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					                                                                                              August, 2001

                          EXAMPLE PAGES OF MATRIX RESPONSES
                         FOR THE NCSS SOCIAL STUDIES STANDARDS
                        FOR THE NCATE PROGRAM REVIEW PROCESS
                                       SPRING 2001

                                STANDARDS 1.1 AND 1.2
                    FROM THE PROGRAM REVIEW REPORT SUBMITTED
                             BY VANDERBILT UNIVERSITY

NOTE: These examples have been reproduced from one institution's Program Review Report. They were
written to fit the specific requirements and needs of that institution. They should be used only as
examples, not be replicated as if they fit any other institution's situation. The introduction section
immediately below explains some of the special circumstances that Vanderbilt University addressed as it
wrote the responses. The most significant difference from most other institutions is that Vanderbilt
University had to address Tennessee license requirements in each subject discipline within social studies.
There is no broad field social studies license category in Tennessee, as there is in most states.

                                 INTRODUCTION TO THE MATRIX

This introduction to the matrix is provided because there are several points of information that will help
NCSS Program Reviewers understand the organization of matrix responses, the distinct elements within
each set of responses, and the context in which the responses are presented.

1. Social studies teacher education candidates for licenses in Tennessee are licensed in specific subjects
   rather than broad field social studies. The subjects for which Vanderbilt University has approved
   programs are
 History,
 Civics and Government,
 Economics,
 Psychology, and
 Sociology.
   It does not have an approved program in geography, so Standard 2.2 is not addressed in the matrix.
   (Because NCSS does not have standards for sociology, Sociology is not addressed as a discipline.)

2. Candidates must have a major in the subject in which they seek their primary license. If they seek a
   license in a second discipline, they must have at least 18 semester hours in the subject in which they
   seek the second endorsement. Most Vanderbilt candidates seek only one license, the one in their
   major.

3. All Vanderbilt social studies majors that lead to licenses meet the respective NCSS disciplinary
   standards.

4. All candidates for licenses in any of the social studies disciplines are expected to maintain a document
   called a Personal Log/Portfolio: Evidence of Professional Learning Experiences and Assessments, in
   which they record personal data for each NCSS type of evidence (programmatic, testing, and
   performance) for each of the ten NCSS thematic standards and the disciplinary standard(s) in which a
   license is sought. These Personal Logs/Portfolios are reviewed at three checkpoints in the unitwide
   evaluation system (Screening I, Screening II, and at the conclusion of student teaching). At this last
   checkpoint, the final decisions about grades for student teaching and if the university will recommend
   the candidate for a license are made.

   The Personal Log/Portfolio system of monitoring and assessing candidates assures that all NCSS
   standards are met. As an example, a copy of the blank pages of a Personal Log/Portfolio document for
   a candidate seeking a license in history is in Appendix A.

5. All masters degree candidates must meet the same matrix requirements as the undergraduates.

6. Three types of testing evidence are provided for each standard:

 a) Course-based evidence that is specific to the standard,
 b) National standardized test data from the Praxis II Specialty Exam of Content Knowledge that is
    specific to the standard, and
 c) National standardized test data from Praxis II tests in general.

7. Performance evidence for each candidate on each standard is required during the combined course,
   Education 2390: Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools and Education 3390: Advanced
   Teaching of Social Studies in Secondary Schools, and in student teaching. In both the course and in
   student teaching, candidate lesson plans and observed teaching are assessed in terms of each NCSS
   standard by the course instructor, the college supervisor of social studies student teaching, or the
   cooperating teacher.

   As examples, copies of the evaluation forms used to assess candidate perforrnance for each of the ten
   NCSS thematic standards and for the discipline of history are in Appendix B.

   Although this performance assessment system is relatively new, all seniors for the current school year
   have been assessed in the combined methods course and in student teaching. Results of these
   assessments are reported for each standard. The actual completed assessment documents will be in the
   Exhibit Room. (They are not in this report because they are confidential materials.)

8. The evidence presented for the matrix responses for all of Standards 1.1 to 1.10 and 2.1 to 2.5 is
   organized under the following headings:

   Programmatic Evidence
      Programmatic evidence imbedded in prescribed courses
      Programmatic evidence as reported in Personal Logs/Portfolios

   Testing Evidence
      Testing evidence from prescribed courses that is specific to the standard
      Testing evidence from national standardized tests
      Testing evidence as reported in Personal Logs/Portfolios

   Performance Evidence
       Performance evidence as reported by faculty/cooperating teachers
       Performance evidence as reported in Personal Logs/Portfolios

   All of this evidence is specific to each standard except for the national standardized test evidence for
   Standards 1.1, 1.3, 1.8, and 1.9.
9. Matrix responses are rather repetitious and overlapping for several reasons:

 a) All NCSS content standards (Standards 1.1-1.10 and 2.1-2.5) are assessed within the common
    four-checkpoint, unit-wide evaluation system. Therefore, similar descriptions are provided for each
    standard.

 b) Although assessments are more specific to each NCSS standard than they are general, the way of
    conducting the assessments is common across the unit. For example, although Praxis II tests are
    different for each discipline and license area, Praxis II tests are used across all licensing areas; and
    although the Logs/Portfolios data recorded for each standard are specific to each standard, the
    Personal Log/Portfolio system and format are common across all standards.

 c) In a number of cases, certain required courses intentionally focus on a number of NCSS standards.

 d) Performance evidence is collected in the same way and on the same forms for all NCSS content
    standards in Education 2390/3390: Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools and in student
    teaching.

 e) Although a number of responses appear to be virtually the same from standard to standard, there are
    often slight differences that make the response accurate for one particular standard and not others.
                                            Matrix Item 1.1
                                              Theme One:
                                     Culture and Cultural Diversity

Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and
provide instruction at the appropriate school levelfor the study of culture and cultural diversity.

Indicators of Capabilities for Teaching Social Studies

Teachers of social studies at all school levels should provide developmentally appropriate experiences as
they guide learners in the study of culture and cultural diversity. They should:

   Enable learners to analyze and explain the ways groups, societies, and cultures address human needs
    and concerns;
   Guide learners as they predict how data and experiences may be interpreted by people from diverse
    cultural perspectives and frames of references;
   Assist learners to apply an understanding as an integrated whole that explains the functions and
    interactions of language, literature, the arts, traditions, beliefs and values, and behavior patterns;
   Encourage learners to compare and analyze societal patterns for preserving and transmitting culture
    while adapting to environmental and social change;
   Ask learners to give examples and describe the importance of cultural unity and diversity within and
    across groups;
   Have learners interpret patterns of behavior reflecting values and attitudes that contribute or pose
    obstacles to cross-cultural understanding;
   Guide learners as they construct reasoned judgments about specific cultural responses to persistent
    human issues;
   Have learners explain and apply ideas, theories and modes of inquiry drawn from anthropology and
    sociology in the examination of persistent issues and social problems.

1.1 Thematic Standard One: Culture and Cultural Diversity

The program prepares social studies teachers who possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions
to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school levelfor the study of culture and cultural
diversity.
                           STANDARD 1.1: CULTURE AND CULTURAL DIVERSITY

1.1.1   Programmatic Evidence

Programmatic evidence imbedded in prescribed courses

Undergraduate candidates for all five social studies discipline licenses - history, civics and government,
economics, psychology, and sociology - are required to take six types of courses with emphases on culture
and cultural diversity.

Masters degree candidates are required to take the courses or show they have already had similar courses
with emphases on eulture and cultural diversity. Candidate transeripts are audited to determine that they
have the prescribed eourse work, and those who fall short must remediate.

1   Candidates are required to take either Social Science 232: Human Geography, or Social Science 235:
    Human Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Social Science 232 is a study of the human and cultural aspects of peoples and regions of the world. It
    emphasizes the analysis of cultural themes and relationships between people and their cultural and
    physical environment.

    Social Science 235 is similar to Social Science 232, but its focus is on cultural aspects of one region
    of the world, sub-Saharan Africa.

    The same instructor, Professor Hari, teaches both courses. Professor Hari's keen interest in cultural
    issues, his research concentration in cultural geography, and his own personal background as a native
    of India and former resident of South Africa are evidenced in how the two courses emphasize
    understanding of both culture and cultural diversity. He was asked to teach the two courses
    specifically for social studies teacher education candidates for these reasons. Social Science 235 is
    also a core course in the College of Arts and Science African Studies program.

    Both courses purposely target this NCSS standard and Standard 1.3: People, Places and
    Environments. They also specifically address the two geography competencies required by the State
    of Tennessee for licenses in all five social studies discipline lieense areas. These competencies are as
    follows:

    (a) Understanding of the influenee of geographic characteristics, including elimate, physieal features
        and natural resourees, on the world's major societies and cultures.
    (b) Ability to integrate into the curriculum skills related to the use of maps, graphs, and charts.

2. All teacher-education candidates, including those seeking licenses in the social studies disciplines, are
   required to take Education 1020: Society, the School, and theTeacher or the masters level equivalent,
   Education 3500: Seminar in Teaching and Schools.

    Education 1020 has a major focus on cultural diversity as a condition of and purpose for classroom
    instruction. Two of the stated goals of the course are

   to develop an awareness of the school goals of equity and excellence within a multi-cultural
    educational system, specifically pertaining to racial desegregation of schools and mainstreaming of
    disabled students, and
   to begin to formulate personal ideas about the purposes and mission of schools and the future of
    pre-K-12 education in America.

    Two topics of study and chapters in the text (which was written by the course instructor) are

       "Students are Alike But Not the Same"
       "Learning for All Students: The Goals of Equity and Excellence"

    Class assignments and activities include visits to a variety of diverse school settings and viewing of an
    emotionally substantial video about race and poverty, Crisis at Central High School. Candidates are
    assigned papers on racially charged school situations and monitor and analyze their own cognitive and
    affective learning about cultural diversity and the teaching of culturally diverse students. Many of
    these assignments are evaluated, and candidate learning about cultural diversity is a main element in
    grades for the course.

    Education 3500 emphasizes the many elements and aspects of school culture. Three major goals are

1. that students be able to analyze the culture of a school at both micro (classroom) and macro
   (school-wide) levels,
2. that they have knowledge and skills to influence those cultures in positive ways, and
3. that they can integrate themselves as effective teachers in a school culture different from their own
   experiences as a K- 12 student.

    Three topics of study that relate directly to culture and diversity are

       "Studying Schools as Cultures"
       "Students Are Alike But Not the Same," and
       "Learning for All Students: The Goals of Excellence and Equity."

    Class assignments and activities include visiting four culturally diverse schools (special needs school,
    elementary school, middle school, high school), and analyzing the cultures of those schools in terms
    of ten specific criteria.

    As the class itself contains a mixture of regular education and special education majors, several
    discussions involve the diversity of the inclusion classroom. The special education candidates serve as
    a resource for the regular education candidates in considering and planning for the special needs
    students who may be in their classes.

3. All secondary education teacher-candidates, including those seeking licenses in the social studies
   disciplines, are required to take Education 2920: Social and Philosophical Aspects of Education or
   Education 3050: Advanced Social and Philosophical Aspects of Education. Education 2920 is a
   dual-level course for undergraduate and masters degree students, and Education 3050 targets master
   degree students. Both focus on the same topics that relate to this standard and both stress culture and
   cultural diversity very heavily throughout the entire course. Major topics of the courses are

    "The Relation of Schools to Society,"
    "Gender and Education,"
    "Multiculturalism in Education,"
    "Families, Communities, and Schools,"
    "The Social Context of Educational Equity,"
    "Equity and the Organization of Schools,"
    "In Pursuit of Educational Excellence and Equity," and
    "Topics in Reform: Desegregation."

4. Candidates for licenses in history are required to have a major in history, and candidates in all four
   disciplines other than history are required to take at least three history courses, at least one being in
   U.S. History. These requirements expose candidates to a rather comprehensive study of cultures over
   time and to cultural differences among and within societies and civilizations. Although undergraduate
   candidates may select among a variety of courses, and masters degree candidates may use history
   courses previously taken to satisfy these requirements, they are expected to record in their Personal
   Logs/Portfolios: Evidence of Personal Learning Experiences and Assessments how and to what extent
   the courses they select teach them about culture and cultural diversity. (The use of the Personal
   Logs/Portfolios is described and explained in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program
   review report and is specifically explained in terms of this standard below.)

5. Within their Liberal Education Core of courses, candidates are required to take at least one history or
   social science course that focuses on "the study of a culture other than one's own. " This requirement
   was inserted into the social studies curriculum several years ago precisely to address this NCSS
   standard.

6. Undergraduate and masters level candidates are required to take the combined course Social Studies
   Education 2390: Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools and Social Studies Education 3390:
   Advanced Teaching of Social Studies in Secondary Schools. The courses are taught together and have
   a common meeting time and syllabus. Adjustments are made within the combined course to
   accommodate the different degree levels and backgrounds of the candidates.

    Major components of the joint course are

   analyzing, interpreting, and understanding the NCSS content standards and
   understanding cultural diversity' and diversity among students and the teaching of all students.

    Ways in which the course directly addresses the content standards are described below in the response
    to Standard 3.2 section of this program review report. The course syllabus is in Appendix C.

    Ways in which the course addresses cultural diversity, diversity among students, and teaching all
    students includes assigned reading, directed study, discussion, writing papers, and developing lesson
    plans relating to student cultural differences, multiple intelligences, literacy difficulties, ESL and
    immigrant students, special needs learners, and gender equity. Two major units of the course are

       "Diversity in the Classroom and Methods to Match" and
       "Teaching and Learning with a Text in a Diverse Classroom."

    Programmatic evidence as reported in Personal Logs/Portfolios: Evidence of Professional
    Learning Experiences and Assessments

    As is explained above in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report,
    undergraduate candidates and masters level candidates for licensure in all five social studies
    disciplines are required to maintain a Personal Log/Portfolio that chronicles their learning in terms of
    each of the ten NCSS thematic standards plus the NCSS disciplinary standard in their major. These
    Personal Logs/Portfolios are reviewed by faculty as part of the Screening I and II decisions and at the
point when recommendations for licenses are made. If candidates are judged to be significantly
deficient, they are not admitted to student teaching and are not recommended for a license.

A copy of the Personal Log/Portfolio instrument is included in Appendix A.

Candidate Personal Logs/Portfolios sections that address this standard need to show

(a) when and how candidates learn about culture and cultural diversity'
(b) how their understanding was evaluated, and
(c) what grades they received.
1.1.2   TestingEvidence

                             Testing Evidence for Candidates for Licenses
                                    in All Social Studies Disciplines

Testing evidence from prescr~bed courses that is specific to the standard

Candidates are assessed in terms of this standard in the courses listed in the "Programmatic Evidence"
section above as follows:

1. Social Science 232: Human Geography and 235: Human Geography of Sub-Saharan Africa. The
   concepts of culture and cultural diversity are so pervasive in these two courses that a candidate's
   understanding of them is assessed multiple times and in multiple ways through quizzes, the rnid-term
   examination and the final examination. Professor Hari notes candidate understanding of the two ideas
   as he grades the tests and records the grades. He grades tests on an A to F scale. The grade distribution
   for each course in recent semesters follows:

   Social Science 232 (Fall 1999).
   All social studies candidates received an A or A- in the course.

   Social Science 235 (Fall 2000).
   All social studies candidates received an A in the course.

   Every candidate in both courses also writes a research paper on a cultural theme. Their work is
   assessed on an A to F scale. Much of the grade on the paper is based on an ability to express
   understanding of cultures and cultural diversity and an ability to analyze elements of cultures, and
   differences within and among them. Grade distributions for this paper assignment for the fall of 1999
   are as follows:

   Social Science 232
   (Fall 1999) All social studies candidates received an A on the paper.

2. Education 1020: Society, the School, and the Teacher and Education 3500: Seminar in Teaching and
   Learning. Understanding of cultural diversity and the teaching of culturally diverse students are main
   foci of Education 1020 and Education 3500. In Education 1020, both are assessed throughout the
   course in quizzes, the mid-term examination and final examination. Several candidate e-mail
   responses to questions and a paper assignment that requires candidates to react to a video-based
   racially charged situation are also evaluated. The test items are evaluated, and the other assignments
   and exercises receive either a letter grade or a rating of Excellent, Satisfactory, or Unsatisfactory. The
   instructor aggregates candidate scores on the cultural diversity test items and other graded
   assignments and exercises. Over the past three years, all candidates in the social studies education
   program have received composite grades of C+ or above on test items, and all of their ratings have
   been Satisfactory or Excellent on the other assignments.

   In Education 3500, candidate understanding of cultural diversity and the teaching of culturally diverse
   students are assessed in the forms of written reflections, written analyses of the cultures of four
   schools that are visited, oral presentations on both topics, the use of instruments that guide classroom
   observations, and questions on the mid-term and final examinations.
3. Education 2920 and Education 3050: The Social and Philosophical Aspects of Education.
   Understanding culture and cultural diversity, with particular emphasis on cultural diversity, is a major
   goal of both courses, and attention to them permeates all class sessions and activities. Assigned
   readings, discussions, papers, and examinations all assess candidate understanding of these two
   concepts, their ability to teach well in terms of them, and their disposition to do so well. Candidates
   are assessed on an A to F scale. Grades for the two courses in recent semesters follow:

Term                  Course                                             Grades
                                                      A                     B                      C
Spring 2000           Education 2920                 14
Spring 2000           Education 3050                  9
Summer 2000           Education 3050                  8                      2
Fall 2000             Education 2920                  4                      9
Fall 2000             Education 3050                  6                     10                     2


4. The Liberal Education Core course requirement of a history and/or social science course that focuses
   on "the study of a culture other than one's own. " Although            candidates have a wide selection of
   courses to choose from to meet his requirement,the course selected to meet this criterion of cultural
   understanding, and the grade received, provide direct evidence of meeting this standard. All courses
   accepted to fit this designation are graded on an A to F scale. The candidate must pass this course in
   order for it to satisfy the requirement. As a result, all candidates have passed the course or courses that
   they choose to meet this criterion. Nearly all grades for candidates have been C or above, most are A
   or B.

5. Social Studies Education 2390/3390: Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools. This combined
   course has multiple assessment activities that provide evidence of candidate understanding in terms of
   this standard. Instead of describing each of these here, we refer the reviewer to the course syllabus in
   Appendix C. Candidates are assessed through written assignments, lesson plans, and lessons taught in
   the practicum portion of the class. All assignments and lessons for candidates during the fall 2000
   were rated B or above on a scale of A-F or "Satisfactory" or above on a scale of "Exemplary,
   Satisfactory, and Unsatisfactory."

   Testing evidence from national standardized tests

   As explained in the Overview and Scope section of this program review report, both undergraduate
   and masters level candidates in all five license areas must pass the Praxis II Subject
   Assessments/Specialty Area Test of content knowledge in each social studies discipline for which a
   license is sought. These tests are required by the State of Tennessee. Although Praxis II Subject
   Assessment/Specialty Area Test scores are not yet reported by Educational Testing Service in terms of
   each standard, each test does include questions directly pertinent to each standard, and they accept
   that evidence as supplemental to the standard specific evidence from course-based testing that is
   reported above. The Vanderbilt University teacher education faculty consider a high passing grade to
   be general evidence that a candidate has a grasp of the content of each standard. Vanderbilt candidates
   in general have scored well on these tests. The scores for the past three years are reported above in the
   "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report.

   Testing evidence as reported in Personal Logs/Portfolios: Evidence of Professional Learning
   Experiences and Assessments
   The Personal Log/Portfolio system for assessing each candidate in terms of every NCSS standard is
   explained above in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report and in the
   "Programmatic Evidence" section that addresses this standard. The testing data from the Personal
   Logs/Portfolios supplement the testing data from actual test scores as reported immediately above.

   This system is being used for the first time this year with current sophomores. It is too early to report
   multi-year comprehensive candidate results for each standard. Preliminary reviews of entries in
   candidate logs indicate that candidates are focusing on each standard as a content goal for the teacher
   education program. Candidates are aware that evidence of meeting each standard is a basis for being
   approved for Screening I and II and is required for them to be recommended for a license.

   No candidate will be recommended for a license to teach without convincing Personal Log/Portfolio
   evidence indicating that they have been evaluated in terms of each NCSS content standard, including
   this one. They must report the grades they have received on these evaluations.

   Sample materials from candidates' Personal Logs/Portfolios will be placed in the NCATE Exhibit
   Room. (They are not in this report because they are confidential materials.)

1.1.3   Performance Evidence

   Performance evidence as reported by faculty/cooperating teachers

   As mentioned above in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report, every
   undergraduate and masters level candidate's teaching performance is assessed in terms of all of the
   NCSS content standards. The performance assessments occur primarily during student teaching and in
   the course, Social Studies Education 2390/3390: Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools,
   which is taken in the semester prior to student teaching and includes an in-school practicum
   component.

   During student teaching and the Social Studies Education course, candidates are assessed in two ways
   on all of the standards:

   (a) They plan lessons and write lesson plans that address each of the specific standards, which are
       assessed by either the instructor of the Social Studies Education course, their college supervisor of
       social studies student teaching, and/or their cooperating teachers.

   (b) They teach lessons that address each of the specific standards and are observed and evaluated by
       either the instructor of the Social Studies Education course, their college supervisor of social
       studies student teaching, and/or their cooperating teachers as they do their teaching.

   Both the lesson plans and the observed lessons are assessed on a 1 to 5 scale. (See the assessment
   instruments in Appendix E.)

   This system is being used for the first time this year with current seniors and masters level candidates.
   It is too early to provide multi-year comprehensive results for each standard. However, we do have
   results from the evaluation of current seniors.

   All candidates who completed Social Studies Education 2390/3390 in fall 2000 were assessed as
   having exceeded minimum criteria for the thematic and disciplinary standards, including this
standard, on the lessons they planned and taught. The specific ratings for candidates, standard by
standard, are in Appendix F. The results concerning this standard, Culture and Cultural Diversity, are
as follows:

     Two candidates’ performances were assessed on this standard. On a scale of "Exemplary,
     Satisfactory, and Unsatisfactory," both candidates were rated "Exemplary" on both planning and
     observed teaching.

Copies of the completed assessment forms will be placed in The Exhibit Room. (They are not in this
report because they are confidential materials.)

Results for student teaching are similarly positive. Student teachers' plans and observed teaching for
the 2000-2001 school year until the writing of this report have been assessed on a scale of

1.   Inadequate,
2.   Minimally Acceptable,
3.   Average,
4.   Very Good, or
5.   Excellent.

All plans and observed lessons that addressed this standard were rated 4 or 5. The specific results for
each candidate, standard by standard, are in Appendix G.

Samples of graded lesson plans and completed evaluations of observed lessons for both Social Studies
Education 2390/3390 and student teaching will be placed in the NCATE Exhibit Room. (They are not
in this report because they are confidential materials.)

Performance evidence as reported in Personal Logs/Portfolios: Evidence of Professional Learning
Experiences and Assessments

Also as described in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report, every
candidate is expected to compile a Personal Log/Portfolio of evidence that all NCSS content
standards are met. Student teachers and candidates in the Social Studies Education courses compile
Personal Log/Portfolio documentation of their lesson plans, the evaluations of those plans, and the
observer evaluations of their planned teaching. They are expected to provide evidence in their
compilations that they have demonstrated an ability to teach middle school and/or secondary school
students the subject matter that is the focus of each NCSS content standard, including this standard.

Sample materials from candidate Personal Logs/Portfolios will be placed in the NCATE Exhibit
Room. (They are not in this report because they are confidential materials.)
                                            Matrix Item 1.2
                                             Theme Two:
                                     Time, Continuity, and Change

   Social studies teachers should possess the knowledge, capabilities, and dispositions to organize and
   provide instruction at the appropriate school levelfor the study of time, continuity, and change.

   Indicators of Capabilities for Teaching Social Studies

   Teachers of social studies at all school levels should provide developmentally appropriate experiences
   as they guide learners in the study of time, continuity, and change. They should:

       Assist learners to understand that historical knowledge and the concept of time are socially
       influenced constructions that lead historians to be selective in the questions they seek to answer
       and the evidence they use;
      Have learners apply key concepts from the study of history such as time, chronology, causality,
       change, conflict, and complexity to explain, analyze, and show connections among the patterns of
       historical change and continuity;
      Ask learners to identify and describe significant historical periods and patterns of change within
       and across cultures, such as the development of ancient cultures and civilizations, the rise of
       nation-states, and social, economic, and political revolutions;
      Guide learners as they systematically employ processes of critical historical inquiry to reconstruct
       and reinterpret the past, such as using a variety of sources and checking their credibility, validating
       and weighing evidence for claims, and searching for causality;
      Provide learners with opportunities to investigate, interpret, and analyze multiple historical and
       contemporary viewpoints within and across cultures related to important events, recurring
       dilemmas, and persistent issues, while employing empathy, skepticism, and critical judgment;
      Enable learners to apply ideas, theories, and modes of historical inquiry to analyze historical and
       contemporary developments, and to inform and evaluate actions concerning public policy issues.

1.2 Thematic Standard Two: Time, Continuity, and Change

The program prepares social studies teachers who possess the knowledge, capabilities and dispositions
to organize and provide instruction at the appropriate school level for the study of time, continuity, and
change.
                   STANDARD 1.2: TIME, CONTINUITY, AND CHANGE

1.2.1   Programmatic Evidence

Programmatic evidence imbedded in prescribed courses

Undergraduate candidates for licenses in history are required to complete a major in history and take
an additional l 2 semester hours of course work in the social sciences. In the process of completing the
major, they must meet the following knowledge and skill requirements set by the State of Tennessee:

   Examine the concept of change over time with the ability to relate past to present.
   Investigate the major events and movements in history including American, Western and
    Non-Western, the turning points of historical development, and their relationship to the present.
   Apply the techniques of historical interpretation including cause and effect, major trends, and
    quantitative and non-quantitative analysis.
   Explore the interaction among peoples of different races and cultures and how such interaction has
    shaped United States and World History.
   Formulate a content balance between broad themes in United States and world history and specific
    historical events, ideas, movements, persons and documents.

History 200: History Workshop, which is required of all history majors addresses this standard and
Standard 2.1 directly in three ways:

(a) The instructors use key indicators from the two standards as guides for candidate study.
(b) Candidates are required to monitor their learning of history in terms of key indicators of the two
    standards.
(c) The indicators are used in the evaluation of candidates in the course.

The instrument used by the instructors of History 200 to connect the course content to this standard
and Standard 2. l is in Appendix H.

Requirements of the history major are reported below under Standard 2. l, and descriptions of the
courses that are part of the history major and, therefore, taken by candidates to meet this standard are
included in Appendix J. The Vanderbilt University teacher education faculty believes this amount of
history study more than meets the requirements of this standard. More specific information about the
history major is reported below under Standard 2. l: History.

Master's degree candidates for licenses in history are required to have a major or to have course work
in history that is comparable to a Vanderbilt major in history. The major or course work comparable
to the major must meet the five State of Tennessee knowledge and skill requirements. Candidate
transcripts are audited to determine if they have had the prescribed course work, and those who fall
short must remediate. More specific information about the history major is reported below under
Standard 2.1: History

Candidates at both the undergraduate and masters degree levels for a license in another discipline
who seek to add history as a second endorsement must complete 18 semester hours of course work in
history with the same distribution among emphases within history as a history major. Their advisor
must approve their course selection. They must also complete the same 12 semester hours of course
work in the social sciences as a history major.
Undergraduate candidates for licenses in the four social studies disciplines other than history (civics
and government, economics, psychology and sociology) are required to take three courses in history,
including one course in U.S. history. In the process of doing so, they must meet the following
knowledge and skill requirements in history set by the State of Tennessee:

1. Explain the historical development of the United States in the following spheres of human
   activity: social, political, scientific and technological, economic, and cultural (philosophical,
   religious, and aesthetic).
2. Explore critical eras in the historical development of the world in the following spheres of human
   activity: social, political, scientific and technological, economic, and cultural (philosophical,
   religious, and aesthetic).

Although candidates have a wide number of choices to select from, the Vanderbilt University teacher
education faculty believes the three courses they choose provide them with the opportunity to meet
this standard. Syllabi of sample courses that are frequently taken by candidates to meet this standard
will be placed in the NCATE Exhibit Room.

Masters degree candidates for licenses in the four social studies disciplines other than history ( civics
and government, economics, psychology, and sociology) are required to have three history courses
that are comparable to those available to Vanderbilt undergraduates. Candidate transcripts are audited
to determine if they have had the prescribed course work, and those who fall short must remediate.

Programmatic evidence as reported in Personal Logs/Portfolios: Evidence of Professional
Learning Experiences and Assessments

As explained above in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report,
undergraduate and masters level candidates for licenses in all five social studies disciplines are
required to maintain a Personal Log/Portfolio that chronicles their learning in terms of each of the ten
NCSS thematic standards plus the NCSS disciplinary standard in their major. These Personal
Logs/Portfolios are reviewed by faculty as part of the Screening I and II decisions and at the point
when recommendations for licenses are made. If candidates are judged to be significantly deficient,
they are not admitted to student teaching and are not recommended for a license.

A copy of the Personal Log/Portfolio instrument is included in Appendix A.

Candidate Personal Logs/Portfolios need to show

(a) when and how candidates learn about time, continuity, and change,
(b) how their understanding was evaluated, and
(c) what grades they received.
1.2.2   Testing Evidence

                      Testing Evidence for Candidates for Licenses in History

Testing evidence from prescribed courses that is specific to the standard

Because all courses in history address this standard, candidate evaluations and grades in all of those
courses provide precise testing evidence specific to this standard. Candidates for licenses in history
must have strong enough grades in their history major to be approved by the History Department
faculty at Screening I and II. They nearly always need at least a B average in their major to be
approved, but faculty professional judgment is the deciding factor rather than an absolute grade point
average. Grade point averages for the past three years of candidates for licenses in history are as
follows:

   Year                Number of                               Grade Point Averages
                       Candidates
1997-1998                   8                      4.00; 4.00; 4.00; 4.00; 4.00; 4.00; 4.00; 3.00
1998-1999                  11             3.69; 3.83; 3.65; 3.64; 3.20; 3.37; 2.88; 3.41; 3.81; 2.55; 3.96
1999-2000                   3                                    3.796; 3.50; 3.785

Testing evidence from standardized nahonal tests that is specific to the standard

As explained in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report, both
undergraduate and masters level candidates in all five license areas must pass the Praxis II Specialty
Exam of Content Knowledge in each social studies discipline for which a license is sought. These
tests are required by the State of Tennessee.

Because candidates for licenses in history take the Praxis II test in history, the results of the test
provide precise testing evidence specific to this standard. Scores on the test in history for the past
three years by candidates for licenses in history are as follows:

        1999-2000                             1998-1999                             1997-1998
   Average Score: 683                    Average Score: 655                    Average Score: 665
   Passing Score: 520                    Passing Score: 520                    Passing Score: 520
          N=3                                  N=11                                   N=8
                          Testing Evidence for Candidates for Licenses
                   in the Four Social Studies Disciplines Other Than History
                (civics and government, econon1ics, psychology, and sociology)

Testing evidence from prescribed courses that is specific to the standard

Undergraduate candidates for licenses in the four areas other than history must demonstrate that they
meet this standard by the grades in their three history courses. These grades are reviewed at Screening
I and II. Grades of C or above are considered to be evidence that this standard and the knowledge and
skill requirements as set by the State of Tennessee are met. All candidates during the past three years
have had a grade of C or higher in their three courses.

Testing evidence from standardized nahonal tests that is specific to the standard

As explained in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report, the Praxis II
Subject Assessments/Specialty Area Tests that candidates take are specific to the discipline in which
they expect to be licensed. Therefore, Praxis II data for candidates for licenses other than history are
not specific to this standard. However, the test scores do provide some general evidence that
candidate have a grasp of the content of all ten thematic standards. The Vanderbilt University teacher
education faculty consider a high passing grade on each discipline test as supplemental test evidence
to the evidence provided by grades in history courses. Vanderbilt candidates in general have scored
well on these tests. The scores for the past three years are reported above in the "Introduction to the
Matrix" section of this program.

Testing evidence as reported in Personal Logs/Portfolios: Evidence of Professional Learning
Experiences and Assessments

The Personal Log/Portfolio system for assessing each candidate in terms of every NCSS standard is
explained above in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report and in the
"Programmatic Evidence" section that addresses this standard. Testing data from candidate Personal
Logs/Portfolios supplement the testing data from actual test scores as reported immediately above.

This system is being used for the first time this year with current sophomores. It is too early to report
multi-year comprehensive candidate results for each standard. Preliminary reviews of entries in
candidate logs indicate that candidates are focusing on each standard as a content goal for the teacher
education program. Candidates are aware that evidence of meeting each standard is a basis for being
approved for Screening I and II and required for them to be recommended for licensure.

No candidate will be recommended for licensure to teach without convincing Personal Log/Portfolio
evidence indicating that they have been evaluated in terms of each NCSS content standard, including
this one. They must report the grades they have received on those evaluations.

Sample materials from candidates'Personal Logs/Portfolios will be placed in the NCATE Exhibit
Room. (They are not in this report because they are confidential materials.)
1.2.3   Performance Evidence

Performance evidence as reported in faculty/cooperating teacher evaluations

As explained above in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report, every
undergraduate and masters level candidate's teaching performance is assessed in terms of all of the
NCSS content standards. The performance assessments occur primarily during student teaching and in
the course, Social Studies Education 2390/3390: Teaching Social Studies in Secondary Schools,
which is taken in the semester prior to student teaching and includes an in-school practicum
component.

During student teaching and the Social Studies Education course, candidates are assessed in two ways
on all of the standards:

(a) They plan lessons and write lesson plans that address each of the specific standards, which are
    assessed by either the instructor of the Social Studies Education course, their college supervisor of
    social studies student teaching, and/or their cooperating teachers.
(b) They teach lessons that address each of the specific standards and are observed and evaluated by
    either the instructor of the Social Studies Education course, their college supervisor of social
    studies student teaching, and/or their cooperating teachers as they do their teaching.

Both the lesson plans and the observed lessons are assessed on a l to 5 scale. (See the assessment
instruments in Appendix E.)

This system is being used for the first time this year with current seniors and masters level candidates.
It is too early to provide multi-year comprehensive results for each standard. However, we do have
results from the evaluation of current seniors.

All candidates who completed Social Studies Education 2390/3390 in fall 2000 were assessed as
having exceeded minimum criteria for the thematic and disciplinary standards, including this
standard, that were addressed in the lessons they planned and taught. The specific ratings for
candidates, standard by standard, are in Appendix F. The results concerning this standard, Time,
Continuity and Change, are as follows:

     Three candidatest performances were assessed on this standard. On a scale of "Exemplary,
     Satisfactory, and Unsatisfactory," all three were rated "Exemplary" on planning, and two of the
     three were rated "Exemplary" on observed teaching. (The third candidate's teaching was not
     reported on this standard.)

Results for student teaching are similarly positive. Student teachers' plans and observed teaching for
the 2000-2001 school year until the writing of this report have been assessed on a scale of

1.   Inadequate,
2.   Minimally Acceptable,
3.   Average,
4.   Very Good, or
5.   Excellent.

All plans and observed lessons that addressed this standard were rated 3, 4, or 5. The specific ratings
for each candidate, standard by standard, are in Appendix G.
Samples of graded lesson plans and completed evaluations of observed lessons for both Social Studies
Education 2390/3390 and student teaching will be placed in the NCATE Exhibit Room. (They are not
in this report because they are confidential materials.)

Performance evidence as reported in Personal Logs/Portfolios: Evidence of Professional Learning
Experiences and Assessments

Also as explained in the "Introduction to the Matrix" section of this program review report, every
candidate is expected to compile a Personal Log/Portfolio of evidence that all NCSS content
standards are met. Student teachers and candidates in the Social Studies Education courses compile
Personal Log/Portfolio documentation of their lesson plans, the evaluations of those plans, and the
observer evaluations of their planned teaching. They are expected to provide evidence in their
compilations that they have demonstrated an ability to teach middle school and/or secondary school
students the subject matter that is the focus of each NCSS content standard, including this standard.

Sample materials from candidate Personal Logs/Portfolios will be placed in the NCATE Exhibit
Room. (They are not in this report because they are confidential materials.)

				
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