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Town of Grand Bank Municipalities Newfoundland and Labrador

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					  Town of Grand Bank
Integrated Community Sustainability Plan 2010



   Town of Grand Bank
Integrated Community Sustainability Plan 2010
                Submitted To:

              Town of Grand Bank
                     P.O. Box 640
                     56 Main Street
               Grand Bank, Newfoundland
                       A0E 1W0


                      Prepared By:

              Edwards & Associates Ltd.
                      P.O. Box 158
               Marystown, NL, A0E 2M0
                       Submitted To:
              Contact: Ian Edwards, P. Eng,
               Town NLS, CLS Bank
                        of Grand
                        709-279-1990
                   Tel:P.O. Box 640
                      56 Main Street
                Grand Bank, Newfoundland
                        A0E 1W0


                      Prepared By:
                       March 2010
               Edwards & Associates Ltd.
                        P.O. Box 158
                Marystown, NL, A0E 2M0
          Contact: Ian Edwards, P. Eng, NLS, CLS
                     Tel: 709-279-1990



                       August 2010
1.0 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................... 3
    1.1 SUSTAINABILITY .................................................................................................................................... 4
       1.1.1 What is Sustainability?.................................................................................................................. 4
       1.1.2 What is an Integrated Community Sustainability Plan (ICSP)..................................................... 4
       1.1.3 Why Develop an Integrated Community Sustainability Plan........................................................ 5
    1.2 PROCESS TO DEVELOP THE INTEGRATED COMMUNITY SUSTAINABILITY PLAN .................................... 7
    1.3 COMMUNITY ATTRIBUTES ..................................................................................................................... 8
    1.4 INTERACTIONS ..................................................................................................................................... 13
    1.5 STRENGTHS, WEAKNESSES, OPPORTUNITIES, THREATS (SWOT) ....................................................... 14
    2.1 QUESTIONS ON SUSTAINABILITY FROM MUNICIPAL AFFAIRS .............................................................. 16
    2.2 PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT ......................................................................................................................... 16
    2.3 ASSET MANAGEMENT .......................................................................................................................... 16
       2.3.1 PSAB Compliance ....................................................................................................................... 16
       2.3.2 Regional Asset Management ....................................................................................................... 17
    2.4 SUMMARY OF SELF ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 17
3.0 OUR COMMUNITY - OUR VISION.................................................................................................. 19
    3.1 COMMUNITY SUSTAINABILITY PILLARS .............................................................................................. 19
    3.2 COMMUNITY VALUES .......................................................................................................................... 23
    3.3 COMMUNITY VISION ............................................................................................................................ 23
4.0 GOALS AND ACTIONS ...................................................................................................................... 24
    4.1 SUMMARY TABLE ................................................................................................................................ 24
    4.2 DEFINITIONS ........................................................................................................................................ 25
    4.3 GOVERNANCE GOALS .......................................................................................................................... 26
       4.3.1 Utilization of Strategic Long Term Planning.............................................................................. 26
       4.3.2 Professional Development and Training .................................................................................... 27
       4.3.3 Maintenance of Town Services ................................................................................................... 28
4.4 CULTURE GOALS............................................................................................................................... 29
        4.4.1 Cultural Development ................................................................................................................. 29
4.5 SOCIAL GOALS ................................................................................................................................... 30
        4.5.1 Social Alliance and Communication........................................................................................... 30
        4.5.2 Social Health and Well-Being..................................................................................................... 31
4.6 ECONOMIC GOALS ........................................................................................................................... 32
        4.6.1 Develop Tourism Industry........................................................................................................... 32
        4.6.2 Investment in Tourism Infrastructure ......................................................................................... 33
4.7 ENVIRONMENTAL GOALS............................................................................................................. 34
        4.7.1 Town Infrastructure .................................................................................................................... 34
        4.7.2 Waste Management ..................................................................................................................... 35
        4.7.3 Sustainable Energy Practices ..................................................................................................... 36
        4.7.4Community Beautification............................................................................................................ 37
        4.7.5 Environmental Awareness/Protection......................................................................................... 38
5.0 COLLABORATIONS ........................................................................................................................... 39
6.0 CURRENT PROJECTS AND FINANCIAL ANALYSIS ................................................................. 40
    6.1 CURRENT PROJECTS .......................................................................................................................... 40
    6.2 FINANCIAL ANALYSIS......................................................................................................................... 41
7.0 IMPLEMENTATION ........................................................................................................................... 42
8.0 CONCLUSION ...................................................................................................................................... 43
    APPENDIX A: PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSION DOCUMENT .................................................................... 44
    APPENDIX B: SUSTAINABILITY SELF-ASSESSMENT RESPONSES ............................................................ 46
                                                                                                                                                            2
1.0 INTRODUCTION

Over the next 5 years the Town of Grand Bank is expecting many challenges in relation
to changing demographics, maintenance of existing infrastructure, the continuance of a
stable tax base, and with promoting the town as a destination for innovative businesses
and tourism. To address these and other issues, the Town of Grand Bank embarked on
the development of an Integrated Community Sustainability Plan (ICSP), which is a long
term plan that has been developed in consultation with the community.

The ICSP encapsulates sustainability principles from an environmental, economic, social
cultural and governance perspective, with the realization that the successful management
of these pillars of sustainability will result in the overall well being of the community.
Grand Bank realizes that sustainability should not be left to chance; instead it should be
carefully planned, with action items being strategically executed to provide for the
overall viability of the community.

In 2006, the Federal and Provincial governments entered into the Canada-Newfoundland
and Labrador Gas Tax Agreement, which included provisions for communities to
complete an ICSP as a requisite to receiving Gas Tax funding. In the past, Grand Bank
has been involved in many ad hoc initiatives that promote sustainability; this ICSP will
formalize these activities and offer a more strategic proactive approach to sustainability,
thereby maximizing the benefits derived from available resources.

The framework developed through this ISCP will guide the town in aligning its activities
with its commitment to sustainability and better prepare the town to become more
proactive in defining what the future will hold. The ICSP will also secure continual
access to Gas Tax revenues, which are essential to meeting the sustainability
commitments established by the town.




                                                                                          3
1.1 Sustainability

1.1.1 What is Sustainability?
The most common definition of sustainability is one which involves “meeting the needs
of the present without compromising the ability of future generation to meet their own
needs.”1 Adapting this to a municipal setting, the Town of Grand Bank considers
sustainability as the utilization of municipal and other resources to meet community
needs and aspirations, and best optimize the unique nature of the community, without
compromising the well being of future citizens. Sustainability is synonymous with
wellbeing and balance, practices that our forefathers incorporated into their everyday
lives. Community sustainability, in the context of this plan, involves a five-pillar
philosophy of balance between environment, cultural, economic, social and governance
considerations, which in the end will contribute to the wellbeing of the community and
permeate into community decision making processes.

While adopting the philosophy of the five-pillar system, Grand Bank will incorporate the
following concepts, which will underpin the entire sustainability planning process:
    • Grand Bank will become a self-reliant community capable of maintaining its
       population and maintaining infrastructure through established funding programs;
    • Grand Bank will develop infrastructure that respects and enhances the
       community’s cultural identity;
    • Grand Bank will develop infrastructure that enhances bio-diversity and minimizes
       our environmental footprint;
    • Grand Bank will promote a public infrastructure that meets the basic needs of its
       citizens, while generating economic opportunity;
    • Grand Bank will be mindful of the impact that internal developments may have
       on surrounding communities and include those affected to participate in the
       planning process.

1.1.2 What is an Integrated Community Sustainability Plan (ICSP)
The ICSP provides a framework for sustainable decision making that will help the
community move towards sustainability over the next 10 years and beyond. The ICSP
fulfils the Federal criteria per the Gas Tax Agreement with the inclusion of:
      • A coordinated approach to community sustainability (e.g., linkages to various
          plans, planning and financial tools that contribute to sustainability objectives);
      • Reflected and integrated social, cultural, environmental and economic
          sustainability objectives in community planning. (governance added by
          Government of Newfoundland and Labrador);
      • Collaborated with other municipalities, where appropriate, to achieve
          sustainability objectives; and
      • Engaged residents in determining the long term vision of the municipality.2

Sustainability is not something that will be accomplished in short order, as it may involve
a paradigm change in town policy, citizen’s attitudes, and coordination and
communication with surrounding communities. The ICSP will become a strategic

1
  World Commission on the Environment and Development. (1987). Our Common Future. The Bruntland
Commission, UNESCO.
2
  Source: Infrastructure Canada. 2005. Gas Tax Agreement.
                                                                                                  4
document utilized by the town to implement various actions to achieve measurable
results, within specific timelines. The successful implementation of the ICSP will be the
shared responsibility of staff, elected officials and residents.

This ICSP is an initiative of Grand Bank, its staff, elected officials and residents. The
process has been guided by their experiences and expertise; however, the Town of Grand
Bank realizes it does not operate in isolation of other communities in the region. The
interconnectedness and interdependences of the actions of neighboring communities has
been built into the development of this ICSP, through reference to such documents as the
Regional Economic Development Plan.3

1.1.3 Why Develop an Integrated Community Sustainability Plan
Despite being in existence for many years, Grand Bank realizes that there are changes
taking place all around it, some of which are entirely outside their control, while others
may fall within their realm of influence. Some of these changes or pressures may
include, but not be limited to the following:
     • Changing population demographic;
     • Economic transitions;
     • Environmental awareness;
     • Municipal service expectations;
     • Cultural pressures; and
     • Social expectations.


Each of these pressures will now be discussed in a little more detail.

Changing Population Demographic
Over the last number of years Grand Bank has experienced a decline in its population.
This is further complicated by the realization that the average age of the remaining
population is more mature, which will have direct impact on future planning for service
delivery, especially as it relates to housing, medical services and social interactions.

There are some seasonal variances in populations, which can be attributed to persons
wishing to occupy cottages on a full time basis and to the summer tourism traffic. These
seasonal variances increase pressures on municipal services; such as waste management,
traditional infrastructure systems, and may impact community character.

Economic Transition
Grand Bank, as with nearly all rural communities in NL, is experiencing an economic
transition from its more traditional sources of economic well being (fish plants, mines,
fishing, ship building, etc.) to a reality where working people work “off-island” yet
choose to reside here. This in many respects has been a doubled edged sword; it has
provided the lifeblood of many rural communities, such as Grand Bank; however, it has
lessened a reliance on local industries, and hence that sense of survival has dissipated.
Without local industries, and the tax base they provide, communities have to find other
sources of revenue, or reduce the services they provide.



3
    Regional Economic Development Plan – Schooner Regional Economic Development Board, 2008.
                                                                                               5
The town is fortunate to host innovative businesses that attract international commerce.
These include Dynamic Air Shelters, a manufacturing facility that provides fulltime
employment to approximately 150 people, and Grand Bank Seafoods Inc. – a subsidiary
of Clear Water Fine Foods that operates a year-round shellfish processing plant.

Environmental Awareness
Citizens are becoming more aware of the environment around them; no longer is it
acceptable to throw your waste into a dump or to dispose of an old car wreck in the
bushes on some back road. The citizens of Grand Bank expect their town council to
practice good environmental stewardship. Citizens expect:
    • that household waste will be managed properly, with recycling programs, etc.
        being implemented wherever practical;
    • that the town will provided a leadership role in managing how sanitary sewage is
        disposed of;
    • that environmentally sensitive areas, such as watersheds, well-fields, etc., will be
        protected and monitored for the common good;
    • that their elected officials are aware of global environmental concerns and that
        they introduce policies to help reduce global warming, such as no idling zones,
        etc.

Municipal Service Expectations
Citizens in Grand Bank expect to receive municipal services on a par with any other
community. They expect clean drinking water (available at tap), paved roads, weekly
waste collection, street lighting, sewer services, recreational facilities, etc. The provision
of these services is very expensive, especially when consideration is given to replacement
costs. Municipalities are setting up preventative maintenance programs to help prolong
the useful life of existing infrastructure, they are strategically planning capital works
programs that maximize the benefits of every dollar, they are establishing regulations to
control development, etc. All these strategies cost money and challenge the resources of
all municipalities.

Cultural Pressures
There was a time when each municipal entity had a strong cultural sense of being.
Citizens in the respective communities took pride in ownership of their customs, dialects,
building patterns, etc. Today many municipalities, out of financial necessity, share
resources, schools, municipal service offerings, etc., to the point that there is often very
little difference between one community and the next. Sport rivalries between
municipalities, which often became a sense of pride, have all but disappeared due to
shrinking population base. Today younger citizens communicate through face book and
other such media, often in isolation of each other, instead of meeting at local restaurants,
etc. where they would traditionally interact with one another. These changes in
behavioral patterns apply pressure to our traditional ways of passing along our heritage,
to creating a sense of community pride, and if communities are to survive, from a cultural
perspective, they must encompass this new reality and plan to participate in it.

Social Expectations
Social expectations are at an all time high. Citizens can turn on a computer, surf the net,
and see what exists in any community in the world. Citizens expect their community will
be able to supply ample employment for them to support their families. They expect that
there will be community organizations            that will organize various social events.
                                                                                            6
Moreover, they expect their children to be educated in their own community; they expect
affordable housing, access to health care within reasonable commute times, and safe
communities and workplaces. These expectations apply pressure on communities, and on
traditional development strategies that often took these things for granted.


1.2 Process to Develop the Integrated Community Sustainability Plan
Grand Bank, as did just about every other community across Canada since the inception
of the Federal Gas Tax Program, embarked on the development of an ICSP to help model
its future. The process undertaken by Grand Bank in completing its ICSP included:
     • having elected officials and staff attended various ICSP workshops to gain a
         better understanding of the planning process
     • the completion of a self assessment to define who we are as a community and to
         see where we are now in terms of resource availability to meet our current and
         future needs
     • an analysis of existing community and regional plans that may impact on the
         sustainability of the town
     • stakeholder consultations, etc. to develop a community vision, which defined
         where the community wants to be in the future, it describes what is important to
         the community and how they want the community to look
     • Identification of specific goals to achieve the community vision, with focus on the
         five pillars of sustainability. Each goal was analyzed to identify lead group, costs,
         schedule, partners (if any), funding, Gas-Tax outcomes, measures of success, land
         use implications, etc…
     • identification of potential partners who may be able to contribute to the success of
         the ICSP
     • an analysis of financial capability of the town to implement the ICSP
     • an implementation and monitoring strategy to ensure the evolution of the ICSP




                                                                                            7
1.3 Community Attributes

Grand Bank is located on the Burin Peninsula, along the south coast of Newfoundland.
Connection to the outside world is achieved via a Provincial highway (Routes 210 and
220) with an approximate distance of 200 Km to the Trans Canada Highway. Grand
Bank is serviced by a small airstrip, unmanned, which is situated at Winterland near the
center of the populated area of the Burin Peninsula. Figure 1, Grand Bank Location,
presents a graphical depiction of where the Community is located in relation to the island
of Newfoundland.




Figure 1, Grand Bank Location




                                                                                         8
The following table presents a summary of the community profile as derived from 2006
Census Canada data.

                                             Community Profile
       Indicator                                                 Discussion
Population                   According to Census Canada (2006), Grand Bank has a total population of
                             2580, down 9.2% from its population of 2841 in 2001. The demographic
                             distribution reveals that the median age is 49, while the largest demographic
                             age group lies in the 50-59 years category. The smallest demographic age
                             group lies in the 20-29 and 0-4 years categories4.
Housing                      The housing situation in Grand Bank shows that 84% of the dwellings are
                             privately owned versus 16% being rentals. The small percentage of rental
                             homes indicates a shortage of accommodation for new residents who wish to
                             relocate to Grand Bank for employment.
Income                       Census Canada data 2006 shows median family income for Grand Bank to be
                             $41,607 which is slightly lower than the provincial median of $49,645.
                             Half of the lone-parent families in Grand Bank had income of less than $20,
                             800 in 2006 compared to the provincial lone-parent income of $25, 300. The
                             2006 self-reliance ratio for Grand Bank indicates that 67.6% of revenue in the
                             town results from private initiatives as compared to 78.5% for Newfoundland.
                             “Self-reliance ratio is a measure of the town’s dependency on government
                             transfers such as Canada Pension, old Age Security, Employment Insurance,
                             Income Support Assistance, etc. 5

                             This indicates that those who have found employment in Grand Bank can
                             expect to make sufficient wages to maintain a lifestyle comparable to other
                             communities in the province.
Immigrant Status             There is a small visible minority population in Grand Bank consisting of less
                             than 1% of the total population.
Generation Status            Census Canada (2006) indicates that 98% of the population in Grand Bank is
                             3rd generation Canadians. This reveals that there are few immigrants
                             establishing permanent residency in the community.
Labour Force                 Population pyramids of Grand Bank reveal an aging of the population moving
Availability/Participation   towards retirement age within the next ten years, resulting in a shortage of
                             employable labor force to fill the resulting job vacancies6.

                             Census Canada 2006 data indicates that there was a 53.5% participation in the
                             labour force in the age 15 and up - 46.8% of the available females and 52.7%
                             of the available males. Provincially, there was a 58.9% participation with
                             54.6% of available females working and 63.5% of available males working.




                                                                                                              9
       Indicator                                       Discussion


Business Analysis   The following table provides a measure of the number of businesses located in
                    the town correlated with an estimated number of years of operations.

                                                Business Summary
                                  Industry               0-10   10-20              20-30         30 +
                                                         years   years              years        years
                     Fishing Enterprise /Resource              1                  1
                     Based
                     Construction                                                 1
                     Manufacturing                     1       1
                     Wholesale Trade
                     Finance / Real Estate             1                                     1
                     Health and Social                 1
                     Education
                     Business Services                                            1          21
                     Other Services                    5       4                  4          5

                    Higher numbers in the 0-10 year column indicates that new
                    businesses/enterprises are commencing operations in the town, which is
                    evidence of new development and future sustainability. Higher numbers on the
                    right hand side of the table is evidence that the community has been stable for a
                    period of time. The best scenario would be to see even distribution in the table,
                    which would indicate a stable community with new businesses looking at it as
                    a place to invest. Little or no numbers in the left hand side of the table can be
                    viewed as a red flag in terms of sustainability, a situation that Council must
                    address.

                    Grand Bank’s business summary shows that it is a stable community; however,
                    it reveals a shortage in educational business services and wholesale trade.
                    Beyond business services and other services such as retail, tourism and
                    aesthetic services, there is a lack of diversity in the major industries. In order
                    to ensure strong economic growth and diversity, focus should be placed on
                    attracting and building upon other industries; especially those that are relatively
                    new to the community.

                    Innovated businesses exist in Grand Bank, attracting international commerce
                    and winning awards for their ambition and success. Dynamic Air Shelters
                    provides a unique product that is utilized for industrial, promotional and
                    emergency response situations. Companies around the world have purchased
                    their portable structures. In 1992, Grand Bank Seafoods Inc. showed foresight
                    and innovation by upgrading their plant to process shellfish and targeted Asian
                    markets. Since then, they have won awards for their ambition and success in
                    foreign markets and show responsible management by demonstrating a desire
                    for a sustainable fishery over easy profits.




                                                                                                     10
       Indicator                                               Discussion
Transportation Patterns    Transportation patterns are discussed in terms of how people get back and forth
                           to work or school. Censes data indicates that 77.6% of the population uses a
                           car or light passenger vehicle, while 17.6% of the population walk or ride a
                           bicycle.7 Grand Bank has two residential areas geographically separated by
                           Grand Bank Brook, which makes foot/cycle traffic less attractive. Grand Bank
                           has as one of its goals a reduction in its carbon footprint and greenhouse gas
                           emissions. This will be partially achieved through strategic planning and
                           development of walking trails, etc.

Food Supplies              Citizens of Grand Bank have access to two grocery stores and several
                           convenience stores that meet the needs of the people who decide to shop there;
                           however, many citizens shop at the larger service hub located in the Marystown
                           Area, approximately 60 km away.

Medical Services/ Health   Citizens of Grand Bank have access to an Emergency Medical Clinic and
Status                     community health services in the community. They are housed in the Grand
                           Bank Community Health Centre and include x-ray and laboratory services.
                           Dental and optometry services are available at clinics within the town. To
                           access regional hospital services and specialist services, patients have to travel
                           to Burin or to St. John’s. There is also an ambulatory and air-ambulatory
                           service that provides emergency pre-hospital care to Grand Bank, Fortune and
                           other nearby communities.

                           “A major indicator of well-being is how a person rates their own health status.
                           In 2005, 62.1% of individuals 12 and over rated their health status from very
                           good to excellent. The provincial rate was 65.4%. Obesity statistics or
                           percentage of people with body mass index of 30 or greater, was 23.3% in 2005
                           compared to provincial rate of 24.5%”8

Education                  The educational needs of students in K-7 are provided by Lake Academy in
                           Fortune that services 300 students. Students in grades 8-12 attend John Burke
                           High School in Grand Bank. Citizens have access to Adult Basic Education
                           program through Keyin Technical College in Fortune.

                            To access College courses, students need to travel to Burin or St. John’s, or
                           other areas in Newfoundland where these courses are offered. To access a
                           university program, students can do a university or Transfer Year at CONA in
                           Burin or attend Memorial University, St. John’s or in Corner Brook Campus.
                           To access skilled trades programs, students can attend CONA, Marine Institute,
                           or one of the many private colleges on the island offering these types of
                           programs. The other alternative is to go to the mainland of Canada to access
                           university education. At the CONA Campus in Burin, many programs offer the
                           opportunity for life long learning to students of all ages.




                                                                                                           11
       Indicator                                              Discussion
Cultural Events           Grand Bank hosts weeklong festivals held seasonally, in both the summer and
                          winter. The annual Grand Bank Summer Festival is a weeklong event that
                          includes a Garden party with a variety of traditional Newfoundland music and
                          food; a Waterfront family festival complete with dory races, live entertainment
                          and fireworks; a Seniors Appreciation Night full of dancing, singing and
                          refreshments. Many other activities fill out the Summer Festival such as soccer
                          tournaments, dances, contests and lots of games for the children.
                          The annual Grand Bank Winter Carnival is a weeklong event that encourages
                          people to enjoy the winter through organized activities such as snow sculpting
                          contests, cross country skiing, curling as well as a family sliding party. In
                          addition to the seasonal events, there is an annual Grand Bank Regional
                          Theatre Festival hosted by Lighthouse Productions Inc., a resident professional
                          theatre company. It runs for 8 weeks during the summer and offers original
                          Newfoundland plays, dinner theatres and children’s programming.9

                          There are numerous heritage buildings which are restored and used as Inns,
                          Dinner Theatre, and even as a backdrop to the Mariners Memorial. There is a
                          heritage walk that showcases the long, documented history of these buildings
                          providing an attraction for tourists and residents who wish to connect with the
                          past. The Mariners Memorial and the Seamen’s Museum provide a tangible
                          link to the rich fishing history of the area. The Town of Grand Bank has the
                          distinction of being known as “the Bank Fishing Capital” in reference to its
                          prosperous history with the Grand Banks fishing grounds.




45698 9
 , , , , , Data complied from the following:
1) Census of Population 1986-2006 Statistics Canada 2) Canada Customs and Revenue Agency summary
information as provided by Small Area and Administrative Data Division, Statistics Canada 3)Census of
Population 2001 and 2006, Statistics Canada 4) Census of Population 2006, Statistics Canada
5)Department of Human Resources, Labour and Employment. 6) Human Resources and Skills
Development Canada 7) Census of Population 2006, Statistics Canada 8) Newfoundland and Labrador
Centre for Health Information ,Clinical Database Management System 9) Canadian Community Healthy
Survey (CCHS), 2005, Statistics Canada 10) Rural Secretariat Region,Within Economic Zone 16 -
Schooner Regional Development Corporation 11) Town of Grand Bank website

                                                                                                       12
1.4 Interactions

This section will highlight some of the organizations, associations, boards, towns,
government agencies, and services with whom Grand Bank interacts as a municipality.

Local
50+ Club
Beavers; Girl Guides, Brownies, Sparkers
Brighter Futures
Figure Skating Club
Grand Bank Community Youth Network
Grand Bank Development Corporation
Grand Bank Fire Department
Grand Bank Harbour Authority
Grand Bank Recreation Department
Heritage Society
Kinette Club
Ladies Auxiliary
Library Board
Lions Club
Minor Hockey Association
Sea Cadets
T’railway Association
Tourism Committee
Various Church Groups

Regional
Burin Peninsula Environmental Reform Committee
Burin Peninsula Soccer Association
Community Business Development Corporation - Burin Peninsula
Department of Municipal Affairs
Heritage Run Association
Municipal Assessment Agency
Municipality of Burin: Waste disposal service
Municipality of Fortune: Ambulance service, Waste disposal service, and Fire Fighting
   collaboration
Schooner Regional Development Corporation




                                                                                        13
1.5 Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats (SWOT)
The following table presents the results of interviews and consultations with stakeholder
groups in Grand Bank with respect to current strengths and weaknesses; and future
opportunities and threats. These indicators are presented below in the context of the five
sustainability pillars of governance, culture, social, economy, and environment.

                                                SWOT - Grand Bank
     Pillar                     Strengths (Current)                                Opportunities (Future)
Governance     •   Town promotes equal opportunity and employs       •   Further training and orientation
                   skilled staff                                     •   Increase youth involvement
               •   Municipality budgets for professional             •   Upgrading of Municipal Plan and land-use
                   development to foster governance                      planning
               •   Diverse well of experience to draw upon;          •   Construct and implement a permanent
                   Council promotes cooperation among its                Professional Development plan
                   members, staff, stakeholders, and other
                   municipalities
               •   Fiscally responsible
               •   Strong management: priority plans & policies in
                   place (i.e. Emergency plan, Health & Safety
                   policy, Management Agreement)
               •   Strong committee structure
Culture        •   Promotion of cultural heritage (i.e. Heritage     •   Development of the town’s downtown core
                   Walk, Museum, monuments, architecture)            •   Strengthen cultural infrastructure
               •   Prudent cultural infrastructure                   •   Creation of more cultural festivals & events
               •   Numerous annual events(Summer & Winter)           •   Seasonal guided tours of the town’s history to
               •   Grand Bank Regional Theatre festival                  enhance tourism
               •   Events and activities to promote town’s active,   •   Fundraising for youth programs
                   healthy lifestyle                                 •   Promote and encourage community cohesiveness
               •   Strong sense of community pride                       by community-spirit building activities
Social         •   Use of email system, website and social           •   Maintain online social networking, adapt to
                   networking sites to maintain contact with the         emerging technology
                   public                                            •   Development of seniors village/patio homes
               •   Affordable housing                                •   Creation of more youth organizations to engage
               •   Strong municipal support for numerous regional        younger residents
                   groups such as Community Youth Network,           •   Develop joint events with neighboring
                   Brighter Futures, SPCA                                communities to highlight/identify cultural ties
               •   Retired residents are available for council           between communities.
               •   Multipurpose building for social gatherings and   •   Increase the availability of accommodations
                   events                                                through the construction of new homes, B&B’s,
               •   Strong collaboration with neighboring                 Inns etc…
                   communities
Economy        •   Active involvement of the Grand Bank              •   In partnership with GBDC, develop and
                   Development Corporation with diversifying the         implement strategies to target priority sectors
                   town’s economy and industrial base                    that have the potential of long term continual
               •   Innovative businesses such as Grand Bank              growth.
                   Seafood Inc. and Dynamic Air Shelters attracts    •   Develop initiatives to encourage
                   international business                                entrepreneurship and attract companies to
               •   Fair tax base                                         operate in a dynamic and progressive community
               •   Skilled work force employed in another            •   More effective tax collection methods to
                   province (20:8) schedule but maintaining              increase operating budgets and reduce “lost”
                   residences in community and spending money            revenue.
                   earned away in Grand Bank                         •   Promote secondary tourism such as salmon
               •   Strong tourism economy based on heritage and a        fishing, guided weekend fishing trips etc…
                   professional theatre group                        •   maximize tourism revenue through an increase
               •   Council participates in EDGE program, a               in accommodations and National/international
                   Provincial government tax incentive for the           promotion of Grand Bank as a tourist destination
                   creation of new businesses in communities             (“A place to go to as opposed to a place to drive
                                                                         through”)
                                                                     •   Creation of a recycling depot to capture “green”
                                                                         revenue source




                                                                                                                      14
Environment   •   Strong stewardship of the community and                •   Develop more walking trails in and around the
                  surrounding green spaces                                   community, linking to the T’railway system.
              •   Proactive maintenance program of nature trails,            Promote health and environmental benefits to
                  green spaces, and heritage trails                          encourage use of the walking trails
              •   Regular bulk garbage removal services                  •    Construction of a green depot to perform
              •   Responsible waste management (lessen                       recycling within the community
                  environmental impacts where possible, ie. Use          •   Educate citizens of new environmental policies
                  of landfill as opposed to incinerator)                     to ensure their participation and promote
              •   Shared waste management infrastructure with                continued stewardship of the surrounding natural
                  Fortune and Burin                                          resources
              •   5 year Capital Works Plan in place                     •   Implement a backyard recycling and composting
                                                                             campaign
     Pillar                   Weakness (Current)                                           Threats (Future)
Governance    •   Long term plan needs updating and revisions,           •    Low availability of staff replacement
                  need to look further ahead                             •    Gaps in infrastructure and services that relate to
              •   Lack of sufficient funding                                 the community’s future needs
              •   Outside staff nearing retirement age, challenge        •    Failed policies due to inadequate funding
                  for small staff to meet all of the government              needed to implement
                  agencies’ requirements for sustainable
                  governance
Culture       •   low percentage of 18-39 demographic in the             •   loss of oral history, degradation of local culture
                  community                                                  and heritage due to declining birth rate, out
              •   disproportionate shift of demographics                     migration and aging population
              •   small number of designated heritage areas              •   unprotected heritage areas at risk of being
              •   undefined heritage planning with regards to                damaged due to neglect or commercial
                  future infrastructure (i.e. not planning far               development; cultural value could be lost forever
                  enough ahead for heritage and cultural needs)          •    Danger of loss of importance of municipal
              •   Lack of people to fill all positions in the cultural       heritage by residents returning from extended
                  programs                                                   absence on the mainland; diluted cultural
                                                                             identity with “adopted” culture
Social        •   Ineffective youth retention strategy, low birth        •   Loss of age mix in community, decreased
                  rates and aging demographic; current                       volunteer contributions and other impacts due to
                  infrastructure is not capable of handling the              declining and aging population
                  abrupt shift to a dependence on social services        •   Underprovided services and infrastructure for
              •   Competition for resources with neighboring                 aging population,
                  communities                                            •   Fewer services and resources available to the
              •   Insufficient accommodations for tourists and               community
                  new or seasonal residents                              •   High demand for cottages with a lack of
                                                                             resources to respond to the need

Economy       •   Tourism revenue does not reach full potential;         •   Growth in the tourism industry will stall if the
                  tourism is mostly day trips to the community               initiatives such as developing facilities,
              •   Small number of innovative                                 accommodations, activities and heritage areas
                  companies/entrepreneurs that can compete in the            are not addressed
                  global market                                          •   There is risk that the global economy may
              •   Poor participation of community businesses and             impact local businesses
                  residents in economic planning activities              •   Without community participation in economic
              •   Lack of available jobs result in high youth                planning activities, a lack of information can
                  unemployment and out migration of recent                   result in poor planning, missed opportunities and
                  graduates                                                  failing to address the needs and desires of the
                                                                             community
                                                                         •   With insufficient resources and education
                                                                             opportunities, youth out-migration will continue
                                                                             and create a gap in the labor force as the current
                                                                             demographic is preparing for retirement
Environment   •   Regional waste site requires long term planning        •   Without sufficient foresight, current waste
                  to identify risks and possible stresses on existing        management practices will not meet
                  infrastructure                                             sustainability requirements
              •   Decaying infrastructure (e.g. road network,            •   Poor infrastructure suitability and availability for
                  sewage system and wastewater treatment)                    growth
              •   Geographic barrier due to rural isolation              •   Long term viability of community of Grand
              •   Lack of full public awareness regarding                    Bank will be significantly impacted by status of
                  environmental protection so environment can be             ecological, environmental resources
                  sustained and enjoyed in future (e.g. lack of          •   Persistence of the “out of sight – out of mind”
                  recycling, proper waste disposal, etc)                     problem in relation to recycling: low
              •   Lack of Community-based recycling services,                participation in recycling initiatives by the
                  education and promotion                                    citizens because there are no visible recycling
                                                                             facilities (for items such as hazardous household
                                                                             waste, batteries, composting etc..)




                                                                                                                             15
2.0 INITIAL SELF ASSESSMENT

2.1 Questions on Sustainability from Municipal Affairs
The Department of Municipal Affairs compiled a list of questions on sustainability to
monitor if communities are successful in meeting the operational and legislative
municipal requirements. Appendix B: sustainability self-assessment contains the
responses for the Town of Grand Bank.


2.2 Public Engagement

“Community engagement refers to the process by which ‘community benefit
organizations’ and individuals build ongoing, permanent relationships for the purpose of
applying a collective vision for the benefit of a community”. 10

Public consultation is a regulatory process by which the public input on matters affecting
them is sought. Its main goals are in improving the efficiency, transparency and public
involvement in large-scale projects or laws and policies. It usually involves notification
to publicize the matter to be consulted on (a two-way flow of information and opinion
exchange) as well as participation involving interest groups in the drafting of policy on
legislation. 11

For the purpose of this ICSP, public “community” engagement will deal with open
consultations in public forums, and through flyers and surveys with the citizens of the
municipality of Grand Bank in order to seek their input on matters that directly or
indirectly affect them and the sustainability of their town.


2.3 Asset Management
The Town of Grand Bank, as does many municipalities in the province, owns and
operates millions of dollars worth of assets on behalf of its citizens. Many of these assets
are more than half a century old, while others are comprised of modern potable water
drinking systems.

The town has recently embarked on the following two initiatives in relation to assets
management, with the aim of increased longevity and better service delivery to the
citizens:
     • PSAB – The town has recently accounted for all tangible capital assets under its
        control and have provided life expectancies for the same;
     • RAMS – the town has partnered with four other towns on the Burin Peninsula, the
        Provincial government and a private sector firm to develop an online regional
        asset management system (RAMS).


2.3.1 PSAB Compliance



10
     Wikipedia
11
     Wikipedia
                                                                                          16
The PSAB, or Public Sector Accounting Board, was founded in 1981 and is made up of
senior government officials, and experts in government financial reporting who serve
without remuneration. This Board was formed to improve and harmonize the public
sector accounting in Canada. This Board is responsible for setting standards and
providing guidance for the reporting of financial and other performance information by
the public sector. The Town of Grand Bank is part of this public sector and is required to
meet PSAB guidelines, as Gas Tax Transfers are contingent upon this being done.

The Town of Grand Bank compiled a detailed list of its tangible capital assets.
Incorporated in this list are the “hard to see assets” many that are included in the Tangible
Capital Asset Details Report for 2009 financial year dated June 2010.


2.3.2 Regional Asset Management

The Town of Grand Bank, in collaboration with the towns of Marystown, St. Lawrence,
Burin, and Fortune has taken a leadership role in the development of an “online”
Regional Asset Management System (RAMS). Development of this system was co-
funded by the five participating towns, the Provincial government and a private sector
business on the Burin Peninsula.

RAMS will enable municipal administrators, elected officials and the general public (if
permitted) to input/view municipal asset information, submit and track applications,
manage municipal zoning and development regulation information and establish
proactive preventative maintenance schedules. RAMS contains full functionality to
enable a town to meet the PSAB 3150 reporting obligations.

RAMS provides full “online” life cycle support for municipal data from the initial
collection to processing to presentation, in the form of reports, maps, etc.

2.4 Summary of Self Assessment
The Town of Grand Bank participated in a self-assessment by completing the
Municipality Self-Assessment Tool Kit provided by the Community Cooperation
Resource Center, Municipalities Newfoundland and Labrador. Appendix B provides
feedback that the Town of Grand Bank received based on their responses to the
questionnaire generated by the above agency.




                                                                                          17
In general the results of the self-assessment may be presented as follows:


                   Summary of Sustainability Self-Assessment
    Topic                                Discussion
Governance       While the Council is successful in achieving good governance, more
                 attention is required with respect to planning to ensure long-term goals
                 are met.
Administration The town has employed and equipped an adequate number of skilled
               personnel.


Finance and      The town is operating with sound financial principles which have
Financial        allowed it to keep debt levels low while still delivering the current level
Management       of services and the requirements of the Municipalities Act.
Service          The town continues to deliver services; however, issues related to
Delivery         Fire/Emergency protection, waste management and Water/Sewer must
                 be addressed before they become problems in the future.
Equipment &      The town continues to ensure maintenance and development of required
Infrastructure   infrastructure to sustain the services being offered.


Community        The town is able to maintain a degree of community well-being;
Well-Being       however issues were identified in the areas of demographics and
                 environment.
Regional         The town is proactively taking advantage of the benefits of regional
Cooperation      cooperation, which can enhance long-term sustainability.




                                                                                          18
3.0 OUR COMMUNITY - OUR VISION

In order to move towards a sustainable community, it is important to determine core
values, which in turn will enable the community to formulate its vision. Once the vision
is in place, the community can take a serious look at itself, per the self-assessment section
of this document, and determine the preferred course of action to achieve its vision.

3.1 Community Sustainability Pillars
For many years, when people thought of Sustainability it was in a global context. For
example, we often hear of global warming, global economic markets, global population
distribution, and so on. Grand Bank is not of the opinion that accomplishing its goals
will change the world; however, there is a strong realization that global change will only
occur a little at a time, whereas with individual communities such as Grand Bank, these
sustainable initiatives will have a larger impact.

Normally, development activities measure success in dollars and cents; sustainable
communities use five measures of success, which include:
    • Economic vitality
    • Environmental integrity
    • Social equity
    • Cultural identity
    • Governance
Achieving balance among these five elements is essential to success in developing a
sustainable community.

Each of these will be discussed in more detail below, so future readers of this ICSP can
have an appreciation of what each of these pillars means to Grand Bank.


Economic Vitality
Economic vitality occurs when a community can create a vibrant, diverse economy that
encourages self-sufficiency, uses resource efficiency, and creates a platform so that future
generations can create wealth.

An economically sustainable community would boost of meeting the following criteria:
   • Provide opportunities to live, work, play, learn, for all citizens;
   • Strong jobs/housing balance.
   • Return on investment to all stakeholders of the community.
   • Collaborate with regional, state, and Federal programs to recruit and grow
      employment base.
   • Attract businesses that support sustainability goals.




                                                                                           19
Environmental Integrity
An environmentally sustainable community would operate with sound environmental
stewardship principles. It would appreciate and recognize the intrinsic value that the
environment can offer in improving the quality of life for its citizens. Community
characteristics that promote environmental integrity include:

   •   Integration of natural and human systems to optimize long-term community
       health and well-being.
   •   Understand and connect to bio-regional context - understand watershed and
       natural systems, leverage the site's natural systems, enhance natural drainage
       potential, plant native trees.
   •   Integrate built infrastructure with natural systems, such as roads, trails and paths,
       utilities, and monitor drainage and water quality.
   •   Promote “Reduce, Reuse and Recycle”
   •   Establish a natural systems interpretation and education program.
   •   Explore potential for reducing their carbon footprint and investigate the concept
       carbon trading.
   •   Reduce dependency on the automobile.

Social Equity
Social equity deals with complex issues such as quality of life, health equity, livability
and social inclusion. Three basic components of social sustainability are basic needs,
individual capacity and community capacity.

Basic needs of individuals in a sustainable community can be met through:
   • Appropriate and affordable housing with flexibility to meet changing needs,
       housing that can accommodate both residents of varying income, housing that can
       meet the needs of those with special circumstances of all ages;
   • Appropriate, affordable and accessible health care, available in the community or
       within a reasonable commute distances;
   • Suitable sources of nutritious and affordable food;
   • Sufficient employment that enables residents to be productive and utilizes their
       skills and abilities;
   • Sufficient income to enable residents to support themselves and their families;
   • Safe and healthy workplaces; and
   • Safe community.

Individual capacity in a sustainable community can be maintained and enhanced by
providing opportunities:
    • to develop and upgrade skills;
    • for local employment, in the community and within reasonable commute times;
    • to develop and make use of creative and artistic expression;
    • to participate in affordable formal and informal life learning;
    • to be involved in recreational programs and other leisure activities; and
    • for individuals to contribute to the community.

Community capacity can be maintained and enhanced by providing:
  • public processes;
  • community economic development;
  • community identity;
                                                                                             20
   •   interaction;
   •   venues and resources for the arts; and
   •   structure for community organization.

The three components of social sustainability must be delivered in an equitable manner,
where citizens have both the right and opportunity to participate at their individual levels.

In summary, socially sustainable communities are vibrant, healthy, safe, inclusionary
environments to live, work, and play, which target three key community ingredients:
education, community programs, and amenities to be shared by all.

Cultural Identity
Sustainable development is concerned not just with retaining local industries, services
and resources, but also with a close connection to the cultural aspects of the community.
Cultural elements of a community can be used as anchors for policy and planning efforts
to ensure cultural resources are integrated as a pillar of sustainability.

Themes of cultural sustainability:
   • Globalization – many citizens feel that culture needs to be protected from
      globalization and market forces as these forces dilute the individual cultural
      identity of a community. To address this, sustainability discussions should focus
      on education, community development and locally based policies that are
      consistent with the cultural values of the community.
   • Heritage Conservation - common stream in any discussion on cultural
      sustainability and focuses on:
          o Preserving heritage sites, practices and infrastructure from outside
              influences.
          o revitalization and re-using heritage buildings for cultural facilities to
              create a sense of place and belonging;
   • Indigenous Knowledge and Traditional Practices – sustainability is linked to the
      “recovery” and protection of cultural health, history and indigenous knowledge.
      Story telling is often used to preserve indigenous knowledge and traditional
      practices through keeping memories alive and by offering lessons in effective
      actions.
   • Community Cultural Development – implies that grass root cultural activists,
      organizations and residents play a role in community decision making. Culture,
      as a development tool, creates discourse among the citizens, which in turn creates
      a collaborative atmosphere where the arts sector can forge partnerships with local
      governments, businesses, etc.
   • Arts, education, and youth - The arts offer an opportunity to engage in collective,
      collaborative activities, and enable youth and the community to become more
      publicly involved and active in the political process.
   • Planning – a sustainable community recognizes the necessity of cultural capital.
      There is a need to show how culture can be integrated into existing community
      buildings and development plans. This requires community culture-based
      planning strategies that address civic identity, pride, youth, multiculturalism,
      poverty, and other aspects of communities today.

Governance
Responsibility for sustainability planning,      with respect to creating vision and policy,
                                                                                          21
for any municipality primarily falls on the shoulders of the elected officials, while
operational management and service delivery primarily rests with the municipal work
force.

Key characteristics of sustainable governance may be summarized as follows:
   • Provides leadership and collaboration to enable community and citizens to be self
      sufficient;
   • Conducts governance and business for the benefit of the citizens as public
      servants;
   • Leads by example – projects represent sustainable development;
   • Council and staff provide basic needs of citizens and plan for future needs as
      required;
   • Citizens engaged and involved in creating community successes;
   • Public well informed and involved in the Council decision making process;
   • Citizen succession planning to become future leaders;
   • Active engagement in partnerships locally and externally to improve
      sustainability and local autonomy;
   • Voice and favourable influence with government, associations and related
      organizations;
   • Fiscal responsibility while providing needed community services;
   • Growth management policies addressing various development needs for our
      town’s future…12

There are many reasons why an individual stands for election to a municipal council and
takes on the responsibilities listed above. The reality in municipal governance is that no
matter how fine tuned the operations sector of the municipal governance model is, there
is still a strong requirement for volunteers to assist in event planning, committee work,
etc. Sustainability planning, with respect to municipal governance, must ensure that the
volunteer network in the community does not become burned out; that they are not placed
in harms way, once hard decisions are made; and that they are supplied with personal
development opportunities to enable them to carry out their responsibilities in
professional manner.




12
 Municipal Sustainability Plan – 2009, Version 09.04.03 Blackfalds, Alberta (Pommen Group – General
Management Consultants)
                                                                                                 22
3.2 Community Values
Every community has a collective set of values that may not be apparent on first glance,
but with a little thought they become evident. These values will create a broad picture of
what many of the citizens currently have in common and will be used to guide our
individual and collective lives, and provide a strong foundation from which decisions can
be made.

                                  Community Values
   Pillar                                         Value
Heritage    The residents of Grand Bank value their heritage with the preservation
            and celebration of their long history and rich culture. Pride in their
            heritage leads to preservation of historic architecture, honoring ancestors
            with moving monuments, and celebration of their culture through festivals
            and theatre productions.
Social      The residents of Grand Bank value their sense of community through
            proactive social networks, sturdy religious foundations and a mutual
            respect for each other. It is this kind of supportive environment that
            encourages social growth and sustains a community.
Governance The residents of Grand Bank value a council that places the needs and
            desires of its citizens at the forefront of the sustainable planning process.
            Sufficient foresight will ensure basic facilities, services, and installations
            are maintained for continual and future use.
Environment The residents of Grand Bank value the environment by taking pride in the
            land through beautification, acting as stewards of water systems and green
            spaces, and by encouraging and supporting sustainable developments that
            preserve natural resources for future residents.
Economy     The residents of Grand Bank value a diverse economy; one that can
            sustain a strong community fabric and provide for the needs of individuals
            within the community, while preserving its heritage and natural resources.


3.3 Community Vision
The community vision statement presented below is a culmination of the community
values and sustainability principles that are important to the community of Grand Bank.
It describes what we want to be like in the future.

       The Town of Grand Bank will be a safe and healthy place that will engage
       it citizens, making it a vibrant community both socially and economically.
       With a strong foundation built upon respect, mutual support and open
       communication, the community can achieve its goals so that positive
       growth can be sustained. Combining our values with our vision of Grand
       Bank’s future promises to foster an environment where responsible
       citizens actively participate in the progress of their town.




                                                                                       23
4.0 GOALS AND ACTIONS

4.1 Summary Table
The following table represents a summary of the five sustainability planning pillars cross
referenced to the various goals that have been adopted by the Town of Grand Bank. The
section numbers provide a link to the appropriate sections of this document where more
detailed information may be obtained for the respective goal.


                                      Grand Bank –Sustainability Goals & Actions Summary
 Section #                                  Goal                                              Pillar
                                                                            Gov       Cult   Social    Econ   Envir
4.3          Governance
4.3.1        Utilization of Strategic Long Term Planning                     P         A       A        A
4.3.2        Professional Development and Training                           P                 A        A
4.3.3        Maintenance of Town Services                                    P                          A      A


4.4.0        Culture
4.4.1        Cultural Development                                                      P       A        A      A


4.5.0        Social
4.5.1        Social Alliance and Communication                               A         A       P               A
4.5.2        Social Health and Well-Being                                    A         A       P


4.6.0        Economy
4.6.1        Develop Tourism Industry                                        A         A       A        P
4.6.2        Investment in Tourism Infrastructure                            A         A       A        P


4.7.0        Environment
4.7.1        Town Infrastructure                                             A                 A               P
4.7.2        Waste Management                                                A                 A               P
4.7.3        Sustainable Energy Practices                                    A                 A        A      P
4.7.4        Community Beautification                                        A         A       A        A      P
4.7.5        Environmental Awareness & Protection                                      A       A        A      P




P = Primary area of responsibility

A = Associated area of responsibility




                                                                                                                   24
4.2 Definitions
The following definitions apply to the strategy tables, presented in subsequent sections of this
plan, which define the goals and actions that Grand Bank will implement to achieve
sustainability.

                                    Definitions Summary
       Term                                        Definition
Goal              A broad statement of what needs to be accomplished. This must be closely
                  related to the community vision and development principles.
Action            Tells what Grand Bank will do to accomplish the goal and hence long term
                  sustainability. Again this must be in compliance with the vision statement.
Results           Tells what is intended to be accomplished by an action.
Success           Describes the quantity indicator to be employed to measure outcomes.
Measures
Schedule          Describes when the action will be commenced and if there will be a
                  recurrence on predefined frequency
Lead Role         Indication of the primary body or responsible person to lead or undertake
                  the required action.
Budget            Any budgetary estimate that may be associated with the action item.
Source            An indication of funding arrangements that will be implemented to ensure
                  that the action item is completed.
Gas Tax           Anticipated outputs and outcomes as per the Canada Newfoundland and
Outputs /         Labrador Gas-Tax Agreement.
Outcomes                      Project Outputs                           Outcomes
                   Community Energy System                Cleaner Air
                   Public Transit Infrastructure          Cleaner Water
                   Water Infrastructure                   Lower Greenhouse Gas Emissions
                   Waste Water Infrastructure
                   Solid Waste
                   Local Roads and Bridges
                   Capacity Building
Benefits          Short description of the benefits that will be realized as a result of a
                  respective action or activity.
Partners          Other agencies and organizations, both internal and external, that may play
                  a role in completing an action.
Resource          Other plans, strategies, resource materials that may be referenced to assist
Material          in completing an action.




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