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					     Liverpool John Moores University
       School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences




  STUDENT HANDBOOK
                     for

MSc in Computing & Information Systems

 MSc in Interactive Multimedia Systems

MSc in Computer Games Technology
                                      CONTENTS
1.     INTRODUCTION TO THE SCHOOL OF COMPUTING & MATHEMATICAL
       SCIENCES ............................................................................................................................. 4

2.     RESEARCH........................................................................................................................... 6

3.     THE ACADEMIC YEAR ..................................................................................................... 7

4.     UNIVERSITY’S MODULAR FRAMEWORK (UMF) ....................................................... 8
4.1       PHILOSOPHY ........................................................................................................................ 8
4.2       AWARDS .............................................................................................................................. 8
4.3       MODULES............................................................................................................................. 9
4.4       STUDYING MODULES AND ATTENDANCE AT CLASSES ......................................................... 9
4.5       ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................................ 9
4.6       ACCREDITATION OF PRIOR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING ....................................................... 13
5.     CMS MASTERS PROGRAMMES ................................................................................... 14
5.1    MSC IN COMPUTING AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS ............................................................ 14
  5.1.1    Programme Introduction ........................................................................................... 14
  5.1.2    Programme Structure ................................................................................................ 15
5.2    MSC IN INTERACTIVE MULTIMEDIA SYSTEMS ................................................................... 16
  5.2.1    Programme Introduction ........................................................................................... 16
  5.2.2    Programme Structure ................................................................................................ 17
5.3    MSC IN COMPUTER GAMES TECHNOLOGY......................................................................... 18
  5.3.1    Programme introduction ........................................................................................... 18
  5.3.2    Programme structure ................................................................................................ 19
5.4    PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION ............................................................................................... 20
5.5    PROGRAMME AWARDS....................................................................................................... 20
5.6    MODES OF ATTENDANCE ................................................................................................... 20
5.7    TRANSFER BETWEEN PROGRAMMES .................................................................................. 20
6.     ACADEMIC IMPROPRIETY ........................................................................................... 21

7.     CAREERS ADVICE AND BUSINESS BRIDGE............................................................. 22

8.     RESOLVING PROBLEMS ............................................................................................... 24
8.1       THE BOARD OF STUDY ....................................................................................................... 24
8.2       RESOLVING ACADEMIC PROBLEMS .................................................................................... 24
8.3       BEING A STUDENT REPRESENTATIVE ................................................................................. 24
8.4       TRAINING FOR STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES ...................................................................... 25
9.     COMPUTING FACILITIES.............................................................................................. 26

10. LEARNING RESOURCE CENTRE................................................................................. 27

11. PEOPLE WHO CAN HELP YOU - WHO’S WHO? ...................................................... 28
11.1      ACADEMIC STAFF .............................................................................................................. 28
11.2      ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF .................................................................................................... 28
12. WELFARE .......................................................................................................................... 29
12.1      STUDENT COUNSELLING SERVICE ...................................................................................... 29
12.2      WELFARE/FINANCIAL ADVICE ........................................................................................... 29
12.3      ECUMENICAL CHAPLAINCY................................................................................................ 29
12.4      MEDICAL SERVICES ........................................................................................................... 30
13. STUDENTS UNION ........................................................................................................... 32




                                                                       Page 2
14. GENERAL ISSUES ............................................................................................................ 34
14.1      ACCESS TO THE JAMES PARSONS BUILDING ....................................................................... 34
14.2      CAR PARKING .................................................................................................................... 34
14.3      STUDENT LOCKERS ............................................................................................................ 34
14.4      NOTICEBOARDS AND EMAIL............................................................................................... 34
14.5      SICKNESS ........................................................................................................................... 34
14.6      BACKING UP YOUR FLOPPY DISKS ..................................................................................... 34
14.7      WITHDRAWING FROM YOUR PROGRAMME ........................................................................ 35
14.8      EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES ..................................................................................................... 35
14.9      STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES ........................................................................................... 35
14.10     GENERAL HEALTH, SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL NOTES ............................................... 35
15. APPENDIX A: STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES IN RESPECT OF
    EXAMINATIONS ............................................................................................................... 37

16. APPENDIX B: ACADEMIC IMPROPRIETY ............................................................... 39

17. APPENDIX C: MODULE SPECIFICATIONS .............................................................. 41




                                                                       Page 3
1. Introduction to the School of Computing &
   Mathematical Sciences

This document is the student handbook for students enrolled on Masters programmes in the
School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences (CMS).

The School is responsible for an extensive portfolio of full-time, sandwich and part-time courses
at postgraduate, degree and sub-degree level.

For the purpose of academic management, the School is organised into three subject groups as
follows:

            Computer Systems
            Information Systems Development
            Mathematics and Statistics

Each subject group is led by a Principal Lecturer who has devolved responsibility for research,
staff development and academic programme integration and development within their subject
area.

Computing Facilities

The School has a number of specialist teaching laboratories comprising a large number of PCs
and workstations, which are overseen by a team of technicians. The laboratories contain
Workstations/Unix facilities, Parallel Processing facilities, IBM PC compatible machines,
Multimedia equipment. All equipment is networked either locally or to the University Ethernet.

School-based students are also major users of the University Central Computer Service, which
provides Ethernet communication network facilities across the University. There are a
significant number of PCs located in the James Parsons building learning resource centre
laboratories. This facility is shared by all the Schools in the Division of Engineering and Science
and managed by technicians of the School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences.

Staff computing equipment consists of networked PCs and there is a wide variety of specialist
software available to support both research and staff development activities.

Research and Staff Development

School policy is that all academic staff should enhance their expertise through scholarly activities
which may include personal research, consultancy and staff development. The publication of
periodical articles, monographs, and participation at conferences and seminars is expected.
Resources are available to support these activities. The School is seeking to develop European
links and professional interaction with national and international organisations.

The School also supports higher degrees by research. Since 1992/93, the number of research
students in the School has increased from 2 to 18 of which 13 are full time students. All research
students have their own networked computer facilities. From 1995 to 1998 the School had 3
post-doctoral fellows in Computing.

Accommodation

The School has modernised laboratories and staff accommodation, mainly located on the sixth
and seventh floors of the James Parsons Building. The principal student computing laboratories
are air-conditioned. Most academic staff have single room accommodation.




                                                 Page 4
This handbook contains information specific to the Masters courses operated through the School
of Computing & Mathematical Sciences. The contents should be studied together with the
following documents:

           University Modular Framework Assessment Regulations
           University Library Services
           University Central Computing Services
           School of Computing & Mathematical Sciences - M Level Module Specifications

The University Modular Framework Assessment Regulations are available in Learning Resource
Centres (libraries) and on the University‟s intranet, CWIS (Campus Wide Information System),
URL: http://cwis.livjm.ac.uk/umf




                                              Page 5
2. Research

The School is active in the following research areas:

            Applied Artificial Intelligence
            Distributed Multimedia Systems
            Computer Security
            Information Systems Development
            Intelligent Tutoring Systems

For opportunities in research or collaboration in any of the above areas, please discuss your ideas
with Prof. M. Merabti.




                                                 Page 6
3. The Academic Year

The University‟s Academic Calendar is published on the following web site:

         http://cwis.livjm.ac.uk/academiccalendar/


NB      ALL MODULE REGISTRATIONS IN BOTH SEMESTERS MUST
        BE COMPLETED IN THE TWO WEEKS AFTER CLASSES
        START - SEE NOTICEBOARD FOR PRECISE DATE.




                                               Page 7
4. University’s Modular Framework (UMF)

4.1 Philosophy
The main educational purposes of the UMF system are:

              to establish credits as the principal means of evaluating learning achievement
              to offer a curriculum which, in its content, assessment and delivery, emphasises the
               demonstration of expected student learning outcomes in terms of knowledge, skills
               and competence
              to increase access to students seeking to enter higher education
              to recognise and give credits for learning based on prior experience, acquired
               through employment, previous education or life experience
              to assist in establishing a common currency with other credit systems in the UK and
               elsewhere.

As you proceed through your programme you will accumulate credits for modules that you have
passed. If you have to break off from study, for work or domestic reasons, the credits gained can be
kept as a kind of 'academic currency'. When you are able to begin studying again you can use your
credits to return to the University or to transfer to another higher educational establishment in Britain
or continental Europe.

4.2 Awards
Students in the School are hoping to receive an award, as follows

              Postgraduate Certificate
              Postgraduate Diploma
              MSc

A student may be registered for any of these awards. In addition, a “lower” award may be made
in the case of a student “failing” the award for which they are registered.

For a given award you must acquire a minimum specified number of credits in core and option
modules. The requirements are explained below.

A core module is a module which is obligatory. An option module is a module selected from a
list of modules defined in the documentation for a particular award. Core and option modules for
the MSc are provided later.

While the School makes every effort to run the full range of options, they are offered subject to
timetabling constraints, staff availability and viable class sizes.

Core modules are 15 credits, option modules are also 15 credits and the project is 60 credits. The
numbers of credits required for the awards listed above are :

                Postgraduate Certificate                60 credits
                Postgraduate Diploma                    120 credits
                MSc                                     180 credits

In the case of the Certificate and Diploma, the credits may not come from the project module.

The MSc programme consists of 180 credits (75 Core credits, 45 Option credits and a 60 credit
Project.)




                                                    Page 8
4.3 Modules
The unit of academic study is the module. In the Master‟s programme, core modules are 15
credits, option modules 15 credits and the project 60 credits. With the exception of the project
module, they are all of one semester‟s duration and are normally assessed at the end of the
semester in which they are delivered.

The modules on the MSc programme are shown in section 7.2 Programme Structure below.

At the beginning of the year, you enrol for your core modules and your selected options. You
may change your module registrations - but only up to the end of the second week of the relevant
semester. Thereafter you are assessed in modules on which you have registered and you cannot
be assessed in modules for which you have not registered.

A module is delivered by a Module Leader, possibly assisted by other staff. You should study the
relevant module specifications carefully. Among other things, the specifications define the
assessment mode (examination only, coursework only or some percentage weighting of
coursework and examination) and where relevant the number of courseworks which will be
required.

If you obtain an overall module mark of 40% or more, you will be deemed to have passed the
module and you will be awarded the number of credits at which the module is rated.

4.4 Studying Modules and Attendance at Classes
As a student in higher education you will be expected to exercise a great deal of initiative in your
studies. This will mean your using the learning resources available to you in independent,
creative and effective ways.

Although we recognise that you might absent yourself from timetabled classes without
consultation, this does not necessarily mean that you are not studying and learning, we normally
regard regular attendance as a crucial part of successful learning. It is our experience that
students who regularly forgo the information imparted in lectures, or the particular advice and
guidance gained in practical activities in tutorials and laboratory sessions, do less well than
students whose attendance is good. We think you should be concerned if you are missing more
than 5% of your classes. Attendance lists may be maintained by your lecturers and your level of
attendance may be taken into account in deliberations of the assessment boards.

4.5 Assessment
Courseworks
Standard practice is that your lecturers may assign you grades instead of marks. The mapping of
grades to marks is as follows:

         E                          <40%
         D                          40 - 49.99%
         C                          50 - 59.99%
         B                          60 - 69.99%
         A                          >=70%

All grades are unofficial until confirmed or modified by a Module Assessment Board. This term
is explained later in this section. Some students spend excessive time on courseworks to the
detriment of private study and some students believe, erroneously, that coursework is
synonymous with private study. We advise you to set aside at least that period of time for private
study which is recommended in the appropriate module specification. We also advise you not to
spend significantly more time on a coursework than is defined in the appropriate module
specification. If you believe that a coursework requires from you significantly more time than is
defined there, you should discuss the matter with the Module Leader.

All courseworks must be submitted only to the Division Office in Byrom St, which is located on
the ground floor near the main entrance. Make sure that you obtain and retain a receipt.




                                                  Page 9
Coursework Deadlines

Courseworks, including the Project, which are submitted after the deadline defined on the
coursework specification are awarded 0 marks. We believe that it would be wrong to
disadvantage students who have handed work in on time by allowing other students to improve a
late coursework in the interval between the due date and time and the submission date and time.

Coursework Extensions

The procedure for applying for a coursework extension is as follows.

1.   You must present a completed coursework extension application form for approval before
     the final assessment date in the semester.
     Obtain a Coursework Extension Application Form from the School Office located on the 7th
     floor of Byrom St. An application is only valid if submitted to the Module Leader and
     approved before the final assessment date which is the last working day before Revision
     Week in a semester, normally a Friday. Otherwise, you should consider completing a
     Personal Mitigating Circumstances (PMC) form.

2.   You should submit your form before the due date of the coursework.
     If you do, your Module Leader can then consider a new due date for the coursework.
     Otherwise s/he will advise you to consider completing a Personal Mitigating Circumstances
     form, unless the reason for the application is illness, in which case s/he will consider a new
     due date.

3.   You should also propose a new due date for the coursework which is before the feedback
     date.
     If you do, your Module Leader will consider whether the reason for the application is
     acceptable. Otherwise, s/he will advise you to consider completing a Personal Mitigating
     Circumstances form, unless s/he has an alternative coursework to give you. However, s/he is
     not obliged to provide an alternative coursework.

4.   The reason for your application must be acceptable.
     If the Module Leader finds the reason for the application unacceptable, s/he will refuse the
     coursework extension. Examples of unacceptable reasons are:
           you ran out of time
           corruption of electronic data
           inability to submit coursework owing to closure of the School or Divisional Office
               at the advertised time
           printer queues
If s/he finds the reason for your application acceptable, s/he will consider what action would be
     in your best interest.

5.   The Module Leader may refer your application to your Course Leader for a decision.
     If the Module Leader finds the reason acceptable, s/he will consider whether it is in your
     interest to grant an extension. S/he may take into account other coursework extensions which
     you are submitting. If s/he judges that an extension is in your interest, s/he will approve it. If
     s/he is unsure, s/he will refer you to your Course Leader who will make the decision which
     s/he judges is in your best interest.

Examinations

Please note that you may be expected to attend examinations in assessment weeks during days or
times of the day when you would not normally attend classes. The timetables for the
examinations are posted on the noticeboards in the main entrance hall in Byrom St.

Mitigating Circumstances

If you believe that circumstances have:




                                                  Page 10
                prevented your acquiring competence in one or more modules or
                prevented you from demonstrating competence in the module(s)

you should:

                complete a PMC (Personal Mitigating Circumstances) form (obtainable from the
                 Divisional Office)
                collect corroborating evidence (e.g. a Doctor‟s note) and ask the Course Leader to
                 sign the PMC form
                and submit it to the School Office within 5 working days of completion of the
                 revision week or within 5 working days of an examination if the PMC relates to an
                 examination.

If the Course Leader

                believes that appropriate corroboration of the claim has been provided and
                is satisfied that circumstances may have affected your performance, she/he will sign
                 it.

This PMC will then be considered prior to or/and at the Module Assessment Board (MAB). The
MAB will either:

                confirm the mark(s) or
                decide that the assessment in the module(s) should be deferred until a later date,
                 provided that you failed the module.

Please note that a PMC claim submitted late will be considered only if exceptional circumstances
have prevented you from submitting it at the correct time.

If, as a result of your submitting a PMC form, the MAB decides that you are to be deferred in a
module, you will be notified of the timing and form of the assessment by means of a Notification
of Reassessment form. However, when you are assessed, it will count as your first attempt at
assessment in the module (assuming that you have not already failed it).

Module Assessment Board (MAB)

A MAB moderates the marks awarded in modules. MABs normally sit in January after the
autumn semester assessments, in June after the spring semester assessments, and in October. A
MAB considers the modules one by one. For each student registered for a module it moderates 1
the student‟s mark.

It also considers and, if appropriate, decides any actions resulting from any PMC‟s received.

You will gain a pass and be awarded the relevant number of credits if your module mark is 40%
or above. If your mark is greater than or equal to 30% and less than 40% this mark is a
compensatable fail. (The meaning of the term „compensatable fail‟ is explained in the section
„Programme Assessment Board (PAB)‟ below.) If your mark is less than 30% the mark is a fail
mark.

If you receive a Fail or a Compensatable Fail, you are said to be referred in the module. You are
entitled to be reassessed in the module. You will be informed of the time and the nature of the
reassessment via a form, Notification of Reassessment Requirement. The time of the
reassessment will have been recommended by the MAB and determined by the PAB. If you
believe that your reassessment should be at a different time, you should complete and submit a
PMC form.

Important Note: The MSc project module is NOT eligible to compensation, but is eligible
for referral.

1
    that is: checks, confirms or, if appropriate, modifies




                                                         Page 11
The form of reassessment, known as the referral conditions, will also have been defined by the
MAB; on the form you will see one of the following codes:

RC               Referral by coursework only, with the referred coursework mark being the reported
                 referral mark.
RCE              Referral by coursework and examination with the aggregate of the two marks being the
                 reported referral mark.
RE               Referral by examination only, with the referred examination mark being the reported
                 referral mark.
RW               Rework all the questions in the original examination paper in your own time and obtain
                 an overall mark of 60% or more, this being the reported referral mark.

Attached to the form will be the details of the work required (except in the case of an RE).

Reassessment

You are entitled to one referral in all modules.

Reassessment in a module will take place at the next available opportunity (normally the
following year).

If you pass a reassessment, you will be awarded a module mark of 40%.

If you are referred in a module, it is in your interest to make contact with the current lecturer,
because:

          the lecturer responsible for this next module delivery may be a different person from
           the lecturer who originally delivered the module to you, or
          the syllabus, or the form of assessment, or other aspects of the module may have
           changed,

You must register for all referred modules at the beginning of the year. You do not have to pay to
re-register for referred modules.

If, as a result of your submitting a PMC form, the MAB decides that you are to be deferred in a
module, you will be notified of the timing and form of the assessment by means of the
Notification of Reassessment form. However, when you are assessed, it will count as your first
attempt at assessment in the module.

Please note, carefully, that you are responsible for registering for appropriate modules. If you are
registered for a module but have not submitted any assessment, you will be awarded a fail grade.
If a computer listing of your registrations shows registrations which are not what you intended, or
you wish to amend your module registrations, or de-register from a module, please complete a
Module Registration Amendment form and ask the Course Leader to sign it.

All students who are referred in a module have the opportunity to seek guidance from the Module
Leader.

Programme Assessment Board (PAB)

A PAB reviews the marks awarded by MABs to students. PABs normally sit in June and
October. The PAB considers the students one by one and examines individual student assessment
profiles. It also applies compensation where it sees fit. In cases of poor performance, it may
recommend that
           the Course Leader counsel the student or
           the student transfer to another award or
           the student withdraw

The PAB also determines the timing of referrals following recommendations by the MAB.




                                                   Page 12
In certain circumstances the PAB may award exceptional credits, but the PAB has no power to
change module marks.

Compensation

If you receive a Compensatable Fail grade for a module, you have failed the module but you may
under certain conditions still be entitled to receive the number of credits at which it is rated. The
award of such credits is termed compensation. Compensation occurs only at the discretion of the
PAB. The conditions are that:

             at least 80% of the credits required for the award has been gained, and
             the average mark is at least 40%, and
             a mark of at least 30% has been achieved in failed modules.

Thus no more than 20% of the total credits required to complete the award may normally be
awarded by compensation.

When compensation is applied, credits will be awarded to eligible modules but the mark/grade
for these modules is not changed.

Progression

The award of a Postgraduate Certificate is attained on passing a minimum of 60 credits. A
Postgraduate Diploma is attained on passing a minimum of 120 credits.

In order to proceed to an MSc award, the student must have completed the 5 Core modules and
have the approval of the Programme Assessment Board.

The MSc award is made up of :

          75 credits from the 5 Core modules
          45 credits from the 3 Option modules
          60 credits from the Project

University Regulations

The University‟s assessment regulations (UMF: assessment regulations, procedures and
guidance) are available for you to access at www.livjm.ac.uk/umf. This document is the
authoritative source of all information regarding the University‟s assessment regulations.

4.6 Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning
Many students admitted to University programmes, particularly on a part-time basis, will have a
background rich in learning experiences. In accordance with the University regulations on the
Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL), students admitted on the Masters
programmes may gain accreditation of such experiences.

If you feel that you have some grounds for Accreditation of Prior Learning (APL), for example,
study on an MSc programme elsewhere, then seek advice from your course tutor.




                                                 Page 13
5. CMS Masters Programmes


5.1 MSc in Computing and Information Systems

5.1.1 Programme Introduction
The disciplines of computing and information technology are ever changing. New advances in
techniques and developments such as object-oriented techniques, multimedia applications,
cooperative working and high speed networks are becoming ever more important. Managers and
technical personnel within industry require an understanding of these techniques and need to
appreciate the impact on their environments if we are to have a competitive economy.

The aim of this MSc programme is to provide people of graduate status working, or planning to
work, in a computing environment, with the opportunity to enhance their career prospects by
gaining additional knowledge and skills in the areas of Computing, Information Systems and the
Management of Computer Technology.

The programme draws on the academic expertise within two subject groups from the School of
Computing and Mathematical Sciences and also the Information Systems & Technology Group
from the Business School. Research strengths and topics relevant to current industrial practice are
reflected in the programme.

The specific aims of the MSc programme are summarised as follows:

 To provide students with a fuller understanding of current and developing computer
  technologies
 To enable students to explore the issues surrounding the Management of Information
  Technology in Business and Industrial contexts
 To facilitate students in the development of expertise and interest in topic areas of direct and
  complementary relevance to their work
 To encourage students to become autonomous learners
 To provide students with an understanding of current research issues
 To further develop students‟ analytical, creative, problem-solving and research skills
 To provide a platform for career development, innovation and further study such as PhD

The programme learning outcomes define that at the end of the programme, students should:

 Be aware of current and developing principles and practices within the Computing Industry
 Have widened and deepened their knowledge and skills in the areas of Computing and
  Information Systems
 Have been exposed to and applied a range of tools and techniques currently being used in the
  development of computer-based information systems
 Have a clear understanding of how to effectively manage Information Technology and its users
  in the workplace
 Be aware of the need for innovation when applying computer-based solutions to business
  problems
 Have critically analysed a range of applications domains, including their own experiences of
  computing with a view to identifying areas of change, innovation, strength and weakness, both
  corporate and individual
 Be able to understand current research issues in the relevant aspects of Computing &
  Information Systems
 Be able to study independently and have developed research methodology skills
 Be able to work more effectively as part of a team or as a team leader

The demand for IT professionals remains high. Some examples of career opportunities after the
successful completion of the programme are listed below:




                                                Page 14
   System analyst/programmer
   Project management
   IT management
   Software quality assurance
   System design
   Further study for PhD

5.1.2 Programme Structure
The programme consists of core and option modules as shown below:

Module Code      Module Title                                             Credit          Subject
Semester 1 Core Modules
BUSISM002        Information Systems Development & Management               15       Info Systems (IS)
CMSSEM002        Software Engineering Technology                            15        Computing (C)
CMSSEM003        Research Methods                                           15            C & IS
Semester 1 Option Modules
CMSSEM004        Database Design and Technology                             15            C & IS
CMSSEM005        Computer Networks                                          15              C
CMSSEM011        Multimedia Systems Development                             15              C
CMSISM012        Systems Maintenance                                        15            C & IS

Semester 2 Core Modules
BUSISM001        Business Analysis                                          15                 IS
CMSSEM001        Computer Systems Technology                                15                 C
Semester 2 Option Modules
BUSISM003        Decision Support Systems                                   15              IS
CMSISM004        Innovation and IT Management                               15            C & IS
CMSISM013        IT Supported Risk Assessment                               15            C & IS
CMSSEM007        Computer Security                                          15            C & IS
CMSSEM009        Human Computer Interaction                                 15              C
CMSSEM018        Knowledge-Based Systems                                    15            C & IS

CMSSEM008         Project Dissertation (Core Module)                        60            C & IS

To gain the award of Masters, students must gain 75 credits from core modules (normally with an
overall average of at least 45%), 45 credits from option modules, and 60 credits from a project.

In Semester 1, full-time students normally study all the three core modules listed above and one
option module selected. Part-time students normally study two core modules in the first year, and
the third core module and one option module selected in the second year.

In Semester 2, full-time students normally study the two core modules listed above and two
option modules selected. Part-time students normally study the two core modules in the first year,
and two option modules in the second year.

For Project Dissertation, full-time students normally complete their projects by the end of
August, and part-time students in December, after the completion of all the five core and three
selected option modules.

For further information on the programme specification, please visit the School‟s website at
http://www.cms.livjm.ac.uk/courses/postgrad.htm.

Please note that options are offered depending on student choice and staff availability and the
University reserves the right to offer only those option modules which meet these requirements.




                                                Page 15
5.2 MSc in Interactive Multimedia Systems

5.2.1 Programme Introduction
A multimedia computing system is one which combines a range of technologies to increase the
range and depth of presentation, interaction and processing, with that system and with other
users. These technologies include: video, graphics, animation and sound for greater presentation;
graphical user interfaces and speech recognition for greater user input; and network and
communication technologies for greater group and social communication.

The continuous development and increasing application of multimedia technologies have
convinced industry of the importance of applying these technologies to update their existing
products and to develop new ones so as to enhance their competitiveness in an increasingly
competitive global market. To achieve this competitiveness, managers and technical personnel
within industry need to acquire an understanding of the technologies and to develop skills in
applying and further advancing them to solve real life problems.

As multimedia technologies are one of the major research subjects in the School of Computing
and Mathematical Sciences, the knowledge, skills and experience of the staff working on this
subject can ensure this MSc programme appropriately satisfies the above need.

More specifically, the programme aims:

 To provide students with a fuller understanding of current and developing multimedia
  technologies
 To facilitate students in the development of expertise and interest in topic areas of direct and
  complementary relevance to practical work
 To encourage students to become autonomous learners
 To provide students with an understanding of current multimedia research issues
 To further develop students‟ analytical, creative, problem-solving and research skills
 To provide a platform for career development, innovation and/or further study such as PhD

The programme learning outcomes define that at the end of the programme, students should:

 Be aware of current and developing principles and practices within interactive multimedia
  systems
 Have widened and deepened their knowledge and skills in the areas of multimedia systems
  and their applications
 Have been exposed to and applied a range of tools and techniques currently being used in the
  development of interactive multimedia systems
 Have critically analysed and developed a major piece of work in the area
 Be able to understand current research issues in the relevant aspects of interactive multimedia
  systems
 Be able to study independently and have developed research methodology skills
 Be able to work more effectively as part of a team or as a team leader

The demand for professionals with knowledge and skills of multimedia technologies has been
increasing rapidly. Some examples of career opportunities after the successful completion of the
course are as follows:

   Multimedia systems development
   Multimedia title production
   Games and entertainment development
   Multimedia systems management
   Interactive electronic publishing
   Virtual reality development and application
   Further research by PhD




                                                Page 16
5.2.2 Programme Structure
The programme consists of core and option modules as shown below:

Module Code       Module Title                                              Credit
Semester 1 Core Modules
CMSSEM003         Research Methods                                            15
CMSSEM010         Multimedia Technology                                       15
CMSSEM011         Multimedia Systems Development                              15
Semester 1 Option Modules
CMSSEM004         Database Design and Technology                              15
CMSSEM005         Computer Networks                                           15
CMSSEM012         Virtual Reality                                             15

Semester 2 Core Modules
CMSSEM009         Human Computer Interaction                                  15
CMSSEM013         Advanced Multimedia Technology                              15
Semester 2 Option Modules
CMSSEM007         Computer Security                                           15
CMSSEM014         Internetworking                                             15
CMSSEM015         Computer-Support for Cooperative Work                       15
CMSSEM016         Multimedia Applications Workshop                            15
CMSSEM017         Multimedia Database Systems                                 15
CMSSEM018         Knowledge-Based Systems                                     15

CMSSEM008           Project Dissertation (Core Module)                        60

To gain the award of Masters, students must gain 75 credits from core modules (normally with an
overall average of at least 45%), 45 credits from option modules, and 60 credits from a project.

In Semester 1, full-time students normally study all the three core modules listed above and one
option module selected. Part-time students normally study two core modules in the first year, and
the third core module and one option module selected in the second year.

In Semester 2, full-time students normally study the two core modules listed above and two
option modules selected. Part-time students normally study the two core modules in the first year,
and two option modules in the second year.

For Project Dissertation, full-time students normally complete their projects by the end of
August, and part-time students in December, after the completion of all the five core and three
selected option modules.

For further information on the programme specification, please visit the School‟s website at
http://www.cms.livjm.ac.uk/courses/postgrad.htm.

Please note that options are offered depending on student choice and staff availability and the
University reserves the right to offer only those option modules which meet these requirements.




                                                Page 17
5.3 MSc in Computer Games Technology

5.3.1 Programme introduction

The computer games industry within the UK is a successful and expanding part of the economy
with a promise of increasing opportunities for talented highly qualified recruits. The production
of computer games needs a team of many different disciplines including specialised computer
programmers. Traditional Computing degree programmes do not provide the specialist
programming and interdisciplinary team skills needed by the industry.

The aim of the MSc programme in Computer Games Technology is to provide people of graduate
status working, or planning to work, in the computer games industry, with the opportunity to
enhance their career prospects by gaining additional knowledge and skills in the areas of games
technologies and their applications.

The specific aims of the MSc programme are summarised as follows:

 To provide students with a fuller understanding of current and developing technologies used
  by the games industry
 To facilitate students in the development of expertise and interest in topic areas of direct and
  complementary relevance to their work
 To encourage students to become autonomous learners
 To provide students with an understanding of current research issues in Computer Games
  Technology
 To further develop students‟ analytical, creative, problem-solving and research skills
 To provide a platform for career development, innovation and/or further study such as PhD

The programme learning outcomes define that at the end of the programme, students should:

 Be aware of current and developing principles and practices within Computer Games
  Technology
 Have widened and deepened their knowledge and skills in the area of Computer Games
  Technology and its applications
 Have been exposed to and applied a range of tools and techniques currently being used in the
  development of Computer Games Technology
 Have critically analysed and developed a major piece of work in the area
 Be able to understand current research issues in the relevant aspects of Computer Games
  Technology
 Be able to study independently and have developed research methodology skills
 Be able to work more effectively as part of a team or as a team leader

Some examples of career opportunities after the successful completion of the course are listed
below:

       Games and entertainment development
       Graphical applications development
       Games production management
       Interactive electronic publishing
       Virtual reality development and application
       Further research by PhD




                                                Page 18
5.3.2 Programme structure
The programme consists of core and option modules as shown below:

 Module Code       Module Title                                          Number of Credits
 Semester 1 Core Modules
 CMSSEM003         Research Methods                                              15
 CMSSEM021         Software Development for Games                                15
 CMSSEM024         Computer Game Design                                          15
 Semester 1 Option Modules
 CMSSEM005         Computer Networks                                             15
 CMSSEM010         Multimedia Technology                                         15
 CMSSEM011         Multimedia Systems Development                                15
 CMSSEM012         Virtual Reality                                               15

 Semester 2 Core Modules
 CMSSEM022         Advanced Games Programming                                    15
 CMSSEM025         Computer Games Workshop                                       15
 Semester 2 Option Modules
 CMSSEM009         Human Computer Interaction                                    15
 CMSSEM014         Internetworking                                               15
 CMSSEM018         Knowledge-Based Systems                                       15
 CMSSEM023         Advanced Computer Graphics                                    15
 CMSSEM026         Computer Visualisation and Animation                          15
 CMSSEM027         Online Gaming                                                 15

 CMSSEM008           Project Dissertation (Core Module)                          60

To gain the award of Masters, students must gain 75 credits from core modules, 45 credits from
option modules, and 60 credits from a project.

In Semester 1, full-time students normally study all the three core modules listed above and one
option module selected. Part-time students normally study two core modules in the first year, and
the third core module and one option module selected in the second year.

In Semester 2, full-time students normally study the two core modules listed above and two
option modules selected. Part-time students normally study the two core modules in the first year,
and two option modules in the second year.

For Project Dissertation, full-time students normally complete their projects by the end of
August, and part-time students in December, after the completion of all the five core and three
selected option modules.

For further information on the programme specification, please visit the School‟s website at
http://www.cms.livjm.ac.uk/courses/postgrad.htm.

Please note that options are offered depending on student choice and staff availability and the
University reserves the right to offer only those option modules which meet these requirements.




                                                Page 19
5.4 Project Implementation
You will be supplied with Project Guidelines at the appropriate time.

5.5 Programme Awards
The award of the MSc degree for each of the programmes is made up from the following 180
credits:

 75 credits from the 5 core taught modules
 45 credits from 3 taught option modules
 60 credits from a project

The intermediate awards are made as follows:

 Postgraduate Certificate: A minimum of 60 credits from either taught core or taught option
  modules (i.e. not including the project).

 Postgraduate Diploma: A minimum of 120 credits from taught core and taught option
  modules.

Eligibility for some awards is subject to constraints additional to those related to credits, for
example the overall average.

5.6 Modes of Attendance
At present, the courses are offered in both full and part time attendance.

 The full time course is for a period of 48 weeks.
 The part time course runs over two years.

There is scope for transfer between full and part time modes of study. If you wish to discuss this
possibility, see the Programme Tutor.

5.7 Transfer Between Programmes
This needs to be considered by the Programme Tutor on an individual basis.




                                                 Page 20
6. Academic Impropriety

Whilst co-operation between students is acceptable and in the case of team courseworks encouraged,
copying or „collaboration without understanding‟ will not be tolerated. Students providing material for
copying or other forms of unreasonable assistance may also be penalised.

Obviously, communicating with or copying from another student during an exam and taking
unauthorised material into an exam are other examples of academic impropriety.

The definition of academic impropriety from the University Assessment Regulations is given in
Appendix B.

The School views academic impropriety with the utmost seriousness. Suspected malpractice is
investigated according to the procedures defined in the University‟s assessment regulations which are
available in Learning Resource Centres.




                                               Page 21
7. Careers Advice and Business Bridge




WHAT DOES BUSINESS BRIDGE DO?
We offer all current students from the Liverpool HEI‟s (undergraduate and postgraduate) the chance to
work with Merseyside companies. The Business Bridge scheme, a national leader for work experience,
is open all year round so you can choose to work during semesters and/or holidays.
WHAT SORT OF WORK IS AVAILABLE?
We have a wide selection of exciting opportunities – popular topics include IT, Web Site design,
marketing, business planning, Arts and graphics, construction, and engineering related projects.
It is important for you to recognise that this is not casual work and therefore you will not find bar
work, waiting on and so forth. We aim to improve the skills that your career will demand. Although
work can be entirely separate from your academic life, we aim to help as many students as possible
who are looking for projects as part of Work Based Learning module, sandwich course or dissertation.
HOW WILL IT FIT IN WITH MY ACADEMIC TIMETABLE?
We fully appreciate that your course is of the utmost importance and will remain your priority. We aim
to offer projects that can be carried out at times convenient to you – when you are not in lectures or
tutorials. Work is usually one or two days per week during semesters with the possibility of full time
work during holiday periods.
WHY SHOULD I GET INVOLVED?
We emphasise that as well as earning some extra money, projects are paid at a minimum of £30 per
day, we are offering the chance to get some valuable, relevant work experience and develop your
personal skills – the important factors in any graduate recruitment advertisement in today‟s competitive
job market.
I’M INTERESTED, HOW DO I GET INVOLVED?
1.   Call in to see us in one of our two offices:
     Aquinas Building, Mount Pleasant (next to the Aldham Robarts LRC)
     Byrom Street (next to the Campus Office on the Ground Floor) – Semester-Time only.
2.   Email bridge@livjm.ac.uk
3.   Visit our web site at www.business–bridge.org.uk
4.   Telephone 0151 708 5800




                                                    Page 22
        C A R E E R S        A D V I S O R Y         S E R V I C E

                         N E E D C A S H ?
            N E E D     W O R K E X P E R I E N C E            ?

                   W H A T ’ S O N O F F E R ?
                    P A R T T I M E W O R K
                         V A C W O R K

        Y O U R    W O R L D       O F    O P P O R T U N I T Y




                      T H R O U G H O U R
          C A R E E R S A D V I S O R Y S E R V I C E

               B R O W S E O U R             W E B S I T E
                    P A Y U S A              V I S I T

                 I N F O R M A T I O N O N U K
       A N D   I N T E R N A T I O N A L V A C A N C I E S

Network Windows  Information Services  Careers Advisory Service 
  Compass Home Page  LJMU eXtra - Campus only  Careers Notices
     Vac work/Part time work Vac work/Part time work  £££’s


  Careers Advisory Service, The Aquinas Building, 98 Mount Pleasant,
                          Liverpool. L3 5UZ
                        Tel : 0151 231 3320
                        Fax : 0151 707 1938
                      Email : Careers@livjm.ac.uk
                Web : http://www.livjm.ac.uk/careers

                   10 .0 0 – 1. 00 Mo n d a y to Fr i d ay
                    A l so G ro u nd Fl o or By r om St
                  10 .0 0 – 1. 00 T u es d ay t o F r id a y
                          1. 45 – 4. 3 0 Mo n d a y
                         4. 30 – 7. 0 0 Th u rs d ay




                                   Page 23
8. Resolving Problems

8.1 The Board of Study
At the start of each academic year a student from each mode of study is elected to act as a
representative for other students. This representative meets with the UMF Manager at the beginning of
the academic year and becomes a member of the School‟s Board of Study which usually meets twice
per year. The Board is composed of staff and the elected student representatives. Its job is to oversee
the academic management of the course.

8.2 Resolving Academic Problems
If you have any difficulty relating to your study of a module, please do not hesitate to discuss it with
your Module Leader at the earliest opportunity. Do not wait until a problem has deepened into a crisis!

Problems which affect a number of students (e.g. examination arrangements, laboratory facilities or
general problems with the delivery of a module) should be passed to the Student Representative who
will help to resolve them in discussion initially with the Module Leader. If the problem cannot be
resolved in discussion with the Module Leader, the Student Representative will approach your Course
Tutor and attempt to help resolve it at that level.

Only strategic and major issues should be referred to the Board itself.

Whoever you talk to, it is very important that you address any problems straight away.

8.3 Being a Student Representative
If you are interested in becoming a Student Representative, you should put your name forward when
your Tutor invites the group to elect one. It can be a useful experience and makes a valuable addition
to your CV. It demands and exercises skills in oral and written communication and persuasion as well
as goodwill and, on occasions, persistence! We know that we are far from perfect and really do
welcome constructive and fair-minded criticism.

The duties of a Student Representative are to:

          represent student opinion in matters relating to any aspect of the students‟ learning
           experiences and help resolve difficulties by addressing them promptly and at the
           appropriate level
          attend the Boards of Study
          write a brief report each Semester on the learning experiences in modules taken by the
           group as well as on general aspects of the programme of study.

Student Representatives will be provided with guidance on general procedures for resolving difficulties
and on the writing of reports.

The reports form part of the School‟s Annual Report and as such are disseminated at the highest levels
of the University. It therefore places a responsibility on Student Representatives to:

          submit their reports by the dates requested and
          make fair and constructive comments and
          represent all shades of student opinion with an indication of the proportion of the student
           group who hold a particular opinion.

We also insist that the Student Representatives discuss the content of the reports on each module with
the Module Leader before submitting it to the Board of Study.




                                                 Page 24
8.4 Training for Student Representatives
A training course is provided to meet the needs of newly elected representatives, giving you all the
information you need to carry out your role and providing skills training in communication,
presentation, teambuilding etc. We encourage you to take this course since we wish you to be effective
and professional representatives. Details about the training course are normally provided by the School
at the beginning of Semester 1.




                                               Page 25
9. Computing Facilities

The School has its own specialist teaching laboratories on the 6th and 7th floors of the James Parsons
Building. All equipment is networked locally and to the University's main network. Each laboratory is
normally open during term time from 9.00am - 9.00pm Monday to Thursday, and from 9.00am -
5.00pm on Fridays. Out of term time the hours are 9.00am - 5.00pm Monday to Friday.

All these laboratories are supervised by Technicians based in room 724 or 618. If you have any
problems when using the machines then just ask a Technician.

CMS students are also major uses of the University Central Computer Service. There are laboratories
on the third floor of the James Parsons Building and PCs can also be used in the learning resource
centres: Aldham Robarts Centre (known as ARC1), Avril Robarts Centre (known as ARC2) and I M
Marsh.

A private study room 643 equipped with network connection points is designated for the use of
Masters students (also suitable for group/team work and seminars), and a general purpose study area
for all students is available on the 7th floor, located near the School‟s computing laboratories.

Misuse of Computing Facilities
Access to, and use of, computing resources by the user is at the discretion of the Director of Computer
Services or his representative. The user registration is given to you so that you can use the computing
facilities of the University for bona fide use arising from the course of study that you are undertaking.
Students who get involved in hacking, inappropriate use of electronic mail etc will be disciplined – this
could involve withdrawal of computing facilities or you may even be required to leave the course.




                                                Page 26
10. Learning Resource Centre

For details of Learning Resource Centres, University Computing facilities and the services they offer,
please refer to:
   The University‟s booklet, "JMU Lifelines" or
   The Learning and Information Services (http://cwis.livjm.ac.uk/lea/) Section in the University for
    information on the library service or
   The Computing and Information Services (http://cwis.livjm.ac.uk/cis/) in the University for
    information on the University‟s computing services.
You can search the library‟s catalogue and reserve books using the LION                       system,
http://whirly.livjm.ac.uk/lionweb.htm.




                                               Page 27
11. People Who Can Help You - Who’s Who?

11.1 Academic Staff
Module Leader
The Module Leader organises the teaching and assessment for a particular module. If you have a
query about the teaching, academic content or your marks for the module you will probably be able to
resolve the difficulty by consulting him/her.

Course Tutor
The Programme Leader carries overall academic responsibility for all aspects of the management and
supervision of your course. Your current Course Tutor is Dr. Rubem Pereira and the Deputy Tutor is
Dr Claude Ghaoui.

Project Tutor
The project tutor, Dr Abir Hussain, is responsible for the management of the project phase of the
course.

Group Leader (or Subject Leader)
The modules run by the School are split into three subject groups. The leaders and their groups are as
follows:

          Dr David England          Computer Systems
          Mrs Sandi Duffy           Information Systems Development
          Dr Dave Pountney          Mathematics & Statistics

Director of School
The Director of the School is available to you, for consultation when you have not been able to resolve
a problem satisfactorily by talking to leaders or tutors.

The Director of the School is: Prof. Madjid Merabti.

UMF Manager
The UMF Manager is responsible for, amongst other things, the overall co-ordination of UMF
programmes, the organisation of curriculum delivery and advising Programme Leaders and Module
Leaders on the UMF. The School‟s UMF Manager is Mr Abdennour El-Rhalibi.

11.2 Administrative Staff
The administrative staff for the School are based mainly in room 703B and include the following
people:

Ms Maria Morris                     Team Leader
Mr Tom Bailey                       Information Officer
Mrs Loretta Gomm                    MSc Administrator
Mrs Lucy Wilson                     Recruitment & Admissions Officer
Ms Carol Oliver                     Director‟s Secretary

It is the job of the staff to provide help, support and advice to all our students, so please remember - do
not hesitate to ask - if we can‟t help you, we will know a man who can! Details of staff room numbers,
telephone numbers and e-mails can be found from the School web site: www.cms.ac.uk.




                                                 Page 28
12. Welfare

For details of the University's advice and support services, please refer to the University booklet "JMU
Lifelines". The Student Welfare Services section of the University‟s website
(http://cwis.livjm.ac.uk/welfare/) also has relevant information.
Some information on student advice and support is provided in the subsections below.

12.1 Student Counselling Service
Anxious? F Confused? F Lonely? F Depressed?
The Student Counselling Service provides a professional and confidential service to assist you in your
personal and/or academic concerns.
IT‟S GOOD TO TALK




To make an appointment with a student counsellor, call or write to:
Counselling Service
Rodney House
70 Mount Pleasant
Liverpool
L3 5UX Telephone: (0151) 231 3153
Or visit the web page at http://www.livjm.ac.uk/counselling
Counselling sessions are held by appointment at the James Parsons Building, Byrom Street, on
Thursdays from 9 am – 5 pm. A drop in service operates from 1 – 2 pm daily, during the Semester.


12.2 Welfare/Financial Advice
Student Loans  Housing  DSS benefits  Childcare
or any other financial matter causing concern
Welfare advice is available all year, Monday to Friday at Charlie Robertson Building, Rodney House,
Mount Pleasant, telephone (0151) 231 3564, either by appointment or „drop in‟ or alternatively on the
Ground Floor of Byrom Street on Thursdays between 2.00pm - 4.30pm (semester time only).
The Welfare Funds Office, Rodney House, Mount Pleasant is open from 9.30 am – 4.00 pm, Monday
to Friday.
Visit the Student Welfare Services Web Pages at http://www.livjm.ac.uk/pws/studwel/ for advice on
Fees and Loans.


All advice is free, impartial and confidential.

12.3 Ecumenical Chaplaincy
         The Ecumenical Chaplaincy Centre is at
         Roscoe Court, 6 Rodney Street
         Telephone: (0151-231-3171)




                                                  Page 29
It is staffed at lunch times (12.30 – 2.00 pm) during semesters by one of the Chaplaincy Team

The major Christian Churches and the University have appointed four Chaplains to JMU. The
Chaplains work as a team and are available to members of the University community of all faiths and
none. They can offer friendly and confidential support and can put you in touch with other agencies
and individuals who can help make your time in JMU as trouble-free and enjoyable as possible.
Feel free to contact them at the centre number or at their individual numbers. Or visit
http://www.livjm.ac.uk/chaplaincy/
The Chaplains are:
Rev David Flavell (Methodist) 0151-733 7117
Rev Bob Dickinson (Church of England) 0151-722-1625
Fr Chris McCoy (Roman Catholic) 0151-709-8069
John Scott (United Reform Church) 0151-475 5060
 Please contact us any time 

12.4 Medical Services
The Liverpool John Moores University Health Service aims to provide you with access to healthcare at
convenient times.
Medical Centre - James Parsons Building
The Medical Centre based in the James Parsons building, Byrom Street site, is situated on the ground
floor, Phase 1. Tel: 0151 231 2003.




Doctors are available on the following days at the following times:
Doctor Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday 1.00pm - 2.00pm
Nurse Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday 9.00am - 3.30pm
In addition to the above there are two other Medical Centres and these are manned at the following
times:
Charlie Robertson Medical Centre, Rodney House, 70 Mount Pleasant:
Tel: 0151-231-3319
Doctor: Monday, Wednesday & Friday 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Nurse: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday & Friday 9.30am - 3.30pm
IM Marsh Medical Centre:
Tel: 0151-231-5233
Doctors Tuesday, Friday 8.30am - 9.30am
Nurses Monday, Wednesday 9.30am - 3.00pm
Tuesday, Friday 8.30am - 3.00pm
Thursday 9.30am - 4.30pm
Appointments for Sports Injuries and Rehabilitation Clinic.




                                                Page 30
The staff on site are concerned that every student should be properly cared for and during term time
offer a wide range of services such as:

   advice on healthy living
   advice on contraception
   cervical smears
   medicals for sporting activities etc.
   vaccination and immunizations
   weekly wart clinic
   blood samples
   asthma management and assessment
   Physiotherapy

Doctors are also available at their surgery by appointment:
29 Greenbank Road (off Smithdown Road), Liverpool, L18 Tel: (0151) 733 3224
9.00 am – 10 am and 4.00 pm – 5.45 pm (except Thursday pm or weekends)




                                                Page 31
13. Students Union

Liverpool Students‟ Union (LSU as many know it) is your union, based in the Haigh Building on
Maryland Street. (Mount Pleasant Campus).
LSU is made up of over 80 full time staff who are devoted to looking after you and the student
community. Every year in March thirteen students are elected by you the students to form an Executive
Committee. Six of these people then take a year away from their studies to become Sabbatical Officers
(Sabbs) who are paid to work full time for the LSU. The remaining seven officers work for LSU on a
part time basis alongside their studies. The main role of this team is Student Representation, that is
to ensure that JMU students get the best possible deal at all times. The President leads a team of five
Vice Presidents who take responsibility for Academic Affairs, Communications and Media, Equal
Opportunities, Recreation and Resources and Welfare. The seven part time officers include two
General Executive officers, the Disabled Rights Officer, the Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Officer, the
Mature Students Officer, the Race Equality Officer, and the Women‟s Officer.
LSU has representation on all of the university‟s decision-making committees, so students really can
influence the way JMU develops and operates. This involvement means that all matters that are of
concern to students are given a voice in JMU and that more importantly, the students‟ needs are
addressed.
The Executive Committee is held to account by the Liverpool Students‟ Union Council or Council as
it known. The council is made up of reps from each of the schools who meet about once a month. The
Council Reps are also elected in March each year. For more information contact the President on
(0151) 231 4900.
The Haigh is the main SU centre – and although the building is small we house a lot inside it! Our
facilities include Scholars- a traditional style pub which serves bar meals at lunch time, The Cooler –
eating, drinking and dancing venue, and The Student Shop – which caters for all your needs, from
sandwiches, drinks and snacks, to stationary and magazines etc.
More importantly, in addition to the commercial arm of LSU we also offer a job finding service called
Unitemp which can help you in finding part time work whilst in Liverpool. We also provide a free,
confidential Student Information and Advice Centre (SIAC).
We also have banking facilities and meeting rooms for students to use.
Course Reps
Course representatives are the vital link between JMU, LSU and ultimately, the student body.
Students from each level of every programme are required to have course reps and although the
method by which reps are appointed may differ from course to course, the nature of the position will
remain similar across the board.
Course reps are the first and the closest point of contact for students wishing to raise concerns or
opinions about their education or the university. They may do this through School meetings, which
may be Staff Student Liaison Committees or Board of Study Meetings.
A Course Rep is expected to be the voice, eyes and ears for the students in his or her group and should
try to remedy problems on their behalf.
Course Reps are offered a short training session by LSU in which they will learn more about their role
and how to deal with it. This training will help reps to perform their job effectively for the year as well
as providing the reps with invaluable skills that will certainly enhance their CV.
Information about Course Reps can be obtained from your lecturer, school office or the Vice President
(Academic Affairs) at LSU. Alternatively, you can click on the LSU website - „Your Union‟,
„Representation‟, then Course Reps for more info.
Student Media




                                                 Page 32
„Liverpool Student‟ is a free fortnightly newspaper written in collaboration with the other two
institutions in Liverpool. Writers come from the student body and the readership is 40,000+. If you
want to get involved contact the editor on (0151) 231 4937.
In addition, LSU also produces „AIR‟ which is available from most JMU sites fortnightly. „AIR‟ is
written by the Sabbatical officers and keeps an eye on local issues, including a „what‟s on‟ guide for
the week.
LSU also has it‟s own radio station – ShoutFM – which again is run by students for students. If you
want to get involved contact them on (0151) 231 4945/4946.
Clubs and Societies
There are many Clubs and Societies run by LSU. And if we don‟t have one you fancy, you can always
make up your own! You can contact the Vice President (Recreation and Resources) for more
information on (0151) 231 4900.
Information and Advice Centre
Students may find that they have difficulties whether personal, academic or financial whilst at
university. Both JMU‟s Student Welfare Service (see Support Services at the University Website) and
LSU‟s Student Information and Advice Centre (SIAC) are there to act as a safety net for you all.
JMU Welfare        (0151) 231 3168
SIAC               (0151) 231 4900
SIAC advisors are all professional advisers and the service is free and totally confidential and non-
judgemental. If you need help – come into the Advice Centre on the 1st floor of the Haigh Building.
Unitemp – Student Employment Service
Should you find that you need a part-time job whilst at university or during your vacations you can use
Unitemp. The service is free and is exclusively for JMU students. Located on the first floor of the
Haigh Building, why not pop in and take a look?
B2 Health Club
B2 is situated in the St Nicholas Centre opposite the John Foster Building on Mount Pleasant and
includes 2 sports halls, dance studio, solaria, sports injury clinic, relaxation lounge and the B2 fitness
suite containing high tech fitness equipment and MTV. In addition, highly trained staff are on hand to
help you out.
Leisure Services
The Leisure Services Team gives you the opportunity to learn a new sport or play in non-competitive
leagues that usually take place on a Wednesday afternoon. Why not take a look on CWIS for the LSU
website for further details




                                                 Page 33
14. General Issues

14.1 Access to the James Parsons Building
The main building is open 24 hours a day and is only closed on Christmas and Boxing days. For access
to the building outside normal hours, you will need a letter of authorisation. For this you should
approach your level tutor.

14.2 Car Parking
Students must not park cars or motorcycles on University premises at any time, except as indicated
below. Cars parked without passes are likely to be clamped.
Student are officially allowed to use the Byrom Street site after 4.30pm and only if you have been
issued with a Type C permit. This permit is free of charge and will also give you access to parking at
certain other sites. There is also special parking arrangement for disabled students. For further details
on parking and application for a parking permit contact: Gaynor Singleton, Tel: (0151) 231 2556.

14.3 Student Lockers
These are available in the School for an annual charge. For further details see the noticeboard.

14.4 Noticeboards and Email
Numerous noticeboards are situated on the 7th floor and are the most popular way of getting
information to students - but the onus is on you to keep checking the noticeboards for information on
exams, timetables, professional placement information etc.
There is a student noticeboard on the CMS web pages, which is used to post important information to
CMS students. To access it, visit the CMS web pages at http://www.cms.livjm.ac.uk/student/
Important messages may also be sent to you via e-mail, so keep checking it!

14.5 Sickness
If you are sick and unable to attend lectures, you, a relative or family friend should try to inform your
Level Tutor or the Administrative Office on : (0151) 231 2602/2269, particularly if you are likely to be
absent for more than 1 or 2 days.

14.6 Backing up Your Floppy Disks
As a student in the School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences, you will inevitably use electronic
material. Sometimes this material is required to be handed in on floppy disc, more frequently this is
your working copy that will finally be printed for presentation. In both cases the security of this
material is your responsibility and a plea of, "My disk got corrupted and I can‟t read it" is not an
acceptable reason for late or non-submission of work.
The fundamental security precaution that we all must take with any information that we cannot afford
to lose is very simple - we keep a copy by "backing up". Any and all material that you have developed
yourself needs backing up (program source and data files but not semi-compiled and executable files -
they can always be regenerated), spreadsheets, databases and text files
To back up your floppy disks follow the following procedure:
         1. Open File Manager;
         2. Insert disk to be copied into Drive a:\;
         3. Click on Drive a:\;




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        4. Click on Disk from the menu;
        5. Click on Copy Disk;
        6. Follow prompt and insert disk to be copied to.
REMEMBER: Keep at least 2 back up copies of your disk and back up every time you amend your
files. Keep one back up copy at home. Always LABEL your disks with your name, registration number
and file contents.

14.7 Withdrawing from Your Programme
It is important to consult with your Level Tutor, since withdrawal may have important implications.
For further information, please refer to the University booklet "JMU Lifelines".

14.8 Equal Opportunities
The School actively supports the University Equal Opportunities policy and strategy in its underlying
philosophy to value and respect individuals, and its commitment to maximise the potential of each
student.
The School is committed to complying with legislation, in particular the Race Relations Amendment
Act 2000 and the Special Education Needs and Disability Act 2001. If you have any queries please
bring these to the attention of School staff or the University's Senior Adviser Equality Policy &
Development Naseem Anwar (0151-231-3188 ; email N.Anwar@livjm.ac.uk)
For further information, please refer to the University booklet "JMU Lifelines" or the University's
website (http://cwis.livjm.ac.uk/employ/equalOpportunities/).

14.9 Students with Disabilities
Students are requested to identify any disabilities including Dyslexia during the admissions process.
This information is treated as strictly confidential but the University has to be informed, before
learning support can be arranged for you. Following enrolment you should contact the School's
Support Tutor for Students with disability, who will act as internal (and, where appropriate, external)
link in helping you to get the help you need and, with your permission, notify appropriate staff. It is
important that you realise that by not declaring your disability you may be able to receive practical
help available to you and financial support such as the disabled students allowance.

14.10 General Health, Safety and Environmental Notes
Fire Alarm and Fire Drills
On hearing a Fire Alarm :
You Must
-   Evacuate the area towards the nearest Fire exit towards the designated Assembly Point (notified on
    the Fire Notices)
-   Wait in an orderly fashion outside at the Assembly Point until the all clear to renter by the Fire
    Marshall
You MUST NOT
-   Remain in the building
-   Use the lifts whilst the alarm is sounding
-   Attempt to fight a fire
-   Re-enter the building at any point until the Fire Marshall indicates it is safe to do so
Fire Doors




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The University has many doors, which are designed to prevent the passage of smoke and fire from one
area to another and to protect escape routes. These fire doors are a critical safety feature particularly in
a multi-storey building. Staff/students are reminded that it is a criminal offence to misuse items
provided for safety reasons and the propping open of fire doors is prohibited and would be regarded as
being a misuse.
Laboratories
-   Aisles and walkways should be kept clear and all doors giving means of escape in case of fire,
    unlocked and immediately available
-   Place bags on shelves provided or under desk out of way
-   Smoking, eating and drinking is prohibited in all computer labs
-   Please keep the lab tidy, put rubbish in the standard bins and waste paper in the recycle bins
-   Switch off mobile phones
Portable Appliances i.e. Laptops
The owner/user of portable electrical equipment in all respects is responsible for the purchase, use,
testing and maintenance of the equipment. All mains operated privately owned equipment should be
presented before use for inspection/test or else removed from the University.
IT Equipment
The School of CMS has many IT appliances most using 240V 13amp supply. Do not move, tamper or
misuse any of the equipment , anyone seen doing so will be asked to leave the lab/room.
For further information on these and other safety codes please visit http://cwis.livjm.ac.uk/hse/New-
Era/contents.htm.




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15. Appendix A: Student Responsibilities in Respect of
    Examinations

1.    All students must be aware of the UMF Assessment Regulations and Procedures.
2.    All students must ensure that they are registered correctly for all modules in which they are to be
      assessed. Failure to do so could preclude a student from assessment.
3.    Students who, because of disabilities, require special arrangements (e.g. additional time or special
      equipment) for examinations are required to notify his/her School Office at the beginning of the
      academic year. Medical evidence will be required.
4.    It is the responsibility of the student to check the draft examination timetable and report any
      clashes immediately. When the final timetable is published, the student must ensure that s/he is
      aware of the date, time and location of all his/her examinations.
5.    The student must display his/her University identification card throughout all examinations.
6.    The student is required to sign an attendance slip at each examination, ensuring that his/her name
      and registration number is shown clearly on the form. This will be collected by the invigilator
      early during the examination.
7.    The module leader will give four weeks notice of what materials may be taken into the
      examination. It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that s/he is equipped with the
      appropriate permitted materials or equipment. Also, the student is responsible for providing
      his/her own copies of particular texts which are allowed into the examination but are not provided
      by the School.
8.    A candidate may be admitted after the start of the examination if no unaccompanied candidate
      has, by that time, left the examination room. No additional time will be allowed for late
      candidates, and s/he will be required to finish the examination at the same time as all the other
      candidates. The late candidate must complete an attendance slip prior to commencing the
      examination. The invigilator will note the time of arrival and the reasons for lateness on the
      candidates script.
9.    Examination candidates who wish to ask a question or require extra paper must not leave their
      seat. S/he must attract the attention of the invigilator by raising his/her hand.
10.   Candidates must not distract other candidates in any way. If an invigilator believes that a
      candidate is causing a disturbance to other candidates in the room, s/he has the authority to
      require that candidate to leave the examination. Normally one warning will be issued and a
      record to the warning made. If this is not heeded, the candidate will be instructed to leave. A
      written report of this incident will be submitted to the Chair of the Module Assessment Board.
11.   A candidate will not normally be permitted to leave during an examination of one and half hours
      duration or less. When examinations are for longer than one and a half hours, candidates must
      not leave during the first sixty minutes or the last thirty minutes of the examination. Any
      candidate who wishes to leave before the end of the examination must first attract the attention of
      the invigilator by raising her/her hand.
12.   Once a candidate has left the examination early, s/he will not be permitted to re-enter the
      examination room. A candidate may leave the examination room temporarily for sickness or
      other valid reasons provided that s/he is accompanied by an invigilator or member of the
      University staff.
13.   A candidate who refuses to obey the instructions of an invigilator shall be deemed guilty of a
      breach of discipline. The matter will be reported to the Vice-Chancellor or his/her nominee
      before the paper is marked. The Vice-Chancellor/nominee will determine the course of action.
14.   If, during the examination, the alarm is sounded following a fire or bomb alert, candidates will be
      instructed by the Chief Invigilator to vacate the room as quickly as possible. The candidate
      should leave his/her script on the desk for collection by the invigilators after the all clear. The
      examination will not be resumed.
15.   It is the responsibility of the student to inform, in writing, either to the Director of the School or
      the person nominated to accept claims of mitigating circumstances as soon as possible, and prior
      to the meeting of the Assessment Board, of illness or other circumstances which may have




                                                  Page 37
affected his/her performance in the assessment, or the reason for his/her absence from assessment
or assessments. Where applicable an appropriate certificate must be provided at the earliest
opportunity. Post-dated medical certificates will not normally be accepted and students are
strongly advised to visit a Doctor at the time of any illness, and not after the event. Students are
assured that claims of mitigating circumstances will be treated with appropriate sensitivity and
confidentiality.




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16. Appendix B: Academic Impropriety

The University assessment regulations state:

Academic impropriety is deemed to cover cheating, attempt to cheat, plagiarism, collusion and any
other attempts to gain an unfair advantage in assessments including written examinations.

The following definitions have been agreed:

Cheating includes:

   Communicating with or copying from any other student during an invigilated examination.

   Communicating during an invigilated examination with any person other than a properly
    authorised invigilator or another authorised member of staff.

   Introducing any written or printed material into the room where the invigilated examination is
    taking place unless expressly permitted by the Assessment Board or regulations of the programme
    of study.

   Introducing any electronically stored information into the room where the invigilated examination
    is taking place unless expressly permitted by the Assessment Board or regulations of the
    programme of study.

   Gaining access to unauthorised material during or before an assessment.

   In any other way the provision or assistance in the provision of false evidence of knowledge or
    understanding in assessments.

Plagiarism includes:

The representation of work, written or otherwise, of any other person, including another student, or any
institution, as the candidate‟s own. Examples of plagiarism may be as follows:

   The verbatim copying of another‟s work without acknowledgement.

   The close paraphrasing of another‟s work by simply changing a few words or altering the order of
    presentation, without acknowledgement.

   Unacknowledged quotation of phrases from another‟s work.

   The deliberate and detailed presentation of another‟s concept as one‟s own.

Collusion includes:

The conscious collaboration, without official approval, between two or more students in the
preparation and production of work which is ultimately submitted by each in an identical or
substantially similar form and/or is represented by each to be the product of his or her individual
efforts. Collusion also occurs where there is unauthorised co-operation between student and another
person in the preparation and production of work which is presented as the student‟s own.

It is the responsibility of the student to be aware that such instances constitute a serious offence.




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It is the responsibility of the student to take reasonable precautions to guard against unauthorised
access by others to his/her work, both before and after assessment.




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17. Appendix C: Module Specifications
Module details are available at the following web sites:

http://activeweb.livjm.ac.uk/modcat/

or

http://www.cms.livjm.ac.uk/courses/postgrad.htm




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