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					CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION
     AND AWARENESS MONTH

                          2011


      Cervical Cancer is Still Killing Women...
      Do Not Be One of Them! Get Your Pap.


                Cervical Cancer Toolkit
          for Public Education and Awareness


                                              Done in partnership
Georgia Department of Community Health, Division of Public Health,
                    Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Branch
                                   American Cancer Society, SAD
                          CERVICAL CANCER TOOLKIT
                                TA B L E O F C O N T E N T S


WHAT IS CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION AND AWARENESS MONTH?         3


FACT SHEET ABOUT CERVICAL CANCER                                4


FACT SHEET ABOUT HPV AND THE HPV VACCINE                        9


WHAT CAN YOU DO?                                               13


HOW CAN YOU WORK WITH THE MEDIA?                               15


TIME TO GET STARTED!                                           18

Talking Points for Radio/TV interviews                         20

Press Release #1                                               22

Press Release #2                                               23

Cervical Cancer Pitch Letter                                   25

Sample Letter to Elected Officials for Constituent Education   26

Sample Letter to Physicians Regarding Cervical Cancer          27


CERVICAL CANCER TOOLKIT EVALUATION                             30




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                   2
                                            OVERVIEW

WHAT IS CERVICAL CANCER PREVENTION AND AWARENESS MONTH?

The United States Congress designated January as Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. This year the primary message
of this campaign is: Cervical cancer is still killing women...Do not be one of them! Get your
Pap.


During January, you may wish to highlight issues related to:

         Cervical cancer, the human papillomavirus (HPV) and the importance of early detection

         Personal stories of women and family members/caregivers battling issues related to their
         battle with HPV/pre-cancer and/or cervical cancer

         Recent advances and research in the prevention, detection and treatment of cervical cancer
         or HPV

         The success of your local/regional early detection cervical cancer screening and treatment
         programs and human-interest stories on the importance of early detection

         Education and the emotional issues related to battling cervical cancer and HPV




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                          3
FACT SHEET ABOUT CERVICAL CANCER


     DISTRICTS: USE LOCAL LETTERHEAD



      T H E FA C T S A B O U T C E R V I C A L
                    CANCER


Cervical cancer begins in the lining of the cervix, which is the lower part of the uterus. Cancer of
the cervix develops when cells change from normal to pre-cancer and later to cancer. It is the
12th most common cancer diagnosed among Georgia women.

KEY CERVICAL CANCER STATISTICS
         In 2010 an estimated 12,200 new cases of invasive cervical cancer will be diagnosed
         nationwide and result in 4,210 deaths.9

         Cervical cancer is now the 12th most common cancer diagnosed in GA women.10

         In 2010 an estimated 390 Georgia women were newly diagnosed with cervical cancer.1 In
         2007 an estimated 140 women in Georgia died from cervical cancer.2

         Cervical cancer is diagnosed at an earlier stage in white women (51%) than in African
         American women (43%).1

         Cervical cancer among women younger than 50 is diagnosed earlier (61%) than in women
         older 50 and older (36%).1

         Women living in rural Georgia are at a greater risk of developing cervical cancer than are
         women living in urban areas.11

         Black women in rural Georgia have the highest incidence rate, and the highest mortality
         rate, of cervical cancer.3

         The mortality rates for both white and black women in Georgia have been declining since
         1980 and the gap between races is closing.3

         U.S. mortality rates from cervical cancer have been declining and this trend is largely
         attributed to prevention and early detection as a result of screening through Pap tests.3

9
  American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts & Figures 2010. Atlanta: American Cancer Society; 2010.
10
   Georgia Comprehensive Cancer Registry, Georgia Department of Human Resources, Division of
Public Health, 2010.
11
   Berzen AK, McNamara C, Bayakly AR, Redding, KC, Slade J. Cervical Cancer in Georgia, 2002-2006. Georgia
Department of Community Health, Division of Public Health, Chronic Disease, Healthy Behaviors, and Injury Epidemiology
Section, March 2010.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                                4
           The five-year survival rate for cervical cancer patients is 71%. The one-year survival rate
           for cervical cancer patients is 87%.1

           In 2005 it was estimated that 2 billion dollars per year is spent on the treatment of this
           preventable cancer in the United States.12

KEY STATISTICS FOR HISPANIC/LATINA AND ASIAN WOMEN

      HISPANIC/LATINA WOMEN

           In 2006, 1,861 Hispanic women were diagnosed with cervical cancer and 465 Hispanic
           women died from the disease.5

           Hispanic women are twice as likely to have cervical cancer, and 1.5 times more likely to die
           from cervical cancer as compared to non-Hispanic White women.6

           Overall, cervical cancer incidence rates among Hispanic women residing in the USA are
           about 70% that those in non-Hispanic whites. A recent geographic analysis found that
           Hispanic women experience the highest cervical cancer incidence rates of any racial/ethnic
           group.13

           The death rate for cervical cancer among Hispanic women is almost 50% higher than that
           in non-Hispanic whites. Low rates and poor adherence to recommended diagnostic follow-
           up after an abnormal Pap test are thought to contribute to the higher mortality among
           Hispanic women.14

           In 2008, 75.4% of Hispanic/Latina women over the age of 18 had received a Pap test within
           the last 3 years.8




12
   Brown ML, Lipscomb J, Snyder C. The burden of illness of cancer: economic cost and quality of life. ANNUAL REVIEW OF
PUBLIC HEALTH 2001; 22:91–113.
5
  “Cervical Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity.” Gynecologic Cancers. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Retrieved on November 14, 2010 from http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/statistics/race.htm. Updated 2010.


6
 “Cancer Data/Statistics” Office of Minority Health. U.S. Department of Health andHuman Services. Retrieved on
November 14, 2010 from
 http://minorityhealth.hhs.gov/templates/browse.aspx?lvl=3&lvlid=20 Updated 2010.

7 “Examples of Health Disparities” Center to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities (CRCHD). National Cancer Institute. U.S.
National Institutes of Health. Retrieved on November 14, 2010 from http://crchd.cancer.gov/disparities/examples.html.
Updated 2009.

8 “Cervical Cancer Screening Rates” Gynecologic Cancers. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved on
November 14, 2010 from http://www.cdc.gov/cancer/cervical/statistics/screening.htm Updated 2010

13
     Cancer Facts and Figures for Hispanics 2009-2011. Atlanta. American Cancer Society. 2009.

14
     Cancer Facts and Figures for Hispanics 2009-2011. Atlanta. American Cancer Society. 2009.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                                    5
    ASIAN WOMEN

         In 2006, 532 Asian/Pacific Islander women were diagnosed with cervical cancer, and 152
         Asian/Pacific Islander women died from the disease.5

         Cervical cancer is the number one cancer to occur in Vietnamese women.
         Incidence rates in Vietnamese women are five times higher than the rate among
         White American women.6

         In 2008, 65.6% of Asian women over the age of 18 had received a Pap test within the last
         3 years.8

RISK FACTORS FOR CERVICAL CANCER3
A risk factor increases a person’s chance of getting a disease.

         HPV: Almost all cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV), which is
         passed from one person to another during sex. The risk of getting HPV increases the earlier
         a person becomes sexually active or if a person or his/her partner has had sex with
         multiple partners. However, anyone who is sexually active is at risk for getting HPV.
         Because HPV can occur in male and female genital areas that are not covered by a
         condom, condom use is not guaranteed to prevent HPV infection; however, condom use
         has been associated with lower rates of cervical cancer.

         Age: The risk of having this cancer is very low among girls less than fifteen years old. The
         risk goes up between the late teens and mid-thirties, so unlike many other cancers that
         rarely affect young adults, cervical cancer can affect young women in their twenties and
         even in their teens. Although cervical cancer risk does not increase very much after 40, it
         doesn’t get any lower either. Many older women do not realize that they have the highest
         risk of developing cervical cancer and that it is important for them to continue having Pap
         tests.

         Not getting regular Pap tests: Women should receive annual Pap tests. The Pap test
         can detect pre-cancerous cells (cervical dysplasia). Treatment can stop cervical dysplasia
         before it develops into an invasive cancer.

         Race and ethnicity: African-Americans, Hispanic/Latinas, Vietnamese and American
         Indians also have cervical cancer death rates that are above the national average.

         Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI): HIV and Chlamydia, which are passed from
         one person to another during sex, increases the risk for cervical cancer. Having
         unprotected sex and multiple partners increases the chance of getting an STI.

         Weakened Immune System: Infection with HIV or taking drugs that lower the immune
         system defenses can increase the risk for cervical cancer.

         Smoking: Women who smoke are about twice as likely as non-smokers to get cervical
         cancer. Researchers believe tobacco smoke causes damage to the cells of the cervix.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                               6
         Diet: Diets low in fruits and vegetables may be linked to an increased risk of developing
         cervical and other cancers.

         Obesity: Women who are overweight or obese are at a higher risk for cervical cancer.

         Birth control pill use: Long-term use of birth control pills increases the risk of cervical
         cancer.

         Having many pregnancies: Women with an HPV infection who have had many full-term
         pregnancies (3 or more) may have a slightly increased risk of cervical cancer.

         Young age at the first full-term pregnancy: Women who were younger than 17 years
         when they had their first full-term pregnancy are almost 2 times more likely to get cervical
         cancer later in life than women who waited to get pregnant until they were 25 years or
         older.

         Family history: Women whose mother or sister had cervical cancer have an increased
         risk of developing the disease. It is not clear why, but some researchers believe this is due
         to an inherited condition, which makes some women less able to fight off HPV; others
         believe women in the same family are more likely to share other non-genetic risk factors.

         Poverty: Many women with low income do not have adequate access to screening, like Pap
         tests, and are therefore at a higher risk for developing cervical cancer.

         DES (diethylstilbestrol): DES was given to some pregnant women in the United States
         between 1940 and 1971. The daughters of women who took this drug during their
         pregnancy may have an increased risk of a rare form of cervical cancer.

SYMPTOMS OF CERVICAL CANCER1
Signs and symptoms of cervical cancer

Cervical pre-cancers or early cervical cancers often have no signs or symptoms, so it is
important for women to have regular Pap tests. Symptoms usually appear only when the abnormal
cervical cells become cancerous and spread to other tissues. The most common symptoms may
include:

         Abnormal vaginal bleeding

         An unusual vaginal discharge, which may contain some blood and may occur between
         periods or after menopause

         pain and/or bleeding during intercourse

FACTS ABOUT EARLY DETECTION OF CERVICAL CANCER
         Routine Pap tests can detect pre-cancers and stop them from becoming cancers or detect
         cancers early, when treatment is more effective.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                7
           In Georgia in 2008, 87.6% of women age 18 and above reported having a regular Pap
           test.9

           6 out of 10 cervical cancers occur in women who have never received a Pap test or have
           not been tested in the past five years.10

SCREENING GUIDELINES1,11
           All women should begin cervical cancer screening within 3 years of becoming sexually
           active, but no later than 21 years old. Screenings should be done every year with
           conventional Pap tests or every two years using liquid-based Pap tests. Women should
           consult with their doctor about whether yearly or biyearly screening is appropriate.

           Beginning at age 30, women who have had 3 normal Pap test results in a row should
           consult with their doctor to determine if fewer screenings are appropriate.

           Women 70 years of age or older who have had 3 or more normal Pap tests in a row and no
           abnormal Pap test results in the last 10 years may choose to stop having cervical cancer
           screening in consultation with their physicians.

           Women who have had a total hysterectomy (removal of the uterus and cervix) may stop
           having cervical cancer screening if advised by their physician, unless the surgery was a
           treatment for cervical cancer or pre-cancer.




                                                     Take Action!

Encourage women to speak to their healthcare provider about getting a Pap test. Low or no-cost
screening is available at local public health departments through the BreasTEST & MORE Programs
to eligible uninsured and/or low-income women. In addition, women with abnormal screening
results are referred for diagnostic and treatment services.

To find out more about cervical cancer, to find out where there is a low or no-cost screening in
your area, or to find the nearest BreasTEST & MORE Provider, call the American Cancer Society at
1-800-227-2345 or visit www.cancer.org.




9
  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Data. Atlanta,
Georgia: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008, available at
http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/brfss/list.asp?cat=WH&yr=2008&qkey=4426&state=All.

10
     National Institutes of Health. Cervical Cancer. NIH Consensus Statement. 1996;14(1):1–38.


11
  “Cervical Cancer Screening.” Division of Cancer Prevention and Control, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention
and Health Promotion, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Updated 2010.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                                  8
FACT SHEET ABOUT HPV AND THE HPV VACCINE


     DISTRICTS: USE LOCAL LETTERHEAD




       FA Q s A B O U T H P V & T H E H P V
                    VACCINE


The human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United
States, and it can lead to cervical cancer. Many lawmakers in states throughout the United States
want to require girls to get a vaccine against HPV before entering middle or high school. The
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends routine vaccination with HPV for
females aged 11-12 years old. A catch-up vaccine is recommended for females aged 13-26 who
have not been vaccinated or who have not completed the full vaccine series. Girls as young as 9
years of age may receive the vaccine. 13

What is HPV?
HPV (human papillomavirus) is a virus that is common in the United States and around the world
and can cause cancer and genital warts. HPV is spread through sexual contact. There are about
100 types of HPV and 13 of these may cause or are associated with cervical cancer. HPV is the
major cause of 99% of cervical cancers in women and is also associated with several other types of
cancer in both men and women.12

How common is HPV?
HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Most sexually active
people will get HPV at some time in their lives. Every year in the U.S., about 6.2 million people get
HPV. HPV is most common in young women and men who are in their late teens and early 20s and
sexually active. 13




12
  “Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Cancer.” National Cancer Institute Fact Sheet. National Cancer Institute. Updated
2008.

13
    “HPV Vaccine: Questions and Answers.” National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention. Updated 2008.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                             9
Is HPV the same thing as HIV or herpes?
No, HPV is not the same as HIV or the herpes virus (herpes simplex virus or HSV). While these are
all viruses that can be sexually transmitted, HIV and HSV do not cause the same symptoms or
health problems as HPV. 13

Can HPV be treated?
There is no treatment for HPV—only prevention. There are treatments, however, for the health
problems that HPV can cause, such as genital warts, cervical cell changes, and cancers caused by
HPV. 13

How many people are affected by HPV?
About 20 million people in the United States are estimated to have HPV at any given time. By age
50, 80% of women will test positive for HPV. 13

How many new cases are there each year?
Approximately 6.2 million13

What are the symptoms?
HPV usually causes no symptoms, but certain strains can lead to cervical cancer and/or genital
warts.13

What is the HPV vaccine?
Gardasil, approved by the FDA on June 8, 2006, is the first vaccine effective against four HPV
types.10 Two of the HPV types, type 16 and 18, cause about 70% of cervical cancers.10 The vaccine
also prevents two types of HPV (HPV 6 and 11) that cause 90% of all genital warts.10 On
September 12, 2008, the FDA approved the expansion of Gardasil to include prevention of vulvar
and vaginal cancers caused by HPV. Another HPV vaccine (being developed by GlaxoSmithKline) is
in the final stages of clinical testing, but it is not yet licensed. This vaccine would protect against
the two types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers.13

Who should get the HPV vaccine?
The CDC recommends routine HPV vaccination for females aged 11-12 years old and should be
given as a series of three injections over a six-month period with the second injection on the
second month and the third injection on the sixth month. The vaccine is also recommended for
females aged 13-26 who have not been vaccinated or completed the series.12

Should sexually active females be vaccinated?
The vaccine is most effective when administered before becoming sexually active according to the
guidelines above. However, vaccination may be beneficial because few young females are infected
with the four HPV types (6, 11, 16, 18) targeted by the vaccine. Nevertheless, women should talk
to their physician about whether or not to get the vaccine based on their previous risk of exposure
and potential benefits from the vaccine.13

How and when is the vaccine delivered?
The vaccine is given in a series of three injections over a six-month period. The second and third
doses should be given at two and six months, respectively, after the first dose. The HPV vaccine
may be given at the same time as other vaccines.13

Is the HPV vaccine effective?




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                10
This vaccine is highly effective in preventing four types of HPV in young women who have not been
previously exposed. This vaccine targets HPV types that cause up to 70%14 of all cervical cancers
and about 90% of genital warts.15 The vaccine will not treat existing HPV infections or their
complications.
Is the HPV vaccine safe?
The FDA has licensed the vaccine as safe and effective. This vaccine has been tested in thousands
of females (9 to 26 years of age) around the world. These studies have shown no serious side
effects. The most common side effect is brief soreness at the injection site. The CDC, working with
the FDA, will continue to monitor the safety of the vaccine as it is in general use.13

Does the vaccine contain thimerosal or mercury?
No, there is no thimerosal or mercury in the vaccine.13

How long does vaccine protection last? Will a booster shot be needed?
The length of vaccine protection (immunity) is usually not known when a vaccine is first
introduced. So far, studies have found that vaccinated persons are protected for five years. More
research is being done to find out how long protection will last and if a booster dose of vaccine will
be needed.13

Will girls/women be protected against HPV and related diseases, even if they don’t get all three
doses?
It is not yet known how much protection, if any, girls/women would get from receiving only one or
two doses of the vaccine. For this reason, it is very important that girls/women get all three doses
of the vaccine.13

Does the vaccine protect against cervical cancer?
Yes, the HPV vaccine is the first vaccine developed to prevent cervical cancer. Gardasil is highly
effective in preventing HPV infection, the major cause of cervical cancer in women. The vaccine
protects against four types of HPV, including two that cause about 70% of cervical cancer. It is also
effective in preventing vulvar and vaginal cancers caused by HPV types 16 and 18.13

How common is cervical cancer?
The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2010, more than 12,200 women will be diagnosed
with cervical cancer and 4,210 will die from this disease.1

Will the girls/women who have been vaccinated still need cervical cancer screening?
Yes! All women will still need to see their healthcare provider for annual cervical cancer screening.
There are three reasons why women will still need regular cervical cancer screening13:

     1) The vaccine will NOT provide protection against all types of HPV that cause cervical cancer,
        so women will still be at risk for some cancers.

     2) Some women may not get all required doses of the vaccine (or they may not get them at
        the right times), so they may not get the vaccine’s full benefits.




14
  Munoz N, Bosch FX, Castellsague X, et al. Against which human papillomavirus types shall we vaccinate and screen?
The international perspective. International Journal of Cancer 2004;111:278–285.

15
  Schiffman M, Castle PE, Jeronimo J, Rodriguez AC, Wacholder S. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer. The Lancet
2007; 370:890–907.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                              11
    3) Women may also not get the vaccine’s full benefits if they have already acquired HPV before
       receiving the vaccine.


Why can’t the vaccine be given to women older than 26 years old?
The vaccine has been extensively tested in 9-26 year-old females, so information is only available
about vaccine safety and protection for girls/women of this age group. However, studies on the
vaccine are now being done in boys/men, as well as in women older than 26 years of age. The FDA
will consider licensing the vaccine for these other groups when there is research to show that it is
safe and effective in these groups.13

Why is the vaccine recommended for girls 11 to 12 years of age?
It is important for girls to get the HPV vaccine before they become sexually active. The vaccine is
most effective for girls/women who get vaccinated before their first sexual contact. It does not
work as well for those who were exposed to the virus before getting the vaccine. However, most
women will still benefit from getting the vaccine because they will be protected against other virus
types contained in the vaccine.13

Should pregnant women be vaccinated?
The vaccine is not recommended for pregnant women. There has only been limited information
about vaccine safety among pregnant women and their unborn babies. So far, studies suggest that
the vaccine has not caused health problems during pregnancy, nor has it caused health problems
for the child, but more research is still needed. For now, pregnant women should complete their
pregnancy and then get the vaccine. If a women finds out she is pregnant after she has started the
vaccine series, she should wait until after her pregnancy is completed to finish the three-dose
series. Most importantly, she should continue her routine prenatal care and enroll in the registry
the vaccine manufacturer is compiling of pregnant women who have received the HPV vaccine.13

What about vaccinating males?
We do not yet know if the vaccine is effective in boys or men. Studies are now being done to find
out if the vaccine works to prevent HPV in males. When more information is available, this vaccine
may be licensed and recommended for boys/men as well.13

Will my child be required to get the vaccine before she enters school?
There are no federal laws requiring the immunization of children. All school and daycare entry laws
are state laws and vary from state to state. Therefore, you should check with your state health
department or board of education to find out what vaccines your child will need to enter school or
daycare.13

Each year the CDC publishes childhood and adolescent immunization schedules that provide
recommended timelines for immunization of children and adolescents. The annual childhood and
adolescent immunization schedules are a joint effort of the CDC, the American Academy of
Pediatrics (AAP), and the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP). While these
organizations have no regulatory authority over the immunization of children, the
recommendations of the CDC, AAP, and AAFP are considered standards of medical practice and
most physicians follow the recommendations.13

How much will the HPV vaccine cost?
The retail price of the vaccine is $120 per dose ($360 for full series) plus any costs associated with
giving the vaccine. However, resources are available for free or low-cost vaccines. Contact your
local      health      department       or     the      Vaccines        for     Children      Program
(www.cdc.gov/vaccines/programs/vfc) for more information.13




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                               12
Will the vaccine be covered by insurance plans?
Most insurance plans and managed care plans cover recommended vaccines. However, there may
be a lag-time after a vaccine is recommended before it is available and covered by health plans.
While some insurance companies may cover the vaccine, others may not.13

How can I get the vaccine if I don’t have insurance?
The Vaccines for Children (VFC) program helps families of children who may not otherwise have
access to vaccines by providing free vaccines to doctors who serve them. The VFC program
provides free vaccines to children and adolescents younger than 19 years of age who are either
Medicaid-eligible, American Indian, Alaska Native or uninsured. There are over 45,000 sites that
provide VFC vaccines, including hospitals and private and public clinics. The VFC Program also
allows children and adolescents to get VFC vaccines through Federally Qualified Health Centers or
Rural Health Centers, if their private health insurance does not cover vaccinations. For more
information about the VFC, visit www.cdc.gov/vaccines/programs/vfc. Some states also provide
free or low-cost vaccines at public health department clinics to people without health insurance
coverage for vaccines.13



WHAT CAN YOU DO?

As someone who is interested in educating and advocating for increased knowledge of cervical
cancer and HPV, you can do a lot. You can offer educational sessions in your community as well as
free screening opportunities for those women who do not have the financial resources to pay for it.
In addition, it is very important that you work closely with the media to disseminate information to
all communities. Lastly, work with your partners to get out the message:

Community Outreach
     Involve your local American Cancer Society staff and the Cooperative Extension Services as
     well as any other community partners such as hospitals, faith community and other
     organizations with similar goals.

         Partner with businesses in your community to provide information about cervical cancer
         screening. Consider cervical cancer outreach activities in places that women frequently
         visit, such as

                          grocery stores
                          pharmacies
                          hair and nail salons
                          childcare facilities
                          community centers
                          post offices
                          churches, synagogues and temples
                          gyms or pools
                          colleges and universities
                          libraries
                          laundromats
                          low-income housing or housing authorities



Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                             13
         Invite qualified healthcare professionals and cervical cancer survivors to speak at special
         events in your community, such as

                          meetings of community and volunteer groups
                          hospital/health agency-sponsored events for the public
                          brown-bag lunches or in-services for employees
         Encourage local businesses and offices to allow women to go for annual cervical cancer
         screening during regular work hours—on paid company time.

         Provide articles and messages about cervical cancer screening for church bulletins and
         newsletters.

         Conduct seminars about cervical cancer screening for women at area churches.

         Run a pre-recorded telephone message about the importance of cervical cancer screening
         that clients can listen to while on hold at your organization.

         Print ads for cervical cancer screening and services on placemats and distribute them to
         local restaurants.

         Coordinate with local transportation providers, such as bus and taxi services, to offer free
         transportation for women traveling to cervical cancer screening appointments.

         Have bilingual volunteers or staff members make home visits to women who are part of
         culturally diverse groups. During the home visits, provide appropriate bilingual materials
         about cervical cancer screening. These visits can be done as an outreach activity or after
         screening is completed to share results and make appropriate referrals, if needed.

         Participate in the Cervical Cancer Quilt Project, with squares made by, or in memory of,
         women who have battled cervical cancer and pre-cancerous lesions. For more information
         or to help develop the quilts or bring them to your community, email rbiety@nccc-
         online.org or call 800-685-5531.

         Post to your Facebook.com or MySpace.com network and encourage online friends to
         spread the Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness Month message: Cervical cancer is
         still killing women...Do not be one of them! Get Your Pap.

         Use the ASK ME button while in public places to facilitate communication about cervical
         cancer.

         Participate in the Spirit Foundation Cancer Walk in January in Atlanta, Georgia.

Healthcare Provider Outreach:

         If available, arrange for mobile cervical cancer screening at special sites throughout the
         community.

         Partner with local health professional education programs, such as nursing schools and
         public health programs to identify students willing to visit physicians' offices and distribute
         information packets and brochures about cervical cancer screening. Distribute brochures in
         creative ways, such as in coffee mugs.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                 14
         Host a breakfast or lunch meeting at a healthcare facility to provide updates on cervical
         cancer screening and early detection to healthcare providers within the facility and in the
         surrounding area.

         Inform health providers in your area about the BreasTEST & MORE program so they will
         refer eligible women into your clinic.

Media Outreach:
       Partner with local television and radio stations to promote programming that highlights
       cervical cancer awareness issues.

         Coordinate with local print media to publish cervical cancer-related articles, editorials and
         public service announcements (PSAs).

         Ask a billboard company to donate billboard space or give a non-profit or government rate.



HOW CAN YOU WORK WITH THE MEDIA?

As part of a nationwide education effort surrounding Cervical Health Prevention and Awareness
Month we are asking local supporters of the BreasTEST & MORE Program to get the word out about
cervical cancer and HPV. Specifically, there are three important activities that we recommend and
that this Toolkit supports:

    1) Distribute the press release to local print media, such as newspapers, magazines and
       advertising flyers;

    2) Enlist radio and TV stations to produce cervical              cancer and HPV Public Service
       Announcements (PSAs); and

    3) Invite local media to cover events throughout the month that promote cervical cancer
       awareness and prevention.

Imagine the amount of education that could be accomplished if each health district and/or county
had just one story and/or PSA placed in each of the three major media venues—radio, television
and print.

To help you get started, the Georgia Department of Community Health and the American Cancer
Society have created this easy-to-follow guide on how to work with the media at the state and local
level to spread the word about Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness Month and its message:
Cervical cancer is still killing women...Do not be one of them! Get Your Pap.

Who Should You Contact?
To spread the “Cervical cancer is still killing women...Do not be one of them! Get your Pap.” message,
you should aim to contact the health or medical editor at each of your local newspapers and
magazines and the news directors or health reporters of each of your local television and radio
stations. Because their time is often limited, be sure to be quick and concise in communicating
your message.

It is important to keep track of all of your media contacts and to note their interest in reporting on
cervical cancer/HPV. This will help to keep you organized and will help you respond more efficiently




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                               15
and promptly to requests for information and interviews. A Communications Log is included in this
Toolkit to assist you with tracking your contacts with the media and other organizations.

How Can You Gain the Media’s Interest?
State and local media are firmly committed to making the news they report relevant to their
readers. In other words, they like to report what is happening in the neighborhoods they serve.

Strive to introduce elements of local interest to your story “pitch.” There are a number of ways this
can be achieved. Be creative! Some examples include

         Make available local cervical cancer survivors for interviews. Local human interest “angles”
         are always popular with reporters and their audiences.

         Talk about innovative research on cervical cancer/HPV that is going on at a local research
         university, or suggest local physicians who are willing to be interviewed.

         Organize a local event to raise awareness of, or money for, cervical cancer/HPV research
         and invite media to attend. Be sure to send out announcements at least a week in advance
         to ensure the greatest amount of interest and attendance.

         Research local statistics on cervical cancer to provide background information to reporters.
         It can help provide a local “tie-in” to a broader story about cervical cancer.

Who Can You Contact for Media Help?
We realize that many of you may have questions about how to develop a media list, where to go
for reporters’ addresses and phone numbers or just need a little coaching to get started.

If you are BCCP staff and have questions about dealing with the media, please contact Cathy
Broom at (404) 657-3156. American Cancer Society staff should contact Elissa McCrary at (404)
949-6418 or Elissa.McCrary@cancer.org.

Media relations work can be intimidating at first, but remember that you have a strong educational
message to deliver and a newsworthy cause to promote. Before long, you’ll be confident and
proficient! You can make this happen! Your active participation within your community will help
educate women, family members and caregivers about issues related to cervical cancer/HPV. Help
make a difference. Your action will make a difference as you remind women: Cervical cancer is still
killing women...Do not be one of them! Get your Pap.

When should you get started?
January is Cervical Health Awareness Month. This gives you plenty of time to get organized to work
effectively through the media. The following is a sample timeline to help guide your activity:

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER

        Develop your media contact list using the Communications Log.
        Develop a list of local experts and/or survivors who are willing to be interviewed.
        Begin to call magazine reporters, who require a longer lead time to file their articles.
        Send copy for public service announcements to radio station managers. Follow-up with a
        phone call.
        Send a press release to all print and broadcast reporters.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                 16
        Begin follow-up phone calls to all reporters, print and broadcast, to urge coverage of
        cervical cancer/HPV.
        Invite your community partners to start planning your local activities.
        Market your program/activity by posting flyers in your community, advertising in church
        bulletins and sending information to the media.
JANUARY

        Work with local media who plan to cover cervical cancer/HPV awareness activities in your
        community.
        Re-send press releases and PSA announcements to all media contacts, and follow-up with
        phone calls.
        Send any press releases announcing specific local events relating to Cervical Health
        Awareness Month.
        Take advantage of social networking sites, like Facebook.com, MySpace.com, etc., to post
        the primary message of Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness Month: Cervical Cancer
        is still killing women...Do not be one of them! Get Your Pap.


FEBRUARY

        Collect all print articles and written transcripts of broadcast and radio mentions of cervical
        cancer/HPV in your local media.             Forward copies to Olga Lucia Jimenez at
        ojimenez@cancer.org or via fax (888) 870-9547. Thank You!
        Send thank-you notes to those reporters you worked with to show your appreciation for
        their coverage of Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness Month. Ensure that they have
        your contact information should they cover the topic again.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                               17
                                         Time to get started!

                                                  MEDIA TOOLS
Enclosed you will find materials to help you secure media coverage of your district’s activities for
Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness Month. The Georgia Department of Community Health
will observe Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness Month during January 2011. Women are
encouraged to get a Pap test and support other women to get checked as well.

The 2011 Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness Month Toolkit include the following media
materials:

                          Communications Log
                          Talking Points for Radio/TV Interviews
                          Press release #1
                          Press release #2
                          Pitch letter
                          Letter to elected officials
                          Letter to physicians
                          Activity Report (return requested by February 12, 2010)


Please contact Olga Lucia Jimenez at (404) 949-6454 or ojimenez@cancer.org or Elissa McCray at
(404) 949-6418 or Elissa.McCrary@cancer.org with any questions or concerns regarding cervical
cancer awareness initiatives.

If you are able to identify cervical cancer survivors in your area, feel free to forward that
information to us, along with a photo release form. We would like to compile and share survivor
stories with your local media and partner with survivors who can serve as spokespersons.

We’d also like to hear about any events or activities you've planned in your district to raise
awareness about cervical cancer screenings, so send us an email or call.

Thank you!




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                             18
                                 2011 COMMUNICATIONS LOG

This communications log is provided to you so you can keep track of the contact your have made
and the issues you have discussed with your contacts.

DATE          CONTACT NAME         NOTES




CONTACT PHONE/EMAIL                NEXT STEPS                                   FOLLOW-UP
                                                                                REQUIRED?
                                                                                  Y     N

DATE          CONTACT NAME         NOTES




CONTACT PHONE/EMAIL                NEXT STEPS                                   FOLLOW-UP
                                                                                REQUIRED?
                                                                                  Y     N

DATE          CONTACT NAME         NOTES




CONTACT PHONE/EMAIL                NEXT STEPS                                   FOLLOW-UP
                                                                                REQUIRED?
                                                                                  Y     N

DATE          CONTACT NAME         NOTES




CONTACT PHONE/EMAIL                NEXT STEPS                                   FOLLOW-UP
                                                                                REQUIRED?
                                                                                  Y     N

DATE          CONTACT NAME         NOTES




CONTACT PHONE/EMAIL                NEXT STEPS                                   FOLLOW-UP
                                                                                REQUIRED?
                                                                                  Y     N

DATE          CONTACT NAME         NOTES




CONTACT PHONE/EMAIL                NEXT STEPS                                   FOLLOW-UP
                                                                                REQUIRED?
                                                                                  Y     N




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                        19
                                TALKING POINTS FOR RADIO/TV INTERVIEWS


January is Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness Month. The Georgia Department of
Community Health and the American Cancer Society are encouraging Georgians to get the facts on
the disease and talk with their physicians about early detection.


General Facts
       Cervical cancer is now the 12th most common cancer diagnosed in GA women.

         In 2010 an estimated 390 Georgia women were newly diagnosed with cervical cancer. In
         2007 an estimated 140 women in Georgia died from cervical cancer.

         Women living in rural Georgia are at a greater risk of developing cervical cancer than
         women living in urban areas.

         Black women in rural Georgia have the highest incidence and highest mortality rates.

         U.S. mortality rates from cervical cancer have been declining and this trend is largely
         attributed to prevention and early detection as a result of screening through Pap tests.

         In Georgia in 2008, 87.6% of women age 18 and above reported having a regular Pap
         test.

         The five-year survival rate for cervical cancer patients is 71%. The one-year survival rate
         for cervical cancer patients is 87%.

Risk Factors
All women are at risk of developing cervical cancer. Many cervical cancer risk factors are linked to
lifestyle behaviors. Risk factors for cervical cancer include

                          Exposure to Human Papillomavirus (HPV)
                          Not getting regular Pap tests
                          Infections transmitted sexually, such as HIV or Chlamydia
                          Not using barrier methods of birth control, such as condoms, that can help to
                          protect against STDs
                          Having multiple sexual partners
                          Early age of first sexual encounter
                          Weakened immune system due to HIV or specific drugs
                          Smoking or a history of smoking
                          Being overweight
                          Long-term use of birth control pills
                          Family history of cervical cancer
                          DES (diethylstilbestrol)
Taking Action
       Women should talk with their healthcare provider about recommendations for routine
       cervical cancer screening.



Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                20
         Pelvic examinations and pap tests are available to eligible low-income, uninsured women at
         local health department clinics and selected private care providers through the BreasTest &
         More (BTM) program. For a BTM provider near you call your American Cancer Society at 1-
         800-227-2345.

         Women with abnormal screening results are referred for diagnostic and treatment services.


                   FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT CERVICAL CANCER CALL 1-800-227-2345




Sources: Georgia Department of Community Health, Division of Public Health; American
Cancer Society.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                             21
                                           PRESS RELEASE #1

    DISTRICTS: USE LOCAL LETTERHEAD

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                              January 2, 2011
                                                                          For information, contact:
                                                                                           xxxxxxx
                                                                                           xxxxxxx


                                CERVICAL CANCER IS STILL KILLING WOMEN.
                                 DO NOT BE ONE OF THEM! GET YOUR PAP.


        Routine Pap tests can detect changes in the cells of the cervix even before they turn into
cancer or detect cancer early, when treatment is more effective. All women should begin getting Pap
tests within 3 years of becoming sexually active, but no later than 21 years old. Women should
consult with their doctor about whether yearly or biyearly screening is appropriate.
        African-Americans, Hispanic/Latinas, Vietnamese and American Indians have cervical cancer

death rates that are above the national average. Black women in rural Georgia are more likely to be

diagnosed with cervical cancer and die from the disease. Among Latinas, cervical cancer screening

rates are lowest among Mexican women. Many women with low incomes and without health

insurance don’t get their Pap because of lack of access to affordable care.

        However, this does not need to be the case. Pap tests are available to eligible low-income,

uninsured women at local health department clinics and selected private care providers through the

BreasTest & More (BTM) program. For a BTM provider near you call your American Cancer Society at

1-800-227-2345. Women with abnormal screening results will be referred for diagnostic and treatment

services.

        For more information about cervical cancer or the BreasTEST & MORE program in Georgia,
please call your local American Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345. Help us spread the message that
Cervical Cancer is Still Killing Women…Do Not Be One of Them! Get Your Pap.


                                                      ##




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                  22
                                         PRESS RELEASE #2

    DISTRICTS: USE LOCAL LETTERHEAD




FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                              January 2, 2010
                                                                          For information, contact:
                                                                                           xxxxxxx
                                                                                           xxxxxxx


            CERVICAL CANCER IS STILL KILLING WOMEN. DO NOT BE ONE OF THEM!
                                           GET YOUR PAP.



        Despite an increase in regular Pap tests to screen for cervical cancer, women in Georgia and

across the nation are still dying unnecessarily from the disease. Cervical cancer is preventable and

treatable if caught early enough. That is why regular Pap tests are so important. Our goal is for every

woman, regardless of race or income, to get a Pap test this January and regularly thereafter to protect

herself from cervical cancer.

        In 2010, an estimated 12,200 new cases of invasive cervical cancer were diagnosed in the

U.S., resulting in 4,210 deaths. Cervical Cancer is the 12th most common cancer diagnosed in

women in Georgia. Last year, 390 women in the state were newly diagnosed with cervical cancer and

in 2007 approximately 140 Georgian women died from the disease.

        Black women in rural Georgia have the highest rate of cervical cancer and the highest

mortality rate as well. African Americans, Hispanic/Latinas, Vietnamese and American Indians have

cervical cancer death rates above the national average.

        All women should begin getting a Pap test within 3 years of becoming sexually active, but no

later than the age of 21. Women should talk to their doctor about their risk for cervical cancer and

how should get their Pap tests. Many women with low incomes do not get screened because they

lack access to affordable healthcare.



Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                   23
        However, they may not know that Pap tests and pelvic examinations are available to eligible

low-income, uninsured women at local health department clinics and selected private care providers

through the BreasTest & More (BTM) program. For a BTM provider near you call your American

Cancer Society at 1-800-227-2345. Women with abnormal screening results will be referred for

diagnostic and treatment services.

        Cervical cancer Prevention and Awareness month in 2011 is designed to spread the message:

Cervical Cancer is Still Killing Women…Do Not Be One of Them! Get Your Pap.


                                                  ##




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                24
                                CERVICAL CANCER PITCH LETTER




    Districts: USE local LETTERHEAD



Dear [INSERT MEDIA CONTACT NAME],

Every year about 140 women die from cervical cancer. It is heartbreaking to know that women are
still dying from this disease when it is highly preventable specially when abnormal cells can be
detected and treated before they turn into cancer. All what women need to do is to have routine
Pap tests. Will you join us in our efforts to educate women about the importance of annual Pap
tests?

Another way that cervical cancer can be prevented is having young girls 11-12 vaccinated against
the Human Papillomavirus. In the last years, researchers have found that there are certain types of
this virus that cause cervical cancer. Gilrs as young as 9 years and women between the ages of 13
-16 can be vaccinated as well. It is important to note that this vaccine is more effective when
having it before becoming sexually active.

During January, the Georgia Department of Community Health, Division of Public Health, and the
American Cancer Society team up to support Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness
Month. These organizations are encouraging women to talk with their physicians and get the facts
about HPV and cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is usually curable. When abnormal cell changes in
the cervix are detected early, the survival rate is greater than 90%.

Thank you in advance for supporting women’s health and cancer prevention. I am available to
connect you with Georgia cancer physicians and outreach workers who can offer your audience
insight on cervical cancer and its risk factors. In addition to being cancer experts, these healthcare
specialists can also provide tips for healthy living, including the importance of undergoing routine
Pap tests. I’ll be in touch soon to talk with you about these opportunities.

Regards,
XXXX




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                               25
             SAMPLE LETTER TO ELECTED OFFICIALS FOR CONSTITUENT EDUCATION

                                      Districts: USE local LETTERHEAD

Dear [INSERT ELECTED OFFICIAL’S NAME]:

Every year closed to 140 women die from cervical cancer. It is heartbreaking to know that women
are still dying from this disease when it is highly preventable specially when abnormal cells can be
detected and treated before they turn into cancer. Would you like to eliminate those deaths in your
district? Women need to be educated about the importance of having regular Pap tests and getting
young girls and women immunized against the Human Papillomavirus (HPV).

January is Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness Month, and the Georgia Department of
Community Health and the American Cancer Society, with your help, can spread the word and
virtually eliminate cervical cancer mortality by promoting early detection through screening.

Here’s what you should know about this preventable disease:

         It kills 140 women in Georgia and threatens 390 women who are newly diagnosed each
         year.

         Rural areas report higher risk rates than urban areas due to access obstacles.

         Women who are elderly, low-income and/or members of ethnic minorities tend not to get
         annual Pap tests due to barriers to accessing healthcare.

         Nearly 100% of women diagnosed in a pre-cancer stage will survive, underscoring the
         importance of annual Pap tests.

         Virtually NO deaths need to occur from cervical cancer!

Through the Georgia Department of Community Health and its Cancer Screening Program, widely
known as BreasTEST & MORE, eligible women over 40 years of age have access to Pap tests, pelvic
examinations, clinical breast examinations and mammograms at low or no cost. This program is
offered in all public health departments in the state and selected nonprofit agencies in the metro-
area. In addition, the American Cancer Society’s toll-free hotline number (800-227-2345) can help
you locate the nearest public health departments to obtain the BreasTEST & MORE services. ACS
cancer information specialist is equipped to provide cancer information in easy-to-understand
terms and can provide callers with other resources available in the area.

Will you join our efforts to make women in your district healthier and decrease new cases of
cervical cancer by promoting screening? Together we can end cervical cancer deaths in Georgia!

Cordially,

Key Health Department Official

Sources: 2008 Georgia Cancer Data Report, National Cancer Institute, Georgia Department of Community Health, Division of
Public Health, Chronic Disease, Injury and Environmental Epidemiology Section, August 2005.




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                                26
                  SAMPLE LETTER TO PHYSICIANS REGARDING CERVICAL CANCER




    DISTRICTS: USE YOUR LETTERHEAD



XXXX, M.D.
Group Name
Address 1
Address 2
City, State Zip

Re: Cervical Cancer Screening

Dear Dr. XXXXX:

January is Cervical Cancer Prevention and Awareness Month. Please take this opportunity to remind
your patients about the importance of annual Pap tests.

While the U.S. mortality rates from cervical cancer have declined significantly in the past several
decades, due largely to screening through Pap tests, more can be done to virtually eliminate deaths
from this disease. In Georgia alone, preventive screening could eradicate approximately one hundred
and forty deaths each year.

Cervical cancer screening is paramount if we are to achieve this goal. The Georgia BreasTEST &
MORE Program offers low or no cost breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnosis to eligible
women who are not able to afford them. For more information on cervical cancer or the nearest
BreasTEST & MORE location, please direct your patients to contact the American Cancer Society at 1-
800-227-2345. This toll-free number is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and connects callers
with knowledgeable, caring staff who can provide cancer resource information.

Thank you for joining us in our effort to eliminate deaths from cervical cancer in Georgia. Cervical
Cancer is still killing women... Do not be one them! Get your Pap. Assist your patients to schedule their Pap
test during this month.

Sincerely,
XXXX




Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                      27
                                        2011 ACTIVITY REPORT
(Please complete ONE form per event or activity.)
LEAD ORGANIZATION                                              CONTACT PERSON


ADDRESS                                    CITY                                STATE             ZIP


PHONE                                      FAX                                 EMAIL



                       Activity Name


               Community Targeted


   Describe how you promoted the
activity (please attach a copy of all
       promotional materials used).



         Describe the event briefly.




 List of services/screenings at the
                            event.




              Share a success story.




  List considerations for next year.



Estimate the cost of the event and
                source of funding.

Event outcomes                                                        Goal                     Actual

                                Number of total participants
                                 Number of Pap tests done
   Number of Pap test appointments scheduled at event
                                                       List all contributions (in-kind, monetary, speakers,
List of Partners
                                                       printed materials, etc.)
ACS                  Yes        No
Extension Services   Yes        No
Other:
Other:
Please send completed Activity Report by February 12, 2011, to Olga Lucia Jiménez at
ojimenez@cancer.org or fax to (888) 870-9547. Thanks!!



Cervical Cancer Toolkit, 2010                                                                             28

				
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