. Incentives, such as pe-   Kid's Night at Chick-Fil-A
dometers, food journals, and other items were also TENNderCare staff set up an informational table
available. 150 people participated in the event.     with various educational material for children and
                                                     their parents. In addition, prizes and the activity
Flu Information                                      wheel were available.
During the Orthopedic Clinic (Children’s Special
Services), staff provided information regarding      Bluff City Middle School Health Fair
H1N1 Flu Vaccine Awareness and Preparing for a Middle schoolers received appropriate health edu-
                                                                                                             45
Flu Pandemic at the Memphis and Shelby County cation information on topics relative to their age
Health Department.                                   and also received a pedometer to encourage
                                                     physical activity.
Car Sear Educational Presentation Demonstration
A car seat educational presentation and demon-       Sullivan Central High School Health Fair
stration was presented by the Memphis and Shelby High School students received appropriate health
County Health Department's "Car Seat Safety" pro- education information pertinent to their age group
gram.                                                as well as pedometers to encourage them to stay
                                                     physically active. Various agencies set up tables
Smith County                                         to promote Child Health Week and distribute infor-
Marquee Displays                                     mation regarding adolescent health.
Child Health Week messages were displayed on
marquees of various business sites throughout the Holston Valley Middle School Health Fair
county.                                              Middle schoolers received appropriate health edu-
                                                     cation information and were encouraged to get 60
Stewart County                                       minutes of physical fitness each day. They also
Healthy Habits                                       received a pedometer to take home with them to
This educational program taught preschool children track their walking steps.
the importance of healthy eating and proper hand-
washing to stay healthy.                             Healthy Youth Day at Girls Inc.
                                                     Youth at Girls Inc. engaged in activities such as
Better Me                                            jump roping, nutrition activities, and a heart health
This program was designed to educate 5th graders game.
on different aspects of healthy habits and the im-
portance of physical activity (this was the 1st ses-
sion in a series of 6 sessions).
Informational Table at Health Department               Jump Rope Jamboree
Staff from the health department set up an informa-    The purpose of the Jump Rope Jamboree was to
tional table and display promoting Child Health        promote cardiovascular activity and wellness
Week. Various educational materials were avail-        among students. The target audience was grades
able for participants to take with them.               K-5. Students had daily jump rope contests during
                                                       Child Health Week.
YMCA—Child Health Week Activities
Children ages 6-12 at the Greater Kingsport Family     Heart Saver CPR
YMCA engaged in various activities through the         High school and middle school students were certi-
week. Some activities included floor hockey, circuit   fied for Heart Saver CPR.
training, Wii challenges and Wii Fit. Information
was also distributed about good health including      "Child Health Week" Coloring Art Contest
diet, exercise, and hygiene.                          This event was held for the pre-school daycares
                                                      that participate in DHS Families First. TENNder-
Sumner County                                         Care staff talked to the children about the TENN-
Fun Family Fitness Day—Clyde Riggs Elementary derCare program and read a book with Elmo about
Family members and the Portland community were the importance of going to the doctor.
invited to participate in the Fun Family Fitness Day.
The event began with fun warm-up exercises that       10 at 10, Walking Across the Heartland
included team work. There were also races, cup        Each classroom at H.B. Williams did 10 repetitions
stacking, rope jumping, hula hooping, scarf danc-     of any physical activity at 10:00 each day during
ing and a karate demonstration by Kirby's Karate      Child Health Week. The school also kicked off its
Academy. A community health specialist attended walking program this year: Walking Across the
to give out information for a healthy lifestyle.      Heartland. Each grade level has a trail (Oregon
                                                      Trail, Appalachian Trail, etc) and will be logging
Girl's Get Up and Dance                               miles on the walking track throughout the year.
An instructor came to lead a Zumba class for high
school and middle school girls at the R.T. Fisher     YMCA—Water as the Primary Drink
                                                                                                               46
Alternative School.                                   The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
                                                      variety of activities focused on water as the primary
Social Services Fair                                  drink. Staff explained the importance of drinking
During parent conference night at the R.T. Fisher     water before/during/after Kids Fit class. Children
Alternative School on October 8th, various social     also participated in Kid Fit and the YNEW.
service agencies were available with information
for parents.                                          YMCA—Healthy Food Choices
                                                      The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
Basketball Tournament--Intramural                     variety of activities focused on the importance of
High school and middle school boys from the R.T. making healthy food choices. Children learned to
Fisher Alternative School competed in an intramu- make healthy snacks (cheerios, pretzels, trail mix,
ral basketball tournament.                            etc.). They also played Nutrition BINGO in Hang-
                                                      time using YNEW.
Buccaneer Stomp
Parents and community leaders participated in a       YMCA—Be Active
one-mile walk with students at Beech Elementary. The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
                                                      variety of activities focused on the importance of
Healthy Youth, Healthy Future                         being active. Activities included a fitness class
Posters were displayed that account for basic calo- with the kids in Kids Zone (jumping jacks, push
ries in food as well as activities/exercises that can ups, sit ups, stretching, etc) and a Kids Fit class in
be done to burn a certain amount of calories.         the gym using YNEW.
Gallatin High School also offered BMI screenings
to faculty, staff, and students in the morning during
Child Health Week.
YMCA—Family Healthy Practices                           and other illness. A dental health program also
The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a            stressed the importance of proper oral hygiene to
variety of activities focused on the role of families   overall good health. The TENNderCare Program
in keeping children healthy. Activities included a      demonstrated how to properly brush and provided
Family Fitness Class and Family Zumba.                  a free toothbrush to all participants.

Tipton County                                           Union County
Newsletter Article                                      Douglas Cherokee Headstart Parenting Fair
An article about Child Health Week appeared in          The purpose of this event was to educate/inform
Out Reach, the newsletter of REACH (Tipton              parents and children on health topics. Planned
County Coordinated School Health program).              activities included a presentation on H1N1 and the
                                                        seasonal flu.
Trousdale County
Get Healthy TCES                                        Van Buren County
Trousdale County Elementary School hosted both          Marquee Displays
Germ City with UT Extension Service & Taking            Child Health Week messages were displayed on
Care of Kids with the TENNderCare Program for           marquees of various business sites throughout the
Students in Grades Pre-K-3.                             county.

Unicoi County                                           You Are What You Eat
Handwashing and Dental Health                           During Spencer Elementary's Parent Teacher Con-
The purpose of this program was to educate the          ference, the school was open to the public. Activi-
children on proper handwashing to prevent the flu       ties included nutrition lessons, games, and activi-
and other illness. A dental health program also         ties to make learning about foods more fun for the
stressed the importance of proper oral hygiene to       entire family. Staff provided creative alternatives to
overall good health. The health educator demon-         meal planning and getting families exercising to-
strated proper handwashing and discussed other
ways to prevent the flu. The TENNderCare Pro-
                                                        gether.                                                  47
gram demonstrated how to properly brush and pro-        Health Rocks DVD
vided a free toothbrush to all participants             The “Health Rocks” DVD was played at the local
                                                        health department in Van Buren County.
Flu Vaccination Awareness
The Public Health Educator provided a display at        Washington County
the Unicoi Piza Hut and in the Unicoi County            Coalition for Kids Healthy Habits Class
Health Department waiting room on flu vaccination       The purpose of this class was to stress the impor-
awareness.                                              tance of handwashing in the fight against the flu
                                                        and illness in general. Staff from the TENNder-
TENNderCare Information Distribution                    Care Program talked about the importance of
Information about the TENNderCare program was           EPSDT screenings and staying up to date on im-
distributed in the lobby of the Unicoi County Health    munizations.
Department during Child Health Week.
                                                        Walk to School Day at Lamar Elementary
YMCA After School Program: Handwashing and              The purpose of this event was to stress the impor-
Dental Health                                           tance of safety, to promote physical activity and
The purpose of this program was to educate the          pedestrian safety, and to make students more
children on proper handwashing to prevent the flu       aware of the health benefits of walking to school.
and other illness. A dental health program also
stressed the importance of proper oral hygiene to       Young Mom's and Dad's Class
overall good health. The TENNderCare Program            The purpose of this program was to stress the im-
demonstrated how to properly brush and provided         portance of dental health in children, including in-
a free toothbrush to all participants.                  formation on healthy snacking. The effects of sec-
                                                        ondhand smoke on dental health were also cov-
Unicoi Elementary Afterschool Program: Hand-            ered. This was presented by TENNderCare and
washing and Dental Health                               the Washington County Health Department Health
The purpose of this program was to educate the          Educators.
children on proper handwashing to prevent the flu
Dental Health Program                                  ing the importance of EPSDT screenings and im-
The health educators conducted a presentation          munizations. Coloring pages were also provided.
about the importance of dental hygiene and the
correct way to brush your teeth.                     Challenge Alert at Westview Elementary
                                                     The purpose of this activity was to get children and
Healthy Smoothie Day                                 parents more aware of nutritional needs. The target
Community helpers were invited to help students at audience was K-8th grade. Activities included a
Boone’s Creek Elementary School prepare              “Challenge Alert” calendar that each student took
smoothies. In addition, smoothie recipes were        home. The calendar had certain things for them to
handed out to the children. Activity logs were       do and not do. For example, Monday showed that
passed out to the classrooms, and children who       they were not to eat fast food, but instead prepare
participated everyday were awarded a prize.          a healthy snack using a fruit, drink 2 glasses of
                                                     water, and exercise outside for 30 minutes.
Walk From School Day at North Side Elementary
School                                               Guessing Game
Johnson City Schools held a "Walk Home from          Students were asked to guess how many cereal
School Day" at North Side School on Roan Street      pieces are in a jar.
to promote physical activity and pedestrian safety
and to make students more aware of the health        Picture Contest
benefits of walking from school.                     Students were asked to take a picture of them-
                                                     selves drinking milk in a crazy place. Pictures were
Ridgeview Elementary School Health Fair              displayed in the cafeteria.
The overall purpose of the event was to provide
free information on how to stay healthy. Display     Weakley
tables included information on dental health, men- Family Fall Fest
tal health, physical health and safety practices for The Family Fun Fest targeted all Weakley County
home and school. The TENNderCare program
provided information on immunizations and well
                                                     children and family members to bring awareness to
                                                     child health issues. Door prizes, activities, free
                                                                                                            48
child checkups.                                      food, and informational booths were provided.

Healthy Habits Calendar                                Step Up for Kids
Students at Boone's Creek Middle School received       This event was a forum for public support of pro-
a healthy habits calendar for the week. They           grams to help children.
tracked their healthy behavior, with each day hav-
ing a different activity (for example, on Monday: do   High School Health Fair
not eat fast food). If they completed the calendar     The TENNderCare outreach worker worked with
and brought it back in, they were eligible for a       5th and 6th graders to get EPSDT screenings.
prize.
                                                       Child Health Week Media Placements
To Start A Healthy Day                                 Four public service announcements were played
Students at Fall Branch Elementary School did          on the radio. An article about School Health Ser-
stretching exercises for 5-7 minutes at the begin-     vices with a picture of the School Health Services
ning of each morning during Child Health Week.         Team was in two newspapers. One newspaper
First grade students also participated in “Healthy     had a spotlight on school screenings with Coordi-
Snack Day” and picked their favorite snack.            nated School Health.

Challenge Alert                                        Octoberfest
Students at South Central School did the Chal-         The purpose of this activity was to bring children
lenge Alert. Each class participated in walks          and their families downtown for physical activity
through the day. There were also nutritional post-     and fun. There were two fun obstacle courses set
ers on display throughout the school.                  up from a local inflatable company. Sponsors
                                                       talked with parents and provided handouts from the
TENNderCare Information Distribution                   Child Health Week website. Additional activities
A booth was set up in the lobby of the health de-      included face painting and carving pumpkins.
partment with programmatic information emphasiz-
White County                                            Smart Girls
Marquee Displays                                        This weekly group meets at the Williamson County
Child Health Week messages were displayed on            Boys and Girls Club of Fairview and encourages
marquees of various business sites throughout the       girls to make smart choices. In honor of CHW, par-
county.                                                 ticipants discussed healthy eating and physical
                                                        activity.
Health Fair
White County Middle School held a health fair with      Celebrate Child Health Week
education booths on nutrition, fire safety, anti-       Moore Elementary Students celebrated children's
smoking, exercise, handwashing & flu, TENNder-          health with a number of activities. Throughout the
Care & dental care, and Cyber Safety. All schools       week, students ran a mile for brain and body
advertised Child Health Week to their parents on        health. Students had opportunities to run at early
newsletters and marquees.                               morning walk/run club, during physical education
                                                        class, during recess and /or at home. Parents,
Williamson County                                       teachers, administrators, and staff were invited to
Barks for Parks                                         join students with this effort. On Tuesday, students
This free event promoted physical activity by get-      celebrated active lifestyles--no screen (television,
ting exercise with your dog. Lots of giveaways          computer, video games) time from midnight Mon-
were provided for people and their four-legged          day until midnight Tuesday. Students were asked
friends! Participants walked together on a trail that   to bring in a note from a parent indicating they ob-
is approximately one mile long.                         served this. The class with best percentage of par-
                                                        ticipation received a "free-choice" physical educa-
Better Me                                               tion class. On Wednesday, Parent Day was held in
Students at Westwood Elementary School partici-         kindergarten SMART class and 1st through 4th
pated in this program designed to teach 4th and         grade physical education classes. Parents were
5th grade students the importance of choosing           invited to come and observe and/or participate in
healthy foods and getting physical activity.            PE classes. Thursday was designated as “Pick up
                                                        Your Fruit at Lunch” Day. The cafeteria offered a
                                                                                                                 49
Better Me                                               variety of fruit. Friday featured a Surprise Activity-
Students at Heritage Middle School participated in      Packed Physical Education Class for students.
this program designed to teach 6th grade students
the importance of healthy eating and physical activ- Healthy Habits Competition
ity.                                                  Hillsboro Elementary School hosted a Healthy
                                                      Habits Competition for students in Kindergarten
Nashville Predators Get Out And Learn!                through Fifth Grade. Prizes were awarded to the
The Nashville Predators Get Out and Learn!            student in each grade who received the most
(G.O.A.L!) program is a free on-ice youth hockey      points for making healthy choices during the week.
program hosted by the Predators in association        The choices included: 5 or more servings of fruits/
with local ice rinks. Designed for boys and girls     vegetables, 3 or more servings of dairy products,
(ages 4-9) with no prior skating or hockey experi-    64 oz. of water, 60 minutes of physical activities,
ence, the four-week program introduced the sport      and 8-10 hours of sleep per day. Different point
of ice hockey to kids while teaching the life experi- values were given for each of these activities and
ences of teamwork, sportsmanship and self-            the children and their parents kept up with the
confidence through athletic participation. Full       points. Students turned in their point totals on Fri-
hockey equipment, including skate rental, was pro- day and the student in each grade level with the
vided free of charge. Once the four-week session      highest number of points received a backpack full
is complete, there are hockey programs available      of gifts. This was to encourage children and their
at local rinks in Nashville for continued develop-    families to make healthy choices.
ment. The Nashville Predators are dedicated to
supporting the development of youth hockey at all
levels and recognize the need for local skating fa-
cilities to be accessible for beginners to help to
grow the sport.
YMCA—Water as the Primary Drink
The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
variety of activities focused on water as the primary
drink. Staff members handed out water to kids in
Fitness Zone, the Teen Center, and YAC, and fo-
cused on water pages in YNew. Water games and
demos were held in YAC and Yplay area. Free
swim lessons were provided, and participants re-
ceived a free bottle of water.

YMCA—Healthy Food Choices
The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
variety of activities focused on the importance of
making healthy food choices. Activities included:
a Healthy Cooking Demo/tasting in Teen Center,
talking about healthy eating in Fit Kid class,
Healthy Food craft in Yplay, and food demos with
healthy snacks and smoothies.

YMCA—Be Active
The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
variety of activities focused on the importance of
being active. Activities included: sportwall/kids'
workout time in the Fitness Zone, YMCA Preschool
fitness games, a Winter Basketball “Fun” practice
to actively promote Winter Basketball, activity
demos for Yplay kids, and a Kids Class.                 50
YMCA—Family Healthy Practices
The YMCA celebrated Child Health Week with a
variety of activities focused on the role of families
in keeping children healthy. Activities included: a
Parent/child Sportwall challenge with healthy
snacks, Fit Kid class, a family fitness class with
Zumba, Kick-boxing, and Boot camp, and a “Family
Fitness Challenge” celebration in which participat-
ing families shared a Healthy Pot Luck dinner.

YMCA—Child Health Week Activity
Chick-Fil-A was present at Klesko fields with the
spinning wheel, give-aways, the Chick-Fil-A cow,
and items for sale. Chick-Fil-A promoted their focus
on kids and healthy choices on their menu. Jeanne
Hammontree, Operator of the Cool Springs Galle-
ria store and new owner of the planned store for
South Franklin, had a table set up with games and
food for sale.
Media Placements
News Items                         Knox County Health Department
(Television, Print, Radio, Web)    LeBonheur Express
                                   Roane County Schools
TN.GOV Capitol Journal             Southern Governors’ Association
TN.GOV Newsroom                    Tipton County Outreach Newsletter
Governor’s Communications Office   Tennessee Chapter of the AAP
Anderson County Schools
Cannon Courier
Chattanoogan.com                   Online Calendar Listings
Chattanooga Times Free Press
Cleveland Daily Banner             Clinton City Schools
Commercial Appeal                  Madison Academic High School
Cookeville Herald-Citizen          NowPlayingNashville.com
Cookeville Times                   South Side High School
Daily News Journal                 Tennessee Dietetic Association
Dyersburg State Gazette            Tennessee Nurses Association
Johnson City Press                 TN Public Health Association
Knox County Health Department      Upper Cumberland CCR&R              51
Mountain View                      UT Obesity Research Center
NewsChannel5.com                   YMCA of Middle Tennessee
NewsChannel9.com
NWTNToday.com
Polk News Online                   Social Media
Seymour Herald
Tennessean                         Facebook—Knox County Health
Tennessee Tribune                     Department
Thunderbolt Broadcasting           Facebook—YMCA of Middle Tennessee
TriCities.com                      Twitter—YMCA of Middle Tennessee
Upper Cumberland Daily News
WATE.com
WBBJ-TV                            Activity Fliers
105.3 WOW Country
                                   Give TN Kids a Chance Kickoff
                                   Grace M. Eaton Block Party
Agency/Organization                Jackson-Madison County Activities
Websites & Newsletters

TN.GOV: Department of Health
TN.GOV: Maternal & Child Health
TN.GOV: TENNderCare
Henry County School System
Resources and Tools
Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination (pages 53-64)
  Child Health Week—Facts for Parents
  Online Resources for Parents, Schools, and Communities
  Child Health Week—Facts for Schools
  Sample Article (Target Audience: Parents)
  Sample Article 2 (Target Audience: Parents)
  Sample Article 3 (Target Audience: General)
  Child Health Week—Information for Faith-Based Communities

Maternal & Child Health (pages 65-87)
  CHW Resources & Ideas for Activities
  Fact Sheet—Childhood Obesity
  Fact Sheet—Depression in Children
  Fact Sheet—How Smoking Harms My Baby
  Fact Sheet—Immunizations
  Fact Sheet—Prescription Drug Use
  Fact Sheet—Teen Smoking
  Fact Sheet—Teens Be A Leader                                           52
  Fact Sheet—TENNderCare Directors
  Fact Sheet—Word Search and Teen Quiz
  Fact Sheet—Youth Suicide
  Flyer—Suicide
  Press Release—TN WIC
  Press Release—Tobacco Use Prevention

Chattanooga-Hamilton Region Child Health Week Committee (pages 88-100)
  Child Health Week Background Information
  Helpful Ways to Reduce Screen Time
  Cyber Safety for Children
  Healthy Info for New Parents
  Nutrition You Can Use!
  Halloween Games That Keep Kids Moving!
  Flu Prevention

Tennessee Dietetic Association (page 101)
   Child Health Statistics Flier
Child Health Week 2009
Information for Parents



Child Health Week is coming up!
   •    Governor Bredesen has declared October 5-11 as Child Health Week in Tennessee.
   •    This is a time for us to help children make good habits that will let them lead long,
        healthy lives.
   •    The Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination is working to spotlight ways that
        children and families can eat healthy and be active.
   •    The theme for Child Health Week is: “Healthy Youth, Healthy Future.” If children make
        healthy choices now, they can live longer, healthier lives.

Childhood Obesity in Tennessee
   •    More children in our state and country are overweight than ever before.
   •    Tennessee ranks fifth in the country for teenagers who are obese.
   •    Children who are overweight or obese are more likely to grow up to be overweight or
        obese adults.
   •    Being overweight or obese makes children more likely to have high blood pressure, high
        cholesterol or diabetes.
   •    Adults who are overweight or obese are more likely to have a heart attack, stroke or get
        diabetes.                                                                                  53
You can help your child have a long, healthy life.
   •    The two major causes of obesity are eating unhealthy foods and not getting enough
        physical activity.
   •    Making good food choices and being active every day can help your child be healthy.

Eat healthy foods every day.
   •    Start each day by eating breakfast.
   •    Help your child eat fruits and vegetables every day.
   •    Try to make your child’s plate as colorful as possible.
   •    Limit high-calorie foods, sodas and juice, and fast food.

Be active every day.
   •    Children should be active for at least one hour every day.
   •    Being active can be fun—parents and children can be healthy by playing together every
        day.
   •    Limit the time that your children spend watching TV or playing video games.

Be good role models to your children.
   •    Children look up to their parents. They want to be like you!
   •    If you have good habits, your children will build those same habits.
   •    Making healthy eating choices and being active not only helps your children, but also
        helps you be healthier.

       For more information, please visit http://www.tennesseeanytime.org/gov/child-health/
        or contact the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination at 615-741-5192
Child Health Week 2009
Links to Online Resources



For Promoting Child Health Week in Tennessee
Tennessee Child Health Week: http://www.tennesseeanytime.org/gov/child-health/
Health Resources and Services Administration – Materials for National Child Health Day:
http://mchb.hrsa.gov/childhealthday/

Tennessee Resources:
Get Fit Tennessee: http://www.getfittn.com/
Coordinated School Health: http://www.tennessee.gov/education/schoolhealth/

Tools and Tips for Parents and Teachers
Connect for Kids Obesity Resource List: http://www.connectforkids.org/taxonomy/term/549
Centers for Disease Control – Ideas to Help Children Maintain a Healthy Weight:
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/healthyweight/children/index.htm
Centers for Disease Control – Resources you (and your child) can use to help reach or keep a healthy weight
through physical activity and healthy food choices:
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/healthyweight/children/index.htm#more
National Institutes of Health – Families Finding the Balance Parent Guide:                                            54
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan_mats/parent_hb_en.pdf
National Institutes of Health – Helping your overweight child: http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/over_child.htm
National Institutes of Health – We Can! Tips to Eat Well and Move More:
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/downloads/tips.pdf
National Institutes of Health – Weekly Meal Planner:
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/downloads/tip_planner.pdf
Centers for Disease Control – Recipes Using Fruits and Veggies:
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnparecipe/recipesearch.aspx
Body Mass Index Calculator for Children and Teens: http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/Calculator.aspx
U.S. Department of Agriculture – My Pyramid Health Planner:
http://www.mypyramidtracker.gov/planner/launchPage.aspx
National Institutes of Health – Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity and Nutrition:
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/whats-we-can/resources.htm
Portion Distortion – Serving Size Wallet Card: http://hp2010.nhlbihin.net/portion/servingcard7.pdf
U.S. Department of Agriculture – Eat Smart, Play Hard Resources:
http://www.fns.usda.gov/eatsmartplayhardhealthylifestyle/
American Heart Association Tips for Parents: http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3033987
Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity:
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/topics/obesity/calltoaction/fact_adolescents.htm
For Educators
Eat Smart, Play Hard for Educators: http://www.fns.usda.gov/eatsmartplayhardeducators/
U.S. Department of Agriculture – Team Nutrition classroom materials:
http://teamnutrition.usda.gov/educators.html
Childhood Obesity Resource List: http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/pubs/bibs/topics/weight/childhoodobesity.pdf
Connect for Kids: http://www.connectforkids.org/taxonomy/term/548
Public Broadcasting Service Teachers – Health and Fitness Resources:
http://www.pbs.org/teachers/healthfitness/
Color Me Healthy for Preschoolers: http://www.colormehealthy.com/

For Health Care Providers
The Surgeon General's Call to Action to Prevent and Decrease Overweight and Obesity
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/obesityprevention/index.html
American Academy of Pediatrics – Overweight & Obesity Resources (handouts, coding resources, continuing
medical education): http://www.aap.org/obesity/about.html
American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Statement – Prevention of Pediatric Overweight & Obesity
http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/pediatrics;112/2/424.pdf
American Academy of Pediatrics Policy Statement – Active Healthy Living: Prevention of Childhood Obesity
through Increased Physical Activity: http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/pediatrics;117/5/1834.pdf
American Heart Association – Dietary Recommendations for Children and Adolescents Practitioners’ Guide:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/reprint/112/13/2061
                                                                                                                  55
American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Report – Lipid Screening and Cardiovascular Health in Childhood:
http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/pediatrics;122/1/198.pdf
American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Report – Promoting the Participation of Children with Disabilities in
Sports, Recreation, and Physical Activities:
http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/pediatrics;121/5/1057.pdf
American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Report – Optimizing Bone Health and Calcium Intakes of Infants,
Children, and Adolescents: http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/pediatrics;117/2/578.pdf
American Academy of Pediatrics Clinical Report – Promotion of Healthy Weight Control Practices in Young
Athletes: http://aappolicy.aappublications.org/cgi/reprint/pediatrics;116/6/1557.pdf
American Heart Association – Overweight in Children and Adolescents:
http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/reprint/111/15/1999?ck=nck

Just for Kids – Games, Activities & More!
BAM! Body and Mind: http://www.bam.gov/index.html
Powerful Girls Have Powerful Bones: http://www.girlshealth.gov/bones/
U.S. Department of Agriculture – Eat Smart, Play Hard! http://www.fns.usda.gov/eatsmartplayhardkids/
My Pyramid Resources for Kids: http://www.mypyramid.gov/kids/index.html;
My Pyramid Games: http://www.mypyramid.gov/kids/kids_game.html
Vote for School Lunch: http://www.voteforschoollunch.org/
Connect for Kids—Resources for Teens: http://www.connectforkids.org/taxonomy/term/552




                                                                                 Child Health Week 2009
Child Health Week 2009
Information for Schools


DID YOU KNOW?
  • Twenty percent of children in Tennessee have a body mass index (BMI) greater
     than the 95th percentile. Fifteen percent of children in Tennessee have a BMI
     between the 85th and 95th percentile. This means that more than one third of all
     Tennessee children are either overweight or obese.
  • Tennessee ranks fifth in the nation for the number of children who are
     overweight.
  • It is not surprising that Tennessee also ranks in the top six states for lowest
     physical activity and for chronic problems related to obesity—high blood
     pressure, heart disease and diabetes.

YOU have the opportunity to change the future health of Tennesseans! School
health coordinators can help tackle the challenge of childhood obesity in
Tennessee.

    •   Child Health Week is October 5-11
    •   The theme for the week is: “Healthy Youth, Healthy Future”
    •   The Office of Coordinated School Health is a key partner in planning this week       56
We are asking every school health coordinator to promote Child Health Week and
organize nutrition and physical activity events at the schools in your LEA. Consider
these ideas:

•   Get the Word Out
    o Write a column for your local newspaper or school newsletter about healthy
       eating or physical activity
    o Offer to write an opinion piece for your local newspaper about the impact of
       childhood obesity in your area

•   Organize a Health Event
    o Body Mass Index (BMI) Screenings
    o Educational Booths/Activities
    o Open house for school clinic or Coordinated School Health program
    o Find student athlete role models from the high school speak to youth about
       nutrition and exercise

•   Plan Activities to Spotlight Nutrition
    o Cook-off for healthy foods — let students be the judge
    o Hands-on activities, such as preparing healthy snacks
    o Collaborate with school cafeteria staff to highlight nutritious choices in cafeteria
    o Invite your state legislators to join the children in your school for lunch
    o Distribute fruits and vegetables
•   Get Moving with Physical Fitness Activities
    o Pedometer challenges or other physical activity challenges (set goal and issue
       challenge between classes, grades, school faculty/staff)
    o Organize a school-wide field day or activity day
    o Invite principal, town mayor, county officials, or local celebrities to join PE class

Resources

State
   • Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination
      o Child Health Week: http://www.tennesseeanytime.org/gov/child-health/

    •   Office of Coordinated School Health
        o Childhood Overweight:
            http://www.state.tn.us/education/schoolhealth/overweight/index.shtml
        o Overweight Resources & Information:
            http://www.state.tn.us/education/schoolhealth/overweight/doc/oweight_resour
            ces.pdf

    •   Department of Health
        o Get Fit TN Program: http://www.getfittn.com/                                        57
        o Office of Child Nutrition & Wellness: http://health.state.tn.us/childwellness/

National

    •   CDC (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
        o Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity Prevention:
          http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/index.htm

    •   Office of the Surgeon General
        o Childhood Overweight and Obesity Prevention Initiative:
            http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/obesityprevention/

    •   National Institutes of Health
        o We can! Program (Ways to Enhance Child Activity and Nutrition):
           http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/index.htm

    •   U.S. Department of Agriculture
        o Food Pyramid: http://www.mypyramid.gov/kids/
        o 5-A-Day Program (now Fruit & Veggies More Matters):
           http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/




                                                                Child Health Week 2009
Child Health Week 2009
Sample Article 1: Parents




Habits form early in life. Parents work hard to help their children learn good habits, like wearing
seat belts, brushing teeth and getting a good night’s sleep. Childhood is also the time to teach
children other good habits that will help them grow up strong and live long, healthy lives. These
habits include eating healthy foods and being active every day.

Unfortunately, many children don’t develop these healthy habits early in life. They spend too
much time watching TV or playing video games. They eat high-calorie foods and drink sodas
and juices that are high in sugar. These habits start early and stick, leading to overweight and
obese children who grow up to be overweight and obese adults at risk for heart attack, stroke
and diabetes. Some problems, like diabetes and high cholesterol, are now starting in childhood,
and are directly related to poor food choices and inactive lifestyles.

What’s the best way to help your child develop good habits that will keep them healthy?
• First, be a good role model for your child. Young children love to imitate adults, so let them
  see you being active every day and choosing fruits and vegetables for snacks. As they try to
  be like you, they will build good habits and learn to make healthy choices all the time.
• Help your children be active for at least one hour a day. Play outside games together, go for       58
  walks, and limit time spent watching TV and video games.
• Let your children help you make healthy snacks, pick colorful foods for their plate, and limit
  sodas and fast food.

Tennessee will celebrate Child Health Week October 5-11 to focus on ways for children and
families to make healthy eating choices and be physically active. Do everything you can during
Child Health Week and every week to be a good role model for your child by helping to make
healthy choices every day.

For more information, visit: http://www.tennesseeanytime.org/gov/child-health/.
Child Health Week 2009
Sample Article 2: Parents




You have the chance to prevent a disease. More children in Tennessee are overweight or
obese than ever before. But by helping a child to be active and eat healthy foods, you can help
prevent obesity.

One in three children in Tennessee is overweight or obese. In fact, Tennessee ranks fifth in the
nation for teenagers who are overweight or obese. Kids who are overweight or obese are more
likely to be overweight or obese when they grow up. They can have health problems like high
blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. When they get older, they are more likely to have
a heart attack, stroke or diabetes.

Sometimes, the cause of a disease is a mystery. But it is no secret why so many kids are
overweight or obese. Many children spend more time inside watching TV or playing video
games than playing outside. Children and families eat foods that are high in calories and fat.
These behaviors cause us to take in more energy than we use. When that happens, that extra
energy is stored as fat.

How can you help prevent this disease?                                                               59
•   The most important thing you can do is to set a good example for children. Children want to
    be like adults, so make sure that the choices you make are ones that will help keep them
    healthy.
•   Help your child be active for at least one hour each day. Play outside games together, go for
    walks, and limit time spent watching TV and video games.
•   Let your children help you make healthy snacks, pick colorful foods for their plate, and limit
    sodas and fast food.

Tennessee will celebrate Child Health Week October 5-11, focusing on ways for children and
families to make healthy eating choices and be physically active. Do everything you can during
Child Health Week and every week to be a good role model for your child by helping to make
healthy choices every day.
Child Health Week 2009
Sample Article: General Audiences




With an eye toward the future health of Tennesseans, Governor Bredesen has set aside
October 5-11, 2009 as Child Health Week in Tennessee. Child Health Week will focus the
state’s attention on childhood obesity while highlighting ways for Tennessee’s children and
families to make healthy eating choices and engage in physical activity.

The number of children in the United States who are overweight has more than tripled in the
past three decades. Nearly one-third of all U.S. children are now estimated to be overweight or
obese. Tennessee is not immune to this national phenomenon; a recent national report ranks
our state fifth in the nation for the number of 10- to17-year-olds who are overweight or obese.

While there are genetic or endocrine disorders that can cause obesity, these are exceedingly
rare and most obesity is caused by a lack of physical activity and excess calorie intake. Surveys
indicate that over more than half of Tennessee high school students do not meet the
recommended levels of physical activity, and less than 20 percent eat the appropriate servings
of fruits and vegetables. Conversely, more than one-third of these students watch three or more
hours of television daily, and nearly half drink regular sodas at least once a day.
                                                                                                     60
Diseases that were previously seen exclusively in overweight or obese adults—diabetes, high
blood pressure and high cholesterol—are now being seen more commonly in children.
Unfortunately, being obese in childhood predicts obesity in adulthood. Adolescents who are
overweight have a 70 percent chance of being overweight as an adult. That risk increases to 80
percent for adolescents with overweight parents. Adults who are overweight have a higher risk
of heart disease, stroke and certain types of cancers. In addition to the human impact of obesity,
the economic toll on the state is staggering – Tennessee spends over $1.8 billion annually
caring for obesity and obesity-related complications, 22 percent more per capita than the
national average.

Existing programs across the state, including Get Fit Tennessee, Project Diabetes and
Coordinated School Health already offer community-based approaches to combating the
epidemic of obesity. During Child Health Week, the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care
Coordination will be working with numerous other community partners to highlight programs that
help children and families develop healthy habits that will promote a lifetime of health.

For more information or to find out how you can be involved in Child Health Week, please visit
the Child Health Week Web site at: http://www.tennesseeanytime.org/gov/child-health/ or
contact the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination at 615-741-5192.
Child Health Week 2009
Information for Faith-Based Communities



DID YOU KNOW?
    •   More than one-third of all Tennessee children are either overweight or obese
    •   Tennessee ranks fifth in the nation for the number of children who are overweight
    •   Children who are overweight or obese grow up to be overweight or obese adults
    •   Problems that result from being overweight, like high blood pressure and diabetes, are
        starting at younger ages than ever before
    •   It is not surprising that Tennessee also ranks in the top six states for lowest physical
        activity and for chronic problems related to obesity, including high blood pressure, heart
        disease and diabetes

YOU have the opportunity to change the future health of Tennesseans! Faith-based
communities can help tackle the challenge of childhood obesity in Tennessee.

    •   Child Health Week is October 5-11th
    •   The theme for the week is: Healthy Youth, Healthy Future
    •   Faith-based communities have a tremendous opportunity to share important information
        about nutrition and physical activity with their congregations
                                                                                                      61
If your congregation is interested in creating an event or undertaking other activities to increase
awareness about Child Health Week, consider these ideas:

Get the Word Out
o   Post information in your congregational newsletter or bulletin
o   Write a column for your community or neighborhood newsletter

Organize a Health Event
o   Body Mass Index (BMI) screenings
o   Educational booths and activities
o   Open house for programs related to health and fitness

Plan Activities to Spotlight Nutrition
o   Cook-off for healthy foods – let your youth judge the entries
o   Hands-on activities, such as instruction in preparing healthy snacks
o   A “healthy potluck” meal in which your congregation brings healthy food to share

Get Moving with Physical Fitness Activities
o   Pedometer challenges or other physical activity challenges -- set a goal and issue
    challenges between different age groups, classes, etc.
o   Congregation-wide activity day
 If your organization is planning a Child Health Week event, please let us know using the
    event information form available on our Web site so that we can keep track of all the
             great things going on across Tennessee during Child Health Week

  For more information, please visit the Child Health Week Web page or contact Ashley
    Barbee in the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination at 615-741-5192.


RESOURCES SPECIFICALLY FOR FAITH-BASED COMMUNITIES

Tennessee Department of Health Office of Faith-Based Initiatives
(http://health.state.tn.us/DMHDE/faith.shtml)
     • 10 Tips for Building a Healthy Ministry http://health.state.tn.us/DMHDE/faithtips.shtml
     • Health Facts for Congregations http://health.state.tn.us/DMHDE/healthfacts.shtml
     • Resources and Tools for Building a Healthy Ministry
         http://health.state.tn.us/DMHDE/faithresources.shtml

National Institutes of Health – Body and Soul: A Celebration of Healthy Living
http://bodyandsoul.nih.gov/index.shtml

Live Healthy in Faith: A Faith Community Guide to Promoting Nutrition and Physical Activity
http://www.district4health.org/pdf/faithbased%20toolkit.pdf

Eat Smart, Move More NC -- Resources for Faith-Based Communities
http://www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/ProgramsNTools/ProgramsNTools.html
http://www.eatsmartmovemorenc.com/Faith.html                                                        62
Lighten Up Forever: A Faith-Based Approach to Lifestyle Change
http://www.lightenupforever.org/index.htm


OTHER RESOURCES

Department of Health Get Fit Tennessee Program
http://www.getfittn.com/

Tennessee Office of Child Nutrition and Wellness
http://health.state.tn.us/childwellness/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity
Prevention
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/index.htm
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/physical/health_professionals/interventions/

Shape Up America!
http://www.shapeup.org/

Office of the Surgeon General: Childhood Overweight and Obesity Prevention Initiative
http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/obesityprevention/

National Institutes of Health -- We can! Program (Ways to Enhance Child Activity and Nutrition)
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/index.htm

U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Pyramid
http://www.mypyramid.gov/kids/

                                                                          Child Health Week 2009
The New Soul Food Pyramid -- A Guide for Daily Food Choices
http://www.blackdoctor.org/soulfoodpyramid.pdf

Fruit and Veggies More Matters 5-A-Day Program
http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Tips for Parents - Ideas to help children maintain a healthy
weight
http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/healthyweight/children/index.htm

Resources you (and your child) can use to help reach or keep a healthy weight through physical activity
and healthy food choices.
http://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/tools/index.html

National Heart Lunch and Blood Institute -- Families Finding the Balance Parent Guide
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan_mats/parent_hb_en.pdf

Helping Your Overweight Child
http://win.niddk.nih.gov/publications/over_child.htm

We Can! Tips to Eat Well and Move More
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/downloads/tips.pdf

Weekly Meal Planner
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/downloads/tip_planner.pdf

Recipes using fruits and veggies
                                                                                                          63
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnparecipe/recipesearch.aspx

Body Mass Index Calculator for Children and Teens
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/dnpabmi/Calculator.aspx

U.S. Department of Agriculture -- My Pyramid Health Planner
http://www.mypyramidtracker.gov/planner/launchPage.aspx

Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity and Nutrition
http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/public/heart/obesity/wecan/whats-we-can/resources.htm

Portion Distortion – Serving Size Wallet Card
http://hp2010.nhlbihin.net/portion/servingcard7.pdf

U.S. Department of Agriculture – Eat Smart, Play Hard Resources
http://www.fns.usda.gov/eatsmartplayhardhealthylifestyle/

American Heart Association Tips for Parents
http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=3033987

HealthierUS.gov
(This Web site provides credible, accurate information to help you choose to live a healthier life.)
http://www.healthierus.gov/

Center for Disease Control and Prevention -- Healthy Youth, Physical Activity
http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/physicalactivity/index.htm



                                                                          Child Health Week 2009
Center for Disease Control and Prevention -- Healthy Youth, Nutrition
http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/nutrition/index.htm

Healthy Communities – Promoting Physical Activity (Washington State)
http://www.mrsc.org/subjects/humanservices/healthyActivity.aspx

Physical Activity and Nutrition Resource List
http://www.med.uvm.edu/ahec/downloads/school_nurse_resource_list.pdf




                                                                                                 64




                                                                        Child Health Week 2009
THE FOLLOWING MATERIALS ARE AVAILABLE UPON REQUEST FOR
AGENCIES POSTING THEIR CHILD HEALTH WEEK ACTIVITIES ON
THE GOCCC WEB SITE http://www.tennesseeanytime.org/gov/child-health/.
Please note the maximum quantities when you make your requests.

For Brochures and Promotional Items contact:
Olga Masrejian
Tennessee Department of Health
615-741-0319
Olga.masrejian@tn.gov

Promotional Items:                   Maximum
Refrigerator clips                   50
Pencils                              50
Markers                              50
Jump Ropes                           50
Coloring books and Crayons ea.       50
Stress Balls                         50
Computer Brushes                     50
Badge Holders                        50
Stickers                             50
Emery Boards                         50
Hand Sanitizer                       50                                 65
Mouse Pads                           50
Best Bones Forever Journals          50
Best Bones Forever Parent Brochure   50
Best Bones Forever Magnets           50
Best Bones Forever Book Covers       50
Best Bones Forever Logo Tattoos      50
Best Bones Forever Posters (Sets)    1

Brochures:                                             Maximum
Room Sharing is Safer than Bed Sharing                 50
Prevent Shaken Baby Syndrome                           50
Child Abuse and Neglect                                50
Rx Zones: The Search Starts at Home                    50
Secondhand Smoke                                       50
Smoke-Free Cares                                       50
Which Friend Do You Want to Lose                       50
Suspect your Teen is Using Drugs or Drinking           50
The Abuse of Prescription & Over-the-Counter Drugs     50
R-U-O-K, Don’t Duck Mental Health                      50
10 Things You Can Do To Keep Your Child Tobacco-free   50
I Love It When…Coloring Book                           50
Protect Your Child From Environmental Health Hazards   50
    In the Home
                           Child Health Week 2009
                             October 5-11, 2009

                     “Healthy Youth, Healthy Future”

                    Potential Ideas for Events/Activities

 Broadcast Messages
    Columns in local newspaper about health topics, i.e. tobacco use prevention
    Op-Ed pieces in local newspaper about the impact of childhood obesity in your
    area

Child Health Fairs
     BMI Screenings
     Educational Booths/Activities

 Nutrition Activities
    Healthy eating spot on local news show cooking segment                              66
    Cook-off for healthy foods
    Healthy recipe contest

 Physical Fitness Activities
    Walk to school event
    Community walk/jog
    Pedometer challenges (set goal and issue challenge w/ friends, co-workers, school
    staff)

 Spotlight Events
    Mass Media Releases
    Open Houses for community programs, parks

 School Activities
    School-wide fitness events, games
    Physical activity challenges between classrooms, grades, etc
    Pedometer challenges between teachers, administrators
    Focus on nutritious cafeteria choices, educational activities re: healthy foods
                                 CHILDHOOD OBESITY
Overweight children are at much greater risk for health problems now and in the future than
children who are in a healthy weight range. Serious weight related conditions that were once
rare in youth, like high blood pressure and Type 2 diabetes, are now being seen more frequently
in children. It is important to understand that the longer a child remains overweight, the greater
his or her risk for serious long-term health problems.

The best way to find out if a youth between the ages of 2 and 20 is overweight is to have a
physician measure their Body Mass Index-for-age (BMI-for-age). These measurements should
be a standard part of your child’s routine physical examination or well child visit, and the results
will determine whether a child is underweight, healthy weight, overweight or obese.

In most cases, a child should not be put on a weight loss diet. The recommended goal is to stop
or slow weight gain as the child continues to grow so that their height and weight eventually
achieve a healthy balance.

Ways to encourage changes to your child’s eating:                                                      67
   Buy, prepare and offer the foods you would like for your child to eat. Allow them to choose
    what, and how much of these foods they will eat.
   Keep offering healthy foods even if they are initially refused.
   Offer mostly whole grain breads and cereals, vegetables and fruits with moderate amounts of
    meat products and low-fat dairy foods.
   Include your child’s choices in the family menu.
   Make healthy food fun by cutting fruit or vegetables into different shapes.
   Involve children in simple food preparation.
   Offer treats such as cakes, chips or “fast foods” only occasionally.
   Limit sweet drinks, including juice, soda and sports drinks, as they add unnecessary calories.
    Offer water instead – it is the best drink for children.
   Let your child decide when they are full to help them understand feelings of fullness and
    hunger. These habits help control appetite and prevent overeating as they grow.
   Encourage slower eating if your family eats quickly. Put your knife and fork down between
    mouthfuls. Chat during the meal.
   Help your child recognize if they eat when they are bored, sad or lonely. Suggest another
    activity to help distract them.
   Do not punish, reward or cheer your child up with food. Doing so may lead to a lifetime
    habit of using food as comfort or as a reward.
Increase everyday activity at home:

Plan and ensure your child is physically active on a daily basis. At least 60 minutes of active
play is recommended. Physical activity can help to build physical, mental and social skills and
increases the feeling of being healthy. Activity should be fun and satisfying without focusing
only on competition, fitness or skills. As children get older, your role as a parent changes from
being active with your child to supporting your child’s involvement with outside activity.

   Be active together. Family-based activities should happen at least once per week.
   Encourage lots of free, outside playtime every day.
   Try to use the car less; for shorter distances walk or cycle to school or shops. Have a plan to
    walk increasingly further distances.
   Help your child find a balance between organized team sport, individual activities like
    swimming and dancing and fun activities such as youth groups, voluntary service and family
    outings.
   Look for an active play buddy who can encourage your child to be more active.

Reduce screen time:
Watching too much television is often linked closely with overweight in children. Inactive
                                                                                                        68
behavior is not just watching television. It also includes playing electronic games, sitting for long
periods of time in transit, long sleep-ins and extended phone calls. When children watch
television they are not being active and are more likely to see food advertisements that encourage
them to eat regardless of hunger. Televisions in bedrooms have been shown to increase viewing
time. Try to:

   Limit sedentary activities like watching television to less than two hours per day.
   Avoid eating while the television is on.
   Suggest or offer alternative activities to television watching.

Resources:
http://kidshealth.org/
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/obesityinchildren.html
http://www.mypyramid.gov/
http://www.getfittn.com/
http://www.walkingworksforschoolstn.com/
http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/
                          DEPRESSION IN CHILDREN
Problem:
Depression is more than just “feeling blue” or having a bad day. It is different from
feelings of grief or sorrow that follow a major loss, such as a death in the family. It’s not
a personal weakness or a character flaw. Children and teens with clinical depression
cannot simply “snap out of it.”

Depression is a serious health problem that affects feelings, thoughts and action, and can
appear as a physical illness. As many as one in eight teens and one in 33 children have
clinical depression. Fortunately, depression in youth is treatable. The behavior of
depressed children and teenagers may differ from the behavior of depressed adults.              69
Signs and Symptoms:
If one or more of these signs of depression persist, parents should seek help.
     Frequent sadness, tearfulness, crying
     Hopelessness
     Decreased interest in activities or inability to enjoy previously favorite activities
     Persistent boredom, low energy
     Social isolation, poor communication
     Low self esteem and guilt
     Extreme sensitivity to rejection or failure
     Increased irritability, anger or hostility
     Play that involves excessive aggression towards self or others, or that involves
        persistently sad themes
     Difficulty with relationships
     Frequent complaints of physical illnesses such as headaches and stomachaches
     Frequent absences from school or poor performance in school
     Poor concentration, indecision or forgetfulness
     A major change in eating and/or sleeping patterns
     Talk of or efforts to run away from home
     Thoughts or expressions of suicide or self destructive behaviors
Recommendations:

       Know the warning signs for depression and note the duration, frequency and
        severity of troubling behavior.
       Get accurate information from libraries, hotlines, the Internet and other sources.
       Take your child to a mental health professional or their primary care physician for
        an evaluation and diagnosis if he or she is exhibiting several of the warning signs.
        The evaluation may include psychological testing, laboratory tests and
        consultation with other specialists.
       Ask questions about treatments and services. A comprehensive treatment plan
        may include psychotherapy, ongoing evaluation and in some cases, medication.
        Optimally, the treatment plan is developed with the family and whenever
        possible, the child.

Resources:

       Primary care physicians
       Local mental health centers/providers
       Others who can help include psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, professional
        counselors, social workers, school counselors and counselors in faith based
        organizations
       Tennessee Voices for Children                                                                 70
        www.TNvoices.org
       NAMI Tennessee
        www.NAMITN.org
       211 Social Services Help Line
        www.211tn.org
       TENNderCare
        www.tennessee.gov/tenncare/tenndercare
        1-866-311-4287
       Youth Villages
        www.youthvillages.org
       Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Developmental Disabilities
        (TDMHDD)’s Best Practice Guidelines for Children and Adolescents at
        http://tennessee.gov/mental/omd/clinical_docs/bpg.pdf. Go to Mood Disorders
        page 72.
       Statewide Crisis Intervention Line
        If you or someone you know is in a crisis now, seek help immediately.
        1-800-809-9957
       National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
        If you or someone you know is exhibiting signs and symptoms of suicide.
        1-800-273-TALK (8255)

Adapted from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health America Fact
Sheet
                       How Does Smoking Harm My
                                 Baby?
Learning that you’re going to have a baby can be a time of great joy and a time of
anxiety and stress. For many women who smoke, thinking about stopping when
pregnant may seem very difficult and overwhelming.

According to the Office of the Surgeon General:
Stopping smoking is probably the most important change women in the United
States can make to prevent unhealthy pregnancies. Stopping smoking offers you and
your baby the best chance for a healthy start.

1. Stop and think for a moment about what you just read.
2. Now, read further to see how you can give your baby a healthy start!
                                                                                     71
How will I help my baby when I stop smoking?
 Your baby gets more oxygen.
 Your baby has a lower chance of being born too small.
 Your baby’s chance of health problems such as asthma is reduced.
 You lower the chance of miscarriage, stillbirth and infant death.

How can I quit? Giving up something I do every day is really hard!
1. Make every effort to stop
2. Create a quit plan
3. Tell your doctor or nurse (or pharmacist) you want to stop
4. Ask for support
5. Try to avoid other smokers
6. Think about what makes you want to smoke
7. Be active

You have the two best reasons to stop smoking: YOU and YOUR BABY.
Give your baby the best chance for a healthy start. You can do it!

         Call the Tennessee Tobacco QuitLine at 1-800-QUIT-NOW
                        (1-800-784-8669). It’s FREE!
                                  TENNDERCARE

                               Adolescent Health
                     Facts about Adolescent Immunizations


Problem:

      Pertussis (whooping cough) incidence has been gradually increasing since the
       early 1980s. Approximately 60 percent of the reported cases in 2004-2005 were
       among persons 11 years of age and older.

      Approximately 1,000 to 3,000 cases meningococcal disease are reported each year
       in the United States. The proportion of cases among adolescents and young adults
       has increased in recent years. The rate of disease is twice that in persons 17-20
       years compared to the overall U.S population. Even with antibiotic treatment,          72
       adolescents die in about 10 percent of cases. About 20 percent of survivors will
       have long-term disability such as loss of a limb, deafness, nervous system
       problems or brain damage.

      Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection
       in the United States among adolescents and young adults. Up to 75 percent of new
       infections occur among persons 15-24 years of age.


Signs/Symptoms:
The causes of most vaccine-preventable diseases are either bacterial or viral infections.
The range of symptoms can be vast and the long-term effect can be damaging.

      Whooping cough (pertussis) causes severe coughing spells, vomiting and
       disturbed sleep. It can lead to weight loss, incontinence, rib fractures and passing
       out from violent coughing.

      Meningococcal infection can become deadly fast, sometime in 48 hours or less. It
       can cause sudden onset of fever, headache and stiff neck, often accompanied by
       other symptoms such as nausea, vomiting and photophobia (eye sensitivity to
       light).
      HPV infections don’t cause any symptoms and often go away on their own.
       However, if they don’t go away, some strains of HPV can cause cervical cancer,
       genital warts and warts in the upper respiratory tract. There is no treatment for
       HPV infection, but the conditions it causes can be treated.


Recommendations:
Pre-teens and teens need annual health checks, even if they seem healthy.

      TENNCare eligibles can receive all vaccines recommended by the Advisory
       Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) from their primary care provider at
       no cost.

      Ask your adolescent’s doctor if your child is up-to-date for all Advisory
       Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommended vaccines:
          o TdaP Vaccine– 1 dose
          o Meningococcal “meningitis” Vaccine (MCV) – 1 dose
          o Varicella Vaccine – 2 doses total
          o Human Papillomavirus Vaccine (HPV) – 3 doses total (Females Only)
          o Hepatitis A Vaccine – 2 doses total                                            73
          o Hepatitis B Vaccine – 3 doses total
          o Annual influenza “flu” shot

      Maintain a copy of your child’s immunization record and take it to every doctor’s
       appointment.


Resources:
To find out additional information about immunizations, visit these Web sites:

Department of Health – Immunization Program
http://health.state.tn.us/CEDS/immunization

Recommended Immunization Schedule for Persons Aged 7 through 18 Years
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/recs/schedules/downloads/child/2009/09_7-
18yrs_schedule_pr.pdf

Pre-Teens and Teens Immunization Information
What Parents Should Know!
http://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/spec-grps/preteens-adol.htm#shouldknow
                     PRESCRIPTION DRUG AND
                  OVER THE COUNTER DRUG MISUSE

Problem:
      Although recent drug use trends in the U.S. suggest that the use of illicit drugs
       among young people has been declining, at the same time misuse of prescription
       and over-the-counter medications continues to rise. More teens abuse
       prescription drugs than any illicit drug except marijuana.

      Misuse can refer to the practice of diverting medications that are normally needed
       by someone else, or taking more than the therapeutic dose to intentionally obtain
       an increased feeling of euphoria or other side effect such as hallucinations. Teens
       today do not need to look further than the family medicine cabinet to get drugs.      74
      In Tennessee, one in three teens report knowing someone who abuses prescription
       drugs. The most commonly abused classes of prescription drugs include opioids
       or pain relievers, sedatives and tranquilizers, and stimulants, with most of the
       recent rise in prevalence attributable to abuse of prescription or over-the-counter
       (OTC) pain medications.

      Among youths ages 12 to 17, Tennessee has the sixth highest percentage who
       abuse prescription pain medication.



Signs/ Symptoms:
A range of symptoms of prescription drug use can occur. The specific symptom depends
on the drug being abused.

   1. Opioids are used as pain killers in clinical settings. They lower heart and
      breathing rates that in turn may leave a person looking lethargic or intoxicated.

   2. Stimulants have the opposite effect. They increase metabolism, heart and
      respiration rates. Nervousness, irritability, hyper-sensitivity and insomnia are
      some visible side effects.
   3. Sedatives are used to control anxiety. Drowsiness, confusion and impaired
      judgment can be seen in people that abuse this medication.

   4. Over the Counter (OTC) medications such as dextromethorphan can be found in
      some cough and cold medications. High doses of these medications can cause
      hallucinations, numbness and stomach pain. Medications that combine opioids
      and over-the-counter medication can cause organ damage. Excess acetaminophen
      may cause liver damage and excess ibuprofen may cause damage to the stomach
      and intestines.



Recommendations:
To reduce prescription drug abuse, The Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse
(CASA) recommends these strategies:
   1. Safeguard all medications at home. Monitor quantities and control access.
   2. Set clear rules for children about all drug use, including not sharing medicine and
       always following the medical provider’s advice and dosages.
   3. Be a good role model by following these same rules with your own medicine.
   4. Properly conceal and dispose of old or unused medicines in the trash.
   5. Ask friends and family to safeguard their prescriptions as well.
                                                                                            75

Resources:
To find more information about prescription drug abuse:

   www.whoyouwant2be.org
   A service of Centerstone Mental Health Center in Tennessee (888) 291-HELP (4357)

   www.taadas.org
     A wide array of substance abuse related information (free and for purchase) from
     the Tennessee Association of Alcohol, Drug and other Addiction Services
     (877) 863-6914 or locally (615) 780-5901

   Great Resources for Parents at:

   www.drugfree.org

   www.theantidrug.com
                        How to Talk to Teens About
                                Smoking?
Encouraging your children to make the right decisions about tobacco and helping
them understand the consequences of using tobacco is very important.

Approximately 3,000 kids in the U.S. become smokers every day. The
most common reasons are…
 Peer pressure
 Wanting to look grown-up
 Lack of positive parental involvement

Here are a few things that you can do as parents related to peer
pressure:
 Provide positive support to teens teaching them how to say “no” in situations
   related to peer pressure.
 Teach them how they can build confidence and self-esteem by being a leader and       76
   walking away.

Here are a few things that you can do as parents related to your teen
wanting to look grown up:
 Discuss the long-term risks of smoking based on facts not opinion.
 Explain that starting smoking is easy, but quitting is very difficult.
 Help your teen weigh the risks of smoking against what they consider the
   benefits.
 Explain that while they may think smoking makes them look older, it does not. In
   fact, they look like they are just trying to look grown-up.

Here are a few ways that you can become more active in your teen’s
life:
 Explain to your teens how choosing the wrong friends can result in pressure to
     make wrong decisions.
 Explore ideas for getting involved in after school activities or sports.
 Most importantly, talk to your teen. Be honest about the impact of smoking. If
     you are a smoker yourself, discuss why you started and if you have been able to
     stop or not.
 Develop a plan together to stop smoking.

         Call the Tennessee Tobacco QuitLine at 1-800-QUIT-NOW
                        (1-800-784- 8669) It’s FREE!
                           Teens Be a Leader- Stop
                                 Smoking!
Have you ever heard this “Smoke, everyone else is.” “What, are you scared?” “I
guess you aren’t cool.” “Come on, it’s fun.”

Peer pressure is difficult and you want to fit in with friends. Before you start smoking
or if you are thinking of quitting smoking…read on!

1. A few cigarettes won’t hurt me.
With each puff, you inhale thousands of poisonous chemicals. Your heart beats faster
and your blood pressure goes up. Your throat, nose and eyes burn especially when
you first start smoking. You may cough and become short of breath. The nicotine in
cigarettes can cause you to feel sick to your stomach and dizzy. Carbon monoxide
replaces the oxygen in your blood, which decreases your ability to play sports. You
won’t cough or feel sick every time you smoke. Your body will get used to it. But the      77
damage to your body increases each time you smoke. Is it really worth it?

2. I’ll stop when I want to.
It’s easy to start but hard to quit. Seven out of 10 teen smokers say they wish they
had never started. Most teen smokers have seriously tried at least once to stop
smoking and failed. The younger you are when you start, the harder it will be to stop
when you are older. The younger you start, the greater your risk of disease. It only
takes a short time to become addicted to nicotine. You will know you are addicted
when you start craving cigarettes and feeling nervous without them. You will really
know you are addicted when you try to stop and you can’t. Are you addicted?

3. Smoking looks cool.
Smoking makes your teeth yellow and gives you bad breath. Smoking makes your
clothes and hair stink. Smoking makes your skin wrinkle sooner. You are becoming
unhealthier with each puff you take and reducing your life expectancy. Is this really
cool?

4. Smoking makes me sexy.
According to an American Cancer Society survey, 78 percent of boys ages 12 to 17
said they do not want to date someone who smokes and 69 percent of girls prefer to
date a nonsmoker. In fact, a lot of people do not want to be around smokers. Most
teens do not think smoking, dipping or chewing tobacco is sexy and they think it is
disgusting. Look at those percentages again!
5. Smoking really relaxes me.
It may feel like it, but nicotine actually does the opposite for your body. It speeds up
how your body reacts inside and increases your heart rate. Does that sound like
relaxing?

6. Smoking keeps me thin. I’ll gain weight if I stop.
Smoking does not keep you slim. Smoking keeps your hands busy so you do not eat.
The small amount of weight you may gain when you stop smoking is much less
harmful than smoking. A simple exercise plan can help with any weight gain.

7. All my friends smoke.
If all your friends jumped off a bridge, would you? If you follow your friends on this
one, you will have bad skin, yellow teeth and bad breath. You will also put yourself at
risk for disease and poor health and be in the uncool group in most teen’s eyes.
What’s your choice?

8. Do you want to be a leader or a follower?
Many teens are smoking without thinking of the health risks that come with
smoking. Peer pressure is hard to ignore. The smokers think they are the cool
people and they are the leaders who others want to be like. Maybe that is true.
Maybe others see those smokers as being cool but are they really after what
you read about what smoking does to people’s bodies and how smoking causes                 78
serious illness? Start today, you be the leader and the new trendsetter not the
follower of what every one else does. Talk to your friends about how cool it is
NOT to smoke and how much better you feel when you do not. Show your
friends that “cool” is not smoking!

Be a LEADER… call the Tennessee Tobacco QuitLine at 1-800-QUIT-NOW
                  (1- 800-784-8669)… IT’S FREE!!
                       TENNderCare is a full program of check ups and health care services for children who
                       have TennCare. These services make sure babies, children, teens and young adults receive
                       the health care they need. For additional information regarding the TENNderCare program
                       and current outreach efforts, please contact your Regional TENNderCare Director:

      Region               Program Dir/Manager            Phone Number                           Address
 Nashville-Davidson           Renee Roberson              (615) 340-2223     Nashville-Davidson County Health Department
                        Renee.Roberson@nashville.gov                                     311 23rd Avenue North
                                                                                        Nashville, TN 37203-1503

       East                    Nancy Foshee               (865) 909--9404           East Tennessee Regional Office
                            Nancy.Foshee@tn.gov              EXT.102                       4310 Papermill Dr.
                                                                                          Knoxville, TN 37909

Chattanooga-Hamilton           Cheryl Shouse              (423) 209-8337    Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department
                            Cheryls@hamiltontn.gov                                       921 East Third Street
                                                                                        Chattanooga, TN 37403

   Knoxville-Knox              Charlayne Frazier          (865) 215-5173       Knoxville-Knox County Health Department
                       Charlayne.Frazier@Knoxcounty.org                                   140 Dameron Avenue
                                                                                        Knoxville, TN 37917-6413

  Jackson-Madison                 Chris Ellis             (731) 927-8545      Jackson-Madison County Health Department
                              Cellis@jmchd.com                                           804 North Parkway
                                                                                         Jackson, TN 38305


                                                                                                                         79
  Mid-Cumberland                 Carol Sylvis             (615) 650-7016           Mid-Cumberland Regional Office
                             Carol.Sylvis@tn.gov                                           710 Hart Lane
                                                                                      Nashville, TN 37247-0801

     North East                Teresa Roberts             (423) 979-4670         Northeast Tennessee Regional Office
                            Teresa.Roberts@tn.gov                                  1233 Southwest Avenue Extension
                                                                                     Johnson City, TN 37604-6519

   South Central               Sharon Nelson              (931) 490-8340             South Central Regional Office
                            Sharon.Nelson@tn.gov                                        1216 Trotwood Avenue
                                                                                       Columbia, TN 38401-4809

     South East                 Teena Myers               (423) 634-5796              Southeast Regional Office
                             Teena.Myers@tn.gov                                     540 McCallie Avenue, Suite 450
                                                                                     Chattanooga, TN 37402-2013

  Memphis-Shelby             Cassandra Brown              (901) 545-7099      Memphis-Shelby County Health Department
                           Cbrown@co.shelby.tn.us                                        814 Jefferson Ave.
                                                                                        Memphis TN 38105

      Sullivan                 Angela Eaton               (423) 279-2657          Sullivan County Health Department
                          Aeaton@sullivanhealth.org                               164 Blountville Bypass, P.O Box 630
                                                                                         Blountville, TN 37617

 Upper Cumberland               Karen Roper               (931) 646-7527          Upper Cumberland Regional Office
                             Karen.Roper@tn.gov                                          200 West 10th Street
                                                                                      Cookeville, TN 38501-6076

       West                    Cathy S. Turner            (731) 426-1451           West Tennessee Regional Office
                            Cathy.S.Turner@tn.gov                                         295 Summar Street
                                                                                          Jackson, TN 38301
TEENCARE Word Search

    T   S   H   S   M    F   Y   H   T   L    A   E   H   B   G

    R   F   M   T   E    W   R   L   C   P    M   X   N   O   N

    A   Y   J   O   A    L   A   U   P   P    B   E   G   F   I

    N   Y   N   T   D    T   B   O   I   T    O   R   L   D   K

    S   U   E   R   N    N   I   A   N   T    P   C   S   W   L

    P   R   F   E   T    N   O   E   T   L    S   I   S   G   A

    O   P   D   H   T    E   M   C   A   E    Z   S   R   N   T

    R   I   M   M   J    T   E   N   W   Y    G   E   F   I   P

    T   Z   E   O   A    A   N   N   S   C    W   E   X   T   C

    A   N   G   E   F    I   U   L   A   M    V   F   V   N   P
                                                                  80
    T   X   R   K   N    R   E   R   F   G    V   B   A   E   I

    I   T   M   G   D    O   C   T   O   R    E   L   C   V   L

    O   N   U   T   R    I   T   I   O   N    O   R   F   E   L

    N   M   Z   M   A    Q   X   M   W   W    V   D   S   R   S

    S   G   N   I   N    E   E   R   C   S    Y   S   R   P   U




   APPOINTMENT          CONDOMS              DENTAL
   DOCTOR               EXERCISE             FRUITS
   HEALTHY              NUTRITION            PILLS
   PLANNING             PREVENTING           SCREENINGS
   TALKING              TEENAGERS            TRANSPORTATION
   TREATMENT            VEGETABLES
81
                                 YOUTH SUICIDE


Problem:
“More teenagers and young adults die from suicide then from cancer, heart disease,
AIDS, birth defects, stroke, pneumonia, influenza, and chronic lung disease
COMBINED”, Surgeon General Satcher stated in the 2002 National Call to Action for
Suicide Prevention.

The teenage and young adult years can be a period of loneliness and confusion. Youth
deal with a number of new experiences such as new relationships, decisions about their
future and the physical changes that are taking place in their bodies.

      Suicide is the third leading cause of death among young people ages 15 to 24.
      Every day 12 young people die by suicide.                                             82
      Male youth are 5 times more likely then females to die by suicide.
      In a survey of Tennessee teens, 1 in 14 admitted that they attempted suicide.
      Firearms are the most commonly used suicide method.
      53% of young people who die by suicide abused drugs or alcohol.

The Key Risk Factors and Warning Signs:

      Impulsivity
      Lack of connection to family or friends
      Ready access to firearms
      Depression, moodiness, expression of hopelessness
      A previous suicide attempt
      Current talk about suicide (direct or shielded, “You’d be better off if I’m gone.”)
      Strong wish to die, giving away prized possessions
      Suicide attempt or suicide by a friend or family member
      Withdrawing from friends or family
      Increased alcohol or drug use
      Rage, anger, acting reckless
      Hopelessness


                 Untreated depression is the # 1 cause of suicide
Recommendations:

     Talk, offer help and hope. Most important, listen if you think someone is
      considering suicide. ASK. It won’t put the idea in their head if that isn’t what they
      are thinking.
     Teens need reassurance that someone cares. Show interest, non-judgmentally, be
      supportive. Let them know help is available
     Trust your instincts, if you feel the situation is critical get immediate help, call
      911
     Don’t act shocked, judgmental or lecture on all the reasons they have to live
     Don’t give advice or false reassurances
     Don’t be afraid to talk directly about suicide, ask specifics, how they would do it,
      when and do they have the means
     Don’t dismiss problems as unimportant and don’t assume they are just seeking
      attention


Resources:

     There are many resources; your physician and your local mental health agency are
      two important sources of help                                                           83
     The National Lifeline 1-800-273-TALK is a resource that will automatically
      connect you to the nearest crisis service where help and direction can be obtained.
     Youth Villages have staff that are available to do an onsite assessment
      (800) 791- 9221
     Tennessee Suicide Prevention Network
      www.TSPN.org
     Jason Foundation
      1- 888- 881- 2323
      www.jasonfoundation.org
     American Association of Suicidology
      www.suicidology.org
     Tennessee Voices for Children
      www.TNVoices.org
     National Institute of Mental Health Fact Sheets
      www.nimh,nih.gov/research/suicidefaq.cfm
     Suicide Prevention Resource Center
       www.sprc.org
  YOUTH SUICIDE… BE AWARE
                          SOMEONE WILL MISS YOU
               If you feel like you can’t go on; give life a chance…
www.tspn.org             Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) and
                           LIVE TO SEE BETTER DAYS
                             (Regional or County Letterhead)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                Contact: Regional/Co. Director
Date                                                 Phone Number


       TENNESSEE WIC PROGAM…BRINGING MORE TO THE TABLE

Participants enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants,
and Children (WIC) are preparing for an exciting change! The food packages are
changing to better meet the nutritional needs of WIC families. New foods will include
fruits, vegetables, whole grains, soy products and baby foods. Changes, based on the
Dietary Guidelines for Americans, decrease the amount of saturated fats, increase fiber
and offer more food choices.

The new food packages better promote and support the establishment of long-term
breastfeeding and strengthen WIC’s breastfeeding promotion efforts. Fully breastfeeding
mothers receive more variety and larger quantities of foods, including a monthly $10 cash
value voucher for fruits and vegetables. Fully breastfed infants receive larger quantities
and more types of baby foods at 6 months of age.
                                                                                              85
The new Tennessee WIC Food Packages for women and children will include a cash
value voucher for fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables, whole grains from cereals, breads,
brown rice, bulgur, or soft corn or whole wheat tortillas, and only children 12 through 23
months of age can receive whole milk. All other women and children will receive
reduced fat milk. The choices of fish for the fully breastfeeding woman have expanded to
include salmon and sardines along with light tuna.

WIC provides low-income pregnant and breastfeeding women, new mothers, infants, and
children up to age five with nutritious supplemental foods. The program also provides
nutrition education and referrals to healthcare services. WIC foods currently include iron-
fortified adult cereal, vitamin C-rich fruit or vegetable juice, eggs, milk, cheese, peanut
butter, dried cereal, dried beans/peas, and canned fish and iron-fortified infant formula
and infant cereal. Special therapeutic infant formulas and medical foods may be provided
when prescribed by a physician for a special medical condition.

More than 175,000 Tennesseans receive WIC benefits each month through this federally
funded nutrition assistance program. WIC is a Federal grant program for which Congress
authorized a specific amount of funding each year for program operations. The Food and
Nutrition Service, which administers the program at the Federal level, provides these
funds to WIC State agencies.

For more information call 1-800-342-5942 or log onto the WIC Web site@
http://health.state.tn.us/wic/.
86
87
Healthy Tips for Families and Kids!
             Sponsored By:

                                      88




                   1
                         What is Child Health Week?
Child Health Day is an annual event sponsored nationally by the Maternal & Child Health
Bureau of Health Resources & Services Administration (HRSA). Tennessee will extend the event
to a week and host Child Health Week 2009 October 5-11. Our theme for the week is “Healthy
Youth, Healthy Future.”

The goal of the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination (GOCCC) and the Tennessee
Department of Health (DOH) is to spotlight ways that Tennessee children and families can make
healthy life choices. We are collaborating with a number of child and family-serving
organizations that already have activities geared toward these topics. A kit of fact sheets, press
releases, resources and ideas for activities is now available. Promotional items are available
upon request to those agencies adding their activities on the Child Health Week events
calendar on the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination (GOCCC).

For additional information on Child Health Week, please visit
http://www.tennesseeanytime.org/gov/child-health/ or contact Ashley Barbee in the
Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination (GOCCC).


The local partners that collected this information would like to disseminate it out to the public
for the 2009 Child Health Week. All information was taken from reliable sources and links are
provided in this document. We encourage everyone to make copies, email, and share this
information with children and their families.                                                        89
       Teachers can use this information provided to teach short 5 minute lessons on any of
       the topics provided.

       Parents can use the fun games and information to make changes at home.

       Schools, daycares, and recreation centers can send this home with parents.

       Organizations can send these out on their mailing lists



We hope everyone finds this information useful and informative. Please pass it on!




                                                2
                Helpful Ways to Reduce Screen Time

Here are a few simple tips to help your children reduce their screen time and increase physical
activity in order to maintain a healthy weight.

       Know how much screen time, active time your family is getting. By knowing how much
       screen media time, including TV, DVD, video games, and non-school- or non-work-
       related computer and Internet use, your family spends and how much physical activity
       they get, you will be more aware of their needs for physical activity to maintain energy
       balance.

       Talk to your family. Explain to your children that it's important to sit less and move more
       to stay at a healthy weight. They will also be more energized, have a chance to practice
       certain skills (such as riding a bike or shooting hoops), and have fun with friends and
       peers. Tell them that you also are going to limit your screen time and increase your
       physical activity, so you will all be working toward this goal together.

       Set limits on screen time. Set a house rule that your children may spend no more than
       two hours a day of screen time. More importantly, enforce the rule once it's made.

       Minimize the influence of TV in the home. Do not put a TV or computer in your child's
       bedroom. This tends to physically isolate family members and decrease interaction.            90
       Also, children who have TVs in their room tend to spend almost 1 1/2 hours more in a
       typical day watching TV than their peers without a set in their room.

       Make meal time, family time. Turn off the TV during family meal time. Better yet,
       remove the TV from the eating area if you have one there. Family meals are a good time
       to talk to each other. Research has shown that families who eat together tend to eat
       more nutritious meals than families who eat separately. Make eating together a priority
       and schedule family meals at least two to three times a week.

       Provide other options and alternatives. Watching TV can become a habit for your child.
       Provide other alternatives for them to spend their time, such as playing outside,
       learning a hobby or sport, or spending time with family and friends.

       Set a good example. You need to be a good role model and also limit your screen time
       to no more than two hours per day. If your kids see you following your own rules, then
       they will be more likely to follow. Instead of watching TV or surfing the Internet, spend
       time with your family doing something fun and active.

       Don't use TV to reward or punish a child. Practices like this make TV seem even more
       important to children.


                                                3
                    Helpful Ways to Reduce Screen Time
       Be a savvy media consumer. Don't expect your child to ignore the influences of
       television advertising of snack foods, candy, soda, and fast food. Help your child develop
       healthy eating habits and become media savvy by teaching them to recognize a sales
       pitch. Ask your child why their favorite cartoon character is trying to get them to eat a
       certain brand of breakfast cereal. Explain to them that this is a way for advertisers to
       make the cereal more appealing to young people, so that they ask their parents to buy it
       for them and the company can make money.

       Make screen time, active time. Stretch, do yoga, lift hand weights while watching TV;
       challenge the family to see who can do the most push-ups, jumping jacks, or leg lifts
       during commercial breaks, or switch to an exercise tape during commercials.

We Can! and the We Can! logo are trademarks of the U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services (DHHS).



Information collected by the City of Chattanooga Parks and Recreation


                                                                                                    91




                                               4
                           Cyber Safety for Children

Teens
I will never give out personal details that would identify who I am, such as my
name, address, phone number, school or photographs.

I will tell a parent or teacher if I see any bad language or pictures on the Internet,
or if anyone writes me anything I don’t like.

I will not reply to any messages or bulletin board items that are suggestive,
obscene, aggressive, or distressing.

I will not use bad language online, neither will I take part in arguments or fights
online.

I will not accept any offers of money or presents, even free offers.

I will never order anything online or give out credit card details.
                                                                                         92
I will not enter chat rooms and websites that I have agreed with my parents are
off-limits.

I will not arrange any face-to-face meetings with anyone I have met on the
Internet unless my parents consent and they accompany me.



Information collected by the City of Chattanooga Parks and Recreation




                                              5
                          Cyber Safety for Children
Pre-Teens
I will never give out personal details that would identify who I am, such as my
name, address, phone number, school or photographs.

I will tell a parent or teacher if I see any bad language or pictures on the Internet,
or if anyone writes me anything I don’t like.

I will not reply to any messages or bulletin board items that are suggestive,
obscene, aggressive, or distressing.

I will not use bad language online, neither will I take part in arguments or fights
online.

I will not accept any offers of money or presents, even free offers.                     93
I will never order anything online or give out credit card details.

I will not enter chat rooms and websites that I have agreed with my parents are
off-limits.

I will not arrange any face-to-face meetings with anyone I have met on the
Internet unless my parents consent and they accompany me.

Information collected by the City of Chattanooga Parks and Recreation




                                              6
                         Healthy Info for New Parents
         Tobacco Use-Detrimental to Unborn Babies, Infants, Children and Adolescents
                  Find More At http://www.cdc.gov/features/childrenandsmoke/
        Smoking during pregnancy increases the baby’s risk to be born prematurely, of low birth
        weight, be stillborn or later be a victim of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.
        Children and infants who are exposed to secondhand smoke are more prone to severe
        respiratory infections such as bronchitis and pneumonia.
        Adolescents who smoke are less physically fit, have impaired lung growth, have more
        respiratory illnesses, and chronically cough and wheeze.
                           Good Nutrition-Basic for a Child’s Development
                   Find More At http://www.aap.org/healthtopics/nutrition.cfm
        Babies should receive most of the needed nutrients from breast milk or formula during
        the first year of life. Solids should be introduced after 6 months of age.
        Children should eat vegetables and fruit each day.
        Eating a nutritious breakfast each day helps assure children and teens will have the
        physical and mental energy needed to learn.
        Children are responsible for how much they eat. Parents are responsible for what, when
        and how children eat.
                                     Physical Fitness-Begins at Birth
                        Find More At http://www.aap.org/family/fitness.htm                               94
        A child’s physical development begins at birth and his or her motor activities continually
        set the stage for the next growth period.
        Parents are to design a safe environment for their children to explore and accomplish
        the necessary physical milestones.
        Parents, by their actions, are the model for how physically active children become as
        they mature.
                                                  Sleep
                              Find More At http://www.sleepforkids.org
          Sufficient, uninterrupted sleep is crucial for children to develop and function efficiently.
        Children who do not get enough quality sleep are: irritable, fatigued, but hyper alert
         (awake but exhausted), and inattentive and unable to learn in school.
         Studies show that children who sleep longer have higher IQs.
        Developing a sleep routine for their children assists parents to consistently get them in
         bed at a time that allows for a full night’s sleep.


Information Collected by Parents are First Teachers



                                                      7
                             Nutrition You Can Use!
                Find more at http://www.mypyramid.gov/tips_resources/index.html


Tips to help you eat whole grains

As Snacks:

       Snack on ready-to-eat, whole grain cereals such as toasted oat cereal.
       Add whole-grain flour or oatmeal when making cookies or other baked treats.
       Try a whole-grain snack chip, such as baked tortilla chips.
       Popcorn, a whole grain, can be a healthy snack with little or no added salt and butter.

Whole Grain Tips for kids

       Set a good example for children by eating whole grains with meals or as snacks.
       Let children select and help prepare a whole grain side dish.
       Teach older children to read the ingredient list on cereals or snack food packages and
       choose those with whole grains at the top of the list.

Tips to help you eat vegetables
                                                                                                     95
Make vegetables more appealing

       Many vegetables taste great with a dip or dressing. Try a low-fat salad dressing with raw
       broccoli, red and green peppers, celery sticks or cauliflower.
       Add color to salads by adding baby carrots, shredded red cabbage, or spinach leaves.
       Include in-season vegetables for variety through the year.
       Include cooked dry beans or peas in flavorful mixed dishes, such as chili or minestrone
       soup.
       Decorate plates or serving dishes with vegetable slices.
       Keep a bowl of cut-up vegetables in a see-through container in the refrigerator. Carrot
       and celery sticks are traditional, but consider broccoli florettes, cucumber slices, or red
       or green pepper strips.


Information Collected by the Tennessee Dietetic Association




                                                8
                             Nutrition You Can Use!
                 Find more at http://www.mypyramid.gov/tips_resources/index.html

Vegetable tips for Kids:
      Set a good example for children by eating vegetables with meals and as snacks.
      Let children decide on the dinner vegetables or what goes into salads.
      Depending on their age, children can help shop for, clean, peel, or cut up vegetables.
      Allow children to pick a new vegetable to try while shopping.
      Use cut-up vegetables as part of afternoon snacks.
      Children often prefer foods served separately. So, rather than mixed vegetables try
      serving two vegetables separately.

Tips to help you eat fruits
As snacks:
        Cut-up fruit makes a great snack. Either cut them yourself, or buy pre-cut packages of
        fruit pieces like pineapples or melons. Or, try whole fresh berries or grapes.
        Dried fruits also make a great snack. They are easy to carry and store well. Because they
        are dried, ¼ cup is equivalent to ½ cup of other fruits.
        Keep a package of dried fruit in your desk or bag. Some fruits that are available dried
        include apricots, apples, pineapple, bananas, cherries, figs, dates, cranberries,
        blueberries, prunes (dried plums), and raisins (dried grapes).
        As a snack, spread peanut butter on apple slices or top frozen yogurt with berries or         96
        slices of kiwi fruit.
        Frozen juice bars (100% juice) make healthy alternatives to high-fat snacks.

Fruit tips for kids:
        Set a good example for children by eating fruit everyday with meals or as snacks.
        Offer children a choice of fruits for lunch.
        Depending on their age, children can help shop for, clean, peel, or cut up fruits.
        While shopping, allow children to pick out a new fruit to try later at home.
        Decorate plates or serving dishes with fruit slices.
        Top off a bowl of cereal with some berries. Or, make a smiley face with sliced bananas
        for eyes, raisins for a nose, and an orange slice for a mouth.
        Offer raisins or other dried fruits instead of candy.
        Make fruit kabobs using pineapple chunks, bananas, grapes, and berries.
        Pack a juice box (100% juice) in children’s lunches versus soda or other sugar-sweetened
        beverages.
        Choose fruit options, such as sliced apples, mixed fruit cup, or 100% fruit juices that are
        available in some fast food restaurants.
        Offer fruit pieces and 100% fruit juice to children. There is often little fruit in “fruit-
        flavored” beverages or chewy fruit snacks.

Information Collected by the Tennessee Dietetic Association
                                                 9
             Halloween Games That Keep Kids Moving!
   Find more at http://familyfitness.about.com/od/seasonalsportsandfun/tp/halloween_games.htm

1. Monster Freeze Dance
Put on "Monster Mash" and other seasonal tunes. Have kids show off their silliest monster
dance moves—but they must freeze in place when the tunes turn off!

2. Snap Apple
Instead of bobbing for apples in a bucket of water (which can really wreak havoc on costumes
or face paint!), have kids try to "snap" a bite from an apple hanging on a string. You'll need
apples with stems—tie the string to the stem, then loop it around a tree branch (outside) or a
broomstick or suspension curtain rod (inside).

3. Relay Races
Get creative with this one—there are lots of silly ways for kids to get from the starting line to
the finish! Try having them stagger like zombies, fly on broomsticks like witches, or hop like
toads. They can also carry a Halloween-themed snack. Or stage a costume relay for guaranteed
silly results.

4. Pumpkin Bowling
Choose smallish pumpkins with short stems (depending on the ages of your party guests). Set
up 1- or 2-liter plastic bottles and tape off a starting line for an instant bowling alley. Fill the
bottles with a bit of sand or rice if they topple over too easily. You can also have kids decorate     97
the bottles with stickers, markers, and other art materials.

5. Skeleton Scavenger Hunt
Have kids roam the yard or the house on the hunt for skeleton parts (cut from paper, or plastic
ones purchased from a toy store or craft shop). For an extra challenge, see if the party guests
can reassemble their bony treasures into a complete skeleton set.

6. Musical Pumpkins
Cut pumpkin shapes from construction paper and arrange them on the floor; kids must move
from pumpkin to pumpkin while music plays, just like in musical chairs. To keep kids from being
excluded, allow them to share pumpkins as you remove a pumpkin for each round. By the end
of the game, all the kids have to squeeze onto one spot. For variety, you could also use spider
webs, tombstones, or witchy cauldrons for targets.

7. Wiggle Worm
This goofy race requires kids to work together (and stick together) as a team. Divide the group
into two equal teams. Teams must line up and form a "worm." The person at the front of the
line reaches his left hand between his legs; the player behind him grabs it with her right hand;
and so on all the way to the end of the line. When you say "Go" (or "Boo!"), each team must
run to a goal line and back. Whichever team gets back first is the winner—but only if their
worm is still intact!

                                                 10
             Halloween Games That Keep Kids Moving!
   Find more at http://familyfitness.about.com/od/seasonalsportsandfun/tp/halloween_games.htm

8. Ghostcatcher
Challenge kids to decorate a pumpkin without being nabbed by the ghostcatcher! Choose a
child to be in the center of the circle of children. Divide the rest of the children into teams of
ghosts, for example Red Ghosts, Blue Ghosts. Place the pumpkin in the middle of the circle and
blindfold the Ghostcatcher.
Ghosts crawl around the circle on their knees and try to sneak to the middle to put their
stickers on the pumpkin. If the Ghostcatcher hears a sound, he points in that direction and says,
'Ghost!' If the Ghostcatcher catches a Ghost before he places his sticker, that child must start
over again.

Information Collected by Step ONE




                                                                                                     98




                                                11
                                    Flu Prevention
                Find more at http://www.flu.gov/individualfamily/parents/index.html

Symptoms of H1N1 (Swine) Flu
It is important to watch for any signs that your child doesn’t feel well and to pay attention to
any unusual behavior. Although the symptoms for all flu are similar, infants could have a fever
or be lethargic, but may not have a cough or other respiratory symptoms.

Seasonal Flu
All types of flu can cause:
        Fever
        Coughing and/or sore throat
        Runny or stuffy nose
        Headaches and/or body aches
        Chills
        Fatigue

H1N1 (Swine) Flu
Same as seasonal flu, but symptoms may be more severe.
       Fever
       Coughing and/or sore throat
       Runny or stuffy nose
       Headaches and/or body aches
       Chills                                                                                      99
       Fatigue
There may be additional symptoms. A number of H1N1 (swine) flu cases reported:
       Vomiting
       Diarrhea

Talking To Children About H1N1

Educate yourself first. Know the basic facts about H1N1—the symptoms, how it spreads, and
how you can help protect yourself and your child from getting sick. Consider following some of
these helpful tips:

       Share information about H1N1 in a calm, reassuring manner. Be careful not to worry
       children.
       Limit their exposure to media and adult conversations about H1N1.
       If your children are watching television, try to watch with them or make sure you are
       available to answer questions about H1N1.
       Use their questions as an opportunity to talk about what they can do to avoid getting
       H1N1 flu.
       Keep activities as consistent and normal as possible even if your normal routine changes
       (due to daycare or school closures).

                                                12
                                        Flu Prevention
                   Find more at http://www.flu.gov/individualfamily/parents/index.html

       Be a good example. Show children that you wash your hands frequently with soap and
       water. When you cough or sneeze, cover your mouth or use a tissue then throw the
       tissue away.

Prevention & Treatment

       Get Vaccinated. Vaccination is the best protection against contracting the flu. You need
       two vaccines to be fully protected this year. The seasonal flu vaccine is different from
       the H1N1 (Swine) flu vaccine. The CDC is encouraging people to get both vaccinations.
       Get the seasonal vaccination as soon as possible and get the H1N1 (Swine) flu
       vaccination as soon as it is available in early fall.

       Find a Flu Clinic Near You and Get Vaccinated. The American Lung Association (ALA) has
       an online tool called, Flu Clinic Locator. Visit the ALA Flu Clinic Locator to find a clinic
       near you.

       If you do contract the flu, talk to your doctor about antivirals. Antiviral drugs are
       prescription medicines (pills, liquid or an inhaler) that can be used for prevention or
       treatment of flu viruses. If you get sick, antiviral drugs can make your illness milder and
       make you feel better faster. Two types of antivirals, Oseltamivir (TAMIFLU®) and
       Zanamivir (RELENZA®) may be effective against the H1N1 (Swine) flu. More information           100
       on medications and antivirals.

Take these everyday steps to protect your health:

       Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in
       the trash after you use it.
       Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze.
       Alcohol-based hand cleaners are also effective.
       Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. Germs spread this way.
       Try to avoid close contact with sick people.
       Stay home if you are sick for 7 days after your symptoms begin or until you have been
       symptom-free for 24 hours, whichever is longer. This is to keep from infecting others
       and spreading the virus further.
       Follow public health advice regarding school closures, avoiding crowds and other social
       distancing measures.
       If you must have close contact with a sick person (for example, hold a sick infant), try to
       wear a facemask or N95 disposable respirator. More on Facemasks and Respirators.

Information collected by the Chattanooga-Hamilton County Health Department


                                                13
PUBLIC & HEALTH POLICY
Which choices are politicians, lobbyists, & administrators making for child health?
•   95% of school systems implemented the 90 minute physical activity law (House Bill 3750). 6
•   1,035 schools implemented a Coordinated School Health (CSH) program (TCA
    49-1-1002, PC 1001). 2                                                                       We have the 5th
•   Over 104,000 children have been referred by CSH for needed health care.6           highest rate of overweight youth
•   $7,308,000 was awarded to 45 agencies for diabetes prevention & treatment                  (10-17 years): 36.5%.4
    activities (TCA 4-40-401).8
COMMUNITY & ENVIRONMENT                                                                                                                                                                                  In 2008 1 of every 2 middle school students
Which choices have been made by TN school systems that impact child health?                                                                                                                                 failed to meet the recommendation of
                                                                                                                                                                                                                 vigorous physical activity daily.6
• 38.8% of students received free or reduced priced lunch in 2007.3
• 60% of schools provide daily physical education.2                                                                                                                                                       13.5% of children 2-5 years are obese.1
• 1027 schools use the School Health Index assessment.2
                                                                                                                                                                                                           8.1% of children less than 5 years
CLINICAL CARE                                                                                                                                                                                                        are anemic.1
How do decisions made by doctors, clinics, hospitals, & insurance companies
impact child health?                                                                                                                                                                                     87% of schools have
                                                                                                                                                                                                  implemented system-wide CSH.6
• 39.4% of children & adolescents are on Tenncare.3
• 61.4% of children received care within a medical home in 2007.5
• 1 in 13 children are uninsured.7
BEHAVIORS
Which choices about your child’s health have you made
or will you make?
• 14.5% of children younger than 5 are
  breastfed until they are 6 months old.1
• 61.7% of children (1-5 years) watched TV for                                                                                                        Child Health Week 2009
  1 or more hours during a weekday.5                                                                                         Developed by S. Looney, MPH, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Modified with permission from the Center for Public Health)
                                                                                                                             Developed by S. Looney, MPH, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Modified with permission from the Center for Public Health)
                                                                                                                             Developed by S. Looney, MPH, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Modified with permission from the Center for Public Health)
                                                                                                                             Developed by S. Looney, MPH, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (Modified with permission from the Center for Public Health)
1Polhamus et al., Pediatric Nutrition Surveillance 2007 Report; 2009; 2TN Department of Education, Office of Coordinated School Health Annual Data and Compliance Report 2008 (http://www.tennessee.gov/education/schoolhealth/data_reports/doc/DataandComplianceReport2008FINAL.pdf); 3Annie E. Casey
Foundation. KIDS COUNT Data Center. (http://datacenter.kidscount.org/); 4Levi et al. F as in Fat: How Obesity Policies are Failing in America (http://healthyamericans.org/reports/obesity2009/); 5US DHHS, Maternal & Child Health Bureau. The Health and Well-Being of Children: A Portrait of States & the Nation 2007
(http://mchb.hrsa.gov/nsch07/state/tennessee.html); 6TN Department of Health. TN Coordinated School Health Report 2007 http://www.state.tn.us/education/schoolhealth/data_reports/doc/CSH07ExecSummRevisedwPromulNumb.pdf); 7Families USA. Left Behind: Tennessee's Uninsured Children
(http://www.familiesusa.org/assets/pdfs/uninsured-kids-2008/tennessee.pdf); 8TN Center for Diabetes Prevention & Health Improvement. Operations & Financial Status (http://health.state.tn.us/Downloads/DiabetesPreventionReport2009.pdf).
                Developed with support through grant number T79 MC 09805, from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
   The Governor’s
Office of Children’s
 Care Coordination
expresses sincerest
  thanks for all the
 hard work done by
our community part-
 ners in celebrating
 Child Health Week
        2009.

 Thank you for the
 work you do every
week, not just during
 Child Health Week,
to keep our children
  safe and healthy.

				
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