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					unit_num                   unit_name




FIT1001 Computer systems




FIT1002 Computer programming
FIT1003 IT in organisations




FIT1004 Data management
FIT1005 Networks and data communications




FIT1006 Business information analysis
FIT1008 Introduction to computer science




FIT1010 Introduction to software engineering
FIT1011 Web systems 1




FIT1012 Website authoring




FIT1013 IT for business




FIT1016 Advanced project level 1
FIT1028 Business information technology and systems




FIT1029 Algorithmic problem solving
FIT1030 Introduction to business information systems




FIT1031 Computers and networks




FIT1033 Foundations of 3D




FIT1034 Principles of computer graphics
FIT1035 Digital media authoring




FIT1036 Enterprises and information




FIT1037 Information management




FIT1038 Introduction to information technology
FIT1039 Web systems




FIT2001 Systems development
FIT2002 Project management




FIT2003 IT professional practice
FIT2004 Algorithms and data structures




FIT2005 Software analysis, design and architecture
FIT2006 Business process modelling and workflow




FIT2008 Networks and data communications
FIT2009 Data structures and algorithms




FIT2010 Database




FIT2011 Decision support systems fundamentals
FIT2012 Flash animation and applications




FIT2013 e-Business software technologies
FIT2014 Theory of computation




FIT2015 Foundations of 3D
FIT2017 Computer models for business decision making




FIT2018 Network and systems administration
FIT2019 Network standards and specifications




FIT2020 Network architecture




FIT2024 Software engineering practice
FIT2026 Sound and video studio




FIT2027 Systems design and implementation




FIT2028 Web systems 2
FIT2029 Web programming




FIT2032 Industry-based learning
FIT2033 Computer models for business decisions




FIT2034 Computer programming 2
FIT2043 Technical documentation for software engineers




FIT2044 Advanced project level 2




FIT2049 Games programming with C++
FIT2052 Electronic business
FIT2055 Web content management
FIT2065 Operating systems and the Unix environment




FIT2069 Computer architecture




FIT2070 Operating systems
FIT2071 Algorithms and data structures with C++




FIT2072 Educational multimedia




FIT2073 Game design and narrative




FIT2074 Technology, information and organisations
FIT2075 Information strategies and systems development




FIT2076 Web-database interface




FIT2077 Database design
FIT2078 Introduction to security




FIT2079 Information graphics
FIT2080 Information architecture




FIT3001 Advanced 3D




FIT3002 Applications of data mining
FIT3003 Business intelligence and data warehousing




FIT3008 Advanced digital video
FIT3009 e-Business systems




FIT3011 Enterprise programming




FIT3013 Formal specification for software engineering
FIT3015 Industrial experience project




FIT3019 Information systems management




FIT3020 Information visualisation
FIT3021 Infrastructure for e-commerce




FIT3022 Intelligent decision support systems
FIT3023 Interactive environments




FIT3027 Mobile middleware




FIT3028 Multimedia concepts and application
FIT3031 Information and network security




FIT3033 Principles of educational multimedia
FIT3036 Computer science project




FIT3037 Software engineering
FIT3039 Studio 1




FIT3040 Studio 2




FIT3042 System tools and programming languages
FIT3043 Web systems 3




FIT3044 Advanced website authoring




FIT3045 Industry-based learning
FIT3046 Operating environments




FIT3047 Industrial experience project




FIT3048 Industrial experience project
FIT3051 Decision support systems for finance




FIT3056 Secure and trusted software systems
FIT3060 Service oriented computing




FIT3063 Human-computer interaction




FIT3072 Managing business records
FIT3077 Software engineering: architecture and design




FIT3080 Intelligent systems
FIT3081 Image processing




FIT3086 Project management
FIT3088 Computer graphics




FIT3094 AI for gaming
FIT3095 Creating narrative in multimedia




FIT3098 Social informatics




FIT3099 Knowledge management
FIT3101 B2C internet commerce




FIT3104 Chinese language information technology




FIT3105 Security and identity management




FIT3107 Advanced programming for database applications




FIT3118 Database design and administration
FIT3121 Archival systems




FIT3122 Information and knowledge management systems




FIT3123 Information access




FIT3124 Professional practice




FIT3125 Information organisation
FIT3126 Applications with C++




FIT3128 Database systems design
FIT3130 Computer network design and deployment




FIT3134 IT-based entrepreneurship
FIT3135 Commercial experience in multimedia systems




FIT3136 IT governance and strategy for business
FIT3138 Real time enterprise systems




FIT3139 Computational science
FIT3140 Advanced programming




FIT3141 Data communications and computer networks
FIT3142 Distributed computing




FIT3143 Parallel computing
FIT3144 Advanced computer science project




FIT3145 Games engine programming
FIT3146 Emergent technologies and interfaces




FIT3147 Managing data




FIT3148 Cases in information and technology
FIT3149 Network administration




FIT4000 Honours thesis extension




FIT4002 Software engineering studio project
FIT4004 System validation and verification, quality and standards




FIT4005 IT research methods
FIT4007 Advanced topics in information systems




FIT4008 Reading unit




FIT4009 Advanced topics in intelligent systems




FIT4010 Advanced topics in algorithms and discrete structures
FIT4012 Advanced topics in computational science




FIT4015 Digital communications technology and protocols




FIT4016 Information security
FIT4017 Network management




FIT4033 Object oriented application programming in C++




FIT4037 Case study




FIT4038 Database management and implementation




FIT4039 Handheld applications and operating systems
FIT4041 Web development




FIT4126 Honours thesis




FIT4186 Honours thesis
FIT4246 Honours thesis




FIT4441 Honours thesis part 1
FIT4442 Honours thesis part 2




FIT4443 Honours thesis part 3
FIT4444 Honours thesis final




FIT4448 Honours thesis final
FIT4606 Honours thesis
                                    Synopsis_str
Synopsis
This unit will introduce students to basic computer hardware and operating systems
software with emphasis on the concepts
required to understand the low-level and internal operations of computer systems. In
particular, this includes study of data
representation, simple digital logic, computer organisation including CPU, memory
and input/output devices, as well as system
software and operating system concepts. The intention is to provide opportunities
for students to relate the hardware
knowledge covered in this unit to the concepts learned in their introductory
programming and systems analysis classes and to
give a more complete understanding of how hardware and software are used to build
systems. This provides opportunities for




Synopsis
This unit will provide students with an overview of programming and its role in
problem-solving and strategies for meeting
user requirements and for designing solutions to programming problems. The
fundamental programming concepts of the memory
model, data types, declarations, expressions and statements, control structures,
block structure, modules, parameters and
input and output will be applied within the context of objects, attributes, methods,
re-use, information-hiding,
encapsulation and message-passing. Software engineering topics include
maintainability, readability, testing, documentation
and modularisation.
Synopsis
The unit will provide students with an introduction and broad overview of the
application of IT to the management of
information in organisations, and the role of the IT professional in developing and
implementing IT-based solutions to
information problems. The discussion of the organisational framework for IT and IT
professional practice will be set within
its broader social context. The opportunities, problems and risks associated with IT
will be examined, together with their
implications for the rights and responsibilities of IT professionals.




Synopsis
This unit will provide an introduction to the concepts of database design and usage
and the related issues of data
management. Students will develop skills in planning, designing, and implementing a
data model using an enterprise-scale
relational database system (Oracle). Methods and techniques will also be presented
to populate, retrieve, update and
implement integrity features on data in the implemented database system.
Manipulation of a database necessarily raises issues of data collection/ creation
and management, data rights (ownership,
copyright, access, privacy etc) and data curation, which this unit will also
address.
Synopsis
This unit introduces students to fundamentals of distributed networked environment.
It provides knowledge of internetworking
standards and understanding of the networking architecture, technology and
operation.




Synopsis
This unit is designed to give students an introduction to statistical and
quantitative methods within a business-related
framework and to provide students with a sound foundation for more advanced
statistical and quantitative studies. The unit
will provide opportunities for the student to gain skills in the presentation of
business and economic data, the use of
frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and dispersion, principles of
probability, use of probability
distributions, sampling theory, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression analysis,
the use of indices and forecasting
methods.
Synopsis
This unit introduces students to core problem-solving, analytical skills, and
methodologies useful for developing flexible,
robust, and maintainable software. In doing this it covers a range of conceptual
levels, from high level algorithms and
data-structures, down to abstract machine models and simple assembly language
programming. Topics include data structures;
algorithms; object-oriented design and programming; and abstract machines.




Synopsis
This unit provides an introduction to the discipline of Software Engineering. The
emphasis is upon a broad coverage of the
areas, since students will at this early stage not have adequate programming skills
to tackle many of the topics in greater
depth. The notion of a software system as a model or approximation of a desired
system is introduced, and used as a way of
describing such things as the software life cycle and its various models,
programming by contract, design and testing issues,
maintenance, reuse, complexity, divide and conquer strategies, metrics and
measurement, project management and software
legacy.
Synopsis
Brief introduction to the physical structure of the Internet. W3C and its role.
Document markup. Hypertext. Elements of web
pages: text, graphics, media. Design with and implementation of: lists, tables,
frames, layers, cascading style sheets. Web
graphics: vector and bitmap images, image constraints, digitising images, basic
graphic design. Plug-ins. Multimedia. Web
page design principles. Elements of visual design. Form design and implementation.
Site development life cycle. Legal and
ethical considerations. Introduction to ASP.Net Introduction to Wireless. WAP 2.0
and XHTML-MP. WAP CSS / WCSS.WCSS
properties. WCSS Extensions




Synopsis
This unit will develop the basic concepts of website authoring, from design to
implementation. Students will develop skills
in creating digital content which is authored to deal with the particular issues of
web publishing. The unit will examine
HTML/XHTML, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), the W3C Document Object Model (DOM) and
JavaScript as the fundamental website
authoring suite. Also skills for incorporating images, audio and video into websites
will be covered. In addition HTML
embedded script languages, will be used to create dynamic database driven content.
The unit will also introduce wider W3C
standards, web usability and web design specification.

Synopsis
Introduction to business application tools and introduction to basic computing
concepts. Principles of spreadsheets and
relational databases, covering their use for the generation of business plans,
reports, financial statements, etc. Both the
spreadsheet and database components incorporate an introduction to programming with
visual basic for applications (VBA). The
database component covers principles of database design. The business application
software packages used in the unit are
Microsoft Excel and Microsoft Access.

Synopsis
This unit introduces students to a variety of topics outside the curriculum, and
provides an opportunity to write programs
(or, rarely, to build hardware) in an area of interest to the student and the
School. The subject operates in an informal
manner, and the programming tasks are designed to be interesting and challenging to
advanced students. Students will
typically meet with their supervisor on a weekly basis and in addition to
demonstrating the results of their project, they
will also give an oral presentation.
Synopsis
This unit introduces students to the value of information within today's society and
the critical role played by information
technology to gather, generate, store, process and distribute information. The unit
will familarise students with hardware,
operating systems, business-oriented software such as spreadsheets and databases,
systems development, decision making,
networks, communication, the Internet, e-commerce and recent developments in the
World Wide Web. Students will be given the
opportunity to develop their own information systems using common tools such as
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Access and Mashup
editor tools.



Synopsis
Algorithms are recipes for solving a problem. They are fundamental to computer
science and software engineering. Algorithms
are the formal foundation of computer programming but also exist independently of
computers as systematic problem-solving
procedures. This unit introduces algorithmics, the study of algorithms. It is not
about programming and coding but rather
about understanding and analysing algorithms and about algorithmic problem-solving,
i.e. the design of systematic
problem-solving procedures. The unit is very hands-on and students will develop
algorithms to solve a wide variety of
different problems, working individually as well as together in groups and as a
class.
The unit will not require any knowledge of a programming language. The initial
instruction will be performed independently of
any programming language and only use simple pseudo-code that will be developed from
scratch in the unit. Various means of
visualising algorithm execution (manipulating sets of tangible physical object,
using turtle graphics, using algorithm
visualisations) will be employed to enable the students to trace the execution of
algorithms and to complement their formal
understanding with an intuitive understanding. Later stages of the unit will make
use of the coding knowledge developed in
FIT1002 to demonstrate how pseudo-code algorithms can be mapped to concrete
programs.
Topics include: What is a computational problem and what is an algorithm; Basic
control structures; basic data structures;
Modular Algorithm Structure; Recursion; Problem-solving strategies for algorithm
development; Arguing correctness of an
algorithm; Arguing termination of an algorithm; Understanding the efficiency of an
algorithm; and Limitations of algorithms.
Synopsis
This unit is aimed at providing the students with an overall knowledge of business
organisations and their structure. The
unit will cover all the steps from business strategy to operational planning and
financial systems. The internal processes of
a business organisation will be described with an emphasis on how they work together
to achieve the financial and physical
goals of the business.
Accounting information systems and the systems for the processing and recording of
business transactions, inventory, sales,
purchasing and financial reporting will be described in detail. Tutorial exercises
using commercial software will take
students through the operational steps of sales, purchasing and deliveries and then
produce the main financial statements for
the organisation.
A range of new management concepts and tools such as process oriented organisations,




Synopsis
This unit introduces students to fundamentals of computer systems and networks. It
provides basic knowledge of computer
organisation and architecture, operating systems, and networking architecture,
technology and operation.




Synopsis
This unit is an introduction to the techniques, frameworks and conceptual processes
comprising 3D modelling and 3D imaging.
Foundations of 3D aims to give students an understanding of the basic concepts of 3D
modelling by developing skills in 3D
model creation for a variety of contexts, including prototyping, visualisation and
games. Students will communicate their
knowledge of 3D theory and put into practice this knowledge through the production
of designs that demonstrate geometrical
modelling, texture mapping, virtual lighting techniques, camera positioning, and
rendering procedures.


Synopsis
This unit will introduce students to the underlying principles of computer graphics
in games. Relevant mathematics will be
covered, with focus on vectors and matrices. This theory will be placed into the
games context and put into practice in a
game engine environment. This will provide a foundation for the manipulation of
graphics and content in future games
programming classes and development.
Synopsis
This unit provides a focus on specialist tools and techniques that are used for
developing content-rich interactive
multimedia systems using Adobe Flash. This unit will cover fundamental multimedia
principles and best practice theory, the
application of practical development processes, the integration of mixed-media
assets, interactive design and ActionScript
programming for digital media and different technologies for product deployment.
Students will create content-rich
interactive applications and/or web-based products using an industry standard
authoring tool, Adobe Flash, and will gain an
understanding of the role of digital media within the broader technology
environment.




Synopsis
This unit examines the nature of the information needs of organisations, groups and
individuals, and the ways in which
IT-based systems support them. The main focus of the unit will be on organizational
needs for IT-based systems and
information management, but it will also consider the wider social context for
issues relating to information and IT usage.
The changing hopes and expectations of what IT and information can offer to assist
the enterprise will be a particular focus
of attention. This will provide the basis for consideration of the range of roles
required of the IT professional in
developing and implementing IT-based solutions to information problems.


Synopsis
This unit introduces fundamental concepts in information, and examines their
implications for the use of IT-based systems
that manage information. The management of information is a major area of concern
for any organisation as it seeks to meet
its objectives. The unit examines a variety of approaches to the creation,
representation, storage, access, retrieval, and
use of information, and the practical contribution of information management (IM) as
a discipline to the achievement of such
tasks. Particular emphasis will be placed upon the consequences for these practices
of information-seeking behaviour by
users, as well as the application of a range of popular IM tools and techniques
commonly used when addressing the information
Synopsis
This unit provides an introduction to information technology architecture. It gives
broad coverage of a range of different
devices used to build an IT infrastructure for an organisation. For each device, its
usage, functionality, internal
architecture and connectivity will be explored. The exploration will enable students
to see the relevance of different
devices to the overall solution provided by an ICT infrastructure.
Synopsis
This unit is the first core unit in the BITS Applications development major, which
aims to teach students the technical and
development process skills required for the development of IT-based application
systems. The unit aims to provide a broad
introduction to the process and tasks of applications development by giving students
practical experience in the development
of a small application system. The unit uses the world-wide web as a development
platform for this application.
The unit will introduce students to the key web technologies, and examine the way in
which their features and characteristics
affect the development processes required to build application systems. It will
introduce students to a number of key
techniques required in systems development, and the knowledge and skills required to
apply them effectively. This examination
of the specific features of the web as a development environment will be used to
highlight the broader needs and issues in
the systems development process which will be addressed in subsequent units in the
major.
The emphasis throughout the unit will be on providing a broad overview of a range of
Synopsis
This unit will provide students with an introduction to systems development using an
agile development approach. The unit
will focus on the application of UML models to the analysis and design of a system.
The unit will introduce students to the
nature of systems analysis and design as a problem-solving activity, describe the
key elements of analysis and design, and
explain the place of the analysis and design phases within the an agile development
life cycle. The unit will introduce
students to the nature of modelling as an analytical and a communicative process.
Major topics include: Agile development and the role of prototyping in systems
development, user interface design, domain
modelling with UML class diagrams, process modelling with use-case diagrams, use-
case driven development and testing,
use-case realisation with sequence diagrams, requirements gathering and the
implementation and support phases of systems
development.
Synopsis
This unit provides both a theoretical and practical overview of processes involved
in successfully managing medium to large
scale projects undertaken by organisations operating within various industry
sectors. Even though, this unit makes references
to projects common to the information technology industry, the principles are
equally applied to non-IT related projects.
Examples and mini-cases illustrating project management issues experienced by
various sectors (e.g. construction, business,
defence) are cited. Typical topics include the project life cycle, problem
definition, project evaluation, high and low level
planning using such techniques as networking, gantt charts and resource levelling,
team building and people management,
contract management, ethical and security issues, project monitoring and control,
reporting and communication, termination
and assessment.




Synopsis
This unit provides a practical and theoretical introduction to what it means to be
an IT professional today. Students will
encounter a range of issues relevant to professional practice in the workplace, as
well as an understanding of the wider
responsibilities that professionals are called upon to uphold in society. Topics
addressed include: organisational and
professional communication; teamwork; the nature of the IT professions; the role of
professional associations; problem
solving and information use; cross-cultural awareness; personal and professional
ethics and codes of practice.
Synopsis
This unit introduces students to problem solving concepts and techniques fundamental
to the science of programming. In doing
this it covers problem specification, algorithmic design, analysis and
implementation. Detailed topics include analysis of
best, average and worst-case time and space complexity; introduction to numerical
algorithms; recursion; advanced data
structures such as heaps and B-trees; hashing; sorting algorithms; searching
algorithms; graph algorithms; and numerical
computing.




Synopsis
This unit examines object-oriented systems modelling/design in greater depth than
the prerequisite unit. The key disciplines
of the Unified Process will be examined to set a context for analysis and design.
Students will learn about static and
dynamic modelling, and component-based design, using UML. Some common design
patterns will be studied. Some topics about
software architecture are examined. The unit prepares students to be able to design
large systems such as will be implemented
in their final year project unit or after graduation.
Synopsis
With increased globalisation, companies are facing stiffer competition and
successful companies cannot afford to harbour
inefficiencies if they are to be competitive. Furthermore, customers are becoming
more demanding. Business processes must be
designed to ensure that they are effective and meet customer requirements. A well-
designed process will improve efficiency
and deliver greater productivity.
This unit will survey the analytical tools that can be used to model, analyse,
understand and design business processes.
Students will also gain hands-on experience in using simulation software as a tool
for analysing business processes.
Upon completion of this unit students should have acquired: an understanding of
business organisations, their functional
structure and the advantage of considering the process oriented view of
organisations; a thorough knowledge of business
processes, their structure and how processes fit in to the overall organisation
objectives; knowledge of the analytical tools
that can be used to model, analyse, understand, and design business processes; and
skills to use simulation software as a
tool for analysing business processes.




Synopsis
This unit will introduce students to fundamentals of distributed networked
environment. The unit provides knowledge of
internetworking standards and understanding of the networking architecture,
technology and operation.
Synopsis
Algorithm analysis. Application and implementation of some common data structures:
stacks, queues, lists, priority queues,
tables, sets and collections. Data representations including: arrays, linked lists,
heaps, trees (including balanced trees)
and hashing. Design of application programs making use of common data structures.
Design and implementation of new data
structures. Study of advanced algorithms in areas such as: graph theory, pattern
searching and data compression. Access to
the University's computer systems through an Internet service provider is compulsory
for off-campus students.




Synopsis
This unit will provide an introduction to the principles and concepts of database
systems their organisation and management.
The issues of physical and logical data description are addressed. Various data
models,and a query language, are introduced.
This will include planning, designing, using and implementing a data model using an
enterprise-scale relational database
system. Methods and techniques will also be presented to populate, retrieve, update
and implement integrity features on data
in the implemented database system.


Synopsis
FIT2011 is the foundation unit for the Decision Making/Decision Support sequence of
units. The unit will introduce the
history of decision support systems (DSS), the types of decision support systems,
the ideas of normative and descriptive
models for decision making and management. Descriptive models of decision making
will be based on behavioral decison theory
and cognitive biases. Evolutionary systems development methods for DSS will be
discussed in detail. Current practice in
personal DSS, data warehousing, and business intelligence will be the underlying
Synopsis
This unit provides a focus on specialist tools and techniques that are used for
developing content-rich interactive
multimedia systems using Adobe Flash. This unit will cover fundamental multimedia
principles, practical development
processes, the integration of mixed-media assets, interactive design and animation
for digital media and different
technologies for product deployment. Students will create content-rich interactive
CD-ROM and Web-based products using
industry standard authoring tools and will gain an understanding of the role of
digital media within the broader technology
environment.




Synopsis
This unit, together with FIT3009, provides a top-to-bottom coverage of e-Business
Systems. The emphasis in this unit is on
the technologies used to implement e-Business Systems, ie. the low level of such
systems. Although this unit is entirely
suitable for a future developer of e-Business Systems, it is optimally targeted at
future managers of such development. Thus
practical exercises will be illustrative rather than industrial strength and
technology issues will be given equal coverage
with technology details. The primary aim of the unit is to familiarise students with
as many of the currently popular
e-Business technologies as possible so that their design and implementation
decisions in the future will be informed and
therefore produce successful systems with a high degree of probability.
Synopsis
This unit gives an introduction to formal languages using logic programming and
looks at what a computer can compute and what
problems are intractable. Examples include why it is so difficult to design
timetables, get computers to play Go, or crack a
code. Topics include computable functions, finite state automata, regular
expressions, grammars, Turing computability,
polynomial-time reductions, and NP-completeness.




Synopsis
This unit is an introduction to the techniques, frameworks and conceptual processes
comprising 3D design and production. 3D
design is an area requiring significant expertise in the Multimedia Industry and
there is currently an increasing demand for
3D artists and animators in advertising, film, television, information
visualisation, education and the burgeoning games
industry. Students will progress through the essential development processes
required to produce 3D projects resulting in a
professional end product and develop skills in conceptual development, storyboards,
modelling, texturing, lighting and simple
animation techniques for 3D projects.
Synopsis
The objective of this unit is to introduce students to the quantitative modelling
techniques commonly used by executives in
decision making and the application of IT tools to real-world decision making
situations. Techniques covered typically
include decision making under uncertainty, linear and nonlinear programming,
sequential decision making, forecasting, and
simulation. Upon the completion of this unit, the students are expected to recognise
a complex decision making situation and
to build a corresponding quantitative model. They are also expected to solve the
model by applying techniques covered in this
unit, to interpret results and finally, to provide analyst-type recommendations. The
unit includes extensive use of advanced
modelling tools available in Microsoft Excel as well as some VBA programming.




Synopsis
This unit will provide students with fundamentals and theoretical foundations of
network and systems administration. In
addition, students will acquire practical skills needed to plan, provide and manage
networks through laboratory activities
and projects.
This unit covers the following topics: Network administration scope, goals, and
philosophy; IT system components and network
structures; host computer and user management; standards, technology and protocols;
managing networked devices; management
issues: planning, implementation, fault diagnosis and performance; network
documentation; security and administration;
provision and management of common network and application services.
Synopsis
This unit introduces the idea of standards and the standardisation process within
the networking and data communications
area. It follows on from the core unit FIT1005 Networks and Data Communications with
a focus on the: types of standards
commonly found in information technology; creation, application and maintenance of
networking standards; network protocol
families, their interdependencies and sequence of development; methods used to
define and maintain standards; composition and
operation of the various national and international standards organisations; review
of some key networking protocol standards
and implementation issues.




Synopsis
This unit will introduce students to advances in the distributed networked
environment. The unit provides knowledge of
internetworking protocols, QoS for critical applications, network management and
TCP/IP operation. Access to the university's
computer systems through an internet service provider is compulsory for distance
education students.




Synopsis
This unit develops students understanding of and skills in professional Software
Engineering practices at the personal level.
Students experience work in a team environment and extend their programming skills
by learning a new object oriented language
and maintaining a system that is larger than their experience in prior units.
Students develop skills in estimating,
monitoring, reviewing and reporting on practical projects.
Synopsis
This unit provides a theoretical and practical guide to the processes involved in
producing audiovisual content designed for
informational purposes. It will cover the processes involved in designing and
documenting such a project in terms of the
information delivered and the logistics involved, the actual recording and editing
of media used in the project, including
technical standards conventionally employed in video and DVD production. This unit
will be delivered in a studio environment
with an emphasis on collaborative learning.




Synopsis
This unit focuses on the nature of systems design and implementation as phases
within the systems development process. By the
end of the unit, students know the principles of how to design and implement a
system, have the knowledge and skills required
to conduct the main tasks typically required in these phases, and have experience in
selecting and using the most suitable
design and implementation techniques to develop a system from a requirements
specification. Design topics include: Transition
from Analysis to Design; Preparation and Selection of design alternatives;
Definition of System architecture requirements;
Design Strategies-Structured, Object-oriented, Design patterns; Object-oriented
design modelling; Interface Design; Systems
security and access controls. Implementation topics include: Implementation
planning, testing overview; data conversion;
training; documentation-user and help systems; systems installation; transition to
maintenance.




Synopsis
The unit covers server-side scripting: PHP structure, syntax and implementation. PHP
scripting techniques for building
dynamic web page interfaces for accessing server-side data stores. Implementing
state-handling in a stateless environment.
Strategies for enforcing data integrity, data security principles and techniques.
Database and web page design concepts and
their importance in commercial applications. Asynchronous Javascript and XML (Ajax).
Client-side scripting: scripting
language structure and syntax, scripting events and event handlers, creating objects
and using built-in objects, objects and
navigation, browser objects.
Synopsis
Introduction to the principles of commercial e-commerce programming tasks. The unit
explores the purposes and approaches in
using scripting and markup languages in relation to the client-server paradigm. The
role of both server-side and client-side
code are examined. The unit will also build upon students previous study of database
systems. Students will study the use of
markup and scripting programming languages to connect to databases via a network.




Synopsis
Students on placement work full time in a defined, graduate level role during a 22
week placement period at established
partners of the industry based learning program (major global companies, leading
Australian companies and worldwide
consultancies). The students on placement are able to apply the knowledge and skills
developed in their academic units,
develop their communication, time management and customer service skills in business
situations, experience the corporate
environment and obtain feedback from experienced supervisors on their performance.
Synopsis
This unit examines the principles and applications of business modelling, how a
business system is used as a key component of
the broad decision support system or DSS. At the completion of the subject the
student should understand some of the most
commonly used computer modelling techniques used in business and industry and be
familiar with the applications of these
techniques to the solution of business related problems. Topics will include the
fundamental breakeven analysis, various
types of linear programming, network models, various aspects of decision making,
waiting lines systems, Monte Carlo
simulation and forecasting techniques.




Synopsis
Following on from FIT1002, this unit introduces more advanced object-oriented
programming topics than its prerequisite, such
as inheritance and polymorphism. It gives students a deeper understanding of
programming and data structures by introducing
recursion and dynamic data structures. It also gives more practical skills in
designing, building and testing larger computer
programs, including ones having graphical user interfaces, and utilising file I/O.
Modern software tools to support
programming activities of testing and group-based development are also demonstrated.
Synopsis
This unit covers problems with paper-based and on-line documentation; types of
technical documentation used in software
engineering; document specifications; minimalist design philosophy; graphic design
of technical documentation; the context of
technical writing; the writing process (analysis, planning, generation, testing,
revision and maintenance of written texts);
document publication techniques (including SGML, LaTeX and XML); the role of
hypertext, hypermedia and markup languages in
technical documentation; small-volume and large-volume hypertext; collaborative
hypertext; intelligent hypertext.




Synopsis
The unit begins with a series of informal lectures on topics or skills outside the
students current curriculum. Informal
lectures do being in the first Semester, however, enrolment in this unit does not
take place until second semester. This
informal lecture series will introduce students to interesting material, get them
started on skills they may find useful for
the projects to be run in the second Semester, and help determine (both for the
student and the unit coordinator) whether the
student would benefit from enrolling in the unit FIT1016/FIT2044.
At the start of the second semester, students are allocated to project supervisors
to work on an advanced project. This will
usually be a programming task, but on occasion, may involve hardware. Students may
work individually or in groups, as
determined by the supervisor of a particular topic. The topics are chosen to cover a
Synopsis
This unit will further develop object-oriented programming skills with the C++
language, and place them into the Games
Programming context. Fundamental games programming design principles will be
covered, including formal game structures and
the game program loop. A number of specific games programming techniques with C++
will be also covered. These include the use
of DirectX, games physics, and advanced 3D rendering, expressing these concepts
through game creation using C++ and Microsoft
Windows DirectX. This provides a strong grounding for further study in this area,
especially related to games engine
development and artificial intelligence.
Synopsis
This unit introduces students to the ways organisations and businesses use the
Internet and related technologies to securely
conduct business activities. Students will acquire an understanding of the way e-
business is carried out across all kinds of
organisations for transactions and other business purposes. Students will analyse
and design an e-business solution as part
of a preliminary business case in order to gain an understanding of how e-business
concepts can be applied to specific
organisational and business environments. Topics include:
The nature of e-business and its infrastructure components - for businesses,
services sector, government, health,
communities, not-for-profit etc
Using Internet concepts and technologies for developing Intranets and intra-
organisational systems and integration
Web site development and implementation issues
Web interfaces and back office systems integration
E-business implementation, business process integration and change management
Inter-organisational systems (IOS) - including current
developments in EDI, VANS and VPNs
Electronic Payment Systems
Demand chains, Customer Relationship Management (CRM) in electronic marketing
E-procurement and supply chain management
Mobile systems and e-business
The use of Web Services (.NET, XML etc), middleware and object-broking in e-business
Synopsis
This unit covers principles and practice of the emergent field of web content
management. It focuses on developing
organisation systems for websites or intranets that are responsive to business
imperatives and user needs, and that
facilitate effective retrieval of information. Particular emphasis is given to
developing practical skills in these areas and
to applying a range of popular tools, techniques, software commonly used for web
content management.
Synopsis
The main topics covered in this unit include computer systems, operating systems,
process management and coordination, memory
management including modern implementations of virtual memory, file systems,
operating system security, shell variant
scripting, regular expressions, Unix utilities, Unix file system, Unix system
administration and installation, Unix
programming, research and development.




Synopsis
This unit covers the internal mechanism of computers and how they are organised and
programmed. Topics include combinatorial
and sequential logic, Boolean Algebra, Karnaugh maps, counters, ripple adders, tree
adders, memory/addressing, busses, speed,
DMA, data representation, machine arithmetic, microprogramming, caches and cache
architectures, virtual memory and
translation look-aside buffers, vectored interrupts, polled interrupts, pipelined
architecture, superscalar architecture,
data dependency, hazards, CISC, RISC, VLIW machine architectures.




Synopsis
This unit covers software organisation of multi-user and multi-tasking computers.
The principles of operating systems are
covered with reference to the underlying hardware requirements and are illustrated
by case studies. Topics include operating
system structure and services, multi-programming processes, CPU scheduling, memory
management, device management,
synchronisation, deadlocks, virtual memory and file systems.
Synopsis
Following on from FIT1002, this unit introduces the C++ language to students. The
unit extends the FIT1002 concepts into more
advanced object-oriented programming topics such as inheritance and polymorphism.
C++ streams, pointers and arrays, classes,
templates and the STL, along with the I/O class hierarchy will be discussed at
length. Interactive programming techniques
will be used to solve various programming exercises. The unit will give students a
deeper understanding of programming and
data structures by introducing recursion and dynamic data structures.



Synopsis
This unit examines the diversity of theoretical and conceptual frameworks which
influence current research and production of
educational multimedia applications. Topics will include: educational theory and
practice, cognition and cognitive
development, the differentiation between child and adult learners, catering to
differences in the capacity to learn, for
example, gifted and disabled learners, creating immersive and interactive learning
environments, current debates surrounding
e-Learning, and enabling equitable access to learning technologies. Students will be
given an overview of issues and
techniques for applying information technology to support instruction in educational
and training contexts and gain practical
experiences in managing a design process involving competing aspects of learning
theories, content characteristics, audience
needs and software development practices.



Synopsis
This unit provides a foundation in the theoretical and practical principles of game
design and game narrative structures in
the games development process. Utilising the principles taught in this unit,
students will be given the opportunity to
consider innovative games design applications together with a narrative structure
and implement the consequences of their
decisions as working game prototypes.
The combination of theory and practice in this unit is geared to equip students with
analytical skills to assess the future
capabilities of the computer game industry both commercially and for wider research
purposes. The unit provides knowledge and
skills which students can apply within their game development projects in the third
year studio project/s (FIT3039 and
FIT3040) and across all subsequent units.
Synopsis
This unit examines the way in which information technology influences the structures
and operations of organisations and
organisational approaches to the management and use of information. The capabilities
and limitations of technologies and the
way they have been commoditised and standardised in the marketplace are fundamental
determinants of what IT-based
applications are capable of achieving. As technologies have evolved and been
commoditised, they have shaped and in turn been
shaped by what individuals and organisations want and expect from them. This unit
applies this perspective as a basis for
analysing the main technologies employed by organisations for the use and management
of information.
Synopsis
This unit provides students with an introduction to the key concepts and principles
involved in the management of information
assets as a key organisational resource. Information assets and the information
systems which create and use them are of
critical importance to the operations of most modern organisations. The unit
examines two main themes: the development and
implementation of organisational approaches to the management of its information
assets, and organisational approaches to the
acquisition and development of information systems. As well as addressing the
separate sets of issues specific to each of
these themes, it will focus on the interactions between them and their implications
for development of an integrated approach
to organisational information management.

Synopsis
This unit provides students with the knowledge, understanding and skills required to
develop an application system which uses
a web interface to a back-end database. The unit assumes a sound basic knowledge of
programming and database concepts and
skills as developed in the introductory units in these areas (FIT1002 and FIT1004).
The emphasis in the unit is on mastery of
the key concepts and the basic knowledge and skills required to build this kind of
application. The unit will provide
students with an awareness of the wide range of technologies which are used to
support this kind of application, but will
Synopsis
This unit looks at the design and implementation issues of database management
systems. Advanced database design using the
object-relational approach and multi-dimensional database design are explored.
Record, file and index structures are dealt
with at the basic level. Higher level details of consistency, atomicity and
durability are introduced along with modern
trends in databases.
Synopsis
This unit will provide students with a knowledge of information systems security
issues, and their relevance to the
management of information systems in contemporary organisations. The students will
gain knowledge of the nature of
information threats, risks and vulnerabilities and of the control technologies and
techniques which can be applied to reduce
risk. Students will be expected to demonstrate ethically sound viewpoints with
respect to the protection of information
resources while maintaining a secure IS framework related to a defence in depth
strategy. Further students will have an
understanding of the ethical, legal and criminal issues relating to the security of
information systems. Additionally
students will be required to analyse and assess recent developments and future
trends in IS security technologies.




Synopsis
This unit presents a diverse range of existing techniques for presenting information
visually including graphs, tables,
charts, diagrams, maps, time series, animations, mechanical devices and interactive
software visualisations in two and three
dimensions. It details the underlying principles and motivations that govern the
design and implementation of these
techniques in different disciplines. The unit offers students an opportunity to
critically assess visual displays produced by
their peers and those produced by experts in a range of domains. It also provides an
opportunity for students to build upon
their knowledge in their home discipline by generating visual displays of direct
relevance to their study in these areas. The
unit provides a strong foundation upon which students can build when interpreting
and devising visual displays of information
Synopsis
This unit provides a broad introduction to the rapidly-expanding field of
information architecture (IA). IA is a major area
of concern for any organisation which has a business need to store and manage large
and varied collections of data. The unit
explains the nature and purpose of IA as a field of study and examines typical IA
needs of large organisations. It examines a
variety of approaches to the task of IA development and the techniques commonly
associated with them. Particular emphasis is
given to developing practical skills in techniques for developing architectures and
to applying a range of popular IA tools
and techniques commonly used in IA projects.




This unit builds upon the skills, techniques and theory introduced in FIT1033 Foundations of 3D
towards an emphasis on 3D character design and modelling for animation. Students will be introduced
to advanced techniques for character detailing (modelling and texturing) and character animation
(rigging, binding and animation). The theoretical and practical considerations contributing to the
conceptualisation, creation and preparation of 3D characters for animation sequences will constitute a
key focus of this unit.




In the modern corporate world, data is viewed not only as a necessity for day-to-day operation, it is
seen as a critical asset for decision making. However, raw data is of low value. Succinct generalisations
are required before data gains high value. Data mining produces knowledge from data, making feasible
sophisticated data-driven decision making. This unit will provide students with an understanding of the
major components of the data mining process, the various methods and operations for data mining,
knowledge of the applications and technical aspects of data mining, and an understanding of the major
research issues in this area.
Automation and the use of technological tools have resulted in the accumulation of vast volumes of
data by modern business organisations. Data warehouses have been set up as repositories to store this
data and improved techniques now result in the speedy collection and integration of such data. OLAP
technology has resulted in the faster generation of reports and more flexible analysis based on the
data repositories. Business intelligence (BI) can be considered as the art of exploring and analysing this
data, extracting relevant information and identifying patterns, and turning such information and
patterns into knowledge upon which actions can be taken. This unit will explore the concepts of BI,
including the emergence of BI and factors influencing BI, technology requirements for BI and will
provide hands on experience on designing and building business intelligence systems.




The unit builds on the knowledge of basic concepts from FIT2026 Sound and video studio by further
developing an understanding of the multimedia development process, tools and techniques as applied
to advanced time based media manipulation in multimedia content production. It introduces students
to a range of techniques by which video can be manipulated and enhanced after the original material
has been recorded.
This unit incorporates organisational, inter-organisational and foundational technological issues in e-
Business systems. Students are introduced to the fundamentals of trading systems so they can be
better placed within an e-Business context. Various types of e-business models are discussed. Contents
and processes involved in e-business planning and strategy development are reviewed. Ways to
manage changes caused by e-business initiatives are discussed. Electronic auctions and their
relationships with business procurement processes are discussed. Security mechanisms safeguarding e-
business transactions are reviewed.




This unit covers: Distributed database systems: clients, servers, application servers; Database servers,
clusters of servers; Distributed database architectures: single-tier, two-tier, multi-tier; Implementation
issues: performance, security, transactions; Enterprise application server capabilities: hot deployment,
clean shutdown, clustering, farming, load balancing, automatic fail-over; Enterprise application coding:
DBMS access, distributed components, messaging services, authentication, authorisation, encryption,
transactions; and Enterprise application software development tools. Access to the Universitys
computer systems through an Internet service provider is compulsory for off-campus students.




Review of set theory, the predicate calculus, relations, relational algebra and formal specification
concepts; algebraic and model based specifications; the role of formal specifications in software
engineering. The Event-B notation, data and algorithm design; data and operation refinement; proofs
of correctness; proof obligations.
In their final year of study, students are given the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills they
have gained, in the development of an information system for a real world client. Students work in
groups and will: design, develop and deliver an information system for a client, manage the project
through all its development stages, communicate effectively with all project stakeholders, develop
project documentation to a professional standard, present their project work to academics and other
groups, attend unit seminars, and contribute in a professional and committed manner to the work of
the group.




This unit provides students with an understanding of the management issues surrounding information
technology (IT), the knowledge of management functions and responsibilities necessary for IT
managers, and the knowledge to apply IT management principles in the organisational environment.
Main topics include: Information Systems, Management, Managing Essential Technologies, Managing
System Development, Managing New Technologies, Acquisition of Hardware, Software, Networks, and
Services People and Technology




With the increasing amount of data available, it is important to be able to represent large collections
from a wide range of domains in forms that more readily convey embedded information. The human
sense of vision is a powerful tool for pattern recognition - this sense can be harnessed via multimedia
interactive presentations. This unit will examine the fundamental principles of information visualisation
and the range of tools and methods which are available to represent large data sets. These techniques
can be applied across a wide range of fields including geographical, medical, statistical and scientific
visualisation. The unit will examine in detail the visualisation of geospatial data in GIS (Geographic
Information Systems).
This unit aims to develop and extend students understanding and knowledge about the information
technology infrastructure that supports and enables modern electronic commerce systems. This
infrastructure includes communication networks (wireline and wireless), the Internet, payment
mechanisms, and a range of enabling technologies, such as XML, server technologies, software agents,
various emerging protocols and standards. Applications and recent developments in such enabling
technologies including mobile commerce are explored. The unit approaches some infrastructure issues
from the perspective of security in electronic commerce, focussing on real and potential security
problems and the techniques for addressing them. Privacy and legal issues concerning electronic
commerce are discussed.




This unit will give the students an opportunity to solve some concrete decision-making problems, such
as resource allocation and investment planning, using different ways of modelling and solving decision
support problems of different size and complexity; strategic, tactical and operational problems;
problems involving discrete alternatives and problems involving continuous variables; problems whose
constraints and goals are precise and problems which need to be further pinned down. The students
will be introduced to a high level problem modelling and solving platform which is supported by a
variety of solvers. They will use the platform to model and solve some quite complex decision support
problems and experiment with different solvers, and search methods.
In this unit students will study the various types of interaction, simulation and visualisation related to
creating interactive games based content, covering topics such as genres of immersive interactive
environments as well as the principles and techniques of game design and game play. In addition,
students will learn how to design and develop their own immersive and interactive environments
following industry development methods.




This unit focuses on how object-oriented abstractions, models, and software can employed in
networked, net centric, and mobile computing to manage and address the complexity found in
environments that are heterogeneous, span multiple platforms, and are delivered to various client
devices. The unit will emphasise hands-on, practical experience with actual devices and emulators.
Research topics and ideas will also be covered for potential post-graduate students




The unit provides the basic concepts of multimedia, multimedia elements and security and privacy
issues required for multimedia applications. This unit also introduces the basic processes of analysis
and design for developing a complete functional specification for a multimedia/web-based application.
In addition to this, it also provides an overview of the application of programming languages and
detailed knowledge of multimedia authoring tools required for implementing a multimedia/web-base
application. Students will have hands-on experience on analysis, design and implementation of a
multimedia/web-base application.
This unit will provide students with an understanding of: OSI security architecture; common
information risks and requirements; operation of encryption techniques; digital signatures; public key
infrastructure; authentication and non-repudiation; intrusion detection and response; firewall defence;
privacy and ethics issues; security configurations to PC-based applications; and design of information
systems with security compliance and security standards and protocols.




This unit examines the diversity of theoretical and conceptual frameworks which influence current
research and production of educational multimedia applications. Topics will include: educational
theory and practice, cognition and cognitive development, the differentiation between child and adult
learners, catering to differences in the capacity to learn, for example, gifted and disabled learners,
creating immersive and interactive learning environments, current debates surrounding e-Learning,
and enabling equitable access to learning technologies. Students will be given an overview of issues
and techniques for applying information technology to support instruction in educational and training
contexts and gain practical experiences in managing a design process involving competing aspects of
learning theories, content characteristics, audience needs and software development practices.
This unit is intended to provide practical experience in designing, developing and testing a non-trivial
computer science project. Projects are generally software-based, although sometimes they may involve
hardware development or investigation of theory. Projects cover the whole process of software (or
hardware) development, from analysis through design to implementation and testing. Comprehensive
written documentation on the project is required. Students are assigned in groups to a project
supervisor. There are no lectures in this unit, although students will be expected to attend regular
meetings with their project supervisor.




In this unit students will learn about many aspects of working with a large team on large projects to
produce quality software products on time and within budget. The student will gain an appreciation of
the tools and techniques used to develop software systems within a group context. Topics to be
studied include: software development lifecycle models; sizing, estimation, planning and control of
projects; functional specification and design of real-time systems; formal specification and design using
Z; integration and testing strategies, configuration management; reuse and re-engineering.
The principal development process focus of the unit will be on the social, legal and business context in
which multimedia and games development companies must operate. Students will work actively in
teams on the development of a multimedia or games application or exhibit. Project teams will use
project planning/management skills, and design and build a prototype of the project using appropriate
software processes and methodologies. Students will integrate multimedia, programming and technical
knowledge in the development process. Requirements are fulfilled by the team producing an identified
set of deliverables. The team must ensure that each deliverable is completed on schedule.




Students will work actively in teams on the development of a multimedia or games application or
exhibit. Using project planning/management skills along with other development procedures, students
must then deliver a functional multimedia system or game, along with all requisite documentation,
which integrates multimedia, programming, and technical knowledge in the development process.
Requirements are fulfilled by the team producing an identified set of deliverables, usually a progress
report, full system documentation, and functional project. The team must ensure that each deliverable
is completed on schedule, with each member of the team demonstrating a significant contribution to
the overall effort.




This unit provides students with an introduction to UNIX tools for managing processes; searching,
editing and modifying files and data streams; and command interpreters and shell scripts. In addition,
students will learn about a typical system call interface and its use for systems programming in a
language like C.
Content covered in this unit, includes: Static and dynamic web pages; ASP.Net environment; HTML
forms reviewed; Standard server controls; C# language; Page life cycles; Event driven programming and
postback; C# basics; Objects in C#; Namespaces and core objects; State handling; Objects and
structured data; Validation controls; Master pages; Themes and skins; Navigation controls; Using data
sources; Reading and updating data stores; XML files as data store; Using Grids; Data binding;
Configuration and optimisation; Authentication; Email and accessing file systems; Components and
user controls; Code behind; .NET Assemblies; Custom Server Controls; Using Ajax; Mobile Web page




This unit extends the website authoring concepts taught in FIT1012 by looking at more advanced
techniques which are available to web site developers in publishing rich media/multimedia content.
The structure of an XML document is investigated and the manner in which such a document can be
converted to HTML or other formats. Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL), a form of
XML, will be investigated as a technique for authoring interactive audiovisual presentations. In addition
the unit introduces Macromedia Flash remoting as a client for web services, phps multimedia
capabilities and the requirements/standards for web audio/video streaming.




Students on placement work full time in a defined, graduate level role during a 22 week placement
period at established partners of the Faculty of IT industry based learning program including major
global companies, leading Australian companies and worldwide consultancies. The students on
placement are able to apply the knowledge and skills developed in their academic units, develop their
communication, time management and customer service skills in business situations, experience the
corporate environment and obtain feedback from experienced supervisors on their performance.
Processes and threads: interprocess communication, scheduling. Deadlock: detection, prevention,
avoidance. Memory management: allocation, swapping, virtual memory. Input/output principles and
examples: disks, graphical user interfaces, network terminals. File systems: files, directories, disk space
management. Security: authentication, cryptography, common attacks, principles of secure system
administration. Case studies: Characteristics of major PC operating systems such as Linux and Windows.




In their final year of study, students are given the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills they
have gained, in the development of an information system for a real world client. Students work in
groups and will: design, develop and deliver an information system for a client, manage the project
through all its development stages, communicate effectively with all project stakeholders, develop
project documentation to a professional standard, present their project work to academics and other
groups, attend unit seminars, and contribute in a professional and committed manner to the work of
the group.
This is the first of two industrial experience units for most majors in the Bachelor of Information
Technology and Systems, the Bachelor of Business Information Systems, the Bachelor of Computing,
the Bachelor of Information Systems and the Bachelor of Network Computing. After successful
completion of this unit, students must enrol in and pass FIT3048 to complete their industrial
experience project requirements.




In their final year of study, students are given the opportunity to apply the knowledge and skills they
have gained, in the development of an information system for a real world client. Students work in
groups and will: design, develop and deliver an information system for a client, manage the project
through all its development stages, communicate effectively with all project stakeholders, develop
project documentation to a professional standard, present their project work to academics and other
groups, attend unit seminars, and contribute in a professional and committed manner to the work of
the group.
This is the second of two industrial experience units for most majors in the Bachelor of Information
Technology and Systems, the Bachelor of Business Information Systems, the Bachelor of Computing,
the Bachelor of Information Systems and the Bachelor of Network Computing. After successful
completion of FIT3047 and this unit, students will have completed their industrial experience project
requirements.
This unit is designed to introduce students to the practical application of decision support systems for
finance using modern computer tools. It covers issues associated with the implementation, theory and
risk of decision support systems for finance. The aims of this course are to provide a study of the
concepts behind decision making; the tools and techniques to support various stages of the decision
making process and to explore key factors of successful decision support systems for finance problems
and their development methodology. On completion of the unit, students should be able to:
a.understand the needs of decision makers and apply techniques and tools to support various phases
of the decision making process.
b.formulate requirements for simulation and modelling and apply techniques of sensitivity analysis.
c.analyse and design effective decision support systems for finance problems.




Students are introduced to some of the most common security issues involved in the development of
software, including secure coding practices, secure database access, secure data communications,
security of web applications, use of encryption techniques and security testing. Students are provided
with a range of practical exercises to reinforce their skills, including authenticating and authorising
users programmatically, user input validation, developing secure web, mobile/wireless and database
applications, encrypting and hashing data programmatically, generating digital signatures
programmatically, security testing, designing logging and auditing mechanisms.
This unit investigates some of the latest developments in the field of web applications. Known as Web
Services, they make use of a number of standards to allow business to business (B2B) systems over the
World Wide Web. Resolving these problems comes under the broad title of interoperability. A number
of technologies and standards allow Web services to be employed. These include XML for description
of Web services, SOAP as the protocol to send messages, WSDL to describe the operations offered by a
Web Service, BPEL to co-ordinate a number of Web Services in complex synchronous and/or
asynchronous interactions, and UDDI as registry to allow discovery and publication of Web Services.




This unit provides a detailed understanding of the underpinning theories, principles and practices of
interface design for computer-based systems. It examines issues in the design of system interfaces
from a number of perspectives: user, programmer, designer. It explores the application of the relevant
theories in practice. The unit will cover topics such as methods and tools for developing effective user
interfaces, evaluation methods such as the conduct of usability and heuristic evaluations, design of
appropriate interface elements including the design of menus and other interaction styles. The unit will
also focus on designing for a diverse range of users and environments.




This unit relates to managing the creation, storage, recall and dissemination of business records within
organisation-wide frameworks. Topics cover: socio-legal and business requirements for evidence;
knowledge bases for representing functions and activities; managing access; designing and
implementing recordkeeping policies, strategies and systems in accordance with industry and
professional standards, including the International Standard for Records Management, and using
recordkeeping business analysis tools (workflow, risk management, identification of vital records,
functional analysis).
This unit builds on introductory units to analysis and design. It provides the professional software
engineer with advanced knowledge and skills in high-level architectural design, its theoretical
foundations, industrial best practice, and relevant application context. In the software life-cycle,
software architecture sits between analysis/specification and design/implementation. The field of
software architecture has come of age with a thriving research community and numerous high-level
models, methods, tools and practices widely used in industry.




This unit includes history and philosophy of artificial intelligence; intelligent agents; problem solving
and search (problem representation, heuristic search, iterative improvement, game playing);
knowledge representation and reasoning (extension of material on propositional and first-order logic
for artificial intelligence applications, situation calculus, planning, frames and semantic networks);
expert systems overview (production systems, certainty factors); reasoning under uncertainty (belief
networks compared to other approaches such as fuzzy logic); machine learning (decision trees, neural
networks, genetic algorithms).
This unit covers fundamental techniques in image processing. Topics include image representation and
enhancement, thresholding, image algebra, neighbourhood operations on images, Fourier methods,
edge detection, feature extraction and representation, shape, texture, segmentation, classification,
restoration, image compression, and colour and multiband image processing.




The unit provides both a theoretical and practical overview of processes involved in managing large
projects, with particular emphasis on projects common to the information technology industry. Topics
include the project life cycle, problem definition, project evaluation, high and low level planning, team
building and people management, monitoring and control, reporting and communication, termination
and assessment.
Computer graphics is concerned with the creation of synthetic images and virtual worlds. This unit
introduces the essential algorithms, theory and programming concepts necessary to generate
interactive 2D and 3D graphics. Students will gain practical experience using the industry standard
OpenGL API to develop their own interactive graphics applications. The topics covered form the basis
of core knowledge necessary for developing applications in scientific visualisation, virtual reality, visual
special effects and computer games.




This unit will introduce Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques that can be used in games development.
General capabilities of AI technology, behaviours/circumstances that need to be
simulated/learned/reproduced by the smart non-player characters/environments in smart games, AI
techniques (such as evolutionary and neural computations) used in the development of smart games
will be discussed at length. This unit will build upon previous programming skills, and provide a strong
grounding for further study in this area, especially related to games engine development. The unit will
examine intelligent game creation using C++.
This unit aims to develop the students knowledge of the concept of narrative structure, and its
importance in the development of their understanding of how to create, and implement contextually
appropriate narrative forms for multimedia products and systems, with a special emphasis on the
game environment.
Topics will include: linear, visual and non-linear narrative, historical perspectives on the evolution of
the narrative forms, and concepts such as representation, characterisation, point of view, genre,
closure, the role of the user, interactivity, immersion and engagement.




This unit provides students with a critical understanding of the impact of information technology (IT)
within contemporary social relations. Using case studies drawn from different social spheres, the unit
explores the ways in which the diffusion of IT has reshaped thinking and practice concerning social
collaboration, the production of knowledge and community building. Particular attention is paid to the
emerging field of community informatics, and the implications that this field holds for the work of
information and knowledge management professionals
This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of a range of techniques for utilising personal
and organisational knowledge to increase organisational efficiency. A broad range of topics will be
covered relating to initiating and implementing knowledge management (KM) initiatives. The unit will
focus on information systems development evolution to knowledge management. The topics to cover
include KM implementation life cycle; KM systems analysis and design; Knowledge audit; Creating KM
blueprint; KM development approaches; organisational and people issues in KM development,
designing a KM team; KM deployment and evaluation.
At the completion of this subject, students will know about the role of personal and organisational
knowledge management in addressing organisational efficiency. They will have an understanding of the
methods and approaches for implementing knowledge management in the organisation. They will have
developed skills in evaluating the sources and potential value of knowledge within an organisation, and
have developed attitudes, which will allow them to participate confidently as a team member in the
analysis and design of a knowledge management system development project.
This unit provides an introduction to the development of business systems for B2C internet commerce.
A complete, non-trivial B2C application will be built, in phases, using specific, currently popular
technologies. Through this development the student will acquire an appreciation of many of the
hardware and software infrastructure and business issues involved. In addition specific, currently
marketable, development skills will be learned.
Reasons for retailers to go on-line will be discussed as well as the risks and threats involved. Peripheral,
but important issues, such as Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) will also be discussed. Typical hardware
and software options and requirements will be assessed.
The B2C application to be built will involve product catalogs with search facilities, transaction

This unit will cover a wide variety of techniques and computing systems developed for supporting
business applications software systems in Chinese language. Specific topics include Chinese-enabling
systems, Chinese character sets and encoding methods, Chinese character input methods, Chinese
character output, and Chinese computing on the Internet. To enable students to understand the
development of global software for all languages including Chinese, the principles and techniques for
multilingual information processing, including universal character encoding methods will be discussed.
The unit will be taught in English, but students need to have a good knowledge of written Chinese.




Introduces students to current theory and practice of authentication and identity management. This
includes authentication and identity management of system components (software, hardware, data
and users); Biometric based Identification systems; Smart card based Identification systems; Crypto-
based Identification systems; Kerberos authentication systems; Large population ID management and
security; Privacy, security, and efficiency of identification systems.




This unit is designed for students who wish to extend their programming abilities in developing
relatively large database applications. An integrated system of significant size will be developed using
the current industry standard software. Topics covered include the principal aspects of database
development and applications, advanced queries, customising forms and professional reporting,
business graphics, importing and exporting data, internet applications, debugging and error-handling


This unit looks at the design and implementation issues of database management systems. Advanced
database design using the object-relational approach and multi-dimensional database design are
explored. Record, file and index structures are dealt with at the basic level. Higher level details of
consistency, atomicity and durability are introduced along with modern trends in databases.
This unit relates to the fundamental role of recordkeeping professionals in society to provide access to
recorded information in the form of essential evidence of social and organisational activity for
business, commercial, governmental, social, and cultural purposes. It covers the role of recordkeeping
in society and organisations, functional requirements for evidence, the formulation of recordkeeping
policy, strategies and tactics, the establishment of recordkeeping regimes, business functional analysis,
appraisal and disposal, the development of metadata schemas and their implementation in
recordkeeping systems.


This unit provides students with skills and knowledge relating to the use of latest technologies for
managing knowledge, electronic documents and records to meet the needs of individuals, work groups
and organisations. The unit aims to build a general understanding of technologies for managing
personal and organisational structured and unstructured information and knowledge and the methods
of developing systems to handle it. Students study the business context, requirements analysis
techniques and implementation issues for electronic document management, recordkeeping, content
and other information and knowledge management systems.

This unit introduces students to the major categories of information resources in all media and how
they are accessed through a variety of common user interfaces from anywhere in the world. The
process of satisfying these needs through the reference interview and the application of skilled search
strategies is explored. The ways that information resources are procured by libraries and e-repositories
through purchase or licensing, and supplied to users on a cost-effective, efficient basis are examined.
Access and authentication, intellectual property law and professional duty of care are described.
This unit prepares students for the professional workplace, through a professional placement in a
library, archives, registry or other information agency; and a lecture/seminar series on professional
issues within the information industry. The placement enables students to link theory with professional
practice, and develops understanding of the role of information agencies within their environment.
Lectures/seminars draw on current professional literature and key players in the field to explore a
range of topical issues within the profession, the role of professional ethics and professional
associations, and career opportunities within the industry.
This unit develops understanding of the fundamental principles, concepts and standards that guide the
development of information organisation and retrieval systems and web-based information
architectures. It deals with standards governing description, distribution and access to information
locally and globally cataloguing, indexing, thesaurus construction, classification and metadata for
knowledge discovery. It examines the effects of economic, social and technological factors on the
development of bibliographic networks and cataloguing operations. Practical sessions deal with the use
of major bibliographic tools, schemes and systems for information organisation.
The main topics covered in this unit are: Object-oriented design and programming in C++ which include
object identification, data encapsulation, inheritance, and polymorphism; concurrent programming
techniques which include principles of concurrency, safety and liveness design, multithreaded
programming in C++; network and distributed software construction principles and techniques which
include network software performance, client-server software construction, socket and RPC
programming in C++; and study and compare C++ with Java and Ada in terms of large software
constructions.




This unit is designed to introduce students to the fundamental concepts necessary for the analysis,
design, use and implementation of business information systems using relational database
management systems. The main topics covered include requirements elicitation, systems analysis and
design informed by a lifecycle based methodology, motivation for the database approach to managing
information, conceptual modelling, coverage of logical process and data models, and the use of SQL
and other facilities provided by database management systems.
This unit aims to introduce the systematic top-down network design approach for designing enterprise
computer networks. A top down process focuses on requirements analysis and architecture design,
which should be completed before the selection of specific network components. The unit provides
students with tested processes and tools to help them understand traffic flow, communication
protocol behaviour, and internetworking technologies. On completion of the unit, students are
equipped to design enterprise computer networks that meet an enterprise users requirements for
functionality, capacity, performance, availability, scalability, affordability, security, and manageability.




This unit will give students insight into how to identify, create, and pursue opportunities for IT-based
products and services. These opportunities have been growing rapidly due to the steady increase in
digital work flows and digital customers. Google, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and Flickr are well-
known examples of digital entrepreneurship; there are many thousands of additional examples.
Specifically, this unit includes the study of entrepreneurship, opportunity analysis, feasibility analysis,
intellectual property, market research, accounting, financial management, sources of funding, business
models, teamwork, and business planning. Understanding these topics will allow students to more
readily identify, analyse, and develop opportunities for the creation of IT-based products and services.
Students will work 12 hours per week for a 15 week period (or the summer equivalent) at a commercial
multimedia studio. There under the joint supervision of an industry sponsor and their lecturer,
students will undertake a portfolio of commercial projects for business, government, university, or non-
government organisations. All projects will be driven by client requirements and timetables. Work will
be supervised and subject to formal peer review by unit participants and formal review by peers and an
academic lecturer.




This unit provides students with an understanding of how to manage and govern the IT function in
business organisations. It builds on themes relating to managing IT as an organisational resource and
discusses IT function from strategy and governance perspectives. The unit also emphasises the
relationship between theoretical knowledge and its practical application using cases and real examples.
Core concepts discussed in this unit include the strategic context of IT management, alignment
between business strategy and IT strategy, IT governance processes, various types of IT processes,
organising and managing the IT function (including the role of the CIO), legal and ethical concerns of IT,
evaluating IT portfolio management, IT provisioning issues, including outsourcing.
This unit provides both a theoretical and practical overview of real time enterprise systems. Real time
enterprise systems are configurable information systems packages, implemented on-line that integrate
people, technology and information processing. The three integrated processes within and across
functional areas are seamlessly interconnected and almost time-lag free in an organisation. Topics
include systems and technology background, ES evolution, ES lifecycle, implementation and
configuration, ES and electronic commerce and ES success and failure factors. The theoretical
component will be augmented by detailed case studies which focus on problems faced by real-life
companies. For the practical component, laboratory exercises using a well-known enterprise system
will be used to deepen student understanding.




The unit provides an overview of computational science and an introduction to the central methods in
this field. While it is not tied to any particular field of scientific study, it requires a general scientific
background at advanced introductory level.
Topics include: the role of computational tools and methods in 21st century science; modelling and
simulation; continuous vs discrete models; analytic versus numeric models; deterministic versus
stochastic models; Monte-Carlo methods; epistemology of simulations; visualisation; high-dimensional
data analysis; optimisation; limitations of numerical methods; high-performance computing and data-
intensive research.
Each topic area will be introduced with a general overview followed by a discussion of one or a few
selected methods in full technical detail. These will be practiced in tutorials and laboratories, which will
This unit develops the students' ability to design, implement and maintain moderately complex,
realistically-sized programs. It builds upon the basic programming techniques introduced in FIT1002,
FIT1008 and offers the first introduction to the implementation of more complex real-world programs.
Examples of such systems include compilers and interpreters, simulations, visualisation tools, drawing
packages, database systems, and graphical games. The unit can offer students the opportunity to get
acquainted with a second programming language within the procedural-object oriented paradigm, such
as C++, Python or one of their cousins.
The unit bridges between core programming knowledge and the large-scale software engineering
context. It will emphasise the implementation and use of intermediate to advanced data structures
(such as search trees, hash structures, graphs and graph algorithms etc.) and the embedding into an
actual computing system (i.e. interacting with the O/S, networking components etc).




This unit introduces students to fundamentals of distributed networked environment. It provides
knowledge of internetworking standards and understanding of the networking architecture,
technology and operation.
Modern computer systems rely increasingly on distributed computing mechanisms, implemented often
as clusters, web services, grids and clouds. Distributed computing systems can provide seamless (or
web-like) access to a variety of networked resources, e.g. processing cores, large data stores and
information repositories, expensive instruments, high-speed links, sensor networks, and multimedia
services for a wide range of applications. This unit provides foundation knowledge and understanding
of the basic mechanisms required to implement distributed computing systems, especially clouds,
grids, web services and clusters. Topics covered include: Introduction to parallel and distributed
computing mechanisms, concurrency and synchronisation, monitors, deadlocks, concurrent program
analysis - Deadlock, Safety & Liveness properties, computational and service-oriented grids. LVS and
Beowulf Clusters. Gridservices, Webservices, WSDL, HPC Portals, Home Grids, Clouds and Peer-to-Peer
(P2P) networks. Distributed applications, and their performance and reliability in relation to processor
and network performance constraints.




Modern computer systems contain parallelism in both hardware and software. This unit covers
parallelism in both general purpose and application specific computer architectures and the
programming paradigms that allow parallelism to be exploited in software. The unit examines both
shared memory and message passing paradigms in both hardware and software; concurrency,
multithreading and synchronicity; parallel, clustered and distributed supercomputing models,
languages and software tools and development environments. Students will program in these
paradigms.
This unit is intended to provide practical experience in designing, developing and testing a non-trivial
computer science project. Projects are generally software-based, although sometimes they may involve
hardware development or investigation of theory. Projects cover the whole process of software (or
hardware) development, from analysis through design to implementation and testing. Comprehensive
written documentation on the project is required. Students are assigned in groups to a project
supervisor. There are no lectures in this unit, although students will be expected to attend regular
meetings with their project supervisor. The application problem will normally be drawn from the
student's field of specialisation.




This unit exposes students to a variety of industry standard games engine environments and
development techniques. Students will develop an appreciation and basic working knowledge of a
number of different platforms used in contemporary games development. The unit aims to provide
students with a practical insight into contemporary, industry standard, games development process
and games engines.
This unit will focus on research into the latest developments in the field of information technology,
including innovative technology developments involving human computer interaction, information
visualisation of complex data and emerging interface techniques. Students will learn valuable research
and communication skills as they investigate and share with their peers the impact of emergent
technologies and interfaces on society. The content presented in the lectures will focus on grand
challenges in the field of information technology and on emerging trends. Students will apply their
theoretical understanding to a practical project negotiated with the lecturer using a learning contract.




This unit provides students with an understanding of the tasks and the main issues associated with the
management of data and electronic records in modern organisations. The management of business
records has always been an important function in any large organisation, but the use of digital
technologies has added greatly to the scope and complexity of the task, and to the number and
diversity of issues which must be addressed. The unit will examine some of the key areas in which
these changes have affected the data management function in organisations. This will be used as a
basis for explaining the nature of specialist work in this field and the professional roles and
responsibilities associated with it.

This unit provides students with insights into key areas of current interest and concern confronting
practising IT professionals. The unit is based around case studies of organisational experiences with the
application of technologies and IT-based applications to meet their information needs. These case
studies will be used to compare and contrast theory and practice in the use of IT and IT-based
applications, and identify the implications for IT professionals and the impact on their roles and
responsibilities. Students will be required to conduct an investigation of a case of current interest and
analyse and report on the lessons it provides for IT professional practice.
The unit will provide students with fundamentals and theoretical foundations of Network
Administration. In addition, students will acquire practical skills needed to plan, install, configure and
manage networks through laboratory activities and projects.




Synopsis
Administrative Honours Extension unit.




Synopsis
Students will undertake a large project and work in groups on a software project for
a client. The client may be internal to
Monash or from the industry or research organisation. In general, projects involve
all aspects of the system development
lifecycle. Groups are responsible for their own project management, with guidance
from a supervisor. Some projects will
warrant students working in pairs or individually.
Synopsis
This unit covers the products, processes, techniques and tools for system validation
and verifications including acceptance
tests. Commercial Testing Tools from Rational, HP and other open-source tools will
be used to apply in practice knowledge
learnt about software testing from a theoretical perspective. Inspection and testing
methodologies, analysis of artefacts,
robustness, performance analysis configuration management, quality assurance plan
and standards, compliance, assessment,
certification issues are covered. It shows how to predict, analyse and control
defects in complex software systems.




Synopsis
This unit introduces students to a variety of issues, concepts, methods and
techniques associated with IT research. Skills
developed and knowledge acquired from this unit will prepare students to conduct
their own research, as well as to be
knowledgeable consumers of others research.
Synopsis
This unit will develop students capabilities to undertake research in the
information systems field. Students will learn
various research methods and study published research papers in which these research
methods have been used. Students will
learn to evaluate how well the research methods have been used in published research
papers. Students will also develop an




Synopsis
This unit is a research unit and an elective unit for the Honours degrees of the
Faculty of IT. Due to the nature of the area
of IT, a wide range of reading unit types can be offered to students. Some project
components are of a practical nature and
may involve some software development and/or experimentation, while other components
are of a more theoretical nature.




Synopsis
Methods from Artificial Intelligence (AI) form the basis for many advanced
information systems. These techniques address
problems that are difficult to solve or not efficiently solvable with conventional
techniques. Building on the undergraduate
curriculum this unit introduces the student to advanced AI methods and their
applications in information systems.




Synopsis
Algorithms are the most fundamental area for all aspects of computer science and
software engineering. Discrete structures,
such as those treated in graph theory, set theory, combinatorics and symbolic logic
form the mathematical underpinning of the
study of algorithms. As well-designed algorithms and data structures are essential
for the good performance of an information
system, an in-depth understanding of the theoretical properties of algorithms is
essential for any computer scientist. As
importantly, the theoretical investigation of algorithms leads to a deeper
understanding of problem structures and classes of
problems and the knowledge of a large variety of algorithm types enables the
designer to approach a new problem from
different angles. Topics for this unit include: Computability and Complexity
Automata Theory Advanced Analysis and Design of
Synopsis
All sciences are increasingly relying on computational support and the growth of
many branches of science has only become
possible due to the availability of efficient computational methods. The common
basis of such methods are; numerical methods
and high performance computing. Topics for this unit include: Numerical Methods,
High Performance and Parallel Computing,
Optimisation and Operations Research Bioinformatics, Simulation, Visualisation and
Modelling.


Synopsis
The first component of this unit looks at digital communication technologies such
as: local area networks; metropolitan area
networks; satellite networks; ISDN; modem techniques; digital networks. The second
component covers protocols including: the
structure, coordination and management of the Internet; Internet standards
development process; Internet link layer
protocols; IP (V4 and V6) and ICMP protocols; TCP and UDP; the Internet addressing
structure, including domain naming and the
DNS/LDAP systems and protocols; bridging systems and spanning-tree protocols;
Internet packet routing techniques and
protocols; mobile IP; Real Time Protocols; the major common applications.




Synopsis
This unit looks at a range of security problems in information systems, namely
physical security, network security and
software security. Within these areas, topics covered include risk analysis,
authentification, access control, and crypto
techniques. It looks at various management issues, including disparate application
examples, distributed systems
authentication, contingency planning, audit and review. A range of security
applications are used as examples.
Synopsis
This unit will cover network strategy development; network design principals;
Telecom services; network performance; network
topologies; network implementation; case studies ; case studies; traffic models;
limitations of traffic models; network
management protocols.




Synopsis
This unit investigates the use of object-oriented languages to implement application
software. Topics covered are aspects of
object-oriented design, object-oriented programming, styles and idioms related to
the C+
+ programming language, memory management, exception handling, the C++ standard
library, performance and efficiency. Typical
application areas studied include graphical user interfaces, event driven systems,
Synopsis
The Case study provides the opportunity for students to focus their skills of system
analysis and development, software
design and development, documentation development and quality, system and software
quality, interpersonal relationships and
formal and quality documentation in the development of a solution to the Case Study
project. Working as members of supervised
teams, students undertake the analysis, design, documentation and implementation of
an appropriate software system to assist
with the resolution of a realistic business problem. As part of their success, teams
Synopsis
This unit looks at the design and implementation issues of database management
systems. Advanced database design using the
object-relational approach and multi-dimensional database design are explored.
Record, file and index structures are dealt
with at the basic level. Higher level details of consistency, atomicity and
durability are introduced along with modern
trends in databases.


Synopsis
Handheld computing, Lite Application Development, Architecture, User Interaction.
Handheld Operating Systems, Application
development environments, Handheld - database connectivity. Use of emulators and
test suites. Construction of handheld
applications, desktop synchronisation and the separation of computing tasks. Use of
modems, cameras, infrared, serial
communcation and TCP/IP. Contexts for deploying handheld computing, user
interaction, modality, screen design, and desktop
integration.
Synopsis
Content covered in this unit, includes: Static and dynamic web pages; ASP.Net
environment; HTML forms reviewed; Standard
server controls; C# language; Page life cycles; Event driven programming and
postback; C# basics; Objects in C#; Namespaces
and core objects; State handling; Objects and structured data; Validation controls;
Master pages; Themes and skins;
Navigation controls; Using data sources; Reading and updating data stores; XML files
as data store; Using Grids; Data
binding; Configuration and optimisation; Authentication; Email and accessing file
systems; Components and user controls; Code
behind; .NET Assemblies; Custom Server Controls; Using Ajax; Mobile Web page




Synopsis
This unit is a research unit and a requirement for the FIT Honours degrees. Due to
the nature of IT, a wide range of Honours
project types can be offered to students. Some project components are of a practical
nature and may involve some software
development and/or experimentation, while other components are of a more theoretical
nature.




Synopsis
This unit is a research unit and a requirement for the FIT Honours degrees. Due to
the nature of IT, a wide range of Honours
project types can be offered to students. Some project components are of a practical
nature and may involve some software
development and/or experimentation, while other components are of a more theoretical
nature.
Synopsis
This unit is a research unit and a requirement for the FIT Honours degrees. Due to
the nature of IT, a wide range of Honours
project types can be offered to students. Some project components are of a practical
nature and may involve some software
development and/or experimentation, while other components are of a more theoretical
nature.




Synopsis
This unit is a research unit and a core unit for all FIT Honours degrees. Due to the
nature of IT, a wide range of Honours
project types can be offered to students. Some project components are of a practical
nature and may involve some software
development and/or experimentation, while other components are of a more theoretical
nature.
Synopsis
This unit is a research unit and a core requirement for all FIT Honours degrees. Due
to the nature of IT, a wide range of
Honours project types can be offered to students. Some project components are of a
practical nature and may involve some
software development and/or experimentation, while other components are of a more
theoretical nature.




Synopsis
This unit is a research unit and a core requirement for all FIT Honours degrees. Due
to the nature of IT, a wide range of
Honours project types can be offered to students. Some project components are of a
practical nature and may involve some
software development and/or experimentation, while other components are of a more
theoretical nature.
Synopsis
This unit is a research unit and a core requirement for all FIT Honours degrees. Due
to the nature of IT, a wide range of
Honours project types can be offered to students. Some project components are of a
practical nature and may involve some
software development and/or experimentation, while other components are of a more
theoretical nature.




Synopsis
This unit is a research unit and a core requirement for the Bachelor of Software
Engineering Honours stream. Due to the
nature of IT, a wide range of Honours project types can be offered to students. Some
project components are of a practical
nature and may involve some software development and/or experimentation, while other
components are of a more theoretical
nature.
Synopsis
This unit is a research unit and a requirement for the FIT Honours degrees. Due to
the nature of IT, a wide range of Honours
project types can be offered to students. Some project components are of a practical
nature and may involve some software
development and/or experimentation, while other components are of a more theoretical
nature.
                                   objectives_str
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
understand basic Computer Structure and Operation and
demonstrate use of the associated vocabulary;
demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of Data Representation, Computer
Arithmetic and Boolean Algebra using
appropriate methods of implementation;
demonstrate knowledge of Internal Bus, Memory, I/O
organisations and interfacing standards;
describe the internal operation of the CPU and explain how it is used to execute
instructions;
demonstrate an understanding of the basics of operating systems and system software;
and
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -An understanding of:
the relationship between a problem description and program design;
the management of problems using recognised frameworks;
the use of design representations;
the semantics of imperative programs;
the object oriented paradigm as represented by Java;
the sequence of steps that a computer takes to translate source code into executable
code; and
primitive data types and basic data structures.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
adopt a problem-solving approach;
recognise the importance of programming and documentation conventions;
appreciate quality parameters in program development;
accept the code of professional conduct and practice; and
act in accordance with best practice, industry standards and professional ethics.
Developed the skills to:
use diagrams to design solutions for programming problems;
apply problem solving strategies;
use pseudo-code to design algorithms;
design object oriented solutions to simple problems using multiple user-defined
classes;
create and test programming solutions to problems using the Java programming
language;
edit, compile and execute a computer program;
analyse and debug existing programs; and
write a test plan.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
produce formal documentation for a program; and
explain an existing program.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A theoretical and conceptual
understanding of:
basic concepts of information, including organisational and social issues relating
to the ownership and control of
information;
basic concepts of information systems, including their role and importance in
organisations and society;
basic concepts of organisations, including organisational structures, the roles of
individuals and groups in organisations,
the role of communication in achieving organisational objectives, and the nature of
communication in organisations;
basic concepts of IT as it is used in organisations and society, including the
evolution of the role of IT in organisations
and society;
information technologies and information technology
infrastructures employed by organisations;
the business and information management processes and functions for which IT is used
in organisations, and in which IT
professionals are involved;
processes of acquiring, developing and managing IT in
organisations;
techniques and tools for describing and analysing information management processes
in organisations;
the roles of IT workers in organisations and the range of ethical
and professional rights and responsibilities associated with them; and .
organisational and social issues arising from the
use of IT in organisations, including privacy and civil liberties issues.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
recognise the importance of information to organisational
processes and functions;
recognise the opportunities and limitations of the role which IT can play in
managing information in organisations; and
appreciate the importance of the IT practitioners role in organisations and society,
and the responsibilities it entails.
The skills to:
document organisational information-related functions and
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have: A knowledge and understanding of:
the major objectives of database technology;
the relational model for databases and competing models;
the phases of the database development life cycle and their correspondence to the
phases of the system development lifecycle;
the issues related to data creation and management, data rights and data curation;
the techniques and tools to design and implement a database suitable for an
information system;
a database retrieval and manipulation language;
methods to in put place physical structures to permit efficient operation of a
database;
the role of a database administrator.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
appreciate the privacy issues relating to storage of data in a database;
practice ethical behaviour when developing, implementing and using a database.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:
discuss network architecture standards for open systems;
describe ISO reference and Internet models;
explain fundamentals and technologies of physical, data-link and network layers;
understand the functions and architectures of LAN and WAN;
analyse and design LAN architecture for organisational
requirements;
adopt a problem solving approach, accept the code of
professional conduct and
practice and act in accordance with best practice, industry standards and
professional ethics;
analyse data communication networks;
cooperate effectively within small groups;
present their work in various forms.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
typical sources of data such as: market research surveys,
mandatory reporting, census and Consumer Price Index,
commercial
sources;
sampling techniques, sampling error;
fundamental statistical concepts such as: probability, mathematical expectation, the
Central Limit Theorem, hypothesis
testing, correlation and regression.
At the completion of this unit, students will have skills in:
techniques for basic statistical analysis including: the calculation of summary
statistics, graphic display of data including
stem-and-leaf plots, boxplots and histograms;
calculations required for problems based on concepts given in point-3;
calculation of probabilities by: direct calculation from probability distribution,
use of tables and spreadsheets;
the use of computer software (eg SYSTAT) to perform all
statistical techniques covered;
communicating the results of descriptive statistical analysis through a written
report.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit, students will have
Developed the ability to:
understand abstract data types and, in particular, data structures for stacks,
queues, lists, and trees, as well as their
associated algorithms for creating and manipulating them. Evaluate the
appropriateness of different data structures for a
given problem;
understand basic searching and sorting algorithms and implement them. Understand the
concept of algorithmic complexity.
Analyse the complexity of these searching and sorting algorithms as well as other
basic algorithms. Compare the complexity of
different algorithms for solving a given problem;
analyse different implementations of abstract data types and determine their
implications regarding complexity,
functionality, and memory usage;
understand the uses of recursive algorithms and data structures, their advantages
and disadvantages. Analyse the complexity
of simple recursive algorithms, and their relationship with iteration. Understand
basic recursive algorithms for lists and
trees, and develop new ones;
understand the basic concepts in the object-oriented (OO) programming paradigm;
understand the basic concepts in testing;
understand the requirements for "good programming practice";
understand the different compilation targets, including abstract machine code,
assembly language, object code, and machine
code. Understand the relationship between simple code in a high level imperative
language and its low level translation into
assembly code;
learn the structure and design of a particular processor simulator. Analyse the
execution in this simulator of simple
iterative algorithms learned before, thus gaining a deeper understanding of the
connection between software and hardware,
between an algorithm and its execution;
understand how the simulator implements function calling, and use it to reinforce
the connection between recursion and
iteration.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
an understanding of the breadth and nature of the discipline of Software
Engineering;
an understanding of the effect and implications of complexity in large software
systems;
an understanding of the issues in constructing large software systems from its
components, and the nature and design of those
components;
an awareness of the responsibilities placed upon a software engineer;
an ability to use basic modelling techniques to define and describe the behaviour of
software systems;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
the physical structure of the Internet;
the role of mark-up languages, especially XHTML;
the features of XHTML;
the use of graphics and multimedia in web applications;
the basic principles of web site design, implementation and maintenance;
some of the legal and ethical issues associated with the Internet, especially the
area of copyright.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
build professionalism towards respecting copyright;
require professional standards in designing and implementing web applications.
Developed the skills to:
write syntactically correct XHTML code;
develop graphics suitable for web use;
develop scripted streaming multimedia presentations;
develop structurally correct web sites with intuitive navigational paradigms.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
understand the characteristics of commercial web sites and the authoring/management
issues associated with them including
dealing with clients in a variety of situations encountered in the
tendering/authoring process and addressing copyright;
have knowledge of the features and applicability of a range of software tools which
are used in the development of websites;
understand internet standards and protocols, in particular the impact of World Wide
Web Consortium (W3C) standards in this
area;
have an understanding of website usability issues;
be able to create and manipulate digital content for websites, including basic
images, audio, video and animation;
have the ability to code web pages using standard HTML/XHTML, Cascading Style Sheets
Objectives
At the completion of this unit, students will have:
A sound knowledge of spreadsheet applications which will provide an understanding of
business spreadsheet modelling for
analysis, reporting and presentation of organisational data;
learnt to construct applications using VBA as the language for enhancing the
appearance and useability of spreadsheet and
database systems;
a knowledge of the use of relational databases for analysis, reporting and
presentation of organisational information;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
understand concepts from several areas of Computer Science not covered in their
normal curriculum;
know where to find further information on a range of topics on computer programming
and computer science;
understand, from their own experience, some of the difficulties that can arise in
larger programming tasks;
be able to learn new programming languages and tools on their own, without formal
instruction;
be aware of the diverse range of tools that can be used to solve computing problems;
be aware of the breadth of the Computer Science discipline;
have an appreciation of the nature of Computer Science;
have skills in using a programming language or technology not covered in their
Objectives
At the completion of this unit, students will have -
Knowledge and understanding of:
the value of information within today's society and the critical role played by
information technology to gather, generate,
store, process, store and distribute information;
technology, software and hardware of computing and of the uses of computing in the
business environment;
the dimensions and scope of Information Technology;
the change from an industrial to a knowledge driven society;
the nature, role, technology and functions of various types of hardware and software
which form a computer system including
simple software tools to more advanced integrated systems such as CRM or Supply
Chain Management.
Developed skills in:
development of spreadsheet modelling.
development of small database models.
development of an information rich web application such as a mashup.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
the difference between algorithms and processes;
basic ways to structure algorithms: basic data structures (simple variables,
collections structure, specifically vectors,
lists, sets, and tables); basic control structures (sequence, choice, iteration);
recursion;
modular algorithm structures;
the equivalence of recursion and iteration;
problem solving strategies suitable for algorithm development including top-down
design and bottom-up design;
simple standard patterns for algorithms (eg traversal, search);
what makes a good algorithm
limitations of algorithms (high level).
Developed the skills to:
develop simple iterative and recursive algorithms
argue the correctness of simple algorithms
judge the efficiency of simple algorithms, and
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
value clear specification of problems;
understand the relation between algorithms and programs;
appreciate the value of designing abstract algorithms before starting to code a
program;
have confidence that they can develop algorithms to solve computational problems;
appreciate that seemingly difficult problems can have very simple elegant
algorithmic solutions (and vice versa);
value correctness arguments for algorithms; and
value the importance of simplicity and efficiency.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
solve a problem by discussing possible approaches and solutions as a team; and
clearly communicate (the specification of) a computational problem, its algorithmic
solution and arguments for correctness
Objectives
On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
understand the business activities of a typical organisation;
perform basic accounting calculations for a business: balance sheet, profit and
loss, cash flow, pricing, stock valuation,
costing models;
understand how to describe and document operations, information and financial flows
using different types of representations;
describe and analyse accounting information systems in an organisation;
understand how web based systems are used by a modern business;
have a basic understanding of the legal aspects of a contract;
analyse the operations and business systems of an existing business;
plan the functions and systems of a new business;
use and understand the financial statements of a business;
take an active part in the planning activities of a business.
Objectives
On completion of this unit, students will be able to:
understand basic computer structure and operation and demonstrate use of the
associated vocabulary;
demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of data representation, computer
arithmetic and Boolean algebra using
appropriate methods of implementation;
demonstrate detailed knowledge of Internal bus and memory;
describe the internal operation of the CPU and explain how it is used to execute
instructions;
differentiate between machine language and assembly language;
identify factors that affect computer performance;
demonstrate an understanding of the basics of operating systems and system software;
understand basic networking concepts;
discuss communication and networking models such as TCP/IP and OSI;
describe the concept of transport layer services and principle of congestion
control;
describe routing strategies and commonly used LAN topologies, and
adopt a problem solving approach, accept the code of
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
a theoretical understanding of the different applications of 3D design over a range
of digital media;
a theoretical understanding of the commercial imperatives of the 3D working
environment;
a conceptual understanding of the simulated spatial environment and taxonomy of the
3D discipline;
developed an understanding of the theoretical and practical issues involved in the
3D development process;
developed an appreciation of 3D as a unique medium in the context of digital graphic
creation and implementation;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
understand the need for mathematical foundations in the
manipulation of computer graphics and game objects;
understand coordinate spaces within computer game worlds;
demonstrate an understanding of vectors and their relevant operations;
demonstrate an understanding of matrices and their relevant operations and
transforms;
demonstrate an understanding of how vectors and matrices are used for orientation
and angular displacement in 3D spaces;
demonstrate an understanding of how these mathematical principles are used in object
movement and collision detection;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
information technology and the software tools as they relate to (and are used in)
multimedia systems, specifically using the
Adobe Flash authoring environment for application and web-based systems development;
the formal process undertaken for preparing and documenting the various development
stages of a multimedia system;
techniques associated with digital video, animation, images and sound and the
appropriate application of these for use in
application and web development using a range of special effects which are commonly
required for advanced interactive design
in multimedia systems;
how to extend fundamental programming techniques and apply this knowledge across
multiple languages.
Developed analytical skills that enable them to:
systems;
formulate constructive criticism within the construct of critical analysis to make
informed decisions on the most appropriate
blend of tools and technologies to support a given multimedia system requirement;
specify an appropriate tool set for developing and supporting advanced
features/functionality in a multimedia system.
Developed practical skills that enable them to:
Objectives
On the completion of this unit, students will:
know and understand basic concepts of information and information systems relating
to their role and importance in
organisations and society;
know and understand basic concepts of organisations and organisational processes in
relation to their information needs and
the application of IT-based systems to support them;
know and understand basic concepts of IT and IT-based applications as they are used
in organisations and society;
know the key information technologies and information technology infrastructures
employed by organisations;
understand the organisational and social issues arising from the use of IT in
organisations, including privacy and civil
liberties issues;
be able to recognise and analyse opportunities, risks and liabilities arising from
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
understand the fundamental concepts of information and its use;
understand the relationship between data, information and
knowledge;
understand the impact of organisational and other contexts upon information needs
and uses;
understand the basic IM tools (eg classification and metadata) that have been
developed to manage information and meet user
evaluate information and its sources critically;
identify particular information needs;
evaluate technology-based IM tools in terms of meeting user needs;
use basic IM tools to create, represent, store, access, retrieve and use
Objectives
At the completion of this unit, student will be able to:
understand different components of a typical ICT infrastructure;
understand the different roles of devices in supporting human activities through
exploration of ICT history;
identify different devices used in ICT, their usage, interfaces, operating systems
and connectivity support;
understand the role of each device in building an ICT
infrastructure;
design a basic ICT infrastructure for a given real world problem.
Objectives
On completion of this unit, students will:
know the technological capabilities and limitations of the world-wide web and
understand their impact on the development
process for web-based application systems;
know the main processes and tasks required in the development of IT-based systems;
recognise and understand the need for formalisation of development processes and
techniques to address the issues arising
during the development of an IT-based application;
be able to specify an appropriate development process to meet
the needs of a given application development problem;
understand the principles of good practice with respect to the management of
information systems development projects;
recognise the range of skills and competencies required in the development of web-
based application systems;
be able to identify the range of technical and systems expertise needed in the
development of a web-based system for a given
set of circumstances;
be able to perform the basic information analysis and design tasks required during
development of a web-based application
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have A knowledge and understanding of:
the roles of systems analysts and designers in agile system development;
the criteria that can be used to evaluate the quality of a model of a system;
the purpose of different types of models in the UML;
the role and application of automated tools in systems modelling.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
Developed the skills to:
interpret and evaluate systems analysis and systems design models created using UML;
create analysis and design models using the main elements of UML; namely class, use-
case, sequence and robustness diagrams;
create system test plans and test cases, and conduct system testing;
create and evaluate models and prototypes of a user interface using storyboards and
wireframes;
apply problem solving techniques at different levels of abstraction and understand
the effect this may have on a system
specification.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
explain the interdependence and relationships between all stake-holders in the
systems development process;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
describe the characteristics and phases of a project and its life cycle and explain
the role played by the project manager;
explain the need for and develop specific goals, detailed plans and control
strategies in large scale projects and relate
this to the major reasons for the failure of projects;
develop relevant, achievable and measurable project goals;
explain and use standard project management techniques including Project Networks,
Critical Path Analysis and Management,
Gantt Charts and Time-Phased Budgets for high and low level project planning;
explore various alternatives in implementing projects by taking into account of
enterprise architecture;
discuss the communication, people handling and team management skills required of a
project manager and explain some of the
techniques that may be employed;
identify and critically discuss the impact on a project of external influences,
including organisational structure, and
stakeholders;
explain the processes involved in selecting and initiating a project and prepare
various critical documents required for
these processes, including financial justification;
explain the importance of resource availability on project plans, perform project
crashing calculations in order to develop
and manage resource constrained project plans;
describe the need for Quality Management in projects and explain, compare and use
various techniques currently employed by
professional project managers;
describe the impact of risk on a project managers decision process, explain how that
risk may be managed and/or mitigated and
develop an appropriate risk management plan;
Objectives
On completion of this unit, students will understand and demonstrate what it means
to be an IT professional. They will:
be familiar with the variety of roles available to IT professionals;
understand the role and function of professional associations;
demonstrate an understanding of the ACS code of ethics and the rights and
responsibilities of IT professionals;
identify and discuss the organisational and social impacts arising from the use of
IT, and the ethical dimensions associated
with IT-related decisions;
be able to explain and demonstrate the elements of effective communication and
interpersonal communication skills;
be sensitive to and demonstrate understanding of cultural differences to improve
intercultural communication;
be able to select and use strategies for effective and efficient productive
(speaking and writing) and receptive (reading and
listening) communications;
describe the purpose, protocols, roles and procedures for
meetings and interviews;
understand the need to and demonstrate the ability to work co-operatively and manage
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
understanding of a formal specification;
ability to create a formal specification for an informal problem;
knowledge and understanding of algorithmic properties such as correctness,
termination and complexity;
ability to, given a non-trivial algorithm, formally prove certain properties, such
as correctness and termination;
ability, given a non-trivial algorithm, to determine its best, average and worst-
case, time and space-complexity;
knowledge and understanding of reasonably complex data structures such as minimum
spanning trees, and Directed and
Undirected, Weighted and Unweighted Graphs;
ability to design and implement new non-trivial algorithms using complex data
structures;
knowledge of and ability to use algorithmic paradigms such as divide and conquer,
greedy, dynamic programming and so on;
ability to identify these paradigms in diverse algorithms;
knowledge and understanding of the issues involved in
implementing a non-trivial algorithm efficiently.
carefully design and/or analyse the algorithms they are using in order to verify
important properties such as correctness,
termination, and complexity;
identify the key features of a brief informal problem description and abstract the
underlying formal problem.
Developed attitudes that enable them to: Developed the skills to:
create their own data structures.
create a new algorithm to solve a new problem.
make a formal argument about desirable properties of the solution.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
understand object-oriented concepts such as: association, aggregation and
composition; polymorphism and generalisation;
messaging and object interaction, state and lifespan of objects; encapsulation,
connascence, domains, encumbrance, cohesion,
coupling;
know the finer details of syntax and semantics of the Unified Modelling Language
with respect to modelling class diagrams,
interaction diagrams, state machine diagrams, package diagrams, activity diagrams,
deployment diagrams, timing diagrams,
interface and component diagrams;
be able to consider advanced topics in relation to use cases and specifications when
analysing a system;
understand the role of software architecture, and be able to employ several common
architectural such as tiered computing,
client/server, pipes and filters, P2P, Layered implementation, publisher/subscriber,
to design systems;
understand the role of patterns and pattern languages in designing systems, and be
familiar with a range of structural,
creational and behavioral patterns;
be able to apply theoretical concepts and techniques for problem solving, to design
complete software systems in a range of
settings;
be able to justify system design decisions with reference to a models quality,
limitations, scope for future extension, and
to theoretical concepts;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
the role of processes in organisations;
process management lifecycle;
process modelling and process modelling techniques;
process simulation techniques;
workflow and process implementation;
process measurement and benchmarking;
popular and leading edge modelling, simulation, workflow and measurement tools.
recognise the value of process orientation within an organisation;
adopt a critical approach to process design and management in a business context;
appreciate the value of modelling and simulation as effective process design tools;
appreciate that a designed business process is not an implemented business process
(i.e. appreciate the limitations of
process modelling and the necessity of implementation methodologies and techniques);
appreciate the risks and benefits of the influence of IT infrastructure on process
design.
Developed attitudes that enable them to: Developed the skills to:
create process models;
perform process simulation;
select an appropriate process design methodology;
assess process performance;
analyse appropriateness of process-based KPIs;
use popular and leading edge modelling, simulation, workflow and measurement tools.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
document and communicate a process model;
work in a team during process design and management;
communicate during, and coordinate the process management life cycle.


Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -The ability to:
discuss network architecture standards for open systems;
describe ISO reference and Internet models;
explain fundamentals and technologies of physical, data-link and network layers;
understand the functions and architectures of LAN and WAN; and
analyse and design LAN architecture for organisational
requirements.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
adopt a problem solving approach;
accept the code of professional conduct and practice; and
act in accordance with best practice, industry standards and professional ethics.
Developed the skills to:
. gain practical skills to analyse data communication networks.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
cooperate effectively within small groups; and
present their work in various forms.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -
the ability to analyse simple algorithms to work out an order of magnitude estimate
of running time and space;
familiarity with some of the most common data structures: stacks, queues, lists,
priority queues, tables, sets, collections;
the ability to implement these data structures using various common data
representations: arrays, linked lists, heaps, trees
(including balanced trees), hashing;
the ability to evaluate which implementation would be most appropriate for a given
data structure and application;
the ability to apply the same principles used in implementing the common data
structures to implement other data structures;
ability to design and implement new data structures;
an understanding of some more advanced algorithms in areas such as: graph theory
(shortest path etc), pattern searching, data
compression (precise selection of advanced algorithms will vary from year to year);
the ability to design new algorithms to solve new problems;
an enjoyment of programming as an intellectual exercise;
an appreciation of the elegance of certain data structures and algorithms as a form
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
the major objectives of database technology;
the relational model for databases and competing models;
the phases of the database development life cycle and their correspondence to the
phases of the system development lifecycle;
the techniques and tools to design and implement a database suitable for an
information system;
a database retrieval and manipulation language;
methods to in put place physical structures to permit efficient operation of a
database; and
the role of a database administrator.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
appreciate the privacy issues relating to storage of data in a database; and
practice ethical behaviour when developing, implementing and using a database.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have: A knowledge and understanding of:
the major approaches to using IT to support management decision making;
the nature of managerial work to a level required for DSS systems analysis;
how managers make decisions and what processes can be followed to improve managerial
decision making;
a systems development methodology for personal DSS;
data warehousing and business intelligence;
the principles of DSS strategy and governance.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
information technology and the software tools as they relate to (and are used in)
multimedia systems;
the Adobe Flash authoring environment for CD-ROM and web based systems development
techniques associated with digital video, images and sound and the appropriate
application of these for use in CD-ROM and web
development;
the formal process undertaken for preparing and documenting the various development
stages of a multimedia system;
how to achieve a range of special effects which are commonly required for advanced
interactive design in multimedia systems;
fundamental programming techniques and how to carry this knowledge across multiple
languages.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
systems;
make informed decisions on the most appropriate blend of tools and technologies to
support a given multimedia system
requirement;
formulate constructive criticism within the construct of critical analysis.
The skills to:
apply advanced interactive design techniques to a multimedia system using a
time/frame based authoring environments;
use a blend of industry standard multimedia tools and products;
further enhance and refine user interface and navigational design and creativity
skills in multimedia systems;
specify an appropriate tool set for developing and supporting advanced
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
client-side programming ((X)HTML, JavaScript, CSS, DHTML, DOM);
server-side programming (ASP.NET, Ruby on Rails, JSF);
basic XML technologies (XML, DTD, XPath, XSLT, XMLSchemas);
web Servers (IIS, Apache);
current, popular IDEs and programming technologies
security (encryption, transport and document level, Digital
Signatures, SSL, TSL, Access Control Standards);
standards Bodies (IETF, W3C, OASIS, OAGIS etc);
eBusiness formal and de jour Standards.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have an appreciation that eBusiness Systems are better designed and managed by
professionals with a sound knowledge of the
technologies used to build these systems;
have an appreciation that underlying technologies often directly
impact the Business goals of an eBusiness System via constraints and opportunities
presented by the technologies;
have a belief that all existing technologies in back-end systems can be integrated
by appropriate middleware;
value the importance of choosing to use established technology standards where
possible.
Developed the skills to:
develop a small eBusiness system (B2B or B2C and IDE/ implement the appropriate
technology;
create an appropriate Technical Architecture for a specified, non-trivial eBusiness
solution;
create XML documents, schemas for these documents, transforming and querying such
documents using fundamental XML skills.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
Objectives
At the completion of this unit, students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
propositional and predicate logic;
how to describe languages using Regular Expressions, Finite Automata,
Nondeterministic Finite Automata, Context Free
Grammars, Pushdown Automata, and Turing Machines;
the relationship between Regular Languages, Context Free Languages, Recursive
Languages, and Recursive-Enumerable (or
Computable) Languages;
how to use Turing Machines to represent computable functions;
how a Universal Turing machine can simulate any Turing Machine on any input;
basic computational complexity theory, including verifiers,
polynomial-time reductions and NP-completeness.
Developed attitudes that will allow them to:
appreciate the limitations of Regular Languages, Context Free Languages, Recursive
Languages, and Computable Languages;
comprehend the limitations of computers in terms of the problems they can solve;
appreciate that there are many solvable problems which cannot be solved in
polynomial time.
Developed the skills to:
use propositional logic to represent and analysis problems in the theory of
computation;
construct Finite Automata, Nondeterministic Automata, and Turing Machines to
describe languages;
convert Regular Expressions into a Finite Automata;
convert Finite Automata into Regular Expressions;
find a Regular Grammar for a Regular Language;
find a parse tree, leftmost derivation and rightmost derivation for a word in a
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have A theoretical and conceptual
understanding of:
the hardware environment in which 3D design programs operate;
the specific issues and requirements related to the field of 3D development;
the different uses of 3D design over a variety of media;
the commercial imperatives of the 3D working environment;
the 3D spatial environment and the taxonomy of 3D.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
demonstrate an acceptance of the time requirements for the 3D development process
and the different 3D techniques;
demonstrate an appreciation of 3D as a unique medium in the context of Multimedia;
demonstrate an appreciation of the relationship of 3D aesthetics to traditional art
composition;
demonstrate flexibility and a willingness to integrate new
techniques into their skill set.
design and create 3D objects, models, scenes and simple animations for specific
output media;
evaluate and assess techniques used in the creation of 3D products;
manage workloads for efficient production of 3D products;
map the physical 2D to the virtual 3D environment.
Developed the skills to: Developed the teamwork skills necessary to:
improve their skills in communicating with other members of a development team;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have: A knowledge and understanding of:
the role of business decision making in organisations;
the decision making lifecycle;
model building techniques;
model solving techniques;
model results presentation and interpretation;
the role of interactivity in decision modelling;
popular and leading edge decision modelling tools.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
recognise the value of effective decision making within an
organisation;
adopt a critical approach to decision models and their use in a business context;
appreciate the value of modelling and simulation as effective decision making tools;
appreciate the limitations of formal decision models and the
necessity of post-solution interpretation stage;
appreciate the risks and benefits of interactive computer-centered decision making.
Developed the skills to:
create interactive decision models;
interpret the results produced at model solving stage;
select an appropriate decision modelling technique;
assess models limitations;
analyse appropriateness of modelling environments;
use Popular and leading edge decision modelling tools.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
document and communicate a decision model;
work in a team during model design and results interpretation stages;
communicate during, and coordinate the decision making life cycle.


Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
the role of a network administrator;
the configuration and management of network infrastructure protocols used in
internets (such as ICMP, DHCP, DNS, LDAP etc);
host computer and user management;
network application protocols used by network management systems (such as SNMP,
RMON);
factors involved in and be able to manage the security, reliability and performance
of computer networks.
The ability to:
adopt a problem-solving approach;
independently research topics and resolve problems associated with network
management;
understand and use a range of hardware and software tools for network and systems
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
have detailed understanding of families of network protocols and their
interdependencies, and developed skills in their
application;
understand the historical development of key internet protocols;
be familiar with the source documents and specifications used to define key internet
protocols, and developed skills in their
be familiar with the common methods used to define and
promulgate network protocols
be able to identify the national and international organisations whose roles involve
the formation of standards in this area;
be able to comprehend the notation used in network standard definitions including
formal data and structure definition
languages such as EBNF, ASN.1, SGML or XML, and developed skills in using this
notation;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
describe the ISO OSI reference model;
analyse physical layer for networking;
understand the architecture of data link layer for networking;
analyse the main functions and design issues of the network layer;
describe the operation of IPv6;
analyse the operation of TCP;
understand integrated and differentiated services architecture;
understand network management architecture;
understand the basic concepts of multimedia communications and QoS.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
the Personal Software Process and its benefits, including the need for planning,
estimation, recording time, product and
defect metrics, reviews, and reflection;
the importance of, and the relationship between, a quality process and a quality
product;
reinforceing and extending their knowledge of OO programming concepts by learning
how they are implemented in another
programming language;
the Software Engineers role in software development and
maintenance and working with large systems;
the Team Software Process and how it relates to the Personal Software Process.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
develop a positive professional attitude;
recognise the importance of adhering to software engineering principles in designing
and implementing systems;
make personal estimates and work plans, produce work logs and
diaries, produce product and defect metrics, and participate in technical review
meetings;
monitor, reflect upon, and improve their own productivity and effectiveness;
use a new object oriented programming language to construct systems consisting of
many interacting classes;
analyse, debug and perform maintenance on large existing object-oriented programs.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
the nature of the development process involved in digital video and audio
production, and the tasks and management processes
associated with it;
the characteristics of computer hardware and software which are used in the
development of multimedia systems related to
sound and video content;
the need for management and control of the multimedia development process and the
contribution which management tools and
techniques can make to this process.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
demonstrate a positive approach to teamwork, allowing them to work as part of a
project team and an ability to communicate
with a client and deliver the relevant information as per the client brief.
effectively make use of sound/video recording hardware and
editing software;
edit digital video in post production;
author a DVD based multimedia product which will play on a standard DVD player.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have: A theoretical and conceptual
understanding of:
the purpose and objectives of the systems design and implementation phases of the
systems development lifecycle, and the
activities which they involve;
the purpose, strengths and weaknesses, and the use of the main techniques which are
used in systems design and
implementation;
the key issues involved in systems design and implementation.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
recognise the value of a team-based approach to the development of information
systems;
value the importance of the systems design and implementation phases of the systems
development lifecycle;
appreciate the importance of a systematic approach to the design and implementation
phases of systems development.
Developed the skills to:
prepare suitable design and implementation approach alternatives to the development
of a business system
use basic design techniques in the development of elements of an information system;
prepare and present a design specification for a business system;
prepare and present an implementation plan for a business system;
construct and implement a quality business system;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
two current scripting technologies, (one server-side, one client-side) performing a
variety of Internet based functions,
including access to data stores;
an approach to web based security using these technologies; and
utilisation of asynchronous technologies in Internet applications.
Developed the skills to:
security methods, and asynchronous technologies.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
show professionalism towards respecting copyright;
require professional standards in designing and implementing web applications.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
have an understanding of the fundamental principles and breadth of commercial, e-
business and e-commerce programming tasks;
have experience in using their programming skills in a number of different
environments such as Linux, Unix or Windows, while
being aware that their fundamental programming approaches remain valid;
have their understanding of and skills in top-down code
development enhanced;
have knowledge of mark-up languages and scripting languages, and skill in creating
applications using these;
understand the client-server paradigm;
be able to develop and code solutions to typical web-based commercial programming
problems using markup and scripting
languages, in a client-server paradigm;
further develop skills in creating suitable and thorough test harnesses;
have a sound understanding of the fundamental principles of web service strategies.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
deliverables, meeting target dates and producing quality output.
Developed the ability to:
set achievable and measurable goals;
apply what was learnt in prior classroom studies in real work situations;
develop initiative, communication, interpersonal and teamwork skills in a business
environment;
develop solutions to business problems using information
technology and other techniques;
prepare documentation and written reports of a professional standard;
address performance improvement opportunities identified by industry supervisors
particularly in the mid-placement
evaluation;
complete business tasks, participate in work teams, comply with the norms and rules
of the industry partner, recognise
personal
strengths and weaknesses particularly after feedback from
industry supervisors, cooperate within groups, and adopt and
practise professional ethics that influence work behaviour; and
and international business phone calls, business emails, business process modelling,
operating software applications quickly
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
principles and applications of business models in decision support systems;
cost analysis using breakeven technique;
main approaches to deal with decision making problems in business;
widely used linear programming tools;
carrying out sensitivity analysis using computer software on a series of problems;
queuing theory and simulation techniques;
concepts of different types of forecasting;
common optimisation methods for business applications;
methodology to solve typical network problems using network flow models.
recognise the potential 0f efficiency and productivity gains through the use of
technologies;
develop interest and expertise in formulation of real world problems and solving
them by computer models.
Developed attitudes that enable them to: Developed the skills in:
the application of spreadsheets such as EXCEL in formulation and solving common
business problems;
use of advanced software such as Excel QM, TreePlan, CrystalBall program;
sensitivity analysis by use of computer models.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
meet peer students and professionals with variety of business expertise;
participate in group discussion and team work solutions to business problems.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
demonstrate an understanding of advanced object-oriented concepts such as
inheritance, polymorphism, and abstract classes and
interfaces as provided for in Java;
be able to create programs that provide a graphical user interface and use event
handling;
be able to write programs involving abstract and dynamic data structures, and
implement algorithms for searching, insertion
and deletion;
be able to use the collection classes in the Java API;
be able to implement algorithms that utilise recursion;
have an understanding of design principles for building a multiple-class object-
oriented program;
be able to implement exception handling techniques;
be able to use files for persistent storage of data;
be able to construct test harnesses for multiple-class programs;
demonstrate an understanding of the range and purpose of modern tools to support the
process of programming complex
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
how to organise and write clear technical documentation.
the different types and roles of technical documentation, including code
documentation (literate programming methods,
function header documentation), internal designs, external designs, reference
manuals, guides and introductory manuals.
the use of the basic types of tools for producing documentation: editors, text
formatters, typesetters, desktop publishers,
graphics tools, printing and viewing tools.
the role of style in writing.
different approaches to the writing process and which approach best suits the
individual student.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
be sensitive to the aims and uses of effective technical
documentation at all stages in a project.
be aware of different writing methods and styles and their
suitability to different tasks.
appreciate the wider use of documentation in evaluating,
promoting, and supporting projects.
develop a sensitivity to different reader / audience types.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
be able to write effective and clear documentation.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
understand concepts from several areas of Computer Science not covered in their
normal curriculum;
know where to find further information on a range of topics on computer programming
and computer science;
understand, from their own experience, some of the difficulties that can arise in
larger programming tasks;
be able to learn new programming languages and tools on their own, without formal
instruction;
be aware of the diverse range of tools that can be used to solve computing problems;
be aware of the breadth of the Computer Science discipline;
have an appreciation of the nature of Computer Science;
have skills in using a programming language or technology not covered in their
normal curriculum;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
an understanding of game entities and formal games program structure;s
an understanding of the notion of the programming game loop and how to set it up;
a working knowledge of basic DirectX, including textures,
displaying sprites, animation, text, and rendering;
a working knowledge of physics in the games programming context, including basic
movement and interaction;
a working knowledge of Direct 3D rendering, including geometry, models, cameras,
textures and lighting;
an understanding of scene management in games;
the ability to express these concepts in a working Microsoft Windows game prototype.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have: A knowledge and understanding of:
the concept of e-business, that is, how organisations and businesses organise their
activities using the Internet and
associated technologies to communicate, carry out and record transactions both
internally and externally;
the nature of e-business activities across business, government, community and not-
for-profit sectors;
core e-business activities and processes e.g. change
management, EDI, electronic record keeping, negotiation;
the legal, privacy and security issues and implications of using the internet to
conduct e-business;
the implications for businesses and organisations of trends in e-business; and
the need for the integration of web interfaces with back office systems and other
business processes.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
appreciate the complexity of legal, privacy and security issues and their
implications for conducting e-business; and
appreciate the impetus of the internet and related technologies in driving internal
integration and external business
relationships and service provision (including mobile systems and web services).
Gained practical skills to:
a simple e-business case.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
environment and to contribute to the preparation of a simple e-business case.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
the principles and practice of the emergent field of web content management;
the relative roles and responsibilities of webmasters and other professionals in a
web or intranet development project;
user information needs and information seeking behaviours within the web
environment.
information retrieval principles (eg precision, recall, relevance, specificity) and
their application in the web environment;
issues and challenges in organising information for effective retrieval on web sites
and intranets;
are represented in the key components of web information architecture;
the application of information design and usability principles to labelling,
navigation and search functions on a web site or
intranet;
commonalities and differences in information architectures in public web, intranet
and extranet environments;
phases and processes in planning and implementing a web content management project
or program;
tools, techniques, and software that are commonly used for web content management.
Developed attitudes that enable them to appreciate:
the range of specialist expertise amongst professionals involved in a web site/
intranet development project, and the
importance of effective communication and collaboration amongst these groups;
the centrality of the user in defining an information architecture for a web site or
intranet and the difficulties users
experience in finding relevant information on the web;
that business imperatives and user requirements are the key drivers of web content
management, but that reconciling the two
may be no easy task;
that findability is a critical factor in determining web usability, and the role
effective organisation systems play in this
process;
that effective organisation systems tend to be largely invisible to web or intranet
users.
their own growing confidence in their information retrieval skills.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
the role of operating systems in the architecture of computer systems;
the practical considerations involved in the use of the Unix operating system;
specifically memory management, process
management and file system implementations;
the role, utility and syntax of Unix scripting languages;
considerations and techniques for securing the Unix operating system;
the responsibilities of and tasks undertaken by Unix system administrators;
points of contrast and similarity between Unix and other operating systems in
widespread use.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
appreciate Unix operating system as it is implemented in modern computer systems -
Unix system file system, memory
management, and networking, and practical functions;
know how to solve many systems problems using Unix scripting and system facilities;
appreciate Unix system programming, research and development, and security.
Developed the skills to:
use important Unix utilities to monitor Unix systems and Unix networks; construct
Unix shell scripts to solve many system
problems;
implement security controls in the Unix environment;
use Unix utilities for data processing, system development and research;
install and configure the Unix environment;
use Unix OS for important network servers and tailor their Unix systems to provide
important system and network services.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
understand the need to balance requirements of users in multiuser operating system
environments;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
combinatorial and sequential logic, Boolean Algebra, Karnaugh maps, and hazards;
counters, ripple adders, tree adders, memory/addressing, computer busses, logic and
bus speed, and Direct Memory Access;
data representation for integers and floating point operands;
machine arithmetic, microprogramming;
storage herarchies, caches and cache architectures, performance impact of caching;
virtual memory and translation look-aside buffers, performance impact of TLB
caching;
vectored and polled interrupt handling;
pipelined architecture, superscalar architecture, data dependency, and hazards;
CISC, RISC, VLIW machine architectures.
Developed the skills to:
model combinatorial and sequential logic circuits using a simulator tool;
perform programming tasks in assembly code.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have: A knowledge and understanding of:
switching, process scheduling and job scheduling;
memory management and virtual memory systems; I/O device drivers and management;
file subsystems;
resource allocation strategies;
asynchronous and synchronous communication mechanisms and their use in operating
systems;
the philosophy and implementation of interprocess communication and its use in
distributed computer systems.
Developed the skills to:
subsystems, as well as programming interrupt handlers and contact switching.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
demonstrate an understanding of the history and concepts of the C ++ language and
how C++ relates to other commercial
languages, especially Java;
be able to write programs making use of the features and capabilities of C++,
comprising: Streams, Pointers, arrays and
vectors, Classes, inheritance and polymorphism, Templates and the Standard Template
Library, The I/O class hierarchy;
be able to write programs involving abstract and dynamic data structures, and
implement algorithms for searching, insertion
and deletion;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
the diversity of theoretical and conceptual frameworks which contribute to the
current research and application of
educational multimedia;
the uniquely immersive, engaging and interactive nature of educational multimedia
learning environments; and
the correlation of the individual needs of a learner with an appropriate digital
environment for the delivery of educational
material and learning experiences.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
be acquainted with and value the diversity of learning styles and requirements
within the community and appreciate the need
for an adaptive approach in the modification of technology to the
requirements of both the learner and the educational content;
recognise the potential of multimedia in enabling educational access and equity.
Developed the skills to:
design and produce documents relating to the conceptual development of educational
learning environments and the need for
quality assurance in production processes;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
an understanding of the key principles of game design;
an understanding of critical factors that serve to balance game design and
playability;
an understanding of implementation techniques for narrative structures in
interactive environments;
developed attitudes that enable them to be aware of the ethical issues involved with
games development;
developed attitudes that enable them to appreciate effective forms of narrative
construction employed in a game environment,
such as embedded and emergent game narratives and the mapping of plotlines and
interactive story structures;
developed attitudes that enable them to explore new directions in the rapidly
emerging discipline of game creation;
developed the skills to prototype a game level and implement balancing techniques to
Objectives
At the completion of this unit, students will:
know and understand the impacts of advances in information technologies on
organisations, their structures and the way they
use and manage information to support their operations;
know and understand how the needs of organisations and the marketplace influence the
path of technology evolution;
know and understand some of the key factors which contribute to the success or
failure of technology-based innovations in
organisations;
recognise the strengths and weaknesses of information technology for performing a
variety of common information tasks;
be able to evaluate the merits and disadvantages of a technology-based solution to
an organisational information need or
Objectives
At the completion of this unit, students will:
know and understand the business imperatives which drive organisational needs in key
areas of information management and
information systems acquisition and development;
know and understand the key principles and contemporary practices in the development
and implementation of information
management strategies in organisations;
know and understand the key principles and approaches to the development,
acquisition and implementation of IT-based systems
in organisations;
recognise the need and understand the importance of taking an integrated approach to
tasks of information management and
systems development in organisations;
be able to analyse needs and specify solutions for a range of organisational
information management and systems development
Objectives
At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:
understand the need and importance for system developers to have skills in this area
of IT applications;
know the key basic technologies which underlie the development of web-database
applications;
understand the key technological issues confronting developers building applications
of this type;
know the key features of programming languages which are commonly used for
developing web-database application;
develop a typical web-database interface using a well-known programming language.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
understand object-relational database design;
understand multi-dimensional database design;
understand query optimisation and its impact on programming;
understand semi-structured database design and retrieval;
understand database trends and current research directions in database management.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have
A knowledge and understanding of:
the importance of information systems security issues to
contemporary organisations;
information security concepts and philosophies;
threats, vulnerabilities and risks to an organisations information assets and the
control technologies and techniques
required to support this;
the mathematical foundation of cryptoanalysis;
the ethical, legal and criminal issues relating to the security of information
systems;
how to evaluate current and future developments and trends in security control
technologies and techniques;
the relevance of human factors to information security planning and management.
adopt a critical approach to the analysis and design of information
systems security systems;
willingness to apply ethical standards of security issues;
demonstrate ethically sound viewpoints with respect to the protection of information
resources while maintaining a secure IS
framework; specifically related to (but not limited to) the goals of security such
as confidentiality, integrity, and
availability, in the professional development of information systems;
cooperate within groups and adopt and practise professional ethics that influence
work behaviour.
Developed attitudes that enable them to: Developed the skills to:
apply information security concepts in the analysis of information systems security
issues;
apply risk management techniques to the planning and
management of information systems security systems;
apply security analysis and design methods and techniques in the analysis of
threats, risk and vulnerabilities to an
information system;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
a familiarity with different approaches to presenting information visually as they
have appeared throughout history and in
different cultures;
an appreciation of the application of visual media to present information in a range
of academic disciplines and in the
public sphere;
a basic ability to select and apply appropriate types of
visualisation and presentation;
an ability to devise new techniques for the visual presentation of information in a
discipline with which they are familiar;
an ability to critically analyse visual information displays and data
visualisations;
an understanding of the advantages, drawbacks and pitfalls of the visual
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
know the basic aims and purposes of information architecture and understand its
importance to the management and use of
information in an organisation;
know a variety of approaches commonly used for the development of information
architectures, and understand the key
principles behind them;
be able to conduct a business requirements analysis, and a user needs analysis, for
the purposes of developing an information
architecture;
be able to critically evaluate an information architecture and assess its
suitability for a given range of user needs;
know the phases and processes involved in planning and implementing an information
architecture (IA) project or program;
recognise the contribution which the varying perspectives of different disciplines
and professional groups can make to the
At the completion of this unit students will have:
•an understanding of the paradigms behind the development and application of computer generated
3D characters;
•an understanding of the principles of 3D animation theory and implementation, including character
specific studies;
•a theoretical understanding of established and emerging procedures for 3D character modelling,
detailing and preparation for animation;
•developed attitudes that enable them to appreciate the theories and practices adopted for complex
3D topology, modelling and animation techniques, including production pipelines;
•developed the ability to evaluate and implement suitable processes for 3D character creation and
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the motivation and the need for data mining;
•characteristics of major components of the data mining process;
•the basic principles of methods and operations for data mining;
•case studies to bridge the connection between hands-on experience and real-world applications;
•key and emerging application areas;
•current major research issues.
Developed the skills to:
•use data mining tools to solve data mining problems.
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the role of Data Warehousing (DW) as opposed to operational databases;
•the definition and the need of Business intelligence (BI);
•DW development methodology;
•dimensional models compared to ER models;
•DW architectures, ETL and data quality issues;
•how DW can support BI;
•BI tools, techniques and OLAP;
•Data Mining (DM) techniques;
•Data Mining Tools.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•recognise the value of DW and BI for a business organisation;
•adapt a critical approach to DW and BI technology in a business context;
•appreciate the value of DW for effective management support and decision making;
•understand the importance and value of BI tool and techniques compared to traditional data analysis
techniques;
•appreciate the value BI tools and DM for providing knowledge for decision making, in ways
unavailable with traditional techniques.
Gained practical skills to:
•create dimensional models;
•create DW architectures suitable for different organisations and requirements;
•interpret results from OLAP and dimensional models;
•create data analysis models using BI tools;
•interpret results from BI and DM tools.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
•the nature of the development process as it relates to complex post -production projects, and the
tasks and management processes associated with it;
•the characteristics of computer hardware and software which are used in the development of
audiovisual content in a complex post production project;
•the need for management and control of the development process and the contribution which
management tools and techniques can make to this process.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•understand the aesthetic and technical requirements involved in creating complex digital content and
to be able to adapt these to their project.
Developed the skills to:
•demonstrate an ability to seamlessly combine separate media elements into their project;
•creatively combine and apply the tools and techniques learned in the prerequisite units with those
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•various types of e-business models adopted by organisations;
•how e-Business projects facilitate trading processes found in organisations, the role of strategic
planning to e-Business initiatives, and the basics of various types of web-enabled auction strategies and
how they relate to electronic procurement projects undertaken by organisations.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•develop an ability to identify and manage changes caused by introducing e-Business initiatives;
•develop an ability to select appropriate e-Business projects to business.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
•develop a professional attitude towards the management and development of e-Business projects;
At the completion of this unit students will:
•understand the various ways in which a database application may be scaled to the enterprise level,
including: applications being split between clients and servers; servers being split between application
servers and database servers; application servers being split into clusters of application servers;
•be able to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of single-tier, two-tier and multi-tier
architectures;
•be aware of some of the pitfalls (and ways to avoid or minimise them) of distributed applications,
including: performance problems due to network latency and bandwidth; security problems when
transmitting data over an untrusted network; transactional problems when transactions must be
distributed over multiple servers;
•be able to evaluate when it is appropriate to use enterprise programming techniques, and when
simpler solutions will suffice.
•be able to configure an enterprise application and application server to take advantage of advanced
capabilities such as: hot deployment; clean shutdown; clustering; farming; load balancing; automatic
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•fundamentals of the Event-B Method;
•applications of the Event-B Method;
•Event-B specifications;
•software Testing in the discrete domain;
•the role of proof obligations and consistent specifications;
•determination of Proof Obligation;
•the role of refinement in developing formal specifications.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•have an appreciation of the professional need to establish formal properties of software;
•have a belief that formal specifications can improve the quality of software.
Developed the skills to:
•use the Event-B notation to develop and prove software specifications;
•install a Event-B Toolkit on a Unix/Linux/Windows platform;
•write basic Event-B specifications;
•refine and extend more advanced Event-B specifications.
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•understand all stages of the process of developing an information system;
understand the roles and responsibilities of clients, system users and developers in a systems
development project;
•understand how information systems are developed;
•apply, in a practical setting, the theoretical work covered in their course;
develop a significant computing application, from the analysis and design stages, through coding and
implementation to evaluation;
•work with clients and communicate effectively with them;
•define a problem, and gather data, facts, opinions and information needed to analyse and solve it;
•outline and evaluate alternative solutions to a system development problem;
•perform a feasibility study that includes estimates of costs, time requirements, a schedule for the
development, and the benefits expected from the system;
•identify hardware and software requirements for a system;
•document a system design using a range of appropriate tools;
•implement a system, including testing and debugging;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the relationship between IT and organisational management and current trends in IT and IT
management;
•operational management requirements of a system and their inter-relationships;
•evaluating the philosophies and processes behind IT resourcing.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•consider ethical issues in IT and IT management.
Developed the skills to:
•access resource management strategies and applying these in case studies;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
•the basic concepts of human visual perception and its impact on cognition;
•the functions of visualisation with respect to amplifying cognition;
•the properties of data and the rules for mapping data to images;
•the role of factors such as pattern, space, color, interactivity and animation in visualisation;
•the range of applications to which visualisation approaches can be applied, particularly with respect
to geospatial data.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•critically select from the range of available visualisation techniques and apply the one that is best for
the domain at hand.
Developed the skills to:
•evaluate a given data set and infer valid conclusions based on a supplied visualisation;
•design and construct an appropriate type of visualisation for a given data set;
•manipulate visual variables such as color and size to optimise a visualisation;
•identify the principle components of a map and describe map projections commonly used;
•import, display and manipulate data within a Geographic Information System (GIS).
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•develop a comprehensive knowledge about global information infrastructure;
•understand the threats to electronic commerce on the Internet and potential security problems;
•understand the process for the design of secure systems;
•demonstrate the understanding and need for security protocols and procedures;
•understand the security issues and vulnerabilities of eCommerce servers and know the defensive
strategies;
•be aware of the problems arising from active content technologies;
•be familiar with the XML standard and examine how it can be applied to develop ecommerce
applications;
•be familiar with the mobile commerce technology and the services it offers.
•understand and evaluate electronic payment mechanisms;
•appreciate the privacy and legal issues and be familiar with anonymity technologies;
•understand the applicability of intelligent software agents in electronic commerce.Students will:
•appreciate the importance of a secure information infrastructure in conducting electronic commerce;
•appreciate the privacy and legal issues;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the role of intelligent decision support in organisations;
•decision support paradigms and applications;
•methods for handling certain and uncertain knowledge;
•issues in the design and construction of intelligent decision support systems;
•correctness, precision and scalability;
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•recognise the value of intelligent decision support within an organisation;
•adopt a critical approach to the choice of decision support method;
•appreciate the impact of data quality, and business constraints on the behaviour of a decision support
system;
•appreciate the limitations of formal decision models and the handling of uncertainty.
Developed the skills to:
•choose appropriate decision support methods;
•separate modelling from solving;
•implement simple decision support tools on a high-level software platform;
•combine methods to meet application requirements;
•assess the limitations in scalability and precision of a solution.
Demonstrated the communication and teamwork skills necessary to:
•document and communicate an intelligent decision support model;
•work in a team during model design and implementation stages;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
•the principles underlying interactive environments;
•a wide variety of interactive and immersive environments;
•the impact of a variety of interactive environments on audiences/users;
•industry requirements in developing a commercial product, including production teams, production
phases, development environments and marketing issues.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•appreciate the ethical issues involved with game development;
•value the contributions of peers, cooperating within the class unit, reflecting the development team
in industry.
Developed the skills to:
•create an interactive environment using a set middleware or authoring tool.
Demonstrated the teamwork skills necessary to:
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•understand how object-oriented and other forms of middleware can be used to address the major
issues and challenges found in networked, net centric, mobile, and other forms of computing;
•design and implement software for networked, net centric, mobile, and other forms of computing
based on middleware such as .NET, Java components, and other technologies;
•design and implement software for networked, net centric and mobile and other forms of computing
based contemporary middleware technologies;
•design applications for networked, net centric, mobile, and other forms of computing based on
software patterns and architectures, such as federations and brokers;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•basic concepts of multimedia including file types, applications, compression and delivery issues;
•processes involved in the analysis, design and production of multimedia applications;
•legal, security and privacy issues related to multimedia applications;
•application and selection of different multimedia authoring tools in the development of multimedia
applications;
•basic priciples of Internet and WWW in the context of web based multimedia development;
•multimedia elements (text, image, animation, audio and video) and 3D modeling techniques;
•basic programming techniques (such as javascript and CGI programming) to control different media
such as audio, video, text and images
•fundamentals of Extended Markup Language (XML);
•database features which support multimedia applications.
•processes of analysis, design and producing of a multimedia application;
•securities issues and corresponding services related to multimedia applications;
•multimedia elements and 3-D modeling techniques.
•development processes for functional specifications for multimedia/web-based applications based on
user requirements;
•basic concepts of organising multimedia elements for multimedia applications based on user
requirements.
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•describe OSI security architecture;
•describe common security standards and protocols for network security applications e.g. electronic
mail, IP, web and network management;
•understand common information risks and requirements;
•explain the operation of conventional and public-key encryption techniques;
•describe the concepts and techniques for digital signatures, authentication and non-repudiation;
•understand privacy and ethics issues;
•appreciate the need for the digital certificates and public key infrastructure;
•appreciate the importance of system security against intruders and malicious software using firewalls;
•appreciate the relevance of privacy and ethics issues to organisations and individuals;
•apply simple security configurations to PC based applications e.g. email, Internet, computer
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
•the diversity of theoretical and conceptual frameworks which contribute to the current research and
application of educational multimedia;
•the uniquely immersive, engaging and interactive nature of educational multimedia learning
environments; and
•the correlation of the individual needs of a learner with an appropriate digital environment for the
delivery of educational material and learning experiences.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•be acquainted with and value the diversity of learning styles and requirements within the community;
and
•appreciate the need for an adaptive approach in the modification of technology to the requirements
of both the learner and the educational content.
Developed the skills to:
•design and produce documents relating to the conceptual development of educational learning
environments;
•develop applications of learning environments for specific learning needs; and
•utilise appropriate techniques and be able to select tools to meet the requirements of specific
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•strategies for developing a non-trivial programming, hardware, or theory-based project.
•how to locate and utilise prior research and methods on a particular topic;
•how to cite bibliographic references the student has used to understand various components of the
project, support claims on knowledge, events, hypotheses and theories;
•how to document software development from a user and application programming perspective;
•software development methods: analysis, design, implementation and testing applied to the design
and development of a non-trivial project.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•acknowledge the importance of attending and contributing to meetings as a method of gaining
important information and ideas about the project;
•understand the basic requirements of software development from both user and developer
perspectives;
•appreciate the importance of correctly acknowledging the work of others in researching solutions to
problems;
•value the role of work books in documenting a projects progress and keeping track of its
development.
Developed the skills to:
•search, access, and analyse research literature as part of the process of developing solutions to
problems;
•understand the importance of analysis, design, documentation, and testing in developing a non-trivial
At the completion of this unit students will have:
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the continuing software crisis, problems encountered in the development of large software systems:
poor quality, late delivery and budget overruns;
•techniques used in software engineering to counter these problems;
•the role of software lifecycle models in project control and planning;
•different categories of software metrics;
•software estimation methods;
•methods for specifying real-time systems;
•techniques and tools to support configuration management;
•strategies for testing software;
•the roles and responsibilites of project team members.
Developed the skills to:
•apply techniques for scheduling and control of large projects;
•construct and validate a software specification;
•formal methods specification of software systems;
•functionally design of software systems;
•describe large software systems using appropriate language and technical sprecification techniques to
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
•the roles and responsibilities of clients and developers in a multimedia or games development
project;
•the methodologies, tools and techniques required for delivering a functional multimedia system or
game.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•approach the development process ethically and professionally.
Developed the skills to:
•develop a significant multimedia/game application, primarily project definition, design, and
prototyping;
•apply project management techniques to a multimedia/game development project;
•integrate multimedia, programming, and technical skills in the design and development of a system
prototype;
•develop effective user and system documentation;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
•the roles and responsibilities of clients and developers in a multimedia or games development
project;
•the methodologies, tools and techniques required for delivering a functional multimedia system or
game.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•approach the development process ethically and professionally.
Developed the skills to:
•develop a significant multimedia/game application, primarily testing, evaluation, finalisation,
documentation, and delivery;
•apply project management techniques to a multimedia/game development project;
•integrate multimedia, programming, and technical skills in the testing and evaluation of a system
prototype;
•develop effective user and system documentation;
At the completion of this unit students will have:
•knowledge of the Unix philosophy at shell and system call levels;
•comprehension of Unix shells and the POSIX standard;
•knowledge of the variety of tools available and understanding of a core selection of them;
•knowledge of the Unix system call interface and associated systems programming;
•programming skills at the Unix shell level using pipelines and shell scripts applying a number of tools;
•programming skills at the system call level for systems programming.
At the completion of this unit students will have:
•an understanding of web environments and their components;
•an understanding of the principles of object oriented Internet applications development;
•the knowledge and skills to design and implement web based applications, using a server side
applications development environment;
•the knowledge and skills to design and implement mobile applications;
•the knowledge and skills to implement data stores in web based applications;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
•the fundamental elements of an XML documents structure and the processes involved in reading and
handling such a document;
•the advantages and limitations of XML in comparison to other formats such as HTML, EDI, Flat files
etc;
•the role of the XML Schema Definition Language and its relationship to Document Type Definitions
(DTDs);
•the role of XML Stylesheet Language (XSL) in document publishing;
•the role of XML in rich media/multimedia presentations through the use of Synchronised Multimedia
Integration Language (SMIL);
•the issues involved with audio/video streaming on the web.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•adopt a flexible approach towards application development by consideration of the wide range of
XML approaches available;
•appreciate the importance of systematic and structured approaches to program development.
Developed the skills to:
•create an XML document and its associated Document Type Definition (DTD);
•create an XSL style sheet and use it to convert XML into HTML or other XML formats;
•use Synchronised Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL) to author interactive audiovisual
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the application of information technology in meeting business needs in terms of effective
communication, measurable deliverables, meeting target dates and producing quality output.
Developed the ability to:
•set achievable and measurable goals;
•apply what was learnt in prior IT classroom studies in real work situations;
•develop initiative, communication, interpersonal and teamwork skills in a business environment;
•develop solutions to business problems using information technology and other techniques;
•prepare documentation and written reports of a professional standard;
•address performance improvement opportunities identified by industry supervisors particularly in the
mid-placement evaluation;
•complete business tasks, participate in work teams, comply with the norms and rules of the industry
partner, recognise personal strengths and weaknesses particularly after feedback from industry
supervisors, cooperate within groups, and adopt and practise professional ethics that influence work
behaviour;
At the completion of this unit students will:
•know the general purpose and functions of operating systems;
•understand the hardware and software mechanisms used to carry out these functions;
•be familiar with the principal differences between common major operating systems such as
Windows and Linux;
•be able to install new operating systems on PC hardware;
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•understand all stages of the process of developing an information system;
•understand the roles and responsibilities of clients, system users and developers in a systems
development project;
•understand how information systems are developed;
•apply, in a practical setting, the theoretical work covered in their course;
•develop a significant computing application, from the analysis and design stages, through coding and
implementation to evaluation;
•work with clients and communicate effectively with them;
•define a problem, and gather data, facts, opinions and information needed to analyse and solve it;
•outline and evaluate alternative solutions to a system development problem;
•perform a feasibility study that includes estimates of costs, time requirements, a schedule for the
development, and the benefits expected from the system;
•identify hardware and software requirements for a system;
•document a system design using a range of appropriate tools;
•implement a system, including testing and debugging;
•evaluate a system, identifying any weakness or possible enhancements;
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•understand all stages of the process of developing an information system;
•understand the roles and responsibilities of clients, system users and developers in a systems
development project;
•understand how information systems are developed;
•apply, in a practical setting, the theoretical work covered in their course;
•develop a significant computing application, from the analysis and design stages, through coding and
implementation to evaluation;
•work with clients and communicate effectively with them;
•define a problem, and gather data, facts, opinions and information needed to analyse and solve it;
•outline and evaluate alternative solutions to a system development problem;
•perform a feasibility study that includes estimates of costs, time requirements, a schedule for the
development, and the benefits expected from the system;
•identify hardware and software requirements for a system;
•document a system design using a range of appropriate tools;
•implement a system, including testing and debugging;
At the completion of this unit students will have:
•familiarity with, and ability to apply, relevant decision support systems to the solution of financial
problems;
•the ability to formulate, frame and solve financial problems in the context of appropriate decision
support systems;
•an understanding of relevant finance concepts and understand how to apply those concepts in a
practical setting.
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
•basic concepts of decision support systems;
•basic concepts of operational (investing and financing) finance;
•basic concepts and principles of decision support criteria as applied to operational finance;
•how decision support are applied to operational finance in organisations;
•opportunities, risks and liabilities arising from the usage and application of decision support in the
context of operational finance in organisations;
•processes of acquiring, developing and managing decision support in the context of operational
finance in organisations;
•techniques and tools (Excel spreadsheet modelling and Expert Choice for describing and analysing
problems in operational finance in organisations under multicriteria decision making framework.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•recognise the importance of decision support systems in the context of operational finance to
organisational processes and functions;
•recognise the opportunities and limitations of the role that decision support systems play in managing
operational finance in organisations.
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•some of the main security concepts and issues involved in the development of software, including:
Software security versus other aspects of computer security; goals of secure and trusted software;
vulnerabilities versus threats; best software development principles and practices; buffer overflows;
security of programming platforms; authentication and authorisation; principle of least privilege;
security features are not equal to secure features; secure use of encryption; user input validation;
reliable software components; data privacy; auditing and logging; security testing;
•the importance of developing secure software in today's electronic world.
Developed the skills to:
•design applications with security in mind;
•validate user input;
•implement secure authentication mechanisms;
•authorise users access to various protected resources;
•encrypt files and hash passwords;
•store session data securely in web applications;
•perform secure database access;
•set up secure transfer of data;
At the completion of this unit students will:
•create and validate XML documents based on XML Schema;
•map organisational rules into XML Schema definition;
•be able to retrieve XML document using XSLT;
•understand the different architectures provided by different component technologies and their
evolution towards service oriented computing;
•be able to create and deploy web services as an example of service oriented computing application;
•know the technologies and standards that enable web technologies including XML, SOAP, WSDL and
UDDI;
•understand the issues of choreographing a number of web services into a business process
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the underpinning theories relevant to HCI;
•the principles and practices of HCI in designing user interfaces;
•the importance and role of usability and evaluation in systems design;
•the issues relating to user diversity, different types of systems, interaction styles, devices and
environments.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•appreciate the development of systems from a user perspective;
•differentiate between good HCI practice in systems development from other development practices;
•formulate attitudes which enable them to interact effectively with users;
•empathise with all users particularly those with specific needs.
Gained practical skills to:
•recognise the principles of HCI design required in systems development;
•gather user requirements effectively;
•design an effective user interface;
•conduct appropriate evaluation of systems from a HCI perspective and interpret the outcome.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
•work in teams to complete assessment tasks;
At the completion of this unit students will:
•understand the business processes that recordkeeping activities support, and the evidential
requirements for evidence of business activities that exist in the work place;
•understand how systems are designed and implemented to meet business needs and evidential
requirements;
•have the skills to undertake various forms of business analysis in support of records management
activities;
•be able to collaborate effectively with other professionals in the design and implementation of
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•modelling and design of flexible software at the architectural level. Basics of model-driven
architecture;
•Architectural styles and patterns, Middleware & application frameworks;
•product lines. Design using COTs software;
•configurations and configuration management;
•in-depth look at software design, design patterns;
•design of distributed systems using middleware;
•design for qualities such as performance, safety, reusability etc;
•evaluation and evolution of designs, reverse engineering.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•apply variety of design pattern;
•appreciate analysis fundamentals;
•analyse well-formedness (completeness, consistency, robustness, etc);
•analyse correctness (eg. static analysis,simulation etc.);
•analyse quality requirements (eg. root cause analysis, safety, usability, security, etc.).
Developed the skills to:
•take requirements for simple systems and develop software architectures and designs at a high level;
•use configuration management tools effectively;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the historical and conceptual development of AI;
•the goals of AI and the main paradigms for achieving them including logical inference, search,
nonmonotonic logics, neural network methods and Bayesian inference;
•the social and economic roles of AI;
•heuristic AI for problem solving;
•basic knowledge representation and reasoning mechanisms;
•automated planning and decision-making systems;
•probabilistic inference for reasoning under uncertainty;
•machine learning techniques and their uses;
•foundational issues for AI, including the frame problem and the Turing test;
•AI programming techniques.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•appreciate the potential and limits of the main approaches to AI;
•be ready to reason critically about claims of the effectiveness of AI programs;
•analyse problems and determine where AI techniques are applicable;
•implement AI problem-solving techniques in Lisp;
•compare AI techniques in terms of complexity, soundness and completeness.
At the completion of this unit students will have -
Developed the ability to:
•understand the processes of image formation, acquisition, processing and analysis;
•develop programs for manipulating grey level, colour and multi-spectral images; and
•use standard image processing software;
•undertake computer analysis of medical, remotely-sensed, document, and other images.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•understand the role of visual information processing and analysis; and
•apply the theory and methods in practical problem solving.
Developed the skills to:
•write programs to carry out basic image processing tasks such as image denoising, image filtering and
segmentation of an image in its constituent parts or objects;
•write programs to carry out advanced image processing and analysis tasks such as image
segmentation, image, image classification, image data mining, and robotic vision; and
•build a software system for processing and analysis of image data.
Demonstrated the communication and teamwork skills necessary to:
•function as an image processing specialist in a group which is involved in developing a major software
system; and
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•describe the characteristics and phases of a project and its life cycle and explain the role played by the
project manager;
•explain the need for and develop specific goals, detailed plans and control strategies in large scale
projects and relate this to the major reasons for the failure of IT projects;
•explain and use standard project management techniques including Project Networks, Critical Path
Analysis and Management, Gantt Charts and Time-Phased Budgets for high and low level project
planning;
•discuss the communication, people handling and team management skills required of a project
manager and explain some of the techniques that may be employed;
•explain the processes involved in selecting and initiating a project and prepare various critical
documents required for these processes, including financial justification;
•explain the importance of resource availability on project plans and develop and manage resource
constrained project plans;
•describe the need for Quality Management in projects and explain, compare and use various
techniques currently employed by professional project managers;
•describe the impact of risk on a project managers decision process, explain how that risk may be
managed and/or mitigated and develop an appropriate risk management plan;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•mathematical representations of basic geometric primitives in Euclidean space, such as points, lines,
polygons and parametric curves;
•how to use homogeneous co-ordinates and transformations on geometric objects in two and three
dimensions.
•how to combine multiple transformations efficiently;
•orthographic, parallel and perspective projections and their related homogeneous transformations;
•appropriate data structures for hierarchical representation of polygonal datasets;
•rasterisation algorithms for drawing in frame buffers;
•the use of Quaternions to represent object rotation;
•a synthetic camera model for viewing and projecting of two and three-dimensional geometry;
•algorithms for hidden surface removal and backface elimination. The capacity to analyse the space
and time complexity of these algorithms to determine the most appropriate in a given situation;
•BRDF Shading models such as Lambert, Phong, Blinns Phong, Torrance-Sparrow-Blinn-Cook-
Beckmann, Oren-Nayar;
•textures and texture mapping;
•basic knowledge of aliasing theory;
•interpolative shading models. Shadow algorithms. Local and global illumination models;
•the OpenGL state-machine, GPUs and graphics pipline.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•understand the role and value of visual communication in the arts and sciences;
•appreciate the uses and application of interactive, real-time graphics and software rendering.
At the completion of this unit students will have:
•an ability to select and use various Artificial Intelligence techniques to build intelligent games;
•an understanding of the general capabilities of Artificial Intelligence (AI) technologies;
•an understanding of the possible opportunities where intelligence can be applied in the game
development world;
•an ability to apply AI techniques in building games that challenge the players by learning/adapting to
their style over time and thereby developing new strategies to take the games into the next level;
•an ability to evaluate the suitability of AI techniques in the development of various games;
•enthusiasm for the endless possibilities that AI technologies can enrich the game development world;
•motivation to develop further skills in AI techniques for games development;
•appreciation and open-mindedness that better collaborations between the game development
industry and the academic AI research will open wider opportunities in the enhancements of smart
games;
•skills in developing smart games using AI techniques;
•ability to design, develop and debug game applications written in C++;
At the completion of this unit students will:
•understand the concept of narrative structure and a range of techniques employed in the
construction of traditional media;
•appreciate the main forms of narrative construction which might be usefully employed in a
multimedia environment;
•understand the key areas of research and development in the creation of narrative structures in
multimedia environments;
•appreciate the importance of narrative structure to the users experience of multimedia
environments;
•appreciate ways in which narrative forms might be adapted to the contextual diversity of different
media;
•appreciate narrative techniques appropriate to the multimedia environment;
•appreciate the goals of multimedia production in relation to the input of narrative structure;
•integrate and further develop skills acquired in previous studies to create multimedia for business,
entertainment, education and social environments;
At the completion of this unit students will:
•understand the nature and operation of information communities within contemporary society;
•have an understanding of community informatics as an emerging discipline and professional practice;
•be familiar with contemporary debates concerning the social impact of information technology use;
•gain understanding of the collaborative behaviours and interdependencies which contribute to
notions of community;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the meanings applied to the terms knowledge and knowledge management in organisational context;
•a range of approaches that may support knowledge management activities;
•the concept of ownership of knowledge and the validity of knowledge processes;
•the methods and approaches for implementing knowledge management initiative in the organisation;
•typical steps and activities associated with implementing knowledge management initiative in the
organisation; and
•the approaches from information systems, artificial intelligence, documents and records management
for representing and manipulating knowledge.
Developed attitudes which allow them to:
•be able to effectively communicate knowledge management perspectives to associated business and
professional groups.
Developed the skills to:
At the completion of this unit students will have -
•knowledge of, and practical development skills in, B2C applications;
•an understanding of the business issues and context salient to B2C applications;
•ability to use popular software development packages for B2C Internet Commerce; and
•ability to develop a non-trivial B2C application, including for displaying catalogs and processing
transactions.


At the completion of this unit students will have -
•a sound basis for Chinese computing in the business environment;
•the ability to use popular Chinese computing software and application packages and extend their
capabilities to other non-Roman languages;
•an understanding of the techniques used to develop Chinese computing software;
•familiarity with Chinese language and multilingual computing environments;
•knowledge of the principles and skills of Chinese business computing through the practical use of
Chinese software systems;
•skills that can easily be translated into using software in non-Roman languages;
At the completion of this unit students will:
•understand the importance of authentication of system components: data, software, hardware, users
and subsystems;
•understand the implementation of different techniques for authentication and identification;
•understand the significance of authentication and identity management in IT security
•understand different authentication and identity management systems;
•understand the role of biometric, smartcards, crypto-based techniques and their issues when applied
to authentication process;
•understand existing networked authentication models and protocols for distributed systems, such as
kerberos;
•appreciate the role of distributed authentication models and protocols in securing electronic
transactions;
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•create a database system for practical application utilising forms, reports and graphics;
•understand the principal aspects of setting up a complete database software system;
•apply professional form design processes and techniques to tailored database applications;
•produce a database system of professional quality.
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•understand object-relational database design;
•understand multi-dimensional database design;
•understand query optimisation and its impact on programming;
•understand the database management systems recovery, concurrency, and transaction management
mechanisms;
•understand database trends and current research directions in database management;
•use design a complex database system; and
At the completion of this unit students will:
•understand the role of records and archives in organisations and society;
•understand and apply theories and models relating to recordkeeping and archiving;
•be able to specify recordkeeping requirements relating to the creation, management, and accessibility
of records as evidence of social and organisational activity in a range of business and social contexts;
•have the skills to develop appraisal and metadata management programs in relation to contemporary
and historical recordkeeping systems, including electronic recordkeeping systems; and
•be able to formulate appraisal and metadata management policies, strategies, tactics and tools with
reference to international and national standards and best practice.
At the completion of this unit students will:
•understand organisational contexts of technological infrastructures and emerging technological
frameworks for electronic information and knowledge management systems, including intranet and
Internet environments;
•appreciate the capabilities and limitations of many products on the information and knowledge
management systems market and how to use implementation strategies to maximise their strengths
and minimise their weaknesses;
•identify and select from appropriate strategic options for designing and implementing an information
and knowledge management system;
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•implement decisions about applying organisational policies for reference and collection services,
justify the principles of collection management strategies, and evaluate them;
•manage networked access for users in the case of electronic resources;
•develop information literacy programs; and
•select the best source of knowledge for a practical information need.
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•evaluate professional literature and knowledge in relation to practice;
•analyse current issues relating to the information industry;
•apply theories and practice of their selected specialisation to the workplace;
•demonstrate practical skills at a professional level in an information agency or information-related
functional area, as well as an ability to interact effectively with work colleagues and clients;
•assess career opportunities within the information industry and develop a personal career plan;
•evaluate the role in professional practice of ethical codes, professional literature, professional
At the completion of this unit students will:
•understand the key principles, concepts and standards that guide the development of information
organisation and retrieval systems and web-based information architectures;
•have skills in applying standard cataloguing, classification, indexing, thesaurus construction, and
knowledge discovery metadata schemes and tools;
•have developed experience in interacting with selected bibliographic utilities/ networks, and in using
bibliographic software; and
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•object-oriented design and programming with C++ for large software development;
•concurrent design and programming with programming languages which do not have built-in features
to support concurrency like C++;
•how to develop high performance software with programming languages that do not support
concurrency such as C++;
•network and distributed programming using C++.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•appreciate OO application design and implementation with C++;
•appreciate design and implementation techniques of concurrent applications with C++;
•appreciate design and implementation techniques of network applications with C++.
Gained practical skills in:
•object identification in software development;
•concurrent design with mutual exclusion, deadlock free software construction, live lock avoidance,
and efficient task communications;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the purpose of requirements specification, of functional modelling of processes and data, and of the
database concept;
•the relational database model;
•how to apply integrity constraints and business rules to a system design and implementation based
around an enterprise level database management system.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•understand business information systems as the implementation of company policies and objectives;
•respect the points of view of both technical and business actors in the system development process.
Developed the skills to:
•develop functional models of processes and data of the business problem scenario;
•design and implement a database;
•implement integrity constraints and business rules in a database;
•write queries in SQL to maintain and use a relational database.
Demonstrated the communication and teamwork skills necessary to:
•communicate requirements for business functionality in terms of data required, management of that
At the completion of this unit students should have:
•a detailed knowledge and understanding of all major protocols used in LAN & WAN and WLAN;
•an understanding of major issues in implementing these protocols;
•a detailed knowledge and understanding of network architectures including interaction with firewalls;
•an awareness of the latest developments in TCP/IP (e.g. IPv6, IPSec, multicasting, VoIP, QoS, iSCSI);
•the knowledge and skills to implement and manage TCP/IP services within wired and wireless LANs;
•understand various measures of data network performance;
•exposition of network performance evaluation tool, Network packet analysers, and other
performance measurement tools;
•use simulation packages to construct models of computer networks;
•use models for performance analysis and prediction;
•make recommendations for network performance improvement;
•practical skills in setting up TCP/IP connections and routing configurations for different environments;
At the completion of this unit students will:
•be able to seek opportunities for the successful application of information technology, whether in an
existing organisation or in a new enterprise;
•be able to evaluate IT-based opportunities in a purposeful and disciplined way, taking into account
both opportunity and risk;
•be able to organise the pursuit of selected IT-based opportunities, including developing and managing
structure, strategy, and finance;
•be able to present IT-based commercial opportunities to potential investors;
•be expected to learn and understand relevant financial and intellectual property issues, as well as
technology issues;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•managing pressures of commercial service delivery including managing client expectations and
balancing workload;
•the roles and responsibilities of clients, strategists, designers and developers in a commercial
multimedia project;
•applying commercially-accepted standard design, development, test and component re-use
methodologies;
•applying quality management, resource and business management practices in a professional
environment;
•the roles of commercially-standard methodologies, tools and techniques;
•the roles of external service providers (e.g. ISPs, CD ROM duplication services, print services, image
libraries);
•the processes and components of quality and business management systems.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•adopt a professional service approach to the production of multimedia systems;
•adopt a business-value oriented and customer-driven approach to creative design;
•appreciate social and ethical behaviour.
Developed the skills to:
•plan and manage the full range of activities in a multimedia systems project;
•problem-solve and work to commercial standards;
At the completion of of this unit student will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•strategic contexts of IT management;
•alignment between business strategy and IT strategy;
•forms of IT governance;
•various types of IT processes;
•organising and managing IT function (including role of CIO);
•legal and ethical concerns of IT;
•evaluating IT portfolio management;
•IT provisioning issues including IT outsourcing.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•develop an ability to identify and manage changes in IT strategy due to changes in business strategy;
•recognise the need to assess the socio-political motivations for evaluating IT business value and IT
outsourcing decisions;
•critically assess the legal and ethical issues associated with managing and governing IT resources.
Developed the skills to:
•prepare IT strategy in alignment with business strategy;
•prepare IT outsourcing policies;
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•understand the strategic and operation requirements, and characteristics of a real time enterprise;
•describe the characteristics of a real time Enterprise system that distinguishes it from other software
systems. This focus is particularly on the concept of an integrated enterprise solution;
•explain the benefits of enterprise systems in terms of integration, world-wide flexibility, interactive
processing, client-server platform, open systems, and the capacity to be configured for all business
types;
•explain the application modules and system architecture of an enterprise system;
•describe an enterprise systems features and functionality that support business processes;
•explain the stages of an enterprise systems implementation lifecycle;
•describe the technical architecture and integration of enterprise systems;
•explain the planning and implementation approaches for enterprise systems;
•discuss the communication, people handling and team management skills required of an enterprise
systems implementation manager;
•explain implementation project team responsibilities using examples from actual business cases;
•discuss the major factors behind the success and failure of enterprise systems implementation
projects using both theoretical knowledge and actual business cases;
•demonstrate a capacity to describe and perform navigation functions of an enterprise systems
system;
•describe system-wide concepts such as workflow, archiving, reporting, and the exchange of
Upon successful completion of the unit students will -
•understand the role of computational tools and methods in modern science;
•understand the process of model construction, model fitting, model verification and analysis in
scientific problem solving;
•understand the differences between the core modelling approaches (numeric versus analytic;
continuous versus discrete; linear versus non-linear; deterministic versus stochastic);
•understand the implications of choosing a particular modelling approach;
•understand central computational methods for the analysis of models in each of these classes
•understand the role of simulation and visualisation;
•be introduced to at least one standard scientific software package for model construction and
Upon successful completion of the unit, students will have a solid working knowledge of advanced
object oriented concepts, including multiple inheritance and polymorphism, and the ability to apply
this knowledge to the construction of non-trivial programs.
They will have an understanding of:
•how to design moderately complex programs where that design will typically incorporate a number of
modules and a number of levels of refinement;
•the role of software architecture in program design and a knowledge of a number of commonly-
applied software architectures;
•how to make use of design patterns, re-usable components and software libraries in designing
modular software;
•how to make design decisions that take into account desirable quality attributes such as flexibility,
maintainability and re-usability;
•how to implement programs in a systematic manner using an integrated testing procedure in such a
way that modules are highly likely to function as specified;
•how to isolate faults within a program in a systematic manner;
•how to use software tools to aid in the program design and implementation process. These tools
might include program design tools, integrated program development environments, configuration
management systems, re-factoring tools, automatic testing environments and debuggers;
•how to adequately document a software project.
They will have developed attitudes that enable them to:
•recognise the importance of process in achieving quality in a repeatable manner;
appreciate the distinction between analysis of program requirements and design that seeks to meet
specificatons;
•adopt an approach to making design decisions that involves considering a range of options for design
decisions and evaluating potential design decisions with reference to a system of values;
•implement a personal software development process with the aim of continuously improving their
At the completion of this unit, students will be able to understand and apply:
•network architecture standards for open systems;
•ISO reference and Internet models;
•Internetworking concepts, IP addressing, and socket-level interface;
•fundamentals and technologies of cabled and wireless physical layer implementations;
•fundamentals and technologies of cabled and wireless data-link layer implementations;
•fundamentals and technologies of network layer implementations, packet-switching and queueing
concepts;
•functions and architectures of cabled and wireless LAN and WAN, including ALOHA and CSMA/CD
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•understand basic problems in distributed computing, especially in relation to concurrency,
parallelism, synchronisation, deadlocks, safety and liveness properties;
•understand differences between various distributed computing models and widely used distributed
computing schemes;
•understand basic functional and performance concepts in grids and clouds and identify frequent
causes of performance problems in grid applications;
•understand basic software and hardware reliability concepts in grids and identify frequent causes of
reliability problems in grid applications;
•discuss some of the enabling technologies e.g. high-speed links, emulators and storage area networks
for building computer grids and clouds;
•explain the use of some of the cloud computing, grid computing and clustering middleware used to
implement virtual super computers, including security mechanisms;
•explain programming toolkits such as Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) for writing parallel computer
applications;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•a variety of parallel architectures, such as bus-based, massively parallel, cluster, vector, GPU;
•a variety of parallel programming paradigms, synchronisation and parallelisation primitives, message
passing, data parallel, tuple space;
concurrency, synchronicity and parallelism;
•software development environments and tools (including performance tools);
•the design issues of parallel systems.
An appreciation of:
•the needs of parallel applications.
Developed skills in:
•designing, developing and debugging parallel programs using a variety of paradigms;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•strategies for developing a non-trivial programming, hardware, or theory-based project;
•how to locate and utilise prior research and methods on a particular topic;
•how to cite bibliographic references the student has used to understand various components of the
project, support claims on knowledge, events, hypotheses and theories;
•how to document software development from a user and application programming perspective;
•software development methods: analysis, design, implementation and testing applied to the design
and development of a non-trivial project.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•acknowledge the importance of attending and contributing to meetings as a method of gaining
important information and ideas about the project;
•understand the basic requirements of software development from both user and developer
perspectives; - appreciate the importance of correctly acknowledging the work of others in researching
solutions to problems;
•value the role of work books in documenting a projects progress and keeping track of its
development.
Developed the skills to:
•search, access, and analyse research literature as part of the process of developing solutions to
problems;
•understand the importance of analysis, design, documentation, and testing in developing a non-trivial
software project;
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
•understand the games development pipeline as used in industry;
•appreciate the number of formal and informal games development platforms that exist and why they
are used;
•research new and unfamiliar games development environments and adapt to their use;
understand how to formally approach the use of a new development environment in the games
context;
•critically analyse and explore new games development technologies, including graphics and audio
engines, for suitability of use for specific games projects;
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A theoretical and conceptual understanding of:
•the diversity of theoretical and conceptual frameworks which contribute to the current developments
in the field of information technology, including human computer interaction, information visualisation
and interface design;
•the grand challenges in the field of information technology and the emerging trends, including the
range of applications to which emerging information technologies, information visualisation techniques
and innovative interfaces can be applied, for example ubiquitous computing, geospatial information
visualisation and mobile devices interfaces.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
•critically evaluate the impact of rapid changes in information technology on society and to appreciate
the pervasive and expanding range of applications and fields on which information technology is
impacting.
Developed the skills to:
•locate and critically evaluate information on current research in the field, for example using electronic
library databases, and to synthesise the information they have gathered into a logical and coherent
argument;
On the completion of this unit, students will:
•understand the purpose of the data management function and recognise its importance for
organisations;
•know and understand some of the key organisational data management tasks and the issues
associated with them;
•understand the impacts of technological change on the data management function and the role of
data management professionals;
•recognise and and be able to analyse the risks and liabilities which must be addressed by
organisational data management strategies;
•understand the importance of a structured and systematic approach to the development and
On the completion of this unit, students will:
•know and understand some of the key issues of current concern in regard to the application of IT and
IT-based applications;
•understand the impact of these issues on the knowledge, skills and attitudes required of IT
professionals;
•appreciate the importance of their role and responsibilities as IT professionals;
•understand the organisational and social issues arising from the use of IT and IT-based applications in
At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
•the role of a network administrator;
•the configuration and management of common network infrastructure protocols, including DHCP,
DNS, LDAP, SMTP, HTTP and others;
•standards relevant to network management systems, including ASN.1, SNMP, SMI/MIB, RMON,
DMTF/DMI, and others;
•standards-based models and practices in fault, configuration, accounting, performance and security
management of networks.
Gained important practical skills, including:
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project.
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous independent research.
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field.
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis.
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research.
have confidence in their abilit to plan and execute an individual research project.
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
Identify open problems in current research;
Identify promising new research directions based on previous results;
Define feasible projects based on such problems;
Set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research project;
Communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Developed the skills to:
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate reseach ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
experience of all stages in the development of a SE project
experience of the role and responsibilities of clients and
developers in a SE project
understanding of the way in which computer systems are
designed, developed and implemented;
understanding of the role of methodologies, tools and techniques;
understanding of the processes and components of a quality system;
ability to adopt a systematic and professional approach to the production of quality
computer systems;
understandig of ethical behaviour;
ability to plan and manage the full range of activities in an SE project;
ability to work productively in a team and individually;
ability to communicate effectively with clients and users;
ability to develop and deliver on time a computer system that meets the specified
requirements.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
the role of validation and verification methods in the system life cycle;
key issues in software testing, testing levels and testing activities;
testing techniques - based on testers experience - adhoc testing, exploratory
testing - specification-based - equivalence
partioning, boundary-value analysis, finite-state machine based, random testing -
code-based - control-flow and data-flow
technique - fault-based - error seeding, mutation testing - usage-based -
reliability measures, operational profile - based
on type of apps - GUI, web based, OO, component testing, testing
concurrent/distributed/real-time/embedded systems -selection
and combination of techniques;
test related measures - evaluation of software under test - fault density, types of
faults - evaluation of tests done -
criteria such as coverage, thoroughness; mutation score;
empirical work, replication experiments vs case study.
adhere to software quality engineering principles;
recognise the importance of adhering to software engineering principles of
Validation and Verification and standards in the
design and development of test methods;
have an understanding of inspection and debugging approaches, configuration
management, performance, and quality standards
issues.
Developed attitudes that enable them to: Developed the skills to:
use open source IDEs such as Eclipse and unit testing with JUnit, and coverage tools
such as djUnit and Cobertura, commercial
validation tools such as from IBM/Rational, and other similar products to help
detect software system defects;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
basic research concepts, major philosophical foundations (theory, framework,
paradigm, scientific method and methodologies in
general);
research methods and techniques relevant to IT research;
key issues in IT research;
methods of argument analysis;
how to design research;
how to evaluate research and peer review procedures;
the process of reviewing research literature on a specific topic;
ethical research practices.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in themselves as informed consumers of published research, able to
critically evaluate the relative quality
and merits of reported research findings;
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent research and to complete a
thesis;
have an awareness of the ethical issues that arise in the design and implementation
of research.
Developed the skills to:
match research tools and methods with research needs;
write effective research papers;
evaluate research ideas and designs;
collect and analyse relevant data.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate research ideas effectively in oral and written form;
assess research ideas and designs.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
develop capabilities to undertake research in the information systems field;
learned various research methods and study published research papers in which these
research methods have been used;
learned to evaluate how well the research methods have been used in published
research papers.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project.
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous independent research.
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field.
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis.
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research.
have confidence in their abilit to plan and execute an individual research project.
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
Identify open problems in current research;
Identify promising new research directions based on previous results;
Define feasible projects based on such problems;
Set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research project;
Communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Developed the skills to:
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate reseach ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
achieved an overview of different technologies that form the basis of intelligent
information systems;
understood the capabilities of these methods;
learned to recognise tasks that can be solved with these methods;
the ability to judge the limitations of these methods.With
successful completion of the unit the students;
the ability to apply the standard techniques in the chosen sub-fields of intelligent
information systems to the construction
and design of such systems;
the ability to critically evaluate the performance of these
approaches;
the ability to compare these techniques to alternative approaches;
gained an appreciation of the practical relevance of intelligent information
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
an improved understanding of the issues involved in designing algorithms in the
chosen specialisation area(s) and in
analysing their performance;
an understanding of the mathematical formalisms that are relevant for these
algorithms;
learned to recognise tasks that can be solved with these
algorithms;
the ability to judge the limitations of these methods.With
successful completion of the unit the students;
the ability to choose and apply algorithms and data structures in the chosen
specialisation area(s);
the ability to evaluate the performance of algorithms using formal approaches;
the ability to design modified algorithms in the chosen area to suit
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
understand the place of computational methods in the chosen field of specialisation
and their relation to non-computational
approaches;
compare and contrast alternative computational approaches in this domain;
critically evaluate the limits and capabilities of these methods;
be able to select, design and test computer programs in the domain;
where appropriate, be able to use the standard computational packages in the chosen
domain effectively for practical problem
solving.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
understand the general architecture of the Internet, the interworking of the key
protocols, and the underlying services
required for the operation of the network;
understand the standards development process for protocols and applications
operating in the Internet;
describe the characteristics of the key protocols in the Internet, and the roles
they play;
understand the key quality of service and security issues applying to the Internet;
knowledge of local area network design and implementation techniques;
identify appropriate standard internet protocols for various networking functions;
select suitable local area network architecture to meet user requirements;
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have -A knowledge and understanding of:
risks, threats and goals of information security;
various controls and their effectiveness for information security in an
organisation;
how to evaluate the effectiveness (both in terms of performance and limitations) of
individual control techniques;
how to match the risk against controls and evaluate their
applicability.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
appreciate the importance of information security in an
organisation;
appreciate the importance of the use of various controls and their effectiveness for
information security in an organisation.
Developed the skills to:
carry out an investigation into the selection and deployment of particular security
measure and application technologies
based on risk analysis as applied to information security in an organisation;
use tools for counteracting risks and threats to information security.
communicate information on threats to information security and key appropriate
controls and counter measure techniques in
written and/or oral form;
work individually or in a small group on an advanced topic related to information
Objectives
On completion of this unit students will have -
An understanding of:
network strategy development;
network design principles;
network performance;
network topologies;
network implementation.
The ability to:
analyse the requirements of a networking systems;
evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of particular networking systems and
technologies in specific situations.
An appreciation of:
the importance of systematic design in networks;
the importance of management protocols and philosophy in networks.
The skills to:
perform basic design tasks for a network;
devise a management model and system for a network, using established protocols.
Gained experience in:
communicating on issues in design and management of networks;
appreciating the organisational and social impact of poor design and management in
networks.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will:
understand object-oriented design and programming with C++ for large software
development;
achieve sound knowledge of concurrent design and programming with programming
languages which do not have built-in features
to support concurrency like C++;
know how to develop high performance software with programming languages that do not
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
Implement system analysis skills;
Implement quality planning and project planning skills;
Provide resolution of a realistic business problem;
Implement software design and development skills;
Implement software implementation skills;
develop documentation.

Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will be able to:
understand object-relational database design;
understand multi-dimensional database design;
understand query optimisation and its impact on programming;
understand the database management systems recovery,
concurrency, and transaction management mechanisms;
understand database trends and current research directions in database management;
use design a complex database system; and
use a database programming language to access a relational database system.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will
be familiar with the various technologies associated with handheld/ portable
computing devices;
be competent in producing software for such devices by event-based programming
techniques, using an industry relevant
Object-Oriented language;
be familiar with a GUI-oriented Integrated Development
Environment (MS Visual Studio. NET);
be familiar with a subset of the Microsoft .NET framework and the various facilities
it provides, in particular those
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
an understanding of web environments and their components;
an understanding of the principles of object oriented Internet applications
development;
the knowledge and skills to design and implement web based applications, using a
server side applications development
environment;
the knowledge and skills to design and implement mobile
applications;
the knowledge and skills to implement data stores in web based applications;
a professional attitude towards the development of web based information systems.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project.
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous independent research.
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field.
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis.
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research.
have confidence in their ability to plan and execute an individual research project.
Developed the skills to:
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
Identify open problems in current research;
Identify promising new research directions based on previous results;
Define feasible projects based on such problems;
Set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research project;
Communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate research ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.

Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project.
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous independent research.
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field.
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis.
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research.
have confidence in their ability to plan and execute an individual research project.
Developed the skills to:
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
Identify open problems in current research;
Identify promising new research directions based on previous results;
Define feasible projects based on such problems;
Set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research project;
Communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate research ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project.
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous
independent research.
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field.
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis.
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research.
have confidence in their ability to plan and execute an individual research project.
Developed the skills to:
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
Identify open problems in current research;
Identify promising new research directions based on previous results;
Define feasible projects based on such problems;
Set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research
project;
Communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate research ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.

Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project;
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous independent research;
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field;
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis;
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research;
have confidence in their ability to plan and execute an individual research project.
Developed the skills to:
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
identify open problems in current research;
identify promising new research directions based on previous results;
define feasible projects based on such problems;
set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research project;
communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate research ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project;
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous independent research;
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field;
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis;
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research;
have confidence in their ability to plan and execute an individual
research project.
Developed the skills to:
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
identify open problems in current research;
identify promising new research directions based on previous results;
define feasible projects based on such problems;
set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research project;
communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate research ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.

Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project;
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous independent research;
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field;
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis;
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research;
have confidence in their ability to plan and execute an individual research project.
Developed the skills to:
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
identify open problems in current research;
identify promising new research directions based on previous results;
define feasible projects based on such problems;
set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research project;
communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate research ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project;
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous independent research;
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field;
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis;
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research;
have confidence in their ability to plan and execute an individual
research project.
Developed the skills to:
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
identify open problems in current research;
identify promising new research directions based on previous results;
define feasible projects based on such problems;
set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research project;
communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate research ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.

Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project;
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous
independent research;
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field;
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis;
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research;
have confidence in their ability to plan and execute an individual research project.
Developed the skills to:
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
identify open problems in current research;
identify promising new research directions based on previous
results;
define feasible projects based on such problems;
set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research project;
communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate research ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.
Objectives
At the completion of this unit students will have:
demonstrated knowledge and understanding in the area of their chosen research
project.
acquired necessary skills to plan and undertake rigorous independent research.
acquired comprehensive research skills in the IT field.
developed the capacity to engage in critical thinking and analysis.
demonstrated the ability to communicate research activities and findings.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
have confidence in their ability to undertake independent and individual research.
have confidence in their ability to plan and execute an individual research project.
Developed the skills to:
find and analyse current research literature;
critically evaluate research findings;
Identify open problems in current research;
Identify promising new research directions based on previous results;
Define feasible projects based on such problems;
Set realistic timelines and intermediate deliverables for a research project;
Communicate research results in a variety of forms, including informal oral
presentations, written reports, seminar
presentations and poster presentations.
Demonstrated the communication skills necessary to:
communicate research ideas effectively in oral and written form;
collaborate effectively with their supervisor.
                     assessment_str                       Chief_examiners_str




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 70%; In-semester assessment: 30%   Dr Dengsheng Zhang




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Mr Stephen Huxford
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Mr Abraham van der
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Vyver




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Mr Lindsay Smith
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Asad Khan




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr John Betts
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment                                                Associate Professor
Examination (3 hours): 70%; In-semester assessment: 30%   Maria Garcia de la
                                                          Banda




                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Ann Nicholson
Assessment
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%
Students must gain a satisfactory result in both the
practical                                                 Chief examiner(s)
and                                                       Dr Des Casey
exercises work and the exam to gain a pass in the unit.
The examination
must be sat at a Monash campus.




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 40%; In-semester assessment: 60%   Ms Kirsten Ellis




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Ms Sue Bedingfield




Assessment
Assessment is based entirely on a demonstration of the    Chief examiner(s)
students project work, which will include oral discussion Associate Professor
of the                                                    Ann Nicholson
concepts and skills learned. The unit is Pass Grade Only.
Assessment
                                                          0
Examination (2 hours): 50%; Assignments: 50%




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr David Albrecht
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Rodney Martin




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Sid Ray




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 40%; In-semester assessment: 60%   Mr Tom Chandler




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Matthew Butler
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 40%; In-semester assessment: 60%   Ms Cheryl Howard




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; in-semester assessment: 40%   Mr Martin Atchison




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Steven Wright




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
In-semester assessment: 100%                              Dr Campbell Wilson
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Mr Peter O'Donnell




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Mr Peter O'Donnell
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Mahbubur Rahim




                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (2 hours): 25%; In-semester assessment: 75%
                                                          Ann Nicholson
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Professor Geoff
Examination (3 hours): 70%; In-semester assessment: 30%
                                                          Webb




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Mr Shane Moore
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 70%; In-semester assessment: 30%   Dr Yen Cheung




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Asad Khan
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Manzur Murshed




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Mr Lindsay Smith




                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Professor David
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%
                                                          Arnott
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
In-semester assessment: 100%                              Ms Cheryl Howard




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Mrs Sue Bedingfield
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 70%; In-semester assessment: 30%   Dr Kevin Korb




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Practical Assignments: 100%                               Mr Tom Chandler
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr John Betts




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 40%; In-semester assessment: 60%   Dr Jefferson Tan
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Jefferson Tan




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%: In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Iqbal Gondal




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 40%; In-semester assessment: 60%   Dr David Squire
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
In-semester assessment: 100%                              Mr Mark Power




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Mr Peter O'Donnell




Assessment
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Ms Janet Fraser
The examination must be sat at a Monash campus.
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Gour Karmakar




Assessment
Mid placement performance: 20%; End placement
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
performance: 30%; Oral presentation: 20%; Written
                                                          Mrs Sue Bedingfield
reports: 25%; Evaluation
meeting preparation and participation: 5%.
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Dengsheng Zhang




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Chris Ling
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr David Squire




Assessment
Assessment is based entirely on a demonstration of the    Chief examiner(s)
students project work, which will include oral discussion Associate Professor
of the                                                    Ann Nicholson
concepts and skills learned. The unit is Pass Grade Only.




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Mr Matthew Butler
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Julie Fisher
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Mr Thomas O'Daniel
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Professor Bala
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Srinivasan




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Carlo Kopp




                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Professor Bala
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Srinivasan
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Matthew Butler




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 25%; In-semester assessment: 75%   Dr Michael Morgan




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 40%; In-semester assessment: 60%   Mr Derrick Martin




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Joanne Evans
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Mr Martin Atchison




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Ms Janet Fraser




                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          David Taniar
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Dr Nandita
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Bhattacharjee




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Alan Dorin
Assessment
                                                          0
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%




In-semester assessment: 100%                              Mr Tom Chandler




                                                          Associate Professor Kai
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Ming Ting
                                                          Dr Damminda
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Alahakoon




In-semester assessment: 100%                              Mr Mark Power
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Mahbubur Rahim




Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Mr Thomas O'Daniel




Examination (2 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Yuan-Fang Li
In-semester assessment: 100%                              Ms Chris Gonsalvez




                                                          Dr Joarder
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%
                                                          Kamruzzaman




Examination (2 hours): 40%; In-semester assessment: 60%   Mr Matthew Butler
                                                          Dr Joarder
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%
                                                          Kamzruzzaman




Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Professor Mark Wallace
Practical Assignments: 100%                               Mr Derrick Martin




Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Ms Janet Fraser




Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Gour Karmakar
                                                          Dr Nandita
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Bhattacharjee




Examination (2 hours): 25%; In-semester assessment: 75%   Dr Michael Morgan
Projects are assessed by individual project supervisors.   Dr Sid Ray




Examination (3 hours): 55%; In-semester assessment: 45%    Dr Gour Karmakar
Practical assignments: 100%. Assignments will include group and
                                                                  Mr Mark Power
individual components.




Practical Assignments: 100%. Assignments will include group and
                                                                  Mr Mark Power
individual components.




Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%           Dr Robert Merkel
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%
Students must gain a satisfactory result in both the practical and
                                                                       Dr Des Casey
exercises work and the exam to gain a pass in the unit. The
examination must be sat at a Monash campus.




Practical and theory Examinations (3 and 1 hours) : 60%; In-semester
                                                                       Mr Lindsay Smith
assessment: 40%




Organisation and preparation for Monash visits: 5%
Mid placement evaluation: 20%
End placement evaluation: 30%                                          Dr Sue Bedingfield
Oral presentation: 20%
Written reports: 25%
                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Manzur Murshed




In-semester assessment: 100%                              Ms Chris Gonsalvez




In-semester assessment: 100%                              Ms Chris Gonsalvez
                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Vincent Cheng-Siong
                                                          Lee




Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Phu Le
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Ms Janet Fraser




Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Judithe Sheard




Examination (2 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Joanne Evans
Examination (3 hours): 40%; In-semester assessment: 60%   Dr David Squire




Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Kevin Korb
Examination (3 hours): 70%; In-semester assessment: 30%   Mr Loke Kar Seng




Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Mahbubur Rahim
Examination (3 hours): 70%; In-semester assessment: 30%   Dr Peter Tischer




Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Alan Dorin
Assignments: 100%                                         Mr Tom Chandler




Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Steve Wright




                                                          Professor Frada
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Burstein
                                                          Dr Damminda
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          Alahakoon




                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (2 hours): 70%; In-semester assessment: 30%
                                                          Chung-Hsing Yeh




Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Phu Dung Le




                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          David Taniar




                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          David Taniar
                                                                    Professor Sue
Examination (2 hours): 45%; In-semester assessment: 55%
                                                                    McKemmish




                                                                    Professor Frada
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                                    Burstein




Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%             Dr Steven Wright




Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%             Professor Sue
Supervised professional placement and host supervisors report (PGO) McKemmish




                                                                    Professor Sue
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%
                                                                    McKemmish
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Phu Le




Examination (3 hours): 70%; In-semester assessment: 30%   Dr Shyh Wei Teng
                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Vincent Cheng-Siong
                                                          Lee




Examination (2 hours): 35%; In-semester assessment: 65%   Professor Michael Vitale
Students will be assessed by a Monash University supervisor in
conjunction with the sponsoring organisation.
mid-placement evaluation based on production criteria: 20%
                                                                 Mr Derrick Martin
end-placement evaluation based on production criteria: 50%
work placement portfolio, including work diary: 20%
student oral presentation at end of placement: 10%




Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%          Dr Mahbubur Rahim
Examination (2 hours) 60%; In-semester assessment 40%     Ms Susan Foster




Examination (3 hours): 50%, In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Arun Konagurthu
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Robert Merkel




Examination (2 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   0
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Carlo Kopp




Examination: 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%             Dr Asad Khan
Projects are assessed by individual project supervisors.   0




In-semester assessment: 100%                               0
In-semester assessment: 100%                              0




Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   0




Examination (2 hours): 30%; In-semester assessment: 70%   0
Examination (2 hours): 40%; In-semester assessment: 60%   0




Assessment
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Presentation and final thesis (normally 10,000 - 20,000
                                                          Dr Michael Morgan
words): 100%




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Assignments: 100%                                         Dr Peter Tischer
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Yuan-Fang Li




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Assignments: literature review, assignment relevant to    Professor David
topic, and class exercises: 100%                          Arnott
Assessment                                                 Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%    Professor Ron Weber




Assessment
Assessment is determined by the supervisor. Assessment
can include a written report or written formal exam. The   Chief examiner(s)
student may                                                Dr Michael Morgan
also be required to present the findings of the research
undertaken.




Assessment
Assignment and Examination, relative weight depending on
topic composition. When no exam is given students will be
expected
to demonstrate their knowledge by solving practical       Chief examiner(s)
problems and maybe required to give an oral report. This Professor Ingrid
variability is                                            Zukerman
designed to give flexibility to the lecturer to decided
the most appropriate form of examination for a given
choice of
topics.




Assessment
Assignment and Examination, relative weight depending on
topic composition. When no exam is given students will be
expected
to demonstrate their knowledge by solving practical
problems and maybe required to give an oral report. This 0
variability is
designed to give flexibility to the lecturer to decided
the most appropriate form of examination for a given
choice of
topics.
Assessment
Assignment and Examination, relative weight depending on
topic composition. When no exam is given students will be
expected
to demonstrate their knowledge by solving practical       Chief examiner(s)
problems and maybe required to give an oral report. This Associate Professor
variability is                                            Jon McCormack
designed to give flexibility to the lecturer to decided
the most appropriate form of examination for a given
choice of
topics.




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Dr Jacques Steyn




Assessment
                                                          0
Examination (2 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 50%, In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Mohan Das




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%   Dr Phu Le




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Practical work: 100%                                      Ms Sue Foster




                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Assessment
                                                          Associate Professor
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%
                                                          David Taniar




Assessment                                                Chief examiner(s)
Examination (3 hours): 60%; In-semester assessment: 40%   Ms Janet Fraser
Assessment
Examination (3 hours): 50%; In-semester assessment: 50%
Students must gain a satisfactory result in both the
practical                                                 Chief examiner(s)
and                                                       Dr Des Casey
exercises work and the exam to gain a pass in the unit.
The examination
must be sat at a Monash campus.




Assessment
Research Proposal: 5%; Literature Review: 10%; Interim
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Presentation: hurdle; Final Presentation: 5%; Thesis
                                                          Dr Michael Morgan
(normally 10,000
- 20,000 words): 80%




Assessment
Research Proposal: 5%; Literature Review: 10%; Interim
                                                          Chief examiner(s)
Presentation: hurdle; Final Presentation: 5%; Thesis
                                                          Dr Michael Morgan
(normally 10,000
- 20,000 words): 80%
Assessment
Research Proposal: 5%; Literature Review: 10%; Interim
                                                         Chief examiner(s)
Presentation: hurdle; Final Presentation: 5%; Thesis
                                                         Dr Grace Rumantir
(normally 10,000
- 20,000 words): 80%




Assessment
Research Proposal: 5%; Literature Review: 10%; Interim
                                                         Chief examiner(s)
Presentation: hurdle; Final Presentation: 5%; Thesis
                                                         Dr Michael Morgan
(normally 10,000
- 20,000 words): 80%
Assessment
Research Proposal: 5%; Literature Review: 10%; Interim
                                                         Chief examiner(s)
Presentation: hurdle; Final Presentation: 5%; Thesis
                                                         Dr Michael Morgan
(normally 10,000
- 20,000 words): 80%




Assessment
Research Proposal: 5%; Literature Review: 10%; Interim
                                                         Chief examiner(s)
Presentation: hurdle; Final Presentation: 5%; Thesis
                                                         Dr Michael Morgan
(normally 10,000
- 20,000 words): 80%
Assessment
Research Proposal: 5%; Literature Review: 10%; Interim
                                                         Chief examiner(s)
Presentation: hurdle; Final Presentation: 5%; Thesis
                                                         Dr Michael Morgan
(normally 10,000
- 20,000 words): 80%




Assessment
Research Proposal: 5%; Progress report: 5%; Interim
                                                         Chief examiner(s)
Presentation: 5%; Final Presentation: 5%; Thesis
                                                         Dr Michael Morgan
(normally 10,000 -
20,000 words): 80%
Assessment
Research Proposal: 5%; Literature Review: 10%; Interim
                                                         Chief examiner(s)
Presentation: hurdle; Final Presentation: 5%; Thesis
                                                         Dr Michael Morgan
(normally 10,000
- 20,000 words): 80%
                       Contact_hours_str




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk, 1 hr tutorial/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
3 hrs lectures/wk, 3 hrs laboratories/wk, 1 hr tutorial/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk, 1 hr tutorial/wk
Contact hours
Students, are expected to spend an average of 12 hrs/week on
this unit. The breakdown of time is as follows. 2 hrs/week:
topic material coverage from the u-learning environment. 2
hrs/week working on sub-tasks and quizzes. 8 hrs/week: private
study to review topic materials, explore supplementary unit
resources and complete main tasks.




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




0
Contact hours
2 hrs lecture/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hr lectures/wk, 2 hr tutorial/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/week, 2 hrs tutorials/week




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk; 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hr studio/tutorial/wk




Contact hours
1 hr lecture/wk, 3 hrs studios/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs lab/tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk, 1 hr meeting/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 3 hr laboratory/fortnight, 1 hr
tutorial/fortnight




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 3 hrs laboratory/fortnight, 2 hrs
tutorial/fortnight




Contact hours
1 hr lecture/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
1 hr lecture/wk, 3 hrs studio/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
This unit is conducted through the Walkabout u-Learning
Environment. Students self manage their learning with the help
of the
Walkabout environment. On campus drop in help sessions, and
evening on line help sessions using the Marratech system are
available for students to obtain timely assistance. A
combination of pre-recorded lectures and face to face lectures
are
provided as required to supplement the online learning
materials.
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
Students on placement are employed full-time for 22 weeks by
the partners of the industry based learning program in a
graduate level role within the company.
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




0




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 3 hr laboratory/fortnight, 1 hr
tutorial/fortnight




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 3 hr laboratory/fortnight, 1 hr
tutorial/fortnight
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorial/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs studios/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




1 hr lecture/wk, 3 hr tutorial/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr tutorial/wk
1 hr seminar/wk, 2 x 3 hrs laboratories/wk as determined by supervisor




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
1 hr lecture/wk, 3 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
1 hr project meeting/week




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk
1 hr lecture/wk, 3 hrs tutorials/wk




1 hr lecture/wk, 3 hrs tutorials/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Online: Optional weekly helpdesk sessions
Sunway: 2 hrs lecture/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Students on placement are deployed full-time for 22 weeks with the industry
partners of the Faculty of IT industry-based learning program in a graduate
level role within the company.
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Caulfield: 1 hr seminar/wk, 3 hrs laboratories/wk
South Africa: As determined by supervisor
Sunway: As determined by supervisor
Gippsland: 2 hrs seminar/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk or as determined by
supervisor




Caulfield: 1 hr seminar/wk, 3 hrs laboratories/wk
South Africa: As determined by supervisor
Sunway: As determined by supervisor
Gippsland: 2 hrs seminar/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk or as determined by
supervisor
2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr laboratory/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr tutorial/wk




3 hr seminar/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr laboratory/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr laboratory/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr laboratory/wk, 1 hr tutorial/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/fortnight




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr laboratory/wk




1 hr lecture/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr laboratory/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratory/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
3 hrs seminar/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr tutorial/wk




2 hrs lecture/wk, 1 hr seminar/wk




3 hrs lecture/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk
12 hours work per week at sponsoring business location for the duration of a
standard Semester (15 week period). An equivalent total hourly period will
be required for the summer semester.




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 3 hrs lab/wk, 1 hr tutorial alternating fortnightly with
attendance at Monash University Research Projects Abroad (MURPA)
seminars.
2 hrs lectures/week, 3 hr laboratory/week




2 hrs lectures/wk, 3 hr laboratory/fortnight, 1 hr tutorial/fortnight
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hr laboratory/wk, 1 hr tutorial/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hr laboratory/wk, 1 hr tutorial/wk
1 hr project meeting/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




2 hr lecture or seminar/wk, 2 hr tutorial/wk
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
Varies according to remaining requirements. To be determined by
Supervisor/Co-ordinator




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
3 hrs seminar/wk




Contact hours
Regular meetings with supervisor(s) over the course of the unit
enrolment




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr laboratory or tutorial/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr laboratory or tutorial/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs tutorial/week
29 April 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -
Accessibility information




0




Contact hours
1 hr seminar/wk, 3 hrs tutorials/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk




Contact hours
2 hrs lectures/wk, 2 hrs laboratories/wk
0




Contact hours
Regular meetings with supervisor(s) over the course of the
semester.




Contact hours
Regular meetings with supervisor(s) over the course of the
semester.
Contact hours
Regular meetings with supervisor(s) over the course of the
semester.




Contact hours
Regular meetings with supervisor(s) over the course of the
semester.
Contact hours
Regular meetings with supervisor(s) over the course of the
semester.




Contact hours
Regular meetings with supervisor(s) over the course of the
semester.
Contact hours
Regular meetings with supervisor(s) over the course of the
semester.




Contact hours
Regular meetings with supervisor(s) over the course of the
semester.
Contact hours
Regular meetings with supervisor(s) over the course of the
semester.
    Prerequisites_str




0




0
0




0
0




0
Prerequisites
FIT1002 or equivalent and FIT1029 or equivalent




Prerequisites
FIT1002 or equivalent
0




0




0




Prerequisites
FIT1002
Prerequisites
Required Knowledge: Familiarity with basic computer operation,
basic Microsoft Windows operation and basic Microsoft Internet
Explorer or Mozilla Firefox operation.




Prerequisites
Only for students in the Bachelor of Computer Science and Bachelor
of Software Engineering, associated Double Degrees and
major/minor sequences. Exceptions can be approved by the unit
leader after assessment of mathematical background knowledge.
0




0




0




0
Prerequisites
FIT1002




0




0




0
0




0
Prerequisites
Completion of at least 24 points of level one study or equivalent.




Prerequisites
Completion of 24 points of Information Technology units
Prerequisites
One of FIT1008, FIT1015 or CSE1303 and 6 points of Level 1
mathematics.




Prerequisites
FIT1002 and FIT2001
Prerequisites
Completion of 24 points at level 1 from FIT or BusEco




0
Prerequisites
FIT1007 or GCO1812 or GCO9808 or FIT2034




0




Prerequisites
Completion of 12 points at level 1 from FIT or BusEco.
Prerequisites
FIT1012




Prerequisites
FIT1002 or BUS1060 or CSE1301
Prerequisites
FIT1029 and 6 points of level 1 (or above) mathematics
For students in courses 2380, 2770, 0050, 2672, 3517, 3282 and
0085 who commenced prior to 2011: FIT1008/FIT1015 and 6 points
of approved mathematics




Prerequisites
Completion of 12 points at level 1 from FIT
Prerequisites
FIT1006 or BUS1100 or ETC1000 or STA1010
Basic knowledge of MS Excel is assumed.




Prerequisites
One of CPE1007, CPE2002, CSE2318, CSE3318, FIT1005, FIT1031,
FIT2008 or equivalent
Prerequisites
FIT1005 or CSE2318 or CSE3318 or equivalent




Prerequisites
One of FIT1031, FIT1005 or GCO3812 or equivalent




Prerequisites
FIT1007 or FIT1008 or FIT1015 or CSE1303 or CSE1203 or BUS2011 or
FIT2034
Prerequisites
FIT1012




Prerequisites
One of FIT1002, CSE1203, IMS1906 or equivalent and one of FIT1004,
CSE2132, IMS1907 or equivalent and one of FIT2001,
CSE1205, IMS1805 or equivalent




Prerequisites
FIT1002 or CSE1202
Prerequisites
FIT1002 and FIT1004




Prerequisites
Available to local students accepted into the Bachelor of Business
Information Systems industry based learning stream at
Clayton campus and local students in all undergraduate degrees of
the Faculty of IT who have been accepted into the
Industry-based learning Placement program with at least 72 credit
points of study accumulated towards a Faculty of
Information Technology undergraduate degree. Prerequisite units
for BBIS students: FIT1002, FIT1013 and one of FIT2035 or
FIT2003. Prerequisite units for BSE, BCS and BITS students:
FIT1002 and one of FIT2035 or FIT2003.
Prerequisites
One of FIT1006, ETW1102 or MAT1097 or equivalent.




Prerequisites
FIT1002 or CPE1001 or CSE1202 or GCO1811 or equivalent
Prerequisites
One of FIT1002, CPE1001, CSE1202, GCO1811, MMS1801, MMS1802,
CSE1301




Prerequisites
FIT1002 or CSE1301




Prerequisites
FIT2071
Prerequisites
FIT1003 or IMS1704 or equivalent
0
Prerequisites
One of FIT1001, FIT1031 or CSE1201 or equivalent




Prerequisites
FIT1031 or FIT1001 and FIT1008 or FIT1015




Prerequisites
(FIT1031 or FIT1001) and (FIT1008 or FIT1015)
Prerequisites
FIT1002




Prerequisites
FIT1035




Prerequisites
Completion of 24 points of FIT units




Prerequisites
FIT1036 or FIT1003
Prerequisites
FIT1036 or FIT1003




Prerequisites
FIT1002 and either FIT1004 or FIT2010




Prerequisites
FIT1004 or CSE2132 or equivalent
Prerequisites
FIT1001 or FIT1031




Prerequisites
Completion of 24 points at first year.
06 May 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -
Accessibility information
Prerequisites
FIT1037 and either FIT1036 or FIT1003




FIT1033 or FIT2015




FIT1004 or FIT2010 or equivalent
One of FIT1004, FIT2010, FIT1013, BUS1010, BUS3112, CSE2316, CSE3316




FIT2026
Completion of 12 points from FIT




FIT1007 or GCO1812 or FIT2034 or equivalent.




FIT2004 and one of MAT1830, MTH1112 or MAT1077
((FIT1001 and FIT1005) or FIT1031) and (FIT1002, FIT1004, FIT2001, FIT2002 and
(FIT1003 or FIT2003) and (6 pts of FIT units at any year level) and (18 pts of FIT
2nd or 3rd year units).
This unit is only available for students in their final semester of study (24 pts or
less to complete). The students must have a credit average in the previous year
of study and must have chief examiner and course director approval.




FIT2005 or FIT2027




Completion of 12 points at level 2 from FIT
FIT2005 or GCO2852 or GCO9806 or BEG1601 or equivalent




FIT1006, BUS1100 or ETC1000 and 24 points at level 1
FIT2015 or DIS1911




CSE1201 or FIT1001 AND a second level programming unit - FIT1007 or FIT2034
or CSE1203 or CPE1004 or equivalent




FIT2029 or equivalent
One of FIT1005, FIT1031, FIT1019, FIT2008, CSE2318, CSE3318 or GCO1815




FIT2012 and FIT2016
FIT2004 or FIT3140




FIT2005
FIT2001, FIT2002 and FIT2012 and one of FIT2016 or FIT2049, OR MMS2401
Systems analysis and design, Project management, and the fundamental
multimedia and/or games development tools.




FIT3039




One of FIT1008, FIT1015, CSE1303
One of FIT1002, BUS1060, IMS1906 or CSE1202




FIT1012




Available to local students accepted into the Bachelor of Business Information
Systems industry based learning stream at Clayton campus and local students in
all undergraduate degrees of the Faculty of IT who have been accepted into the
Industry-based learning placement program with at least 72 credit points of
study accumulated towards a Faculty of Information Technology undergraduate
degree. Prerequisite units for BBIS students: FIT1002, FIT1013 and one of
FIT2035 or FIT2003.
Prerequisite units for BSE, BCS and BITS students: FIT1002 and one of FIT2035 or
FIT2003.
FIT1001



For Bachelor of Information Technology and Systems (3334):
((FIT1001 and FIT1005) or FIT1031) and FIT1002, FIT1004, FIT2001, FIT2002,
(FIT1003 or FIT2003), (6 pts of FIT units at any year level) and (18 pts of FIT 2nd
or 3rd year units).
The off-campus offering of FIT3047 is only available to BITS Gippsland DE
students.
For Bachelor of Computing (2330) and associated double degree students only:
CSE2132 or FIT1004 and CSE2203 or FIT2002. Student should also have
completed at least 84 credit points towards their Bachelor of Computing or
associated double degrees.
For Bachelor of Information Systems (3323) and associated double degree
students only: IMS2502 or equivalent.
For Bachelor of Network Computing and associated double degree students
only: (FIT1002 or CPE1001) and (FIT1001 or CPE1002) and (FIT1011 or CPE1003)
and (FIT2034 or CPE1004) and (FIT1003 or CPE1006) and (FIT1005 or CPE1007)
and (FIT2002 or CPE2006) and 2 of (FIT2001 or CPE2003) or (FIT1004 or
CPE2005) or (FIT3031 or CPE2007).




FIT3047
The off-campus offering of FIT3048 is only available to BITS Gippsland DE
students.
0




FIT1002 and one of FIT1019 or FIT2078
FIT1002 or CSE1202




One of FIT2001, FIT2027, IMS2805, CSE2200 or equivalent




Completion 36 points at level 1
FIT2001 (or CSE2305) and FIT2004 (or CSE2304)




FIT2004 or CSE2304
FIT2004 (or CSE2304) and FIT2014 (or CSE2303)




Completion of at least 24 points of IT study.
FIT2004 or CSE2304




FIT2049
FIT2012




Completion of 36 points of study




Completion of 36 points at level 1 or equivalent
FIT1002 or BUS1060




Familiarity with written Chinese




FIT1019 or equivalent




One of FIT1004, FIT2010, BUS3112, CSE2316, CSE3316, CPE2005, CSE2132,
GCO2815 or IMS1907




FIT1004 or CSE2132 or equivalent
One of FIT2054, IMS2102 or IMS2603 and 12 points of FIT level 2 units or
equivalent




FIT2001 or equivalent




Completion of 36 credit points at level 1 or equivalent




FIT3122 or FIT3123 or equivalent
Only available to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Information Systems, or
the IM major of the Bachelor of Information Technology & Systems.




Completion of 36 credit points at level 1 or equivalent
One of FIT1002, CPE1001 or CSE1202 or equivalent




Completion of 24 points at level 2
One of FIT1005, FIT2008, BUS2062, CPE1007, CSE2004, CSE2318, CSE3318 or
GCO3812




FIT2002 or FIT3086 and completion of 96 points towards a degree or double
degree in the Faculty of Information Technology.
To be eligible for an industry placement, a student must have completed all first
year and second year core units of a Bachelor of Information Technology and
Systems (Multimedia Development or Game Development majors) degree.
Application by other students within the Faculty with equivalent standing will
also be considered on a case-by-case basis. Students must submit an application,
including a folio of their work and undertake an interview with the sponsoring
business and Monash University staff as part of a formal selection process.




Completion of 24 points of second year IT units
Completion of 12 points of level two units from Information Technology, Science
or Engineering or equivalent.




One of MAT1841, MAT2003, ENG1091, MTH1030 or equivalent plus any
introductory programming unit (eg FIT1002, ECE2071, TRC2400, or equivalent)
FIT1008




FIT2069 and one of FIT2070 or FIT2022
(FIT2069, FIT2070 and FIT3141) or (FIT1005/FIT2008 and FIT2022)




FIT2004
FIT2004 or FIT3140 plus completion of a named minor or of 24 points of units
counting towards a named major.




FIT2049 and FIT2073
Completion of 24 points of level 2 or 3 FIT units




FIT1036 and FIT1037 and FIT1004




FIT1002, FIT1004, FIT1031, FIT2001, FIT2002 and FIT2003 plus 18 credit points of
study from core units within either the Enterprise Information Management
major or the information and communication technologies major. Students must
have achieved an average grade of distinction over their prerequisite study.
One of CPE1007, CPE2002, CSE2318, CSE3318, FIT1005, FIT2008 or equivalent.




Prerequisites
Admission into the FIT Honours program. Course Coordinator
approval required.




Prerequisites
FIT3077 or CSE3308 and one of FIT2002, FIT3086 or BUS2176
Prerequisites
FIT2004, FIT2024, FIT3042, FIT3077 and one of FIT2002 or FIT3086
or students must be enrolled in FIT Masters program at




Prerequisites
Students must be enrolled in an FIT Honours degree, Masters degree
or Research degree. Foundation knowledge in computer
science, business information systems or information technology
and systems fundamentals is assumed.
0




Prerequisites
Admission to the Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours) or
Bachelor of Business Information Systems (Honours) or Bachelor of
Information Technology and Systems (Honours) program. Enrollment
in FIT4008 is subject to the approval of the ADE on the
advice of the relevant Honours program leaders.




Prerequisites
Completion of the Bachelor of Computer Science or equivalent to
the entry requirements for the Honours program. Students must
also have enrolment approval from the Honours Coordinator.




Prerequisites
Completion of the Bachelor of Computer Science or equivalent to
the entry requirements for the Honours program. Students must
also have enrolment approval from the Honours Coordinator.
Prerequisites
Completion of the Bachelor of Computer Science or equivalent to
the entry requirements for the Honours program. Students must
also have enrolment approval from the Honours Coordinator.




0




0
0




Prerequisites
FIT9017




Prerequisites
FIT9017, FIT9018, FIT9019 and FIT9030
Must be enrolled in course 3309, 0366, 0539, 0360 or 1772




Prerequisites
FIT9019 or FIT9003
Knowledge of relational database principles, including SQL




0
Prerequisites
FIT9017 or similar unit in object oriented programming.




Prerequisites
Admission to the Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours) or
Bachelor of Business Information Systems (Honours) or Bachelor of
Information Technology and Systems (Honours) program.




Prerequisites
Admission to the Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours) or
Bachelor of Business Information Systems (Honours) or Bachelor of
Information Technology and Systems (Honours) program.
Prerequisites
Admission to the Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours) or
Bachelor of Business Information Systems (Honours) or Bachelor of
Information Technology and Systems (Honours) program.




Prerequisites
Admission to an FIT Honours program.
Prerequisites
Admission to an FIT Honours program or stream.




Prerequisites
Admission to an FIT Honours program or stream.
Prerequisites
Admission to an FIT Honours program.




Prerequisites
FIT4441
Prerequisites
Admission to the Bachelor of Computer Science (Honours) or
Bachelor of Business Information Systems (Honours) or Bachelor of
Information Technology and Systems (Honours) program.
    Corequisites_str




0




0
0




0
0




0
0




0
0




0




0




0
0




0
0




0




0




0
0




0




0




0
0




Co-requisites
FIT1004 or FIT2010 For students in courses 2380, 2770, 3517 and 2672 who
commenced
prior to 2011: FIT1008
0




0
0




0
0




0
0




0




0
0




0
Co-requisites
6 points of level 1 (or above) mathematics




0
0




0
0




0




0
0




0




0
0




0
0




0
0




0




0
0
0
0




0




0
0




0




0




0
0




0




0
0




0
0




0




0
0




0
0




0




0
0




0




0
0




0
0




0




0
0




0
0




0
0




0




0
0




0




0
0




0




0
0




0
0




0




0
0




0
0




0
0




0
0




0




0
0




0




0




0




0
0




0




0




0




0
0




0
FIT2019 or FIT2020




0
0




0
0




0
0




0
0




0
0




0
0




0




0
0




0




0
0




0
Co-requisites
FIT4005




0




0




0
0




0




0
0




0




0




0




0
0




Co-requisites
FIT4005




Co-requisites
FIT4005
Co-requisites
FIT4005




Co-requisites
FIT4005
Co-requisites
FIT4441




Co-requisites
FIT4442
Co-requisites
FIT4443




Co-requisites
FIT4442
Co-requisites
FIT4005
                                  Prohibitions_str




Prohibitions
CSE1201, CPE1002, GCO2812




Prohibitions
CPE1001, CSE1202, GCO1811, MMS1801, MMS1802
Prohibitions
CSE1204, ELC1000, IMS1704, BUS1021, CPE1006




Prohibitions
BUS3112, CPE2005, CSE2132, CSE2138, CSE2316, CSE3180, CSE3316, FIT2010, GCO2815,
IMS1907, IMS2112, MMS2801
Prohibitions
BUS2062, BUS3150, CPE1007, CSE2004, CSE2318, CSE3318, CSE9801, GCO3812, FIT2008




Prohibitions
BUS1100, ETC1000, ETC1010, ETC2010, ETF2211, ETW1000, ETW1010, ETW1102, ETW2111,
ETX1100, ETX2111, ETX2121, MAT1097
Prohibitions
CSE1303, CSC1030, FIT1007, FIT1015
23 February 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -Accessibility
information




Prohibitions
CSE1401
29 April 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -Accessibility
information
Prohibitions
CPE1003, CPE9005, GCO1821, IMS1401




Prohibitions
CPE1003, MMS1402, MMS9401




Prohibitions
BUS1010, CSE1720, GCO1851, MMS1401




0
Prohibitions
BUS1010, CSE1200, CSE1720, COT1130, COT1720, IMS1000. This unit is prohibited to all
students enrolled in any degree of the
Faculty of Information Technology, including double degrees in which this Faculty is
a partner.




0
0




Prohibitions
FIT1001




Prohibitions
FIT2015, DIS1911




0
Prohibitions
MMS2402, FIT2012, FIT9028




Prohibitions
FIT1003




Prohibitions
FIT1021, FIT2054, IMS1603, IMS2603
29 April 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -Accessibility
information




0
Prohibitions
FIT1011, FIT2053




Prohibitions
BUS2021, CPE2003, CSE1204, CSE1205, GCO1813, GCO2601, GCO2852, GCO2826, IMS1001,
IMS1002, IMS1805, IMS2071, IMS9001
Prohibitions
AFW3043, BEW3640, BUS2176, CIV3205, CPE2006, CSE2203,
GCO3807, GEG3104, GSE3003, FIT3086, MGW2700, MMS2203




Prohibitions
FIT2035
Prohibitions
CSE2304, FIT2009, FIT2071
Additional information on this unit is available from the
faculty at:
21 February 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -Accessibility
information




Prohibitions
GCO2813, GCO2816, GCO9806
Prohibitions
ETC2490, BUS3502




Prohibitions
BUS2062, CSE2004, CSE2318, CSE3318, GCO3812, CPE1007, FIT1005, BUS3150
Prohibitions
FIT2004, FIT2071, FIT9015, GCO2817, GCO3512, GCO9807




Prohibitions
FIT1004, BUS3112, CPE2005, CSE2132, CSE2138, CSE3180, CSE2316, CSE3316, GCO2815,
IMS1907, IMS2112, MMS2801




0
Prohibitions
FIT1035, IMS2402, MMS2402 This unit is prohibited to all students enrolled in the
Bachelor of Information Technology and
Systems multimedia development major.




Prohibitions
BUS1042
Prohibitions
CSE2303




Prohibitions
MMS2405
Prohibitions
ETC2480, ETC3480, ETC4348, ETF2480, ETF9480, GCO2802, MAT1097, BUS1110




Prohibitions
CPE3012, CPE5013, CSE3153, CPE2009, FIT3149
0




Prohibitions
GCO3824




Prohibitions
CSE2201, GCO3811, FIT3037
Prohibitions
VSA3020, MMS2407, MMS2410




Prohibitions
BUS2021, CPE2003, CSE2200, CSE3308, GCO2813, GCO2816, FIT2005, IMS2805




Prohibitions
CPE3003, CSE2030, CPE2010, FIT2029
29 April 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -Accessibility
information
Prohibitions
BUS1042, CPE3002, CSE2030, FIT2028, FIT2076, GCO2811, MMS2802




Prohibitions
BUS2000
22 February 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -Accessibility
information
Prohibitions
FIT2017, ETC2480, GCO2802
Additional information on this unit is available from the
faculty at:




Prohibitions
CPE1004, CSE1203, CSE2305, GCO1812, FIT1007
Prohibitions
CSE1305, CSE1402




Prohibitions
CSE2370




Prohibitions
MMS2804
Prohibitions
BEW1601, CPE3008, ELC1000, GCO2803, IMS2704, IMS3280, FIT1009
Prohibitions
FIT2080
Prohibitions
CPE3007, CPE2008, CSE2208, CSE2391, CSE3001, CSE3208, CSE3391, FIT3041, GCO3813
Additional information on this unit is available from the
faculty at:
03 March 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -Accessibility
information




0




Prohibitions
CSE2302, FIT2022
01 June 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -Accessibility
information
Prohibitions
FIT2004, FIT2009




Prohibitions
FIT3033, MMS2701




Prohibitions
FIT2048




0
0




Prohibitions
FIT2028, FIT2029, FIT3043, FIT3057




Prohibitions
CSE3000, FIT3118, FIT4038
Prohibitions
FIT1019




0
Prohibitions
FIT2055




MMS3409




CSE3212, GCO3828
0




0
BUS2710




CSE3450, GCO3823, GCO4823




CSE4213
CSE3301, GCO3819, GCO3700, GCO3800, GCO3900, GCO3800A, CPE3200, CPE3300, CSE3200, FIT2032,
FIT3016, FIT3017, FIT3025, FIT3026, FIT3038, FIT3039, FIT3040, FIT3045, FIT3047, FIT3048, IMS3000,
IMS3501, IMS3502




GCO3816, IMS3002




0
GCO3601




0
MMS3405




CSE3211, CPE3010, FIT4039




BUS3400, IMS2402, IMS1403, GCO3822, GCO2823, MMS1403, MMS2402
CPE3001, CPE2007, CSE2500, GCO2831, FIT2058, FIT3018, FIT4028, GCO4831




MMS2701
CSE3301, FIT3144




CSE2201, CSE2401, FIT2024, GCO3811
MMS3404, MMS3407




MMS3408




CSE2391, CSE3391
CPE3016, IMS2906




CPE3002, CSE2030, GCO2811, GCO3823, MMS2802




BUS3000
FIT2022, GCO2814, GCO3818




CPE3200, CPE3300, CSE3200, CSE3301, FIT2032, FIT3015, FIT3039, FIT3040, FIT3038, FIT3025, FIT3026,
FIT3016, FIT3017, FIT3045, GCO3819, GCO3700, GCO3800, GCO3900, GCO3800A, IMS3000, IMS3501,
IMS3502




CPE3200, CPE3300, CSE3200, CSE3301, FIT2032, FIT3015, FIT3016, FIT3017, FIT3025, FIT3026, FIT3038,
FIT3039, FIT3040, FIT3045, GCO3819, GCO3700, GCO3800, GCO3900, GCO3800A, IMS3000, IMS3501,
IMS3502
BUS3030, AFF2051, AFW2051




0
0




CSE3030, FIT2016, FIT3033, GCO3814, IMS2403, IMS3470, MMS2403




FIT5107, IMS3007, IMS5047
CSE3308




CSE2309, CSE3309, DGS3691
CSE3314




FIT2002, BUS2176,CSE2203, GCO3807, MMS2203, CPE2006
CSE3313, DGS3622, FIT3005, GCO3817




0
MMS3403




FIT5090, IMS3010, IMS3810, IMS5023




IMS3012
IMS3280, BUS3960, BUS5960




BUS3200




0




BUS3010




CSE3000, FIT4038
FIT5087, IMS3610, IMS5010, LAR3631




FIT5088, IMS3012, IMS3611, IMS5330, IMS5033




FIT5015, IMS3616, IMS5016, LAR3650, LAR3652




LAR3654, LAR3634, IMS3615, FIT5104, IMS5015




FIT5106, IMS3617, IMS5017, LAR3651
CSE3400, CSE4530, FIT4033




FIT1004, FIT9003, CSE9002, BUS3112, BUS4112, IMS9001, IMS9003, GCO9804, BUS9003, BUS5071,
GCO3851
This unit is not available to any student enrolled in an FIT degree
CSE3821, CPE3004, CSE5807, FIT3030, FIT3024




0
BUS2000, BUS3000, MMS2901, MMS3901, FIT3500




FIT3066, FIT3019
FIT3012, FIT3133, FIT3068




0
0




0
FIT3010




FIT4001, CSE4333
CSE3301, FIT3036




0
0




0




FIT3066
CPE2009, CPE3012, CPE5013, CSE3153, FIT2018, FIT5034




Prohibitions
Students are not permitted to enrol in this unit more than once.




Prohibitions
CSE4002
Prohibitions
CSE4431




Prohibitions
ITW4001, IMS5036, IMS4036, BUS5000, CSE4910, GCO4010, CSE4650
0




0




0




0
0




Prohibitions
CPE3004, CSE3821, CSE4881, CSE4882, ECE4044, ECE4411, ECE5411, FIT5173




Prohibitions
CSE4892
29 April 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -Accessibility
information
0




Prohibitions
CSE4530, FIT3126




Prohibitions
CSE3900, CSE9020, FIT3015, FIT3048, GCO9800,GCO3500




Prohibitions
FIT3118, CSE3000




Prohibitions
CSE3211, FIT3027
Prohibitions
FIT3043
07 June 2011 - Maintained by publications@adm.monash.edu.au -Accessibility
information




Prohibitions
CPE4000, CSE4000, IMS4000




Prohibitions
CPE4000, CSE4000, IMS4000
Prohibitions
CPE4000, CSE4000, IMS4000




Prohibitions
CPE4000, CSE4000, IMS4000, FIT4126, FIT4186, FIT4246, FIT4606
Prohibitions
CPE4000, CSE4000, IMS4000, FIT4126, FIT4186,FIT4246, FIT4606




Prohibitions
CPE4000, CSE4000, IMS4000, FIT4126, FIT4186, FIT4246, FIT4606
Prohibitions
CPE4000, CSE4000, IMS4000, FIT4126, FIT4186, FIT4246, FIT4606




Prohibitions
CPE4000, CSE4000, IMS4000, FIT4126, FIT4186, FIT4246, FIT4606 Only available to
students enrolled in the Honours stream of
the Bachelor of Software Engineering.
Prohibitions
CPE4000, CSE4000, IMS4000
unit_num                         unit_name                  z   CL_CA_SEM1 CL_CA_SEM2 z WEB SITE LINK z sum_off_campus z
 FIT1002   Computer programming                                      1          1          FIT1002             1
 FIT1004   Data management                                           0          1          FIT1004             1
 FIT1005   Networks and data communications                          0          1          FIT1005             0
 FIT1008   Introduction to computer science                          1          1          FIT1008             0
 FIT1010   Introduction to software engineering                      0          1          FIT1010             0
 FIT1012   Website authoring                                         1          1          FIT1012             0
 FIT1013   IT for business                                           0          1          FIT1013             0
 FIT1016   Advanced project level 1                                  0          1          FIT1016             0
 FIT1031   Computers and networks                                    1          1          FIT1031             1
 FIT1033   Foundations of 3D                                         0          1          FIT1033             0
 FIT1034   Principles of computer graphics                           0          1          FIT1034             0
 FIT1035   Digital media authoring                                   0          1          FIT1035             0
 FIT1037   Information management                                    0          1          FIT1037             0
 FIT1038   Introduction to information technology                    0          1          FIT1038             0
 FIT2002   Project management                                        0          1          FIT2002             1
 FIT2003   IT professional practice                                  1          1          FIT2003             1
 FIT2014   Theory of computation                                     0          1          FIT2014             0
 FIT2019   Network standards and specifications                      0          1          FIT2019             0
 FIT2027   Systems design and implementation                         0          1          FIT2027             0
 FIT2032   Industry-based learning                                   0          1          FIT2032             0
 FIT2034   Computer programming 2                                    1          1          FIT2034             1
 FIT2043   Technical documentation for software engineers            0          1          FIT2043             0
 FIT2044   Advanced project level 2                                  0          1          FIT2044             0
 FIT2049   Games programming with C++                                0          1          FIT2049             0
 FIT2070   Operating systems                                         0          1          FIT2070             0
 FIT2072   Educational multimedia                                    0          1          FIT2072             0
 FIT2075   Information strategies and systems development            0          1          FIT2075             0
 FIT2076   Web-database interface                                    0          1          FIT2076             0
 FIT2078   Introduction to security                                  0          1          FIT2078             0
 FIT3003   Business intelligence and data warehousing                0          1          FIT3003             0
 FIT3013   Formal specification for software engineering             0          1          FIT3013             0
 FIT3023   Interactive environments                                  0          1          FIT3023             0
 FIT3036   Computer science project                                  1          1          FIT3036             0
 FIT3039   Studio 1                                                  1          1          FIT3039             0
 FIT3040   Studio 2                                                  1          1          FIT3040             0
 FIT3043   Web systems 3                                             0          1          FIT3043             0
 FIT3056   Secure and trusted software systems                       0          1          FIT3056             0
 FIT3063   Human-computer interaction                                0          1          FIT3063             0
 FIT3072   Managing business records                                 0          1          FIT3072             0
 FIT3080   Intelligent systems                                       0          1          FIT3080             0
 FIT3107   Advanced programming for database applications            0          1          FIT3107             0
 FIT3124   Professional practice                                     0          1          FIT3124             0
 FIT3125   Information organisation                                  0          1          FIT3125             0
 FIT3126   Applications with C++                                     0          1          FIT3126             0
 FIT3130   Computer network design and deployment                    0          1          FIT3130             0
 FIT3134   IT-based entrepreneurship                                 0          1          FIT3134             0
 FIT3136   IT governance and strategy for business                   0          1          FIT3136             0
 FIT3138   Real time enterprise systems                              0          1          FIT3138             0
 FIT3139   Computational science                                     0          1          FIT3139             0
 FIT3140   Advanced programming                                      0          1          FIT3140             0
 FIT3142   Distributed computing                                     0          1          FIT3142             0
 FIT4000   Honours thesis extension                                  1          1          FIT4000             1
 FIT4005   IT research methods                                       1          1          FIT4005             0
 FIT4007   Advanced topics in information systems                    0          1          FIT4007             0
 FIT4008   Reading unit                                              1          1          FIT4008             1
 FIT4009   Advanced topics in intelligent systems                    0          1          FIT4009             0
 FIT4012   Advanced topics in computational science                  0          1          FIT4012             0
 FIT4033   Object oriented application programming in C++            0          1          FIT4033             0
 FIT4037   Case study                                                1          1          FIT4037             0
 FIT4041   Web development                                           0          1          FIT4041             0
 FIT4126   Honours thesis                                            1          1          FIT4126             1
 FIT4186   Honours thesis                                            1          1          FIT4186             1
 FIT4441   Honours thesis part 1                                     1          1          FIT4441             1
 FIT4442   Honours thesis part 2                                     1          1          FIT4442             1
 FIT4443   Honours thesis part 3                                     1          1          FIT4443             1
 FIT4444   Honours thesis final                                      1          1          FIT4444             1
 FIT4448   Honours thesis final                                      1          1          FIT4448             0
 FIT4606   Honours thesis                                            1          1          FIT4606             1
FIT1001   Computer systems                                0   0   FIT1001   0
FIT1003   IT in organisations                             0   0   FIT1003   0
FIT1006   Business information analysis                   1   0   FIT1006   1
FIT1011   Web systems 1                                   0   0   FIT1011   0
FIT1028   Business information technology and systems     0   0   FIT1028   0
FIT1029   Algorithmic problem solving                     1   0   FIT1029   0
FIT1030   Introduction to business information systems    1   0   FIT1030   0
FIT1036   Enterprises and information                     1   0   FIT1036   0
FIT1039   Web systems                                     1   0   FIT1039   0
FIT2001   Systems development                             1   0   FIT2001   1
FIT2004   Algorithms and data structures                  1   0   FIT2004   0
FIT2005   Software analysis, design and architecture      0   0   FIT2005   1
FIT2006   Business process modelling and workflow         1   0   FIT2006   0
FIT2008   Networks and data communications                0   0   FIT2008   0
FIT2009   Data structures and algorithms                  0   0   FIT2009   1
FIT2010   Database                                        0   0   FIT2010   0
FIT2011   Decision support systems fundamentals           0   0   FIT2011   0
FIT2012   Flash animation and applications                1   0   FIT2012   0
FIT2013   e-Business software technologies                1   0   FIT2013   0
FIT2015   Foundations of 3D                               0   0   FIT2015   0
FIT2017   Computer models for business decision making    1   0   FIT2017   0
FIT2018   Network and systems administration              1   0   FIT2018   0
FIT2020   Network architecture                            0   0   FIT2020   1
FIT2024   Software engineering practice                   1   0   FIT2024   0
FIT2026   Sound and video studio                          1   0   FIT2026   0
FIT2028   Web systems 2                                   0   0   FIT2028   0
FIT2029   Web programming                                 0   0   FIT2029   1
FIT2033   Computer models for business decisions          0   0   FIT2033   1
FIT2052   Electronic business                             0   0   FIT2052   0
FIT2055   Web content management                          0   0   FIT2055   0
FIT2065   Operating systems and the Unix environment      1   0   FIT2065   0
FIT2069   Computer architecture                           1   0   FIT2069   0
FIT2071   Algorithms and data structures with C++         1   0   FIT2071   0
FIT2073   Game design and narrative                       1   0   FIT2073   0
FIT2074   Technology, information and organisations       1   0   FIT2074   0
FIT2077   Database design                                 1   0   FIT2077   0
FIT2079   Information graphics                            0   0   FIT2079   0
FIT2080   Information architecture                        0   0   FIT2080   0
FIT3001   Advanced 3D                                     0   0   FIT3001   0
FIT3002   Applications of data mining                     0   0   FIT3002   0
FIT3008   Advanced digital video                          0   0   FIT3008   0
FIT3009   e-Business systems                              1   0   FIT3009   0
FIT3011   Enterprise programming                          0   0   FIT3011   0
FIT3015   Industrial experience project                   0   0   FIT3015   0
FIT3019   Information systems management                  0   0   FIT3019   0
FIT3020   Information visualisation                       0   0   FIT3020   0
FIT3021   Infrastructure for e-commerce                   0   0   FIT3021   0
FIT3022   Intelligent decision support systems            1   0   FIT3022   0
FIT3027   Mobile middleware                               1   0   FIT3027   0
FIT3028   Multimedia concepts and application             0   0   FIT3028   0
FIT3031   Information and network security                1   0   FIT3031   0
FIT3033   Principles of educational multimedia            0   0   FIT3033   0
FIT3037   Software engineering                            0   0   FIT3037   0
FIT3042   System tools and programming languages          1   0   FIT3042   0
FIT3044   Advanced website authoring                      0   0   FIT3044   0
FIT3045   Industry-based learning                         0   0   FIT3045   0
FIT3046   Operating environments                          0   0   FIT3046   0
FIT3047   Industrial experience project                   0   0   FIT3047   0
FIT3048   Industrial experience project                   0   0   FIT3048   0
FIT3051   Decision support systems for finance            1   0   FIT3051   0
FIT3060   Service oriented computing                      0   0   FIT3060   0
FIT3077   Software engineering: architecture and design   1   0   FIT3077   0
FIT3081   Image processing                                0   0   FIT3081   0
FIT3086   Project management                              0   0   FIT3086   0
FIT3088   Computer graphics                               1   0   FIT3088   0
FIT3094   AI for gaming                                   1   0   FIT3094   0
FIT3095   Creating narrative in multimedia                1   0   FIT3095   0
FIT3098   Social informatics                              1   0   FIT3098   0
FIT3099   Knowledge management                            0   0   FIT3099   0
FIT3101   B2C internet commerce                                       0   0   FIT3101   0
FIT3104   Chinese language information technology                     0   0   FIT3104   0
FIT3105   Security and identity management                            1   0   FIT3105   0
FIT3118   Database design and administration                          1   0   FIT3118   0
FIT3121   Archival systems                                            1   0   FIT3121   0
FIT3122   Information and knowledge management systems                1   0   FIT3122   0
FIT3123   Information access                                          1   0   FIT3123   0
FIT3128   Database systems design                                     0   0   FIT3128   0
FIT3135   Commercial experience in multimedia systems                 0   0   FIT3135   0
FIT3141   Data communications and computer networks                   0   0   FIT3141   0
FIT3143   Parallel computing                                          1   0   FIT3143   0
FIT3144   Advanced computer science project                           0   0   FIT3144   0
FIT3145   Games engine programming                                    0   0   FIT3145   0
FIT3146   Emergent technologies and interfaces                        0   0   FIT3146   0
FIT3147   Managing data                                               0   0   FIT3147   0
FIT3148   Cases in information and technology                         0   0   FIT3148   0
FIT3149   Network administration                                      0   0   FIT3149   0
FIT4002   Software engineering studio project                         0   0   FIT4002   0
FIT4004   System validation and verification, quality and standards   1   0   FIT4004   0
FIT4010   Advanced topics in algorithms and discrete structures       1   0   FIT4010   0
FIT4015   Digital communications technology and protocols             0   0   FIT4015   0
FIT4016   Information security                                        0   0   FIT4016   0
FIT4017   Network management                                          0   0   FIT4017   0
FIT4038   Database management and implementation                      1   0   FIT4038   0
FIT4039   Handheld applications and operating systems                 1   0   FIT4039   0
FIT4246   Honours thesis                                              0   0   FIT4246   0
Berwick First semester Berwick Second semester Berwick Summer semester z Caulfield First semester Caulfield Second semester
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Caulfield Summer semester z Clayton First semester Clayton Second semester Clayton Summer semester z Gippsland First semester
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Gippsland Second semester Gippsland Summer semester z Hong Kong First semester Hong Kong Second semester
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Hong Kong Summer semester z South Africa First semester South Africa Second semester South Africa Summer semester South Africa Summer
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z   Sunway First semester Sunway Second semester Sunway Summer semester Sunway Summer z
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posted:10/12/2011
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