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IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes

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IMS Installation and
Maintenance
Processes
Examine IMS installation and
verification methodologies

Review your upgrade strategy
along with recommendations

Utilize IMS technical
support effectively




                                                        Jouko Jäntti
                                                   John Butterweck
                                             Xavier Cervelló Vergara
                                                           Jim Field



ibm.com/redbooks
International Technical Support Organization

IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes

May 2002




                                               SG24-6574-00
 Take Note! Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the
 general information in “Notices” on page xiii.




First Edition (May 2002)

This edition applies to IMS/ESA Version 7 (program number 5655-B01) or later for use with the
OS/390 or z/OS Operating System.

Comments may be addressed to:
IBM Corporation, International Technical Support Organization
Dept. QXXE Building 80-E2
650 Harry Road
San Jose, California 95120-6099

When you send information to IBM, you grant IBM a non-exclusive right to use or distribute the
information in any way it believes appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.

© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 2002. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S Government Users – Documentation related to restricted rights – Use, duplication or disclosure is subject to
restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents

                     Figures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi

                     Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiii
                     Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xiv

                     Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
                     The team that wrote this redbook . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xv
                     Notice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii
                     Comments welcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xvii

Part 1. Installing and maintaining IMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

                     Chapter 1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
                     1.1 Reasons to upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
                     1.2 IMS support for Parallel Sysplex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
                        1.2.1 IMS Parallel Sysplex data sharing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
                        1.2.2 OS/390 Automatic Restart Manager support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
                        1.2.3 Shared IMS message queues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
                        1.2.4 Support for VTAM generic resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
                        1.2.5 IMS sysplex management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
                        1.2.6 IMS BMPs in a data sharing environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
                     1.3 Other IMS V7 and IMS V8 major enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
                        1.3.1 IMS connectivity enhancements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
                        1.3.2 Support for large databases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
                        1.3.3 Online Recovery Service (ORS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
                        1.3.4 Application development and execution enhancements . . . . . . . . . . 10

                     Chapter 2. Ordering and packaging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
                     2.1 Ordering IMS software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
                     2.2 Product packaging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
                        2.2.1 CBPDO Database Systems feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
                        2.2.2 ServerPac Database Systems feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
                        2.2.3 IBM Software Distribution (ISD) Database Systems feature . . . . . . . 13
                        2.2.4 SystemPac Database Systems feature. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
                     2.3 General installation considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
                        2.3.1 Installation documentation precedence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
                        2.3.2 Data set name changes between IMS Version 6 to IMS Version 7 . 14
                     2.4 Installing IMS Version 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
                        2.4.1 Packaging and installation changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16



© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                                                                 iii
                     2.4.2 Changes in target and distribution data sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
                     2.4.3 SMP/E processing changes in IMS Version 8. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
                     2.4.4 User exits in IMS Version 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

                 Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
                 3.1 Installing IMS using CBPDO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
                 3.2 CBPDO - Database Systems feature distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
                 3.3 Reviewing shipped documentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
                 3.4 Unloading the tapes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
                 3.5 Creating the INSTALL/IVP data sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
                 3.6 Invoking the INSTALL/IVP dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
                 3.7 INSTALL/IVP option panels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
                 3.8 INSTALL/IVP phase selection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
                 3.9 INSTALL/IVP variable gathering phase. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
                    3.9.1 Obtaining variable values from previous execution. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
                    3.9.2 Updating variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
                    3.9.3 Variables requiring special attention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
                    3.9.4 VG Complete Verification panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
                 3.10 INSTALL/IVP file tailoring phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
                    3.10.1 File Tailor All Request panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
                    3.10.2 File tailoring in progress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
                    3.10.3 INSTALL/IVP FT ALL Completed panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
                    3.10.4 File Tailoring LST Mode panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
                    3.10.5 FT Complete Verification panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
                 3.11 INSTALL/IVP execution phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
                    3.11.1 Execution LST mode panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
                    3.11.2 Job task member names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
                    3.11.3 Actions against execution list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
                    3.11.4 Job and task execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
                    3.11.5 Execution steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
                    3.11.6 Executing Ax steps: INSTALL/IVP preparations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
                    3.11.7 Executing Bx steps: Building DLIBs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
                    3.11.8 Health check . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
                    3.11.9 Executing steps Cx through Zx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
                 3.12 Installing IMS Java Application Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
                    3.12.1 SMP/E considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
                    3.12.2 Unload sample JCL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
                    3.12.3 Execute installation jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
                    3.12.4 Activating IMS Java Application Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

                 Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
                 4.1 Installing IMS using ServerPac . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
                 4.2 Reviewing shipped documentation and materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46



iv   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
4.3 Using the CustomPac installation dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
   4.3.1 Configuring the functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
   4.3.2 Variables function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
   4.3.3 Zones function. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
   4.3.4 Modify function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
   4.3.5 Alias function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
   4.3.6 SSA function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
   4.3.7 Installation function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
   4.3.8 Executing the ServerPac installation jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
   4.3.9 ServerPac installation verification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
   4.3.10 Executing the ServerPac post-installation jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
   4.3.11 Save . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
   4.3.12 Update. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.4 ServerPac service delivered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
4.5 ServerPac SMP/E reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
   4.5.1 CSI report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
   4.5.2 SELECTION report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
   4.5.3 HIPER report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
   4.5.4 IFREQ report. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
   4.5.5 RESOLVED PE report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
   4.5.6 UNRESOLVED PE report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
   4.5.7 FORCED SYSMOD report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
   4.5.8 NO SERVICE report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
   4.5.9 UNRESOLVED SYSTEM HOLD report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64
   4.5.10 APAR report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
   4.5.11 AHEAD report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
   4.5.12 UNINSTALLABLE SYSMOD CHAIN report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

Chapter 5. Health check after the SMP/E installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
5.1 Health check during and after the SMP/E install . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
   5.1.1 PSP subset review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
5.2 Enhanced HOLDDATA and SYSMOD processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
   5.2.1 HIPER APARs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
   5.2.2 Exception SYSMODs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
   5.2.3 Reviewing HOLDDATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
5.3 Sources of Enhanced HOLDDATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
   5.3.1 CBPDO and ServerPac orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
   5.3.2 Downloading from the World Wide Web . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
5.4 Receiving HOLDDATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
5.5 Report ERRSYSMODS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
   5.5.1 ERRSYSMODS report before receiving HOLDDATA . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
   5.5.2 ERRSYSMODS report after receiving HOLDDATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
   5.5.3 SMPPUNCH generated by REPORT ERRSYSMODS . . . . . . . . . . . 77



                                                                                                 Contents      v
                 5.6 HOLDERROR processing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
                    5.6.1 Executing APPLY CHECK BYPASS(HOLDSYS,HOLDERROR) . . . 78
                    5.6.2 Reviewing the SMP/E reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78

                 Chapter 6. Using the IVP dialog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
                 6.1 Processing execution list members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
                 6.2 Executing Cx steps: IMS system definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
                    6.2.1 Steps C1xx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
                    6.2.2 Steps C2xx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
                    6.2.3 Steps C3xx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
                    6.2.4 Steps C4xx . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
                 6.3 Executing Dx steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
                    6.3.1 Steps D1xx: IMS interfaces to OS/390 and VTAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
                    6.3.2 Steps D2xx: OS/390 interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
                    6.3.3 Steps D3xx: VTAM interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
                    6.3.4 Steps D4xx: Activating changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
                 6.4 Executing Ex steps: Preparing IVP systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
                    6.4.1 Steps E1xx: Allocating IMS data sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
                    6.4.2 Steps E2xx: Creating application control blocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
                    6.4.3 Steps E3xx: Customizing the IMS system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88
                 6.5 Executing the IVP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
                    6.5.1 Establishing the IMS test environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
                    6.5.2 Verifying the IMS environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
                    6.5.3 Verifying partitioned data bases and HALDB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
                    6.5.4 Verifying IMS reporting functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
                 6.6 The Zx steps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91

                 Chapter 7. IMS system definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93
                 7.1 IMS system definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
                    7.1.1 What is IMS system definition? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
                    7.1.2 Why perform IMS system definition? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
                 7.2 System generation phases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
                    7.2.1 Coding macros in stage 1 input. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
                    7.2.2 Running the preprocessor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
                    7.2.3 Assembly stage 1 input . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
                    7.2.4 Submitting stage 2 jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
                    7.2.5 Rebuilding SMP/E relations among IMS mods: JCLIN . . . . . . . . . . . 97
                    7.2.6 Security Maintenance Utility (SMU) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
                    7.2.7 Applying and accepting maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
                 7.3 Types of system generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
                 7.4 Minimizing the need for system definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
                    7.4.1 Online change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
                    7.4.2 Extended Terminal Option (ETO) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101



vi   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
8.1 IMS maintenance philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
   8.1.1 Reasons for change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
   8.1.2 Accessing risk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
   8.1.3 What are acceptable risks? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
   8.1.4 How current should IMS maintenance be? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
8.2 IMS maintenance strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
   8.2.1 Preventative maintenance strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109
   8.2.2 Corrective maintenance strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
   8.2.3 Emergency maintenance strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
   8.2.4 Maintenance testing strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114
8.3 Processing IMS maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115
   8.3.1 Process flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
   8.3.2 PE PTF inadvertently applied on system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
8.4 APARs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
   8.4.1 APAR management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
   8.4.2 APAR naming conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120
8.5 USERMODs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
   8.5.1 USERMOD management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121
   8.5.2 USERMOD naming conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
8.6 APAR and USERMOD SMP/E regression . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123
8.7 Other IMS maintenance considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
   8.7.1 System libraries concatenation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124
   8.7.2 RECON maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
   8.7.3 Operating system upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129

Chapter 9. Managing IMS software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
9.1 IMS software maintenance strategies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
   9.1.1 SMP/E structures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
   9.1.2 SMP/E zone topologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
   9.1.3 Sharing IMS specific libraries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
9.2 Configuring IMS libraries for availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
   9.2.1 Rolling IMS restarts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
   9.2.2 Library structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
   9.2.3 Facilitating rolling restarts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
   9.2.4 HFS considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
   9.2.5 OS/390 interface considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
   9.2.6 Other methods of activating a change . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
   9.2.7 Sharing IMS online data sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
9.3 Cloning IMS subsystems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
   9.3.1 Cloning methods for IMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
   9.3.2 IMS naming guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145
9.4 Considerations for mixed releases of IMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145



                                                                                                 Contents       vii
                         9.4.1 Effect of mixed releases on key IMS control blocks . . . . .                          ......     .   146
                         9.4.2 Effect of mixed releases on IMS system definition . . . . . .                         ......     .   147
                         9.4.3 Sharing IMS data sets in mixed releases . . . . . . . . . . . . .                     ......     .   147
                      9.5 Miscellaneous information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .        ......     .   147

Part 2. Problem management and technical support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149

                      Chapter 10. Problem management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
                      10.1 Identifying problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
                      10.2 Setting your system for gathering information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152
                         10.2.1 OS/390 settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
                         10.2.2 IMS settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
                      10.3 CQS settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
                      10.4 Preservation of standard documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
                      10.5 Troubleshooting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
                      10.6 Reporting problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158

                      Chapter 11. Tools for technical support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
                      11.1 IMS support Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
                      11.2 TechSupport Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
                      11.3 ShopzSeries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
                         11.3.1 ShopzSeries features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
                         11.3.2 Service order options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
                         11.3.3 Accessing ShopzSeries Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
                         11.3.4 Entering a guest order. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
                         11.3.5 Registering as a user . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
                         11.3.6 User access level . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
                         11.3.7 Accessing ShopzSeries as a user. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
                         11.3.8 Uploading installed software inventories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
                         11.3.9 Tracking orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
                      11.4 S/390 Service Update Facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173
                      11.5 IBMLink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 173

Part 3. Appendixes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175

                      Appendix A. Output lists for SMP/E REPORT ERRSYSMODS . . . . . . . . 177
                      SMPOUT list prior to receiving HOLDDATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178
                      SMPOUT list after receiving HOLDDATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
                      SMPPUNCH list after receiving HOLDDATA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183

                      Abbreviations and acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187

                      Related publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
                      IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191



viii     IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
   Other resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .         ......      .......      ......     .   191
Referenced Web sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .           ......      .......      ......     .   192
How to get IBM Redbooks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .              ......      .......      ......     .   193
   IBM Redbooks collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .              ......      .......      ......     .   193

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195




                                                                                                     Contents       ix
x   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Figures

                  3-1        INSTALL/IVP Phase Selection panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
                  3-2        Variable Documentation panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
                  3-3        Disposition of Log and List Data Sets panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
                  3-4        INSTALL/IVP Execution LST Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
                  4-1        CustomPac Installation — main panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
                  4-2        CustomPac Install Orders function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
                  7-1        System generation types diagram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
                  8-1        Dynamic maintenance installation cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
                  8-2        Potential risk chart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
                  8-3        SMP/E SYSMOD processing flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117
                  9-1        Rolling restarts of IMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
                  10-1       zSeries Web site technical support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
                  10-2       Trouble shooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
                  10-3       Reporting selection Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
                  11-1       IMS support Web site. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
                  11-2       TechSupport Home Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
                  11-3       ShopzSeries home Web site . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
                  11-4       Order for Guest screen 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
                  11-5       ShopzSeries registration screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
                  11-6       ShopzSeries user screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
                  11-7       Upload Software Inventories screen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                                                        xi
xii   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Notices

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© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                                xiii
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States,
other countries, or both:

  ACF/VTAM®                             MORE™                                S/390®
  BookManager®                          MQSeries®                            Sequent®
  CICS®                                 MVS™                                 SP™
  DB2®                                  MVS/XA™                              TCS®
  DFS™                                  OS/390®                              VM/ESA®
  DFSMS/MVS®                            PAL®                                 VSE/ESA™
  DFSORT™                               Parallel Sysplex®                    VTAM®
  eServer®                              Perform™                             WebSphere®
  IBM ®                                 ProductPac®                          z/OS™
  IBMLink™                              RACF®                                z/VM™
  IMS™                                  Redbooks™                            zSeries™
  IMS/ESA®                              Redbooks(logo)™
  Language Environment®                 RMF™



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UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries.

SET, SET Secure Electronic Transaction, and the SET Logo are trademarks owned by SET Secure
Electronic Transaction LLC.

Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.




xiv    IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Preface

                  This IBM Redbook is intended to help systems programmers who are
                  responsible for IMS systems in performing their daily tasks. It describes the
                  different options available in the installation of IMS and IMS service maintenance.

                  This book is suitable for experienced IMS professionals as well as for someone
                  relatively new to IMS who has had to come in and take over. It provides a review
                  of the steps involved in installation, installation verification (IVP), and system
                  definition of IMS.

                  General recommendations are given regarding when and how to upgrade the
                  maintenance level of IMS systems. Also discussed are the important topics of
                  problem management: how to search resolution for a problem, how to report a
                  new problem to IBM, and how to get service for the problem. Examples of the
                  new Web based tools and Web sites are included. The examples cover the IMS
                  and z/OS technical support Web sites and the usage of ShopzSeries.

                  This book is based on the usage of IMS Version 7, but also anticipates the
                  changes that are introduced by IMS Version 8. It can be used as a reference
                  when migrating to these versions of IMS or when upgrading the existing version
                  to the newer maintenance level.



The team that wrote this redbook
                  This redbook was produced by a team of specialists from around the world
                  working at the International Technical Support Organization, San Jose Center.

                  Jouko Jäntti is a Project Leader specializing in IMS with the IBM International
                  Technical Support Organization, San Jose Center. He holds a bachelor’s degree
                  in Business Information Technology from Helsinki Business Polytechnic, Finland.
                  Before joining the ITSO in September 2001, Jouko worked as an Advisory IT
                  Specialist at IBM Global Services, Finland. Jouko has been working on several
                  e-business projects with customers as a specialist in IMS, WebSphere, and UNIX
                  on the OS/390 platform. He has also been responsible for the local IMS support
                  for Finnish IMS customers. Prior to joining IBM, he worked as a systems
                  programmer and transaction management specialist in a large Finnish bank for
                  13 years, and was responsible for the bank's IMS systems.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                        xv
                 John Butterweck is a Senior Software Engineer with IMS Product Technical
                 Support, Silicon Valley Laboratory, IBM San Jose. He provides Level 2 support to
                 IMS customers specializing in IMS installation and maintenance as well as in the
                 IMS systems arena. Before joining IMS Product Technical Support 10 years ago,
                 John worked in IBM Professional Services as a Systems Programmer for 5
                 years, and was an IBM customer for 12 years.

                 Xavier Cervelló Vergara is an IT Specialist with IBM Global Services in
                 Barcelona, Spain. He has 6 years of experience in IMS. He holds a degree in
                 Telecommunication Engineering at the ‘Escola Tècnica Superior d'Enginyeria de
                 Telecomunicació de Barcelona’. He has been assigned full time to La Caixa
                 d'Estalvis i Pensions de Barcelona, one of the largest financial entities in Spain.
                 His responsibilities include installation, support, maintenance, and problem
                 determination for IMS and all IMS related products.

                 Jim Field is an IMS Systems Programmer with the CONVERGYS corporation in
                 Lake Mary, Florida. He holds a bachelor of science degree in Business
                 Administration from the University of Central Florida in Orlando, Florida. He has
                 19 years of data processing experience, including most recently his 3 years at
                 CONVERGYS. Jim has worked as an MVS/XA console operator, a tape library
                 supervisor, a COBOL IMS programmer, an IMS data base administrator, and an
                 IMS systems programmer for the last 11 years. Since starting at CONVERGYS,
                 Jim has also provided on-call support for their CICS, DB2, IMS, and MQSeries
                 systems. Currently he is supporting the OS/390 performance products used at
                 CONVERGYS. His areas of expertise include IMS system support, problem
                 diagnosis and resolution, and OS/390 program product installation and
                 maintenance.

                 Thanks to the following people for their contributions to this project:

                 Emma Jacobs
                 Yvonne Lyon
                 Deanna Polm
                 International Technical Support Organization, San Jose Center, USA

                 Rich Conway
                 Bob Haimowitz
                 Frank Kyne
                 International Technical Support Organization, Poughkeepsie Center, USA

                 Jim Campbell
                 Richard Cooper
                 Barbara Klein
                 Jeff Maddix
                 Pete Sadler
                 IBM Silicon Valley Laboratory, San Jose, USA


xvi   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
         Rich Lewis
         IBM Dallas Systems Center, USA

         Tim Maley
         IBM Global Services, USA

         Robert Hain
         Luke Wilby
         IBM Global Services, Australia

         Reijo Kylä-Liuhala
         IBM Global Services, Finland

         Dougie Lawson
         IBM Global Services, UK



Notice
         This publication is intended to help managers and professionals to understand
         and evaluate the options available when installing new version of IMS or when
         performing a maintenance upgrade to the current version of IMS. The information
         in this publication is not intended as the specification of any programming
         interfaces that are provided by IMS Version 7 or IMS Version 8. See the
         PUBLICATIONS section of the IBM Programming Announcement for IMS/ESA
         Version 7 and IMS Version 8 for more information about what publications are
         considered to be product documentation.



Comments welcome
         Your comments are important to us!

         We want our Redbooks to be as helpful as possible. Send us your comments
         about this or other Redbooks in one of the following ways:
            Use the online Contact us review redbook form found at:
               ibm.com/redbooks
            Send your comments in an Internet note to:
               redbook@us.ibm.com
            Mail your comments to the address on page ii.




                                                                           Preface   xvii
xviii   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                        Part 1


Part        1     Installing and
                  maintaining IMS
                  In this part of the book, we discuss the topics of installing a new version or a new
                  maintenance level of IMS. First we describe the major reasons for migrating IMS
                  to the latest versions, and then we cover the different methods of installation and
                  migration. Also, the topics of maintenance processes and how you can manage
                  your IMS software are discussed.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                           1
2   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                           1


    Chapter 1.    Introduction
                  Since the first IMS system, which was an inventory tracking system for the U.S.
                  moon landing effort in the late 1960’s, IMS has successfully provided features
                  that has made it one of the leading transaction and database management
                  systems. Features like industry leading performance with guaranteed integrity,
                  ability to recover from failures, and cost efficiency for high volumes of work are
                  well-known, but they cannot be over advertised.

                  Still, after over 30 years, the strengths that have been in place from the beginning
                  are virtually second to none. Also, just as important, IMS has been able to evolve
                  through the decades and versions.

                  Perhaps the most important thing is that this evolution is still continuing. In
                  addition to the fact that most corporate data is managed by IMS today, it can also
                  be a foundation for a new generation of Web-based, high workload applications.

                  In this chapter we provide a brief overview of the major enhancements of the
                  recent IMS versions. We also discuss the reasons for upgrading to the latest
                  versions. In the later chapters of this book, we review how you can do that.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                             3
1.1 Reasons to upgrade
                 Among the major reasons for customers to upgrade their IMS systems are the
                 valuable enhancements and new functions that are added in each version, as
                 well as the support that is available for the most recent versions.

                 With the demands of the evolving e-business environment, and a marketplace
                 working in Web time, ever-growing workloads, and increasing capacity, IMS has
                 been successful in enhancing its traditional strengths in the areas of open access
                 and high availability.

                 Another good reason for upgrading your IMS system is to take advantage of the
                 reduced cost and increased performance of the newer hardware while leveraging
                 your investment in IMS data and application programs. A practical reason for
                 staying on a current level of maintenance would be that, when you encounter
                 some error that needs to be fixed, the effort needed for maintenance is usually
                 minor, because you have already put most of the prerequisites on. Also, you will
                 probably encounter these situations much less frequently.

                 At the time of writing this book, the supported versions are IMS/ESA Version 6.1
                 and IMS Version 7.1. IMS Version 8 has been announced and the Quality
                 Partnership Program (QPP) has been started for it. The general availability date
                 will be decided during the QPP. The IBM Redbook IMS Primer, SG24-5352, can
                 be used to gain a basic knowledge of the functions and features of IMS.

                 There have been significant enhancements that have enabled the systems to
                 grow beyond the old limits. The following sections cover some of the major
                 enhancements of IMS up to Version 7 and also some anticipation of the features
                 of IMS Version 8. These and numerous other smaller enhancements are good
                 reasons for you to switch to IMS Version 7, and then you will be ready to migrate
                 to IMS Version 8 when it is generally available.



1.2 IMS support for Parallel Sysplex
                 As IMS subsystems continue to play an increasing role in the success of
                 companies, the demands for increased availability, capacity, and functionality
                 become more critical. In order to meet these challenges, IMS takes advantage of
                 various functions and features offered by Parallel Sysplex.

                 IMS already has a well-earned reputation as a high availability transaction and
                 database server. That reputation was further enhanced when Extended
                 Recovery Facility (XRF) support was added in 1986 with IMS Version 2. In 1994,
                 IMS Version 5 was introduced, bringing with it IMS support for Parallel Sysplex,
                 which provides both capacity and availability benefits to IMS.



4   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           Starting from IMS Version 5, sharing databases across the Parallel Sysplex has
           been enabled, thus allowing for much larger IMS systems. Starting from IMS
           Version 6, Parallel Sysplex also provides the capability to share the IMS
           message queues between more than one IMS subsystem, thus improving
           availability across both planned and unplanned outages.

           The Rapid Network Recovery (RNR) feature of IMS Version 7 expands the IMS
           exploitation of Parallel Sysplex by utilizing the capabilities of VTAM Multi-Node
           Persistent Sessions (MNPS) to reconnect IMS terminals to a recovered IMS
           subsystem with minimal processing overhead.

           The sections that follow describe the Parallel Sysplex exploiting features that
           were added to these releases of IMS.


1.2.1 IMS Parallel Sysplex data sharing
           IMS Version 5 was the first release of IMS to take advantage of Parallel Sysplex.
           This support was enhanced with IMS Version 6 to allow almost all IMS database
           types to be shared by a maximum of 255 IMS subsystems residing in as many as
           32 OS/390 systems. The only exceptions are Main Storage Database (MSDB)
           and Generalized Sequential Access Method (GSAM) databases. MSDB
           databases can be converted to Data Entry Data Base (DEDB) Virtual Storage
           Option (VSO) databases that can be shared like the other databases. Without
           this support, an IMS database could only be shared across two MVS images.
           Shared databases must be registered with Data Base Recovery Control (DBRC).
           Use of this function requires that Integrated Resource Lock Manager (IRLM) 2.1
           be used.

           This support adds the keyword GLOBAL to various database commands which
           cause the command to be issued on all IMS subsystems in the data sharing
           group. When the GLOBAL keyword is used, the command is first executed on the
           system on which it was entered and, if successful, IRLM NOTIFY is used to pass
           this command on to the other IMS subsystems in the data sharing group.


1.2.2 OS/390 Automatic Restart Manager support
           Automatic Restart Manager (ARM) is an element of OS/390 that provides the
           ability to rapidly and automatically restart failed components. IMS Version 5
           added ARM support so that IMS and related tasks can be automatically
           emergency restarted in the event of a failure.

           If the IMS subsystem fails, it can be automatically restarted on the same OS/390
           system by ARM. If the OS/390 that IMS is running on fails, the IMS subsystem
           can be automatically started on another OS/390 image.




                                                                      Chapter 1. Introduction   5
                 ARM supports restart of the control region for TM-DB, DCCTL, DBCTL, FDBR
                 and XRF environments. Other IMS regions (DBRC, DLI/SAS, MPRs, and so on)
                 are not restarted by ARM, as the control region will automatically restart these
                 regions.

                 More information on IMS support of ARM, and how to set it up, is available in
                 IMS Version 7 Administration Guide: System, SC26-9420.


1.2.3 Shared IMS message queues
                 IMS Version 6 continued the exploitation of Parallel Sysplex by adding the
                 Shared Message Queue (SMQ) support that provides a common set of queues
                 for input, output, and Fast Path messages. In IMS Version 7 the shared queue
                 support was enhanced so that also asynchronous Advanced Program to
                 Program Communications (APPC) and Open Transaction Management Access
                 (OTMA) transactions are eligible now for sysplex-wide processing.

                 Any IMS subsystem in the data sharing group can process a message from the
                 common queue as long as that subsystem has the ability to process that
                 particular message. This enables workload balancing as well as the ability to
                 add/remove IMS subsystems as workload fluctuates. If one IMS subsystem in
                 the sysplex fails, the other IMS subsystems can continue processing work in the
                 common queue resulting in greater system availability. For additional information,
                 see the IBM Redbook IMS/ESA Shared Queues: A Planning Guide, SG24-5257.


1.2.4 Support for VTAM generic resources
                 VTAM Generic Resources provide the capability for a number of server
                 applications to use a common VTAM APPLID. For example, a user could enter
                 LOGON APPLID(IMSP), and get connected to any of the IMS systems that are
                 connected to that generic resource. Generic Resource support provides the
                 ability to balance sessions between members in the resource group by allowing
                 VTAM to determine to which IMS subsystem in the generic resource group a
                 terminal will connect. Without this support, balancing sessions between different
                 IMS subsystems requires you to code your own VTAM exit, or statically define
                 sets of terminals to log onto the different IMS subsystems.


1.2.5 IMS sysplex management
                 IMS Version 6 added support for IMS commands to be entered from an OS/390
                 Multiple Console Support (MCS) or Extended Multiple Console Support (EMCS)
                 terminal. These commands can be routed to all IMS subsystems in a sysplex or
                 to a specific IMS subsystem.




6   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Routing commands to all IMS subsystems is accomplished by using the MVS
ROUTE command with the *ALL parameter. ROUTE command processing
allows for combining responses from different systems into an aggregated
response. For additional information on the MVS ROUTE command, see
OS/390 MVS System Commands, GC28-1781.

IMS Version 8 provides additional enhancements for systems management in
Parallel Sysplex environment. There are significant enhancements in the areas of
operations and resource management as well as coordination of online changes
between the IMS systems.

Single Point of Control in IMS Version 8
For operations management, IMS Version 8 adds support for Single Point of
Control (SPOC), that enables the automation or end user to enter commands
through a new component called Operations Manager (OM) to any or all IMS
systems in the Parallel Sysplex. Responses to these commands from different
IMS systems are consolidated as a single response to SPOC. With IMS Version
8, IBM provides TSO-based SPOC. The software vendors and users can develop
other SPOCs.

Resource management enhancements in IMS Version 8
For resource management IMS Version 8 provides a new component called
Resource Manager (RM) that enforces consistency between the resource names
and types so that, for example, a same resource name cannot be defined as a
transaction on one IMS system and as an LTERM on another system. New
system terminal management makes it possible to enforce single user signon.
Also it enables terminal and user resource status recovery across IMS sysplex
environment (IMSplex) by resuming the significant status on another IMS after
failure.

Coordinated global online change of IMS Version 8
One enhancement of IMS Version 8 is the coordinated global online change,
also called global online change. It is an optional replacement for traditional local
online change and it can be used, as the name suggests, to coordinate the online
change process across multiple IMS systems in an IMSplex. Global online
change status is kept in an OLCSTAT data set that is one shared data set for all
participating IMS systems. Global online change is invoked by Operations
Manager commands that can be entered through the SPOC.




                                                             Chapter 1. Introduction   7
1.2.6 IMS BMPs in a data sharing environment
                 A scheduling enhancement has been added to allow spreading of BMPs (or
                 MPPs and IFPs) across the IMS datasharing group. The IMSGROUP parameter
                 has been added to define the name of the group.

                 This function uses MVS Name Token services to store information that will be
                 available to other address spaces. During control region initialization, the IMSID
                 will be placed in the token specified via the IMSGROUP parameter. During BMP
                 (or MPP and IFP) initialization, connection processing will be attempted in the
                 following order:
                 1. IMSID provided on the execution parameter.
                 2. ALTID provided on the execution parameter.
                 3. IMSID provided on the execution parameter to find a corresponding MVS
                    Name Token. If found, the connection will be made using the IMSID that was
                    put in the token during control region initialization.
                 4. ALTID provided on the execution parameter to find a corresponding MVS
                    Name Token. If found, the connection will be made using the name that was
                    put in the token during control region initialization.
                 5. If not able to connect, a DFS690A message will be issued.



1.3 Other IMS V7 and IMS V8 major enhancements
                 The other major IMS enhancements provide improved connectivity, increased
                 capacity and availability, and they enable new application development
                 technologies.


1.3.1 IMS connectivity enhancements
                 IMS Version 6 introduced Shared Messages Queue support. In this version,
                 OTMA and APPC messages have to be processed on the front-end IMS. In IMS
                 Version 7, asynchronous APPC and OTMA messages can processed on any
                 system in the shared queues group. In IMS Version 8, synchronous APPC and
                 OTMA messages can be processed on any system in the shared queues. In IMS
                 Version 8, dynamic definition of descriptors is introduced.

                 IMS Connect is a separately priced product that provides connectivity to IMS TM
                 from any TCP/IP client, so you can access IMS TM resources from a TCP/IP
                 network. The Local Option feature of IMS Connect supports non-TCP/IP
                 communications (program calls) between IMS Connector for Java with




8   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           WebSphere Application Server (WAS) and IMS Connect when IMS Connect and
           WAS reside in the same OS/390 image. IMS Connect for z/OS 1.2 is extended to
           provide WebSphere Adapter support with the addition of the IMS Connector for
           Java J2C (J2EE Connector Architecture) Runtime Support.


1.3.2 Support for large databases
           Before IMS Version 7, DL/I databases were limited in size because segments of
           the same type must be in the same data set with the maximum data set size
           limited to 4 GB for VSAM and 8 GB for OSAM. High Availability Large Data Base
           (HALDB) feature introduced in IMS Version 7 removes that limitation.

           A HALDB is a partitioned DL/I database. Partitioning a database allows the use
           of smaller elements that are easier to manage. Multiple partitions decrease the
           amount of unavailable data if a partition fails or is taken offline. Partition
           independence leaves more data available because a particular partition can be
           taken offline while the rest of the partitions in the HALDB remain available.
           Usability is improved when performing reorganization, because the databases
           are immediately usable after image copies have been created. Availability of the
           databases is increased because neither prefix resolution or prefix update utility
           processing is required.

           HALDB provides a capacity increase. Each partition can be equivalent in size to
           one DL/I non-HALDB database, and one HALDB can support up to 1001
           partitions. HALDB allows the grouping of DL/I database records into sets of
           partitions that are treated as a single database while permitting functions to be
           performed independently for each partition. Each HALDB partition has the same
           capacity limit as a DL/I non-HALDB database. Like a DL/I non-HALDB database
           each partition may consist of up to 10 data sets, however the number of data sets
           selected will then apply to all the partitions in that HALDB. This allows a large
           amount of data to be contained in a single partition.


1.3.3 Online Recovery Service (ORS)
           IMS Online Recovery Service (ORS) is a separately priced facility for IMS
           providing database recovery processing in an online IMS environment. ORS can
           be used with IMS Version 7 or later.

           This facility enables you to recover multiple database data sets simultaneously.
           IMS Online Recovery Service reads image copies, logs, and change
           accumulation data sets in parallel. It reads each input only once, even when it is
           used in the recovery of multiple data sets. IMS Online Recovery Service applies
           the database changes to multiple database data sets simultaneously.




                                                                      Chapter 1. Introduction   9
                 IMS Online Recovery Service also enables you to recover databases to any point
                 in time. This includes times at which the databases were being updated. Creating
                 a recovery point by quiescing or deallocating the databases is not necessary.
                 IMS Online Recovery Service applies only committed updates as part of this
                 process.


1.3.4 Application development and execution enhancements
                 Starting with IMS Version 7, IMS applications can be written in Java and
                 executed in IMS dependent regions. IMS Java applications have access to IMS
                 message queues and databases through the use of IMS Java classes.
                 Additionally, the JDBC interface can be used to access both IMS databases and
                 DB2 data.

                 IMS has two new region types, Java Message Processing region (JMP) and Java
                 Batch Processing region (JBP) that allow you to execute your Java application
                 programs in a Java Virtual Machine (JVM) environment. The IMS Version 7 Java
                 Classes have been updated to support Java Development Kit (JDK) 1.3.1S.

                 The Dynamic LE Runtime Parameters enhancement in IMS Version 8 allows you
                 to dynamically update Language Environment (LE) runtime parameters for an
                 IMS application. By having this ability, it is also easier to use the Debug tool for
                 application testing. LE parameters can be changed without requiring CEEROPT
                 and CEEUOPT to be changed, reassembled, and rebound.




10   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                        2


    Chapter 2.    Ordering and packaging
                  This chapter contains ordering and packaging information for IMS. We describe
                  how you can order IMS software, and what software offerings are available. Then
                  we discuss some general considerations that are not dependent on the type of
                  order you have chosen, and we offer a brief overview of the installation process
                  changes in IMS Version 8. Topics covered in this chapter are:
                      IMS installation product offerings
                      General installation considerations
                      Installing IMS Version 8




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                     11
2.1 Ordering IMS software
                 IMS can be ordered and installed through several methods. The following IMS
                 installation product offerings are available for you to order:
                    Custom Built Product Delivery Offering (CBPDO) Database Systems feature
                    ServerPac Database Systems feature
                    IBM Software Distribution (ISD) Database Systems feature
                    SystemPac Database Systems feature

                 The most common option for installing IMS is using the IMS INSTALL/IVP
                 process. This process provides dialog that guide you through the steps
                 necessary to install and test a new release of IMS. The INSTALL/IVP process
                 supports three types of distribution media. The SystemPac feature, a non-IMS
                 INSTALL/IVP supported option, is also available.



2.2 Product packaging
                 IMS products are ordered by Function Modification Identifiers (FMIDs). Table 2-1
                 lists the FMIDs for IMS Version 7 and IMS Version 8.

                 Table 2-1 FMIDs for IMS V7 and IMS V8
                  Function Description                    Function Modification Identifier (FMID)

                                                          IMS Version 7          IMS Version 8

                  System Services - INSTALL/IVP, Logger   HMK7700                HMK8800
                  Data Base Recovery Control (DBRC)

                  Database Manager                        JMK7701                JMK8801

                  Transaction Manager, APPC/LU            JMK7702                JMK8802
                  Manager

                  IRLM V2 R1                              HIR2101                HIR2101

                  Extended Terminal Option (ETO)          JMK7703                JMK8803

                  Remote Site Recovery/Recovery-Level     JMK7704                JMK8804
                  Tracking

                  Remote Site Recovery/Database Level     JMK7705                JMK8805
                  Tracking

                  IMS Java Application Support            JMK7708                JMK8806




12   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
2.2.1 CBPDO Database Systems feature
           The CBPDO feature is supported by the INSTALL/IVP process. The
           INSTALL/IVP dialog guides you through a file tailoring process that takes your
           system specific values for the input variables and creates the JCL required to
           install the IMS system. The dialog then guides you through the execution of the
           JCL and other specific tasks that build and load the SMP/E environment,
           generate the IMS system definition, and verify the system.

           This feature contains all the products and service features you ordered on one
           logical tape. There may be several physical tapes, depending on the size of the
           order. The desired service is processed via SMP/E.

           CBPDO contains all maintenance available when the order is created. SMP/E
           program temporary fix (PTF) in error (PE) processing must be done when
           installing using CBPDO.


2.2.2 ServerPac Database Systems feature
           The ServerPac offering is supported by the INSTALL/IVP process. The offering
           provides a dialog you invoke to tailor system and IMS information. Once the
           ServerPac Installation Dialog is set up, it creates the necessary JCL to offload
           the ServerPac onto your system. You can reuse the same dialog once it has
           been set up for previous installation of IMS or some other product delivered by
           the same method.

           After the ServerPac is off-loaded, a IMS system generation is performed, and
           then system verification. The benefit of this feature is that IBM has already
           performed the necessary SMP/E installation steps. All service that can be
           integrated has been applied and accepted up to the date when the package was
           built. Any service that was not able to be integrated, is provided with the order on
           the separate service tape. Be sure to process this service as appropriate.


2.2.3 IBM Software Distribution (ISD) Database Systems feature
           This offering contains a separate tape for each product feature. The features are
           shipped at the base level. To receive service above the base level, you must
           place a separate order.

           This offering is processed through the INSTALL/IVP dialog. This offering is being
           withdrawn.




                                                            Chapter 2. Ordering and packaging   13
2.2.4 SystemPac Database Systems feature
                 The SystemPac feature is a custom offering. The system is built specifically for
                 an individual customer. System maintenance is integrated to a recommended
                 service level. SMP/E target and distribution libraries are then shipped to the
                 customer.

                 This feature is not supported by the INSTALL/IVP process and it is not discussed
                 further in this book.



2.3 General installation considerations
                 There are some general items you should take into consideration when preparing
                 for installing a new version of IMS. Obtaining the latest required documentation
                 and SMP/E data set name changes are discussed.


2.3.1 Installation documentation precedence
                 There are multiple sources of documentation available regarding installation
                 procedures and currency of IMS maintenance. Basically, the rule is that whatever
                 is written later, overwrites the previous documentation, if they are conflicting.
                 Following is the recommended order that should be used to obtain the most
                 current information:
                    Documentation provided with CBPDO / ServerPac order
                    Current Preventative Service Planning (PSP) bucket
                    Program Directory provided with CBPDO / ServerPac order
                    IMS Version 7 Installation Volume 1: Installation and Verification, SG24-6574


2.3.2 Data set name changes between IMS Version 6 to IMS Version 7
                 Several SMP/E data set names used for processing IMS has changed between
                 IMS Version 6 and IMS Version 7. These changes were made to simplify the IMS
                 installation and maintenance process, as well as to conform to OS/390
                 packaging standards.

                 IMS Version 6 libraries GENLIB, GENLIBA, and GENLIBB are combined to a
                 common target library of SDFSMAC and a common distribution library of
                 ADFSMAC in IMS Version 7. This nullifies the MACLIB parameter on the
                 IMSGEN macro in system definition. If the parameter is specified, it will be
                 ignored. DBSOURCE, SVSOURCE, and TMSOURCE are combined to a
                 distribution library of ADFSSRC. Table 2-2 shows the data set name changes.




14   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
         Table 2-2 Data set differences between V6 and V7
          Old distribution     Old target library   New distribution         New target library
          library                                   library

          GENLIB               SMPMTS               ADFSMAC                  SDFSMAC

          GENLIBA              MACLIB               ADFSMAC                  SDFSMAC

          GENLIBB              MACLIB/SMPMTS        ADFSMAC                  SDFSMAC

          LOAD                 -                    ADFSLOAD                 -

          -                    RESLIB               -                        SDFSRESL

          DBSOURCE             SMPSTS               ADFSSRC                  SMPSTS

          SVSOURCE             SMPSTS               ADFSSRC                  SMPSTS

          TMSOURCE             SMPSTS               ADFSSRC                  SMPSTS

          DFSCLSTA             DFSCLST              ADFSCLST                 SDFSCLST

          DFSEXECA             DFSEXEC              ADFSEXEC                 SDFSEXEC

          DFSISRCA             DFSISRC              ADFSISRC                 SDFSISRC

          DFSRTRMA             DFSRTRM              ADFSRTRM                 SDFSRTRM

          DFSMLIBA             DFSMLIB              ADFSMLIB                 SDFSMLIB

          DFSPLIBA             DFSPLIB              ADFSPLIB                 SDFSPLIB

          DFSSLIBA             DFSSLIB              ADFSSLIB                 SDFSSLIB

          DFSTLIBA             DFSTLIB              ADFSTLIB                 SDFSTLIB



2.4 Installing IMS Version 8
         Some further changes have been made to IMS packaging and installation
         procedures to conform to OS/390 packaging and installation standards. The aim
         of this is to make IMS have the same look and feel as other products, thus
         reducing the need for staff who are skilled in IMS-specific installation.




                                                            Chapter 2. Ordering and packaging   15
2.4.1 Packaging and installation changes
                 In IMS Version 8 the installation process has changed. The INSTALL/IVP
                 process has been eliminated and it is replaced by two things: INSTALL and IVP.
                 The INSTALL process is standard SMP/E installation. The INSTALL/IVP dialog
                 has been renamed to the IVP dialog and the SMP/E (‘B’ series) jobs are removed
                 from the dialog. With IMS Version 8, the IVP process is used to set up the
                 OS/390 and VTAM interfaces and to verify the installation. The changes in the
                 IVP process are described later on Chapter 6, “Using the IVP dialog” on page 81.

                 The installation process is documented in the program directory that is shipped
                 with the order. The program directory contains information on the jobs used to
                 install IMS. Each job contains instructions for customization to your environment.
                 The instructions for unloading these jobs as well as the run sequence is
                 provided. A new IMS library (ADFSBASE/SDFSBASE) contains sample
                 installation jobs to perform an IMS Version 8 installation. The sample jobs are
                 replacements for the INSTALL/IVP ‘B’ series jobs of the earlier IMS versions.

                 If you want to build a new SMP/E environment to install IMS Version 8 in its own
                 SMP/E zone, there are optional SMP/E jobs provided for this purpose:
                    DFSALA for allocating and initializing new CSI
                    DFSALB for initializing CSI zones, allocating SMP/E data sets, and building
                    SMP/E required DDDEFs

                 It is strongly recommended that you use these jobs. If you don’t use the DFSALB
                 job, be sure that you set the ACCJCLIN parameter in the IMS distribution zone
                 before IMS is installed.


2.4.2 Changes in target and distribution data sets
                 There are several SMP/E data sets that are new for IMS Version 8.

                 New target libraries:
                 SDFSBASE                  Contains sample jobs used for installation
                 SDFSSMPL                  Contains samples for exits, data base descriptors, etc.
                 SDFSDATA                  Contains Operations Manager (a new component of IMS
                                           Version 8) translatable text file in English
                 SDFSSRC                   Contains source code, target library created for the
                                           corresponding distribution library




16   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
New target HFS DDDEFs and PATHs
SDFSJCIC              usr/lpp/ims/imsjava81/samples/jdbc/IBM/
SDFSJDC8              usr/lpp/ims/imsjava81/samples/jdbc/IBM/
SDFSJHF8              usr/lpp/ims/imsjava81/samples/jdbc/IBM/
SDFSJTOL              usr/lpp/ims/imsjava81/samples/jdbc/IBM/

Changed target HFS DDDEF and PATH
SDFSJSAM              Changed from usr/lpp/ims/imsjava71/samples/jdbc/IBM/
                      to usr/lpp/ims/imsjava81/samples/jdbc/IBM/

Obsolete target libraries and DDDEFs
These IMS Version 7 Java Application Support target libraries and DDDEFs need
to be deleted from IMS Version 8 zones, when installing over the existing IMS
Version 7 SMP/E zones:
   SDFSJJCL
   SDFSJDOC
   SDFSJHFS
   SDFSJIVP

New distribution data sets
ADFSBASE              Contains sample jobs used for installation
ADFSSMPL              Contains samples for exits, data base descriptors, etc.
ADFSDATA              Contains Operation Manager commands, translatable text
                      file in English
ADFSJDC8              Contains Java documentation
ADFSJHF8              Contains Java file system
ADFSJCIC              Contains Java file system
ADFSJTOL              Contains Java file system

Obsolete distribution libraries and DDDEFs
These IMS Version 7 Java Application Support distribution libraries and DDDEFs
need to be deleted from IMS Version 8 zones, when installing over the existing
IMS Version 7 SMP/E zones:
   ADFSJDOC
   ADFSJHFS
   ADFSJIVP




                                             Chapter 2. Ordering and packaging   17
2.4.3 SMP/E processing changes in IMS Version 8
                 All FMIDs are installed using the normal SMP/E RECEIVE, APPLY. and ACCEPT
                 command sequence. This conforms to the packaging standards of z/OS and
                 other IBM products. During the APPLY processing, you will see multiple SMP/E
                 messages which indicate no target library for parts that are defined in the IMS
                 system definition. The expected messages are documented in the program
                 directory.

                 IMS Version 8 has eliminated the job DFSJCLIN that was available in previous
                 versions, and which could be used to build the non-system definition parts of
                 IMS. The non-system definition parts are now created during the SMP/E APPLY
                 processing. SMP/E uses the inline ++JCLIN that is provided with FMIDs to
                 accomplish this. The SMP/E GENERATE command can be used to create the
                 JCL to build non-system definition parts, if ACCJCLIN was set in your distribution
                 zone before processing the FMIDs.


2.4.4 User exits in IMS Version 8
                 In IMS Version 7, the majority of the source code and samples that are provided,
                 are in ADFSSRC distribution library. ADFSSRC library does not have
                 corresponding SMP/E target library, so the default SMP/E SMPSTS is used
                 instead. With IMS Version 8 some of the optional user exits have been moved
                 from ADFSSRC to ADFSSMPL (distribution) and SDFSSMPL (target) libraries
                 and they are created as ++SRC type part. This allows the exits to be updated by
                 line updates during SMP/E service processing as opposed to complete
                 replacement.

                 IBM is not shipping the object code for these user exits anymore and no module
                 (MOD) to load module (LMOD) relationships are created during IMS install. That
                 means that SMP/E will not automatically assemble and bind the parts during
                 APPLY processing. If the user creates the MOD to LMOD relationship, then
                 SMP/E APPLY processing will automatically assemble and bind these exits.




18   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                         3


    Chapter 3.    Installing IMS using CBPDO
                  In this chapter we explain how to install IMS when it is ordered as a Custom Built
                  Product Delivery Offering (CBPDO) Database Systems feature. The installation
                  process is accomplished by using the IMS INSTALL/IVP dialog. We also discuss
                  the installation of IMS Java Application Support.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                       19
3.1 Installing IMS using CBPDO
                 The IMS installation process is described from the point of receiving your
                 CBPDO order through the completion of establishing the IMS SMP/E
                 environment. Chapter 6, “Using the IVP dialog” on page 81, explains the IMS
                 INSTALL/IVP process from the point that the IMS SMP/E environment is
                 established through the completion of the installation.

                 Additional information regarding this process can be found in Part 1,
                 “INSTALL/IVP Information”, in IMS Version 7 Installation Volume 1: Installation
                 and Verification, GC26-9429.



3.2 CBPDO - Database Systems feature distribution
                 The Custom Built Product Delivery Offering (CBPDO) distribution type delivers all
                 of the ordered products on one logical tape. Your order however, may include
                 several physical tapes. The tapes contains the base product, optional features
                 and service.



3.3 Reviewing shipped documentation
                 Once your order has been received, the process begins by reviewing the
                 documentation that was shipped with the tapes.

                 Program Shipping Request letter
                 The Program Shipping Request letter contains the shipped to address, order
                 date, process date, customer number, branch number, package number, and
                 description of items shipped. The most important information included, is the
                 description of the items, because this contains the IMS CBPDO LEVEL that was
                 shipped and the tape volume serial numbers (VOLSERs).

                 Country of Origin report
                 The Country of Origin report contains Program ID, IBM order information, the
                 location from which the product was shipped, and customer information
                 mentioned on the Program Shipping Request.

                 Packing List
                 The Packing List lists the memos that were shipped and the customer
                 information mentioned above.




20   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
         Information on ordering through ShopzSeries
         This page includes information on placing your next order though ShopzSeries.

         Customer Support letter
         The Customer Support letter contains general information on what is shipped
         and whom to contact if you did not receive the correct shipment or have
         questions regarding your shipment.

         Read This First letter
         The Read This First letter contains the IBM license agreement, disclaimer of
         warranty, and general information about how to start the installation of the
         CBPDO.



3.4 Unloading the tapes
         There are several jobs that you must execute in order to establish the
         INSTALL/IVP environment and obtain further documentation for later review.

         There will be additional jobs requiring tape processing later, during the SMP/E
         processing.

         To unload your tapes, perform the following steps:
         1. Create and execute the RIMLOD job.
            Create and execute the RIMLOD job that will load the CBPDO RIMLIB from
            tape to partitioned data set (PDS), IMS710.PDO.RIMLIB, on DASD. Use a
            high level qualifier that is appropriate for your installation. Example 3-1
            contains the JCL that might be used. A complete example and explanation is
            included in the Read This First letter included with your shipment.

         Example 3-1 Example of RIMLOD JCL
         //RIMLOD JOB (999,POK),'RIMLOAD',CLASS=A,REGION=0K,
         //          MSGCLASS=T,TIME=10,MSGLEVEL=(1,1),NOTIFY=&SYSUID
         //RIMLOD1 EXEC PGM=IEBCOPY,REGION=512K
         //SYSPRINT DD SYSOUT=*
         //TAPE     DD DISP=SHR,DSN=RIMLIB,UNIT=3490,LABEL=(2,SL),
         //         VOL=SER=IC8698
         //TARGET   DD DSN=IMS710.PDO.RIMLIB,DISP=(NEW,CATLG,DELETE),
         //         VOL=SER=TOTSTA,UNIT=3390,SPACE=(6160,(90,15,15)),
         //         DCB=(RECFM=FB,BLKSIZE=6160,LRECL=80)
         //SYSIN    DD *
          COPY INDD=TAPE,OUTDD=TARGET
         /*




                                                    Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   21
                 2. Execute the DOCLOAD job.
                    The DOCLOAD job is executed from the IMS710.PDO.RIMLIB data set you
                    just created. The DOCLOAD job creates a partitioned data set,
                    IMS710.PDO.DOCLIB, which includes member MEMOEXT.
                    Member MEMOEXT contains the CBPDO DBS SYSTEMS MEMO TO
                    USERS EXTENSION document.

                  Attention: We recommend that you read member MEMOEXT prior to
                  proceeding further with this process. This document contains IMPORTANT
                  INSTALLATION INFORMATION.

                 3. Execute the INSTMLD job.
                    The INSTMLD job is executed form the IMS710.PDO.RIMLIB data set. The
                    INSTMLD job creates partitioned data set, IMS710.PDO.PGMDIR, and loads
                    the Program Directories and PSP file information into this data set.
                    The Program Directory is located in member Q0833400 and the PSP files for
                    each product are in the other members in data set IMS710.PDO.PGMDIR.



3.5 Creating the INSTALL/IVP data sets
                 The INSTALL/IVP data sets are also off-loaded from the tapes sent with your
                 shipment. You must use the INSTALL/IVP data sets that are shipped. Do not use
                 an existing copy of the INSTALL/IVP data sets from a prior IMS release.

                 To create your INSTALL/IVP environment, three jobs may be executed. You will
                 have to create the JCL for first two jobs. An example of the necessary JCL, along
                 with a complete description of each job can be found in Chapter 6, “Installation
                 Instructions for IMS V7”, in Program Directory for Information Management
                 System Transaction and Database Servers, GI10-8334, that is shipped with your
                 order.

                 The INSTALL/IVP jobs are:
                 1. DFSIVJ01: This job is optional. If it is executed the JCL must be created. This
                    job creates a user catalog and its alias. If you already have the appropriate
                    user catalog defined, the JCL can be modified to only perform the alias
                    functions. If you already have the appropriate IVP high-level qualifier (HLQ)
                    defined to a user catalog, then this job is not required.




22   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
         2. DFSIVJ02: This job is required. You must create the JCL. This job allocates
            two partitioned data sets. The HLQ for these data sets must be the same as
            the IVP data sets. The data sets created are IMS710.INSTALIB and
            IMS710.INSTATBL. This job also copies JCL member DFSIVJ03 into
            IMS710.INSTALIB from the distribution tape. You will need to obtain the
            VOLSER and file sequence information from the DBS SYSTEMS MEMO TO
            USERS EXTENSION that was off-loaded in step 2 of section 3.4, “Unloading
            the tapes” on page 21. Example 3-2 shows the sample JCL for the job
            DFSIVJ02.

         Example 3-2 Example of DFSIVJ02 job JCL
         //DFSIVJ02 JOB (999,POK),
         //          'DFSIVJ02',
         //          CLASS=A,MSGCLASS=T,MSGLEVEL=(1,1),
         //          REGION=0M,NOTIFY=&SYSUID
         //CPYIVSRC EXEC PGM=IEBCOPY
         //SYSPRINT DD SYSOUT=*
         //IN        DD DISP=(OLD,PASS),DSN=IBM.HMK7700.F4,
         //             VOL=SER=(IC8698),
         //             UNIT=3490,LABEL=(12,SL)        ADFSISRC
         //OUT       DD DISP=OLD,
         //             DSN=IMS710C.INSTALIB
         //SYSUT3    DD UNIT=SYSALLDA,SPACE=(CYL,(2,2))
         //SYSUT4    DD UNIT=SYSALLDA,SPACE=(CYL,(2,2))
         //SYSIN     DD *
           COPY INDD=((IN,R)),OUTDD=OUT
                 SELECT MEMBER=DFSIVJ03
         /*

         3. DFSIVJ03: This job is required. The JCL for this job is placed in
            IMS710.INSTALIB by the previous job DFSIVJ02. This job allocates the
            remaining data sets that are required to execute the INSTALL/IVP dialog and
            loads them from the distribution tape. You will need to obtain the VOLSER
            and file sequence information from the DBS SYSTEMS MEMO TO USERS
            EXTENSION that was off-loaded in Step 2. “Execute the DOCLOAD job.” on
            page 22.



3.6 Invoking the INSTALL/IVP dialog
         The INSTALL/IVP dialog is invoked through a TSO CLIST. The CLIST is passed
         parameters that are used to establish the environment. The process can be
         simplified if the same high level qualifier is used for all data sets.




                                                    Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   23
                 The following TSO command is used to execute the dialog list. Minimum
                 parameters required are the data set containing the CLIST, the CLIST name, and
                 the high-level qualifier for the data sets being used:

                 ex ‘ims.sdfsclst(dfsixc01)’ ‘hlq(xxx)’

                 Additional overrides allow you to have different high level qualifiers and turn on
                 tracing. In addition there are overrides that allow you to concatenate your
                 customized libraries in front of the libraries supplied by IBM. The following is an
                 example of commonly used overrides:

                 ex ‘ims.sdfsclst(dfsixc01)’ ‘hlqiv(aaa) hlqdl(bbb) hlqsy(ccc) debug’

                 The parameters in the previous commands have the following meanings:
                 hlq(xxx)                  Can be specified if all data sets use the same high level
                                           qualifier
                 hlqiv(aaa)                High-level qualifier for IVP data sets
                 hlqdl(bbb)                High-level qualifier for IMS distribution data sets
                 hlqsy(ccc)                High-level qualifier for IMS system data sets
                 debug                     Will cause the display of each instruction to be presented
                                           at the terminal.

                 Refer to IMS Version 7 Installation Volume 1: Installation and Verification,
                 GC26-9429, for more information.


3.7 INSTALL/IVP option panels
                 The first time the INSTALL/IVP dialog is executed, two panels are received.
                 These are the IMS panel and the IBM copyright panel. Verify that the IMS release
                 panel displays the IMS release that you are installing. If the IMS release is
                 different, you are not executing with the correct INSTALL/IVP data sets.

                 Initial Install Environment Options panel
                 The Initial Install Environment Options panel is displayed every time you enter
                 the INSTALL/IVP dialog. This panel allows you to select the environment type
                 that is being installed. The option selected in this panel determines the names for
                 most of the members that will be placed into the IMS710.INSTALIB data set.

                 Sub-Option Selection panel
                 The Sub-Option selection panel allows you to define the IMS features that are
                 being installed as well as what SMP/E zones should be re-used, if any. Options
                 that are selected in this panel affects the user variables, JCL, and tasks created.


24   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
 Note: If you later change any of the options on this panel, you must redo the
 entire INSTALL/IVP process, including the Table Merge, Variable Gathering,
 File Tailoring, and Execution steps.


Distribution Media Selection panel
The Distribution Media Selection panel allows you to select the IMS distribution
media ordered. Choices available are CBPDO, ServerPac, and ISD.

Table Merge Request panel
The Table Merge Request panel is used to determine if your tables data set,
IMS.INSTATBL, should be updated from the master tables. This process must be
executed the first time in the INSTALL/IVP dialog and if the distribution media
type is changed.

The table merge process does not change any customized variables, therefore it
can be executed multiple times. This process may also be required if specified in
IMS maintenance HOLDDATA. Once the table merge process has been
completed, the existing tables can be used.

VG Table Merge In Progress panel
Whenever the table merge process is invoked, the VG Table Merge In Progress
panel is displayed. This panel is displayed to inform you that the table merge
process is in progress. There are three sections on this panel each with a
percent completed counter. As members are processed, the counter is increased
to show that processing is being performed. Your keyboard will be locked during
the process. Once complete, the keyboard will be released and the next panel
displayed.

Table Merge Completed panel
Once the table merge completes, the Table Merge has Completed panel is
displayed. This panel notifies you that the Phase Complete flags have been
turned off. A explanation is also given concerning the Phase Complete flags.

Global Update in Progress panel
The Global Update in Progress panel is used to display members that are being
updated by global options. This process is setting the global variables that will be
used in subsequent panels.




                                             Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   25
3.8 INSTALL/IVP phase selection
                 The phase selection portion of the INSTALL/IVP dialog consists of three main
                 phases, variable gathering, file tailoring and, job execution.

                 Phase Selection panel
                 The INSTALL/IVP Phase Selection panel (Figure 3-1) lists the three sections of
                 the phase selection process, variable gathering (VG), file tailoring (FT), and
                 execution (EX). Upon entering the Phase Selection panel, a positioning option
                 will be selected based what in the phase was last completed. This is
                 accomplished with the use of option flags that are set based on how you exited a
                 phase. When a phase is exited, you are notified to either use the enter key to
                 signify completion of the phase or the end key to flag your current position for the
                 next iteration of the dialog.

                 The first time this dialog panel is entered, option VG1 (number 1) is selected. The
                 options must be performed in the order presented, therefore you cannot go on to
                 a subsequent phase until the previous phase has been completed.

                 Here are the meanings of the phase positioning options:
                    VG1, FT1, EX1 - positions you to the first item of the corresponding phase.
                    VG2, FT2, EX2 - positions you to the last known item within a phase.
                    FT3, EX3 - positions you to the first item of a step in the corresponding phase.




                 Figure 3-1 INSTALL/IVP Phase Selection panel




26   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
3.9 INSTALL/IVP variable gathering phase
           The Variable Gathering panel displays variables that are associated with the
           features being installed. There are multiple pages of variables so the up (pf7) and
           down (pf8) keys are used to scroll through the pages. The find command does
           not work.


3.9.1 Obtaining variable values from previous execution
           File tailoring parameters are required for INSTALL/IVP process. If you have used
           the INSTALL/IVP process in the past, you can execute that version of the
           INSTALL/IVP dialog and go into the variable gathering phase to obtain the
           variables last used. The variables can be obtained by either of two methods.

           One method is to simply scroll through the variables, performing a screen print
           for each page. There may be over 200 variables, so this would take
           approximately 27 screen prints.

           A second method is to place a ‘D’ for Doc on the first variable in the Variable
           Gathering list. This brings up a Variables Documentation panel. Select the mode
           type with a ‘1’ or ‘2’ and variables with a ‘/’ then press Enter. This will write the
           documentation requested to your ISPF LIST file. Figure 3-2 shows that LST
           mode was selected along with general and data set allocation variables.




           Figure 3-2 Variable Documentation panel




                                                        Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   27
                 You access the ISPF LIST file by exiting from ISPF, saving your list data set, and
                 by allocating a new list data set your next ISPF session. This is done by selecting
                 option ‘4’ in the List Data Set Disposition when you exit from ISPF. Figure 3-3
                 shows how this can be done.




                 Figure 3-3 Disposition of Log and List Data Sets panel


3.9.2 Updating variables
                 To update a variable, type the desired variable and press Enter. Depending on
                 the variable being changed, associated variables will also be updated at the
                 same time. You will be presented a panel that shows the variables being
                 updated, then the variable update panel will be returned.
                    The action field can be also be used to perform actions against the variables.
                    The available actions are:
                     – Chg or C — Can be used to change a variable. Updating the variable and
                       pressing Enter also works.
                     – Doc or D — Takes you to the Variable Documentation panels. Allows
                       variables, JOBs, and TASKs to be formatted and printed via the ISPF LIST
                       data set.
                     – eNt or N — Displays a description of the variable. This action is very
                       useful. When viewing a variable description, ‘NXT’ and ‘PRV’ actions can
                       be used to scroll through prior or subsequent variables descriptions.
                     – Rfr or R — Changes a variable back to the IMS default setting.


28   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           After an action takes place, the action field will be updated to reflect the outcome
           of that action. The possible outcomes for the actions are:
              ‘!’ — The variable has been added to the table or the ‘Rfr’ option has been
              done against a variable.
              ‘*’ — The variable has been changed, either by the copy startup process or by
              the user.
              ‘@’ — The variable has been changed, either by the copy startup process, a
              result of propagation from a change to a global variable, or by the user.
              ‘ERR’ — The variable was updated but the value entered was invalid. When
              variables affecting SMP/E data sets are changed an additional WARNING
              panel is displayed prior to allowing the change to be made.

           When all the variables are updated, use the PF3 key to precede to the next
           phase.


3.9.3 Variables requiring special attention
           There are several variables that should be reviewed during the variable gathering
           phase.

           IXUSMACT
           Variable IXUSMACT specifies the fully qualified data set name (DSNAME) of the
           High Level Assembler Toolkit Feature macro library. This data set is used in the
           SYSLIB DD concatenation of the SMP/E procedure for IMS. It is concatenated
           following SYS1.MACLIB and SYS1.MODGEN (or SYS1.AMACLIB and
           SYS1.AMODGEN)

           The default variable is SYS1.PP.MACLIB. This variable should be updated to use
           your system data set where MACLIB member ASMMSP resides. The default
           OS/390 data set is ASM.SASMMAC2 or SYS1.SASMMAC2.

           IXUUPROC
           Variable IXUUPROC specifies the user PROCLIB that is used whenever an IMS
           cataloged procedure is needed by an INSTALL/IVP job. These IMS procedures
           will be placed into data set IMS710.PROCLIB as part of IMS system definition
           stage 2 processing.

           For JES2, specify the DDNAME of the user PROCLIB; and for JES3, specify the
           last 2 characters of the DDNAME of the user PROCLIB definition in your JES3
           procedure.




                                                        Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   29
                 For JES2, the default value for variable IXUUPROC is PROC99. This will create
                 JCL statement /*JOBPARM PROCLIB=PROC99 that is then included in each job.
                 For JES3, the INSTALL/IVP generates //*MAIN PROC=nn in each job according
                 the suffix specified here.

                  Note: Variable IXUUPROC can be changed, but the INSTALL/IVP dialog does
                  not allow the variable to be left BLANK. Therefore, the JCL statement
                  /*JOBPARM PROCLIB= or //*MAIN PROC= IS generated for all the jobs created.

                 The discussion in the following paragraphs shows the different options for using
                 the new IMS procedures in JES2. Similar considerations are also valid for JES3
                 with the exception of differences in syntax between JES2 and JES3.

                 The /*JOBPARM PROCLIB= statement is included in the jobs. The PROCLIB
                 members that are pointed to by this statement may be valid, invalid, or not found.
                 The results would depend on what is set up in your JES2 systems PROCLIB
                 concatenation, how you handle the IMS procedures that will be created during
                 IMS system definition stage 2 processing, and whether you include any
                 additional JCL statements to handle the PROCLIB concatenation differently.

                 To use the PROCLIB members that will be created during the IMS system
                 definition stage 2 processing, different methods could be used.

                  Important: Depending on which option is chosen, the steps in that option may
                  need to be performed: during the variable gathering phase, prior to
                  executing jobs in the execution phase, or after the IMS system definition
                  stage 2 process is executed during the Execution phase.

                 Several options are available:
                    First option: Change variables in the variable gathering phase. These two
                    steps are done one time only and do not affect any data sets in the JES2
                    concatenation, so this is one of the easier methods:
                    a. Change the default variable IXUUPROC from PROC99 to PROCxx, where
                       PROCxx does not exist. This would cause the job to receive the following
                       messages, but will still execute:
                            IEC130I PROCJF   DD STATEMENT MISSING
                            IEF196I IEC130I PROCxx DD STATEMENT MISSING
                            $HASP307 IV3E311J UNABLE TO OPEN PROCxx
                    b. Also, add a JCLLIB ORDER statement to your JCL that points to the
                       HLQ.PROCLIB data set. This is done with the variables IXUJESC1
                       through IXUJESC5 and is described in“IXUJESC1 through IXUJESC5” on
                       page 31.



30   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
   Second option: Copy the HLQ.PROCLIB members into the PROC99 data
   set currently in your JES2 PROCLIB concatenation. This must be done after
   the IMS system definition stage 2 processing is complete and prior to
   executing any jobs requiring these IMS procedures. This option depends on
   your installations use of PROC99 in the JES2 concatenation.
   Third option: Copy HLQ.PROCLIB members into any data set in JES2
   concatenation.
   a. Copy the HLQ.PROCLIB members into any PROCLIB data set currently in
      the JES2 PROCLIB concatenation. The data set chosen must be high
      enough in the concatenation to guarantee that the new PROC members
      are accessed before older duplicate members if they exist. This must be
      done after the IMS system definition stage 2 processing is complete and
      prior to executing any jobs requiring these IMS procedures.
   b. Also, change the default variable IXUUPROC from PROC99 to proxy,
      where proxy does not exist OR remove the /*JOBPARM PROCLIB=
      statement from EVERY job prior to execution.
   Fourth option: Change the JES2 PROCLIB concatenation. If PROC99 is in
   the JES2 PROCLIB concatenation, change the data set name to point to the
   HLQ.PROCLIB data set. If PROC99 is not in the JES2 PROCLIB
   concatenation, add it and the associated HLQ.PROCLIB data set to the JES2
   PROCLIB concatenation. This requires a JES2 restart to take affect. Task
   IV_D201T is provided as an example for this.

IXUJESC1 through IXUJESC5
Variables IXUJESC1 through IXUJESC5 can be used to add additional JCL
statements to every job. Their default value is BLANK. You may wish to add JCL
statements based on your systems operation environment. These may include:
   // JCLLIB ORDER=(IMS710C.PROCLIB)
   Used to include a data set that is not in the system concatenation. This is
   valid statement for both JES2 and JES3 environment.
   /*JOBPARM SYSAFF=SC53
   Used to force the job to execute on a particular system in JES2 environment.
   You can have multiple /*JOBPARM statements in JES2 JCL.
   //*MAIN CLASS=IMSIVP
   Used to define the jobclass, which can be 1 to 8 characters in JES3
   environment. You can have multiple //*MAIN statements in JES3 JCL.




                                            Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   31
                 IXUVNDU1, IXULTNU1, IXUVNDU2, IXULTNU2
                 The values of the variables IXUVNDU1, IXULTNU1, IXUVNDU2, IXULTNU2 are
                 used to add definitions for two 3270 LOCAL - VTAM terminals to the system
                 definition stage 1 source deck. Variables IXUVNDU1/2 are used for TERMINAL
                 macros for VTAM nodes, and variables IXULTNU1/2 are used for NAME macros
                 for the LTERMS. Later in the execution phase, the terminal related MSDB data
                 base for the Fast Path sample application is built by using these LTERM values
                 as keys. You should specify some existing LTERMs here and leave them in your
                 stage 1 source deck when running the system definition.


3.9.4 VG Complete Verification panel
                 When you end the variable gathering phase the first time, the VG Complete
                 Verification panel is presented. This panel notifies you that the customizing of the
                 dialog variables is complete. The variable completion flag will be set to complete
                 if you press Enter at this time. The phase complete flags can be re-set by
                 re-running the Table Merge process.



3.10 INSTALL/IVP file tailoring phase
                 Upon completion of the variable gathering phase, you are again presented the
                 INSTALL/IVP Phase Selection panel that was shown in Figure 3-1 on page 26.
                 This time however, option FT1 (number 3) is selected. Pressing Enter will then
                 present the File Tailor All request panel.

                 The file tailoring function builds a set of customized members that will be used in
                 the execution phase. These members are placed into the IMS710.INSTALIB data
                 set. Some of the members explains tasks to perform while others are jobs that
                 must be executed.


3.10.1 File Tailor All Request panel
                 The File Tailor All Request panel presents the options to either perform the ALL
                 action before entering the file tailoring panels or proceed directly to the file
                 tailoring panels.

                  Note: The ALL action must be done the first time you enter the File Tailoring
                  panels, or your variables may not be used in the Execution Phase.




32   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
            When YES (number 1) is chosen, the ALL action is performed. This option will
            file tailor all members prior to presenting the file tailoring panels. When NO
            (number 2) is chosen, you will go directly to the file tailoring panels where a
            specific member could be chosen for file tailoring. This option would normally be
            used on subsequent iterations of the dialog. If variables are changed in the
            variable gathering panels then members using those variables would need to be
            file tailored again to pick up those changes.


3.10.2 File tailoring in progress
            When YES is selected in the File Tailoring request panel, members that will
            eventually be executed are updated with the variables supplied in the variable
            gathering phase. During this process, the keyboard is locked and the File
            Tailoring in Progress panel is displayed. This panel shows the member being
            updated and the percent of the members completed.


3.10.3 INSTALL/IVP FT ALL Completed panel
            The INSTALL/IVP FT ALL Completed panel indicates that file tailoring has
            completed. The panel also states that when you leave this panel, the File
            Tailoring LST MODE panel is displayed.


3.10.4 File Tailoring LST Mode panel
            The File Tailoring LST Mode panel shows the entries that file tailoring affects.
            Members can be reviewed to show the affects of file tailor customizing. File
            tailoring MUST be done for all members prior to entering the execution phase.
            File tailoring can be done for one, multiple, or all members depending on which
            action is selected and where it is selected in the list.

            The following are possible actions:
               All — Performs file tailoring against all members from this point forward.
               brM or M — ISPF/PDF is used to browse the INSTALIB library member.
               When a task is selected rather than a job, you are brought to the eNt option
               for that member. The description for the member is presented.
               brS or S — ISPF/PDF is used to browse the members of SDFSSLIB and
               SDFSISRC that will be used to create the INSTALIB member.
               Doc or D — Takes you to the Variable Documentation panels. Allows
               variables, JOBs, and TASKs to be formatted and printed via the ISPF LIST
               data set.
               Edm or E — ISPF/PDF is used to edit an INSTALIB member. Do not alter
               members in this phase, wait until the execution phase.



                                                        Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   33
                    eNt or N — Displays a description of the member. When viewing a member
                    description, ‘NXT’ and ‘PRV’ actions can be used to scroll through prior or
                    subsequent members descriptions.
                    Ftl or F — Performs file tailoring against a specific member.

                 After an action is done against a member, the action field is updated to reflect the
                 outcome of that action. The possible outcomes for the actions are:
                    ‘!’ — The member has been added to the table by the table merge request, or
                    its value has been refreshed using ‘Rfr’ or ‘Chg’ action during the variable
                    gathering.
                    ‘*’ — The member has been processed by either the All or ‘Ftl’ actions.

                 When all the members are updated, use the end key to precede to the next panel.


3.10.5 FT Complete Verification panel
                 The FT Complete Verification panel signifies that you have ended the file tailoring
                 phase of the INSTALL/IVP dialog. Press Enter, if you have finished the file
                 tailoring phase. Press the End key if you have not completed yet. The phase
                 complete flags can be re-set by re-running the Table Merge process.



3.11 INSTALL/IVP execution phase
                 Upon completion of the file tailoring phase, you are once again presented the
                 INSTALL/IVP Phase Selection panel shown in Figure 3-1 on page 26. This time
                 however, option EX1 (number 6) is selected. Pressing Enter will then present the
                 Execution LST Mode panel.

                 The execution phase is the portion of the INSTALL/IVP process where you
                 perform specific defined tasks and execute customized jobs to install and verify
                 your IMS system.


3.11.1 Execution LST mode panel
                 The Execution LST Mode panel contains all the jobs and tasks necessary to
                 install, set up the interfaces, and test the IMS system. The members must be
                 processed in the order they are presented. Figure 3-4 shows the Execution LST
                 Mode panel.

                  Note: In IMS Version 8, the installation process is withdrawn from the dialog.




34   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
          Figure 3-4 INSTALL/IVP Execution LST Mode


3.11.2 Job task member names
          The INSTALL/IVP dialog generates members containing jobs, tasks, or
          supporting materials with specific names. Names are generated based on
          options selected, step being performed, and type of member. The naming
          conventions with a complete description can be found in Appendix B,
          “INSTALL/IVP JOBs and TASKs”, in IMS Version 7 Installation Volume 1:
          Installation and Verification, GC26-9429. Here is a breakdown of the character
          sequence used in the naming convention:
             The first two characters are IV for IVP.
             The third character varies depending on environment option selected.
             The forth through seventh characters vary, depending on the execution step
             and the process being performed.
             The eight character denotes the type of member: job (J), task (T), or
             supporting materials (N).




                                                        Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   35
3.11.3 Actions against execution list
                 Multiple actions can and should be performed against each member. These are
                 the actions that can be executed against the list members:
                    Brm or B — ISPF/PDF is used to browse the execution list member. When a
                    task is selected rather than a job, you are brought to the eNt option for that
                    member. The description for that member is then presented.
                    Doc or D — Takes you to the JOB/Task Documentation panels. Prints
                    requested documentation to the ISPF List data set for viewing.
                    Edm or E — ISPF/PDF is used to edit the execution list member. The job
                    members can be submitted from this option.
                    eNt or N — Displays a description of job including the expected condition
                    codes. This action should be done for each member prior to editing and
                    submitting the job.

                  Note: All jobs are NOT expected to end with a ZERO completion code. Review
                  the job description, the acceptable condition codes, and any special actions
                  via the eNt action, prior to submitting the job.

                    eXe or X — Performs the TSO submit command.
                    spR or R — Results in a special processing routine being executed for the
                    selected item. The eNt action will specify if this action is available for a
                    particular member. If the ‘spR’ action is requested for an item that does not
                    support a special processing routine, a warning message will be displayed.

                 After an action is performed against a member, the action field is updated to
                 reflect the outcome of that action. The possible outcomes for the actions are:
                    ‘!’ — The member has been added to the table by the table merge request, or
                    its value has been refreshed using ‘Rfr’ or ‘Chg’ action during the variable
                    gathering.
                    ‘*’ — The member has been processed by either the submit action ‘eXe’ or by
                    the ‘Edm’ action.


3.11.4 Job and task execution
                 There are many jobs and tasks that you must perform to install and verify the IMS
                 system with the number varying depending on the options selected. You will be
                 positioned in the execution list at the first task or job requiring reviewing or
                 execution. If you exit the dialog prior to completing all the jobs or tasks, you will
                 be re-positioned to the last completed member upon re-entering the dialog.




36   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           When entering a member, first use the ‘eNt’ action to review instructions. The
           member will list instructions on the tasks to perform or jobs to execute.

           After you review the member instructions, use the ‘Edm’ or ‘eXe’ actions. It is
           recommended that you use the ‘Edm’ action so that the JCL can be reviewed
           prior to submitting the job.

           Upon completion of the job, the member will be marked with an ‘*’, denoting that
           the job has been executed or tasks performed.


3.11.5 Execution steps
           The execution steps for the INSTALL/IVP process begins with step ‘A’ and
           proceeds through step ‘Z’ for the CBPDO feature. The ServerPac feature begins
           execution in step ‘C’ and continues through step ‘Z’. In IMS Version 8 IVP, the
           execution also begins with step ‘C’, because all the SMP/E jobs have been
           removed from the dialog.

           All iterations of the INSTALL/IVP process DO NOT contain the same steps. Your
           iteration of the INSTALL/IVP process will create the specific steps required based
           on the options you selected. All steps should be completed to thoroughly test the
           IMS system.

           A complete description of each step, including all the members associated with
           each step, is documented in Appendix B, “INSTALL/IVP JOBs and TASKs”, in
           IMS Version 7 Installation Volume 1: Installation and Verification, GC26-9429.
           A brief description for each step follows.

           Member steps
              Ax — INSTALL/IVP preparation
              Bx — Distribution libraries (DLIB) build
              Cx — System definition (SYSDEF)
              Dx — Interface IMS to OS/390 and VTAM
              Ex — Prepare IVP applications and systems
              Fx — IVP execution — DBB system (batch)
              Gx — IVP execution — DBC system (DBCTL)
              Hx — IVP execution — DBT system (DB/DC)
              Ix — IVP execution — XRF system
              Jx — IVP execution — DCC system (DCCTL)
              Lx — IMS sample application
              Mx — Fast Path sample application
              Nx — Partition DB sample application, new in IMS Version 7
              Ox — TSO Single Point of Control (SPOC), new in IMS Version 8
              Zx — Index of additional PDS members



                                                       Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   37
3.11.6 Executing Ax steps: INSTALL/IVP preparations
                 The items within the ‘Ax’ series steps are used to perform initialization for the
                 INSTALL/IVP dialog. Upon entering the Execution list the first time, you may be
                 positioned in the ‘Bx’ steps. This is because there are not any executable jobs in
                 the ‘Ax’ series. However, you can use the ‘eNt’ action to obtain information on
                 those entries.

                 Member IV_A303N contains statements used to load IVP MSDBs. It uses the
                 values entered for the variables IXULTNU1 and IXULTNU2 in the variable
                 gathering phase as key values when building terminal related MSDB for Fast
                 Path sample application. If you didn’t include these LTERMs in your system
                 definition, you need to change these key values to point to some existing
                 LTERMs in your system.


3.11.7 Executing Bx steps: Building DLIBs
                 The items within the ‘Bx’ series of steps comprise the INSTALL portion of the
                 INSTALL/IVP process. The ‘Bx’ series of steps perform the jobs and tasks
                 necessary to establish the SMP/E environment used by IMS and to create the
                 IMS product distribution libraries.

                 Steps B1xx
                 Jobs and tasks in steps B1xx define the SMP/E data sets, IMS distribution data
                 sets, and IMS SYSLIB data sets.

                  Note: The SMP/E data set SMPLTS is allocated as a PDSE. If installing IMS
                  Java Application Support (FMID JMK7708), then SMPLTS must be a PDSE.
                  If not installing IMS Java Application Support, then SMPLTS can be a standard
                  PDS.


                 Steps B2xx
                 Jobs and tasks in steps B2xx perform the SMP/E steps required to establish the
                 environment. The steps include these:
                    Initialize the SMP/E zones
                    Receive the IMS SYSMODS (FUNCTION, PTFs, HOLDDATA) from the
                    distribution tapes.
                    Print the IMS Program Directory.
                    Print SMP/E HOLDDATA for SYSMODS which were processed with the
                    SMP/E RECEIVE option.




38   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
   Review SMP/E HOLDDATA. The PTFs just RECEIVEd may require special
   handling or additional service before you can properly install them. Here are
   some possible reasons for this:
   –   PTFs in error (PE PTFs)
   –   SYSGEN required
   –   UCLIN required
   –   Significant documentation changes
   –   Dependencies on PTFs for other products
   Determine appropriate action regarding SMP/E HOLDDATA. After reviewing
   the SMP/E HOLDDATA you must determine what actions, if any, are required
   for exception SYSMOD processing. The following documentation and
   resources can be used in this endeavor:
   –   Documentation accompanying service tapes
   –   PTF HOLDDATA, and cover letters
   –   Preventive Service Planning
   –   SMP/E manuals
   –   Chapter 5, “Health check after the SMP/E installation” on page 67
   –   IBM level II support
   Perform appropriate actions regarding SMP/E HOLDDATA. Additional SMP/E
   actions might be necessary prior to proceeding with the installation process.
   These should be based on your research and might include the following:
   –   RECEIVE additional service
   –   RECEIVE additional HOLDDATA
   –   Add exclude lists to SMP/E SYSMOD processing steps
   –   Modify BYPASS options in SMP/E SYSMOD processing steps

Steps B3xx
Jobs IV_B3101J through IV_B3110J performs SMP/E processing with ACCEPT
BYPASS(APPLYCHECK). The following IMS functions may be processed
depending on the options you selected.
   System services
   – DBRC
   – Logging system services
   Data base management
   Transaction management
   Extended Terminal Option (ETO) feature

Job IV_B330J performs SMP/E ACCEPT BYPASS APPLYCHECK for
pre-generation service. Review this job carefully before submitting and pay
particular attention to the SOURCEID specification.



                                           Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   39
                 Job IV_B331J performs an SMP/E ZONEMERGE to copy the distribution zone to
                 the target zone.

                 Job IV_B340J updates the target zone with JCLIN information for the non-IMS
                 system generation elements such as the INSTALL/IVP and Dump Formatting
                 dialogs.

                 Job IV_B350J completes the installation of IMS non-system definition elements.
                 Review the PSP files to determine if special processing is necessary.

                  Note: Pay special attention to any PTFs that indicate IV_B350J needs to be
                  file tailored. The steps to perform this function are in the PSP file.

                 The following steps could be used to file tailor this job:
                    Exit out of the INSTALL/IVP.
                    Copy the IVP distribution libraries (DLIBs) to the IVP target libraries (TLIBs).
                    The first step in job IV_B350J can be used to do this.
                    Re-file tailor job IV_B350J. Enter the INSTALL/IVP dialog File Tailoring phase
                    and select the act ‘Ftl’ next to job IV_B350J. Next, exit out of File Tailor phase
                    and continue with the Execution phase.
                    Execute job IV_B350J starting in STEP 2.

                 The remaining IV_B35xJ jobs perform SMP/E processing for IRLM and Remote
                 Site Recovery (RSR) features, if you have selected them.

                 Member IV_B360T concerns tasks required for other products. Browse the
                 member for additional information.

                 Steps B5xx
                 The tasks in these steps are required to pick up service (maintenance) which
                 may affect the remaining JOBs and TASKs in the INSTALL/IVP process. This
                 may require you to rerun portions of the INSTALL/IVP dialog.

                 Browse and review member documentation for additional information.


3.11.8 Health check
                 After completing steps Bxxx and before proceeding to steps Cxxx, you may wish
                 to perform a health check against the SMP/E environment. This helps to identify
                 additional maintenance that you may wish to apply. Refer to Chapter 5, “Health
                 check after the SMP/E installation” on page 67.




40   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
3.11.9 Executing steps Cx through Zx
           The process of establishing the IMS SMP/E environment using either CBPDO or
           ServerPac features is very different. That is why this portion of the INSTALL/IVP
           process for CBPDO has been discussed in this section.

           The remaining steps of the INSTALL/IVP dialog process, steps Cx through Zx are
           identical between the CBPDO and ServerPac features. The discussion regarding
           these steps can be found in Chapter 6, “Using the IVP dialog” on page 81.



3.12 Installing IMS Java Application Support
           The IMS Java Application Support feature (FMID JMK7708) is not installed as
           part of the INSTALL/IVP dialog. The following is a brief description on how to
           install IMS Java Application Support.

            Attention: A complete description can be found in Chapter 7, “Installation
            Instructions for IMS Java”, in Program Directory for Information Management
            System Transaction and Database Servers, GI10-8334, that is shipped with
            your order. It is suggested that you refer to this document throughout this
            installation process.


3.12.1 SMP/E considerations
           IMS Java Application Support is installed using the SMP/E RECEIVE, APPLY,
           and ACCEPT commands.


3.12.2 Unload sample JCL
           Sample installation jobs are provided on the distribution tape to help with the
           installation process. To unload the sample JCL members, you will first need to
           create and execute unload JCL. One example can be found in Chapter 7,
           “Installation Instructions for IMS Java”, in Program Directory for Information
           Management System Transaction and Database Servers, GI10-8334, that is
           shipped with your order. Example 3-3 is another sample JCL that can be used.




                                                      Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   41
                 Example 3-3 Unload JCL for Java Application Support
                 //JAVAUNLD JOB (999,POK),'JAVAUNLD',CLASS=A,REGION=0K,
                 //          MSGCLASS=T,TIME=10,MSGLEVEL=(1,1),NOTIFY=&SYSUID
                 //STEP1   EXEC PGM=IEBCOPY,REGION=512K
                 //SYSPRINT DD SYSOUT=*
                 //IN       DD DISP=SHR,DSN=IBM.JMK7708.F7,UNIT=3490,LABEL=(42,SL),
                 //         VOL=SER=IC8698
                 //OUT      DD DSN=IMS710.INSTALL,DISP=(NEW,CATLG,DELETE),
                 //         VOL=SER=TOTSTA,UNIT=3390,
                 //         DCB=*.STEP1.IN,SPACE=(8800,(15,5,5))
                 //SYSUT3   DD UNIT=SYSALLDA,SPACE=(CYL,(1,1))
                 //SYSIN    DD *
                   COPY INDD=IN,OUTDD=OUT
                   SELECT MEMBER=(DFSJALLC,DFSJDDDF,DFSJRECV)
                   SELECT MEMBER=(DFSJAPPC,DFSJACPC,DFSJSMKD,DFSJMKDR)
                 /



3.12.3 Execute installation jobs
                 The following are the installation jobs to be executed.

                 DFSJALLC
                 The Job DFSJALLC allocates the SMP/E target and distribution data sets. Data
                 sets ADFSJLIB and SDFSJLIB are defined as PDSE.

                 DFSJDDDF
                 The job DFSJDDDF job creates DDDEF entries, a ALLZONES report for IMS
                 Java Application Support, and also sets the path for the DDDEF.

                 You may consider mounting a file system such as service_imsv7 to hold your file
                 definitions. This will keep them out of root. If you do this, edit the path statements
                 to include that level as follows:
                    PATH('/service_imsv7/usr/lpp/ims/imsjava71/IBM/')

                 DFSJSMKD
                 The DFSJSMKD job will execute the DFSJMKDR EXEC to create the necessary
                 directories used by IMS Java Application Support. Review documentation prior to
                 executing this job. Here are several major items are worth noting:
                    This job creates Hierarchical File System (HFS) directories, so it must
                    execute on the system where IMS Java Application Support is required.
                    The submitter of this job must have SUPERUSER access.
                    If you created a file system such as service_imsv7 to hold your file definitions,
                    edit JCL statement accordingly, such as DFSJMKDR /service_imsv7/.


42   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           DFSJRECV
           The DFSJRECV job performs the SMP/E RECEIVE for IMS Java Application
           Support.

           DFSJAPPC
           The DFSJAPPC job performs the SMP/E APPLY CHECK for IMS Java
           Application Support. This is done to help resolve any problems that may prevent
           the APPLY from executing.

           Once you have take appropriate actions indicated by the APPLY CHECK, remove
           the CHECK operand and execute the job again to perform the APPLY function.

           DFSJACPC
           The DFSJACPC job performs the SMP/E ACCEPT CHECK for IMS Java
           Application Support. After you have taken appropriate actions indicated by the
           ACCEPT CHECK, remove the CHECK operand and run the job again to perform
           the ACCEPT function.


3.12.4 Activating IMS Java Application Support
           The step-by-step procedures required to activate the functions of IMS Java
           Application Support are documented in IMS Version 7 IMS Java User’s Guide,
           SC27-0832. More information about setting up the Java support and about the
           new Java region types is available in the IBM Redbook, IMS Version 7 Java
           Update, SG24-6536.




                                                     Chapter 3. Installing IMS using CBPDO   43
44   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                       4


    Chapter 4.    Installing IMS using
                  ServerPac
                  This chapter contains information about installing IMS by using the ServerPac
                  installation offering. We describe this process from the point of receiving the
                  ServerPac order through the completion of establishing the SMP/E environment.
                  The INSTALL/IVP verification phase is then covered in Chapter 6, “Using the IVP
                  dialog” on page 81.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                    45
4.1 Installing IMS using ServerPac
                 ServerPac is an entitled software delivery package.Your ServerPac order
                 includes the CustomPac installation dialog, an Interactive System Productivity
                 Facility (ISPF) dialog that you use to install the order.

                 The CustomPac installation dialog lets you to organize all products you have
                 received in your installation, keeping them as orders and listing all items that
                 have been delivered to you in each shipment.

                 You can order most of the IBM OS/390 products to be delivered with ServerPac.
                 Even the OS/390 base operating system is delivered in this way. The number of
                 jobs and tasks you must execute during product installation depends on what you
                 have ordered and what you have already installed in your own installation.



4.2 Reviewing shipped documentation and materials
                 You should start IMS ServerPac installation by reviewing the documentation that
                 is shipped with your order:
                    ServerPac: Using the Installation Dialog, SA22-7815
                    ServerPac/IMS: Installing Your Order

                 ServerPac/IMS is distributed on tapes or cartridges having standard
                 machine-readable labels. Each tape is also externally labeled with the order
                 number and volume serial.
                    RIM tape: The RIM tape (Related Installation Material) contains a copy of the
                    CustomPac installation dialog and order-specific data. There is always one
                    RIM tape.
                    Service tape: In addition to a RIM tape, your order includes a service tape.
                    The files might span one or more physical tapes depending on the size of the
                    order. Also, the last volume might not be used.
                    System and distribution tapes: These tapes contain the software you
                    ordered.

                 You can find a detailed description of these tapes in the ServerPac/IMS: Installing
                 Your Order document, which you received with the ServerPac delivery package.




46   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
          Important: Before you install your order, be sure to review the contents of the
          ServerPac shipment that you received from IBM. Check the packing list to
          ensure that you have a complete set of installation tapes and documentation.
          Also, take note of your order number, which is printed on the cover of
          ServerPac: Installing Your Order. Later this order number is used as input to
          the installation dialog.

         With ServerPac you don’t create SMP/E zones, target, or distribution libraries.
         You download them from the tape you received. ServerPac considerably reduces
         the number of jobs to be executed, and performs the SMP/E processes for you.
         The high level qualifier of these data sets can be changed during the installation
         process to match your own installation standards.



4.3 Using the CustomPac installation dialog
         To install the ServerPac package on your system and complete the installation of
         the software included, use the CustomPac installation dialog, which is the same
         dialog used for all CustomPac offerings, including SystemPac (dump-by-data-set
         format), ProductPac, and RefreshPac.

         If this is the first time you are installing a ServerPac, you must first install the
         CustomPac panels. Chapter 2, “Installing and starting dialog”, in ServerPac
         Using the Installation Dialog, SA22-7815, included in your ServerPac shipment,
         describes the process.

         The CustomPac dialog can be made available to TSO/ISPF by using several
         different methods, and you may be able to start it by using an option from a
         locally customized ISPF panel or by using a TSO command defined in your
         environment.

         In our environment, we use the TSO command cppcispf imsserv.master
         for accessing the main CustomPac dialog. Figure 4-1 shows the main options
         you can execute on your order. Alternatively, depending on how the CustomPac
         dialog is made available to your TSO or ISPF session, use the method supported
         by your installation to access the dialog.

         The first task you must perform is to receive your products from the delivered
         tapes. This is done with option ‘R’. This process is described in detail in
         Chapter 3, “Receiving a New Order”, in the document, ServerPac: Using the
         Installation Dialog, SA22-7815.




                                                    Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac   47
                 Figure 4-1 CustomPac Installation — main panel

                 After receiving your product, go through the Install Orders panel option ‘I’.

                 The first time you enter this CustomPac dialog, you can only select the Configure
                 option, as shown in Figure 4-2, and the two display options, DI and DT. All the
                 others options appear with asterisks and cannot be processed until the previous
                 option has been performed.

                 The following options are required to fully install IMS:
                    Configure
                    Variables
                    Zones
                    Modify
                    Alias
                    SSA
                    Installation

                 The Save and Update options are not needed to install IMS, but they help you to
                 better handle all orders in your system.

                 The Display options provide information about the variables you may customize.




48   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           Figure 4-2 CustomPac Install Orders function


4.3.1 Configuring the functions
           Each order arrives with a set of preconfigured tables where installation variables
           are stored. You can select the configuration shipped to you or merge it with a
           previously saved configuration customized by you. See ‘Merging a configuration
           with a Previous Order in ServerPac: Using the Installation Dialog, SA22-7815.
           This considerably reduces the time required to set installation variables.


4.3.2 Variables function
           The Variables function sets all the variables for the jobs that are executed during
           the installation function. Review the variables provided and change them if
           required to match your installation standards. You can use the browse line
           command to determine what every variable is used for.


4.3.3 Zones function
           You must set your target and distribution zone names in the Zones function
           panel. Because ServerPac allows you to install more than one product, multiple
           zones can be delivered and displayed in this panel. The Nickname column is an
           internal variable used by ServerPac to differentiate among more than one pair of
           target and distribution zone variables.




                                                      Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac   49
4.3.4 Modify function
                 Data sets downloaded by ServerPac come with a default data set names and
                 attributes. The Modify function allows you to change these defaults to other
                 values according to the standards of your installation. To change high level
                 qualifiers (HLQ) of all data sets, use the CHANGE DSN *HLQ* command from
                 the Data Set Summary option (SUMD). Be aware that if you change the high
                 level qualifier of a data set, you might need to re-establish its catalog and SMS
                 relationships.


4.3.5 Alias function
                 The Alias function displays the high-level qualifier (HLQ) aliases and allows you
                 to associate them to a catalog. New high lever qualifier data sets must have their
                 own aliases and catalogs associated. Overtype the catalogs to match your
                 installation criteria.


4.3.6 SSA function
                 The SSA function creates new catalogs if required. New catalogs would be
                 required if you selected a HLQ variable that does not exist in your system. If you
                 are using an existing HLQ you do not need to perform this task. You may require
                 support from a storage administrator.

                  Important: Set to ‘N’ the allocate and define fields in order to avoid creating
                  already existing catalogs.


4.3.7 Installation function
                 The Installation function provides a set of jobs that creates a new IMS
                 environment. OS/390 jobs are also included and perform tasks that already may
                 have been done in your system. Therefore they may not be required. Review
                 each job to determine if it is necessary. Some of these jobs may not be needed if
                 you have already installed IMS in your system.

                  Note: You may require assistance from your storage, security, network and
                  automation administrators and OS/390 systems programmers to perform
                  some tasks required installing IMS.

                 Table 4-1 shows all jobs you can run to install IMS on your system. Most of the
                 jobs are required, and a few are optional depending on what is already installed
                 on your system.



50   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Table 4-1 ServerPac installation jobs
 Jobname           Description                                            Notes

                   SRC:DEFAULT JOBCARD

                   ===>INSTALLATION JOBS

                   DOC: Running Installation Jobs

                   DOC: Installation Setup Jobs

 OFFLINIT          JOB: Initialize required DASD                          Optional

 UNLODOC           JOB: Unload DOCLIB from tape to DASD                   Optional

 UNLDSCPP          JOB: Unload SCPPLENU from tape to DASD                 Required

 UNLDBOOK          JOB: Unload InstGuid from tape to DASD                 Optional

                   DOC: Define Catalogs and Restore

 RACFDRV           JOB: RACF profiles on driving system                   Optional

 DEFCAT            JOB: Define catalogs                                   Optional

 DEFSSA            JOB: Define system-specific aliases                    Optional

 ALLOCDS           JOB: Allocate and catalog data sets                    Required

 RESTORE           JOB: Restore data sets from tape                       Required

 ALTCAT            JOB: Rename data sets to final name

                   DOC: Restore IMS HFS File System

 RESTFSI           JOB: Restore IMS HFS File System                       Required

                   DOC: Define New SMP/E Environment

 LOADCSI           JOB: Load SMP/E CSIs from RIM tape                     Required

 UPDCSI            JOB: Update new SMP/E zones                            Required

 UPDDDD            JOB: Update new SMP/E DDDEFs                           Required

 RECHOLD           JOB: Receive service tape PTFs                         Required

                   DOC: Build post-apply links

 CALLJOB           JOB: Build post-apply links                            Required

 CALLLINK          JOB: Execute post-apply link                           Required

                   DOC: Install IFREQ maintenance




                                             Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac   51
                  Jobname            Description                                Notes

                                     DOC: Migration

                                     ===>IMS POST-INSTALLATION ACTIVITIES

                                     DOC: IMS Post-Install Jobs

                                     DOC: IMS 7.1.0

                  UCLIN              JOB: IMS-specific UCLIN                    Required

                  IMSCPY             JOB: Copy SDFSTLIB to INSTATBL             Required

                  IMSPARM            JOB: Creates SYS1.PARMLIB members          Required

                                     ===>INSTALLATION VERIFICATION -IMS         Refer to 4.3.9,
                                                                                “ServerPac
                                                                                installation
                                                                                verification” on
                                                                                page 58

                                     DOC: IMS Installation Verification

                                     DOC: IMS 7.1.0

                                     DOC: Internal Resource Lock Manager

                                     ===>COMPLETE THE INSTALLATION

                                     DOC: Installation cleanup tasks

                  UPDDEF             JOB: Zone/DDDEF cleanup                    Optional

                  UPDBCK             JOB: Clean up DDDEFs                       Optional

                  DELDSN             JOB: Delete data set alias names           Optional

                  DELCSI             JOB: Delete work system s CSI DS           Optional

                  DELTRANS           JOB: Delete transport data set             Optional

                  DELSSA             JOB: Delete SSAs in driving sys MCAT       Optional

                                     ===> BUILD XML PACKAGE DESCRIPTION

                                     DOC: Build XML package description

                  XMLGNR8            JOB: Build XML package description         Optional

                 Once you have received an order on your system and the ServerPac installation
                 task has been completed, you should go through the specific IMS installation
                 steps in INSTALL/IVP panels. You will execute the INSTALL/IVP beginning with
                 the ‘Cx’ series jobs and tasks.


52   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           Access the INSTALL/IVP panels as described in 3.6, “Invoking the INSTALL/IVP
           dialog” on page 23. Serverpac Installation has downloaded and installed its own
           set of INSTALL/IVP data set. You must use these INSTALL/IVP panels.

           When IMS installation is complete, you need to review ServerPac SMP/E reports
           as described in Appendix C, “Using the Package reports” at ServerPac/IMS:
           Installing Your Order. Look for ACTION report to know which actions you must
           review to ensure that maintenance is applied properly.

           Pay particular attention to the UNRESOLVED SYSTEM HOLD report to verify if
           there are any unresolved PEs and how your system may be affected by them.
           See the comments on each report in 4.5, “ServerPac SMP/E reports” on
           page 62, then go through Chapter 5, “Health check after the SMP/E installation”
           on page 67 before bringing up your IMS system.


4.3.8 Executing the ServerPac installation jobs
           This section briefly describes the installation jobs.

            Note: Jobs described in this book are taken from the ServerPac OS120741
            ordered for installing IMS Version 7. Some differences can be found on
            different orders.


           OFFLINIT
           OFFLINIT job initializes volumes that you have specified in the Modify System
           Layout. Before running OFFLINIT you must vary offline those devices that are
           being initialized. Use MVS commands V adr,OFFLINE and V adr,ONLINE. If you
           have specified volumes that are already initialized and have enough free space
           for installing IMS, you can skip this step.

            Attention: Running OFFLINIT deletes any existing data on the volumes. You
            may require support from a storage administrator.


           UNLODOC
           UNLODOC downloads file number 6 from the RIM tape to your site. For
           ServerPac order OS120741, this data set name was SYS1.OS120741.DOCLIB.

           Only the members LOADRIM and SUMTERM are described here. You can
           ignore the other members unless IBM support requires you to use them.
           LOADRIM          Member LOADRIM is described in ServerPac: Using the
                            Installation Dialog, SA22-7815. It is used to install CustomPac
                            dialog. If you need to install this dialog, you can use this member
                            to download all data sets needed. For instance, if you plan to


                                                       Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac   53
                                    install additional CustomPac dialogs in other systems you can
                                    use this job. You can skip this step if you can use the dialog that
                                    is already installed for some previous order.
                 SUMTERM            Member SUMTERM contains the SMP/E reports from your
                                    order. It must be reviewed carefully. Refer to 4.5, “ServerPac
                                    SMP/E reports” on page 62.

                 UNLDSCPP
                 Job UNLDSCPP downloads the IMSSERV.OS120471.SCPPLENU from the RIM
                 tape. It contains following members:
                    LIST1403, soft copy of ServerPac/IMS: Installing Your Order in LIST 1403
                    format.
                    ORDERREF, soft copy of ServerPac/IMS: Installing Your Order in
                    BookManager format.
                    PACKRPT, ServerPac SMP/E reports. See 4.5, “ServerPac SMP/E reports”
                    on page 62.

                 UNLDBOOK
                 Job UNLDBOOK downloads another soft copy of ServerPac/IMS: Installing Your
                 Order in BookManager format on IMSSERV.OS120741.INSTGUID.BOOK.

                 RACFDRV
                 Job RACFDRV defines RACF profiles needed later for the other jobs in the
                 installation job stream. It also defines some profiles for the HLQ in the order. You
                 must review carefully the profiles defined by RACFDRV. Security administrator’s
                 support is required.

                 DEFCAT
                 Job DEFCAT defines an ICF user catalog. In most cases this has already been
                 done. It requires storage administrator’s support.

                 DEFSSA
                 Job DEFSSA defines specific aliases (SSAs) for any catalog needed to install
                 your order. It may require a storage administrator’s support.

                 ALLOCDS
                 Job ALLOCDS allocates all data sets required to install IMS. Most of them need
                 special considerations about storage properties. For additional information,
                 please refer to:
                    IMS Version 7 Release Planning Guide, GC26-9437
                    IMS Version 7 Installation Volume 1: Installation and Verification, GC26-9429


54   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
If your data sets are allocated on SMS-managed target system volumes, you
should review the topic about installing an order on SMS-managed volumes in
ServerPac: Using the Installation Dialog, SA22-7815. This may require a storage
administrator’s support.

RESTORE
After allocating your data sets, RESTORE job copies the contents to the data
sets from your order tapes.

ALTCAT
You can change the default data set attributes in your order to meet your needs,
as described in 4.3.4, “Modify function” on page 50. The most common change is
the High-Level Qualifier for the data set names. If you have renamed the data
sets, job ALTCAT performs the renaming. It also defines some RACF profiles for
new HLQ.

RESTFSI
Job RESTFSI sets up the elements that reside in the Hierarchical File System
(HFS) under the OS/390 UNIX System Services. For order OS120741 HFS file
OMVS.IMS710D.HFS.IMSJAVA is allocated, mounted, and copied from tapes.

LOADCSI
Job LOADCSI downloads SMP/E libraries to the data sets that have been
allocated previously.

UPDCSI
Job UPDCSI updates your SMP/E zones with the values you entered in the
define zone configuration. See 4.3.3, “Zones function” on page 49. If you
renamed the data sets in your order, they are also updated in the SMP/E zones.

For instance, IMS RESLIB DDDEF, SDFSRESL is assigned to
IMS710.SDFSRESL.

UPDDDD
Job UPDDDD completes the SMP/E zone updates by adding the DDDEFs for the
IMS SMP/E data sets.

For instance, SMPLOG DDDEF is assigned to IMS710.SMPLOG. Work files
SYSUT1, SYSUT2, SYSUT3 and SYSUT4 are also defined by UPDDDD.




                                         Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac   55
                 RECHOLD
                 Job RECHOLD performs the following two steps:
                 1. It receives HOLDDATA from the first file of your service tape. See 4.5,
                    “ServerPac SMP/E reports” on page 62
                 2. It receives PTFs not selected to be installed in your order. See 4.5.11,
                    “AHEAD report” on page 65 for more details. They are delivered in the second
                    file of your service tape. RECHOLD assigns a SOURCEID related to your
                    order number to the PTFs; for order OS120741, the SOURCEID is OS0741T.

                 CALLJOB
                 Jobs CALLJOB and CALLLINK identify and relink load modules from your target
                 system, which have external references to products and services not included in
                 this ServerPac/IMS order. Some LMODs contain a CALLLIB entry because they
                 use the automatic library call option to implicitly include modules from a specified
                 library.

                 Job CALLJOB executes the SMP/E REPORT CALLLIBS command for the target
                 zone. Its output is a list of LMODs and libraries that must be included in the
                 SYSLIB DD to relink-edit those LMODs. CALLLJOB also provides a job for each
                 LMOD to be relink-edited. See “CALLLINK” on page 57.

                 For instance, ServerPac order OS120741 LMOD DFSCLIB has four CALLLIBS
                 entries. See Example 4-1.

                 Example 4-1 LMOD DFSCLIB CALLLIB entries
                 CSI QUERY - LMOD ENTRY               Row 1 to 3 of 5
                  ===>                                                              SCROLL ===> CSR

                   To return to the previous panel, enter END .

                   Primary Command: FIND
                   NOTE: ENTER L ON COMMAND LINE TO DISPLAY LINK-EDIT DATA

                   Entry Type:     LMOD                                 Zone Name: IMSTZ7D
                   Entry Name:     DFSCLIB                              Zone Type: TARGET

                 RETURN CODE: 4                           LASTUPD: UQ61539   TYPE=UPD
                 Link-edit Parameters:
                 RENT,AMODE=31,RMODE=ANY,CASE(MIXED),DYNAM(DLL),CALL
                 -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- -------- --------
                  SYSLIB   SDFSJLIB
                 CALLLIBS SCEELKED SCEECPP CSSLIB    SDFSRESL
                 SIDEDECK SDFSJSID
                 UTIN     DFSCLBSD IN LIB   SDFSJSID
                          DFSHPJSD IN LIB   SDFSJSID



56   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
DFSCLIB must be relink-edited adding SCEELKED, SCEECPP, CSSLIB and
SDFSRESL to its SYSLIB DD.

CALLLINK
CALLLINK may consist of multiple jobs that are built by executing the CALLJOB
job. Each CALLLINK job relink-edits LMODS with associated CALLLIB entries.

See Example 4-2 to look at the DFSCLIB link job. You must carefully review all
output from these jobs. If a module is not link-edited successfully, you may
encounter S0C1 abends when these modules invoke certain functions.

Example 4-2 DFSCLIB link job
//**********************************************************************
//*
//* LMODS LINKED IN THIS STEP:
//*
//*    DFSCLIB
//*
//**********************************************************************
//SYSLIB   DD DSN=CEE.SCEELKED,
//             DISP=(SHR)
//         DD DSN=CEE.SCEECPP,
//             DISP=(SHR)
//         DD DSN=SYS1.CSSLIB,
//             DISP=(SHR)
//         DD DSN=IMS710.SDFSRESL,
//             DISP=(SHR)
//SYSPRINT DD SYSOUT=*
//SYSLMOD DD DSN=IMS710D.SDFSJLIB,
//             DISP=(SHR)
//SYSUT1   DD UNIT=VIO,
//             SPACE=(CYL,(350,50))
//             SPACE=(CYL,(350,50))
//SMPLTS   DD DSN=IMS710D.SMPLTS,
//             DISP=(SHR)
//SYSDEFSD DD DSN=IMS710D.SDFSJSID,
//             DISP=(SHR)
//SDFSJSID DD DSN=IMS710D.SDFSJSID,
//             DISP=(SHR)
//SYSLIN   DD *


UCLIN
In our ServerPac order OS120741, the UCLIN job consists of a step that adds
DDDEF SYS1.PARMLIB to the SMP/E zones. Some jobs in the INSTALL/IVP
dialog may need this DDDEF.



                                         Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac   57
                 IMSCPY
                 IMSCPY job copies SDFSTLIB members to the INSTATBL library. These
                 members are used when running the INSTALL/IVP dialog.

                 IMSPARM
                 Job IMSPARM creates members IEFSSNxx, PROGxx, IEASVCxx and SCHDxx
                 on your SYS1.PARMLIB data set. An IPL or appropriate OS/390 commands are
                 required to make SYS1.PARMLIB changes effective. You can use commands for
                 dynamic subsystem definition, dynamic APF authorization, and dynamic update
                 of the Program Properties Table (PPT). See OS/390 MVS System Commands,
                 GC28-1781 for the details of SET and SETPROG commands. IMS utility
                 DFSUSVC0 can be used to update the type 2 SVC during the life of the IPL.

                 You may prefer to review your existing definitions instead of adding these
                 members to your SYS1.PARMLIB. All these definitions can be done or reviewed
                 during the INSTALL/IVP verification process. Please refer to 6.3.2, “Steps D2xx:
                 OS/390 interfaces” on page 84.


4.3.9 ServerPac installation verification
                 After executing the installation jobs successfully, you should verify the installation
                 by using the IMS provided INSTALL/IVP dialog. You can invoke the INSTALL/IVP
                 dialog by entering the following command:

                 exec ‘ims710.sdfsclst(dfsixc01)’ ‘hlq(ims710)’

                 If you have changed the HLQ of your data sets, you must change this command
                 accordingly. Once in the INSTALL/IVP dialog, you must select ServerPac as the
                 IMS distribution media.

                 The sections from 3.6, “Invoking the INSTALL/IVP dialog” on page 23 through
                 3.10, “INSTALL/IVP file tailoring phase” on page 32 contain information about
                 invoking the INSTALL/IVP and about variable gathering and file tailoring phases.
                 The considerations in these sections are valid also for the ServerPac.

                 The INSTALL/IVP execution phase, which covers the verification process, is
                 described in Chapter 6, “Using the IVP dialog” on page 81.

                 Once you have run through all of the INSTALL/IVP dialog, continue with
                 ServerPac post-installation jobs.


4.3.10 Executing the ServerPac post-installation jobs
                 This section briefly describes the post-installation jobs. The post-installation jobs
                 are optional and the execution of them can be performed when convenient.


58   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
UPDDEF
Job UPDDEF updates DDDEF statements to match the names of target and
distribution library data sets. If you have already run UPDDDD in the installation
job stream, you don’t need to run UPDDEF.

UPDBCK
Job UPDBCK removes SSAs that you no longer need from SMP/E DD
definitions, such as SMPPTS. If you have already run UPDDDD in the installation
job stream, you don’t need to run UPDBCK.

DELDSN
Job DELDSN deletes data set name aliases from target system catalogs. If you
didn’t define any new alias earlier, this job is empty.

DELCSI
Job DELCSI deletes the path entries for CSI data sets on the system where you
run the installation process. If no SSA was defined, this is a null job and it does
not need to be run.

DELTRANS
Job DELTRANS deletes the transport data set, which is no longer required after
the data set has been restored into the new file system on the target system.

For order OS120741, the following data sets were deleted:
   OMVS.TRANS
   IMS710D.CPAC.HFSFILE

DELSSA
Job DELSSA deletes SSAs from driving and target system catalogs. Again, if no
SSAs were defined earlier, this is a null job.

XMLGNR8
Job XMLGNR8 builds a file containing an XML description of the ServerPac you
received and the products it contains. This job is optional.

The file can be used as input to z/OS msys for Setup Custompac package input
adapter (PIA).

Run XMLGNR8 on the target system. Ensure that the target system has a sort
product enabled, such as DFSORT.




                                           Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac   59
4.3.11 Save
                 After you install a ServerPac order, you can use the Save Used Configuration
                 function of the dialog to save your work configuration. Doing so can help you
                 save time in installing subsequent ServerPac orders. Rather than manually
                 re-entering all of the data required for each new order, you can merge the saved
                 configuration with the new order and avoid much of the data entry.


4.3.12 Update
                 The Update step updates the order inventory. It allows you to track and manage
                 your orders. It must be run only after installation is complete.

                  Attention: Once this step is complete, you cannot go back through the
                  installation panels. Your order now has INSTALLED status. You can display it
                  with option ‘O’ from the main menu.



4.4 ServerPac service delivered
                 For ServerPac orders, service is integrated with product code, as described in
                 the following sections.

                 PUTyyxx
                 ServerPac includes the PTFs contained in the Extended Service Offering (ESO)
                 packages that were available approximately two months before the OS/390
                 release became generally available. Look for your order PUT level in the
                 ServerPac/IMS: Installing Your Order document, which you received with the
                 ServerPac delivery package. For instance, order OS120741 has PUT level 0108.

                 PE fixes available
                 ServerPac includes HIPER and PTF-in-error (PE) fixes that were available
                 approximately one week before your order was created. Refer to 5.2, “Enhanced
                 HOLDDATA and SYSMOD processing” on page 70 for the definition of HIPER
                 and PE.

                 RSUxxyy
                 On a monthly basis, ServerPac incorporates the Recommended Service
                 Upgrade (RSU) PTFs that were available approximately two months before your
                 order was created. Look for your order PUT level at ServerPac/IMS: Installing
                 Your Order you received with the ServerPac delivery package. For instance,
                 order OS120741 has RSU level 0111. Refer to 8.2.1, “Preventative maintenance
                 strategy” on page 109 for the description of RSU.


60   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
RECHOLD is included in the ServerPac job stream and it receives all PTFs to
your global zone. It receives higher level PTFs than your current ServerPac level.
These are not installed. You can use them for corrective maintenance. For
instance, order OS120741 is RSU0111 level, but some PTFs from RSU0112 are
included. The SMP/E AHEAD report lists all PTFs higher than the level of your
order. See 4.5.11, “AHEAD report” on page 65.

To apply and accept RSUxxyy, you can use IMS710.CPAC.SAMPLIB(APPRSU)
and IMS710.CPAC.SAMPLIB(ACCRSU).

APPRSU is shown in Example 4-3.

Example 4-3 Apply RSUxxyy

//APPRSU    EXEC PGM=GIMSMP
//*--------------------------------------------------------------
//* THIS SAMPLE JOB PERFORMS THE SMP/E APPLY CHECK OR APPLY FOR
//* THE AHEAD PTFS ON THE 2ND FILE OF THE SERVICE TAPE.
//* PLEASE CUSTOMIZE THIS SAMPLE JOB ONLY IF SPECIFIC GROUPS OF
//* AHEAD PTFS NEEDED TO BE APPLIED.
//* NOTE 1: UPDATE THE NAME OF THE GLOBAL CSI DATA SET
//* NOTE 2: UPDATE THE NAME OF THE TARGET ZONE YOU WANT TO APPLY
//*          THE PTFS.
//* NOTE 3: UPDATE THE RSUYYMM SOURCEID WITH THE YEAR AND MONTH
//* OF YOUR CHOICE.
//* NOTE 4: THIS JOB IS SET TO RUN THE APPLY CHECK. YOU WILL
//* NEED TO REMOVE THE CHECK AND UNCOMMENT THE C(ALL) IN ORDER
//*          TO RUN THE APPLY.
//*-----------------------------------------------------------
//SMPCSI    DD DISP=SHR,
//         DSN=SMPE.GLOBAL.CSI            /* <=== NOTE 1 */
//SMPOUT    DD SYSOUT=*
//SMPLOG    DD DUMMY
//SMPLOGA DD DUMMY
//SYSPRINT DD SYSOUT=*
//SMPCNTL DD *
  SET BDY (TARGETZONE)                    /* <=== NOTE 2 */
      .
  APPLY
      GROUPEXTEND(NOAPARS,NOUSERMODS)
      SOURCEID(RSUYYMM)                   /* <=== NOTE 3 */
      BYPASS(HOLDSYSTEM,HOLDUSER,
             HOLDCLASS(UCLREL,ERREL))
      CHECK                              /* <=== NOTE 4 */
  /* C(ALL)       */                      /* <=== NOTE 4 */
      .
/*




                                          Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac   61
4.5 ServerPac SMP/E reports
                 After installing IMS, you must review the SMP/E reports provided by ServerPac.
                 You can find more detailed information in Appendix C, ”Using the Package
                 reports” at ServerPac/IMS: Installing Your Order.

                 You can find the SMP/E reports delivered with ServerPac in the following
                 members:
                    IMSSERV.OS120741.SCPPLENU(PACKRPT)
                    IMSSERV.OS120741.DOCLIB(SUMTERM)

                 The following sections describe the contents of each report.


4.5.1 CSI report
                 The Consolidated Software Inventory report lists all SYSMODs delivered in your
                 order and included on your distribution zones.


4.5.2 SELECTION report
                 The Selection report specifies all SYSMODs delivered to you. Both installed and
                 not-installed SYSMODs are included in this report. The section 4.4, “ServerPac
                 service delivered” on page 60 describes in more detail what service is delivered
                 in ServerPac.


4.5.3 HIPER report
                 The HIPER report shows which HIPER SYSMODs are installed in your order and
                 what APARs they fix.


4.5.4 IFREQ report
                 The IFREQ report provides a list of FMIDs and PTFs for those FMIDs that you
                 must apply. Review this report carefully; there may be actions required to other
                 FMIDs that are not included in your order.

                 For instance, in OS120741 order, where IMS Version 7 is delivered, some
                 OS/390 and DB2 PTFs have to be installed because they are required for IRLM.
                 You must check if the FMIDs listed in this report are installed in your system and
                 then apply PTFs associated to those FMIDs listed there.




62   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
4.5.5 RESOLVED PE report
          The RESOLVED PE report shows which PTFs, that have been flagged to be in
          error (PE PTFs), are included in your system and have been resolved by a
          corrective PTF. No action is necessary for the items in this list. Example 4-4
          shows the content of the RESOLVED PE report. In the example, PTF UQ56599
          is flagged to be PE; and PTF UQ61547, which corrects this PE, has also been
          processed.

          Example 4-4 Resolved PE report
          RESOLVED PE REPORT
          Date of service select was JANUARY 17, 2002

          LIST OF INSTALLED PE PTFS IN YOUR SREL THAT ARE RESOLVED
          AND THE CORRECTION COULD BE INSTALLED

           *** FOR ZONE NICKNAME 200, NAME IMST200,     SST IMS , SREL P115. ***
           UQ57016-HMK7700-RSU0110 -SUP BY -UQ57697     -PE APAR-DQ53692
           UQ56599-HMK7700-RSU0108 -DQ56002-UQ61547
           UQ56382-HMK7700-RSU0112 -DQ51091-UQ59780
           UQ55785-HMK7700-RSU0107 -DQ51091-UQ59780
           UQ55252-HMK7700-RSU0106 -DQ54760-UQ61395
           UQ55211-HMK7700-RSU0106 -DQ51318-UQ58854
           UQ55170-HMK7700-RSU0112 -DQ52481-UQ59097
           UQ55061-HMK7700-RSU0106 -DQ51091-UQ59780     -DQ52553-UQ61540 -DQ52553-UQ58732
                                   -SUP BY -UQ61476     -PE APAR-DQ53839



4.5.6 UNRESOLVED PE report
          The UNRESOLVED PE report contains the list of the PE PTFs that cannot be
          integrated in your order, because there were no fixes available. Check to see, if
          these errors affect your installation. If they do, check to see if fixes are available.
          If fixes are available, process them before proceeding to the verification phase. If
          fixes are not available, contact IBM support for assistance.

          Example 4-5 shows the UNRESOLVED PE report. UQ55863 is shown as an
          unresolved PE. It causes a loop using HALDB with sequential buffering. If you
          don’t use HALDB, you can continue with your installation. At the time this book
          was written, UQ61996 was available, so it can be ordered and processed.




                                                       Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac   63
                 Example 4-5 Unresolved PE report
                 UNRESOLVED PE REPORT
                 Date of service select was JANUARY 17, 2002

                 LIST OF INSTALLED PE PTFS IN YOUR SREL WHICH ARE NOT RESOLVED
                 OR THE CORRECTION COULD NOT BE INSTALLED

                  *** FOR ZONE NICKNAME 200, NAME IMST200, SST IMS , SREL P115. ***
                  UQ55863-HMK7700-RSU0107 -DQ54672-UNRESOL



4.5.7 FORCED SYSMOD report
                 The FORCED SYSMOD report lists SYSMODs for which BYPASS(HOLDERR)
                 was specified. You cannot apply a PE unless you bypass the hold error. PTFs
                 can be marked as PE when they are already applied. For instance if the
                 problems reported by PEs shown in the UNRESOLVED PE REPORT do not
                 affect you, they can be processed by bypassing their hold error.


4.5.8 NO SERVICE report
                 The NO SERVICE report lists FMIDs delivered on your SMP/E zones for which
                 there are no additional service available.


4.5.9 UNRESOLVED SYSTEM HOLD report
                 The UNRESOLVED SYSTEM HOLD report shows which hold PTFs are not
                 resolved in your order. Review this report carefully and take an appropriate
                 action. IMS710.CPAC.DOCLIB contains a member for each type of hold. Some
                 of them can be empty. The name of the member matches the name of the hold
                 PTF.


                      ACTION                      DOWNLD             IPL
                      AO                          EC                 MSGSKEL
                      DB2BIND                     ENH                MULTSYS
                      DDDEF                       EXIT               MVSCP
                      DELETE                      EXRF               RESTART
                      DEP                         FULLGEN            UCLIN
                      DOC                         IOGEN




64   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
4.5.10 APAR report
          Review the APAR report carefully. It lists the APARs associated with the
          unresolved PE installed in your order. It will include APARs shown at
          UNRESOLVED PE report and in UNINSTALLABLE SYSMOD CHAIN report. You
          can use these APARs to look for fixes at IBM databases.


4.5.11 AHEAD report
          Higher level PTFs are included in your global zone than those that were installed
          with your order. They are listed in the AHEAD report. You can use them for
          corrective maintenance. See 4.4, “ServerPac service delivered” on page 60.


4.5.12 UNINSTALLABLE SYSMOD CHAIN report
          The UNINSTALLABLE SYSMOD CHAIN report shows those PTFs that are
          delivered in the ServerPac package and were selected to be included, but
          haven’t been installed for one of the following reasons:
             The PTFs were marked PE after selection.
             The PTFs had a relationship with a PTF that was marked PE.
             They do not match one of the selection criteria. See section 1.9.1 Service
             Included with your order in ServerPac/IMS: Installing Your Order. for more
             details. For instance, some RSU0112 PTFs are delivered, but they are not
             installed. Also see 4.4, “ServerPac service delivered” on page 60.




                                                   Chapter 4. Installing IMS using ServerPac   65
66   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                       5


    Chapter 5.    Health check after the
                  SMP/E installation
                  This chapter contains information regarding the health of your IMS SMP/E
                  environment and how to check for available maintenance. The health of your IMS
                  systems depends greatly on what IMS maintenance you have processed on your
                  system. By knowing the status of IMS maintenance available, you will be able to
                  make a more informed decision on what actions to take regarding additional IMS
                  maintenance.

                  We discuss several processes that will help you determine what IMS
                  maintenance may need to be installed onto your system. These processes
                  include reviewing Preventive Service Planning (PSP) subsets and processing
                  HOLDDATA.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                     67
5.1 Health check during and after the SMP/E install
                 The health, or maintenance level of your IMS SMP/E environment should be
                 reviewed periodically. Described are several reviews or checks you can perform
                 to determine if you might need additional IMS maintenance. These checks
                 should be done the first time while you are installing your IMS order, prior to
                 performing the IMS system definition.

                 You should also perform these checks periodically between major IMS
                 maintenance upgrades. Some customers perform this on a weekly basis, while
                 others do it on a monthly or quarterly basis, if at all. The elapsed time between
                 these checks will depend on your shop’s requirements for IMS maintenance
                 currency.

                 When installing your IMS order, the criticality of these checks increases when
                 there is a long delay between the time you receive the IMS order and when you
                 process that IMS order.

                 These are the main checks to perform:
                    Reviewing current PSP subsets
                    Reviewing current SMP/E HOLDDATA


5.1.1 PSP subset review
                 Preventive Service Planning subsets contain information regarding specific
                 installation tips, high impact or pervasive problems, as well as service
                 recommendations, along with other information.

                 The PSP subsets are delivered with your CBPDO and ServerPac order. The PSP
                 subsets delivered, however are only as current as the date they were created for
                 your order. PSP subsets are ever evolving because they contain information from
                 the time when the subset is first created through today. Therefore it is important
                 to obtain the latest PSP subsets for all FMIDs you are processing.

                 One PSP subset corresponds to each FMID. As problems (APARs) are reported,
                 the appropriate information is added to the PSP subsets. The Program Directory
                 contains the names of the appropriate PSP subsets corresponding to your order.

                  Attention: When reviewing PSP subsets, be sure to obtain a current copy of
                  the PSP subsets and to review all corresponding PSP subsets.




68   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
PSP subsets include the following information:
   Opening Text: Contains product announcements.
   Change Summary: Lists the date of the last change made to each section.
   Service Recommendation Summary: Summarizes HIPER APARs.
   Installation Information: Contains information and changes to the IMS
   Program directory.
   Documentation Changes: Indicates significant documentation changes.
   General Information: May include information on a wide range of topics such
   as maintenance practices and migration tips.
   Service Recommendations: Contains HIPER APAR descriptions.
   Cross Product Dependencies: Contains maintenance and product level
   recommendations for products other than those in the IMS PSP UPGRADE.

The PSP buckets are organized by UPGRADE and SUBSET names. For IMS
Version 7, the UPGRADE name is IMS710. The IMS Version 7 related SUBSET
names are presented in Table 5-1.

Table 5-1 IMS Version 7 related PSP bucket SUBSET names
 CHG/INDEX       HIR2101/9906    HMK7700             JMK7701             JMK7702

 JMK7703         JMK7704         JMK7705             JMK7706             HMK7707

 JMK7708         HIR2101/0014    HMK7700/GA          JMK7701/GA          JMK7702/GA

 JMK7703/GA      JMK7704/GA      JMK7705/GA          JMK7708/GA

 HIR2101/0036    HALDB           HMK7700/GA2


 Note: For the GA level of IMS Version 7, use the subset names suffixed with
 the GA or GA2. Subset names without the suffix /GA or /GA2 reflect the QPP
 level of the product, with the exception of HIR2101 and HALDB. Included are
 subset names for FMIDs JMK7706 (Online Recovery Service) and HMK7707
 (IMS Connect), that were separated into their own products, when IMS version
 7 was made general available. The current versions for these products are:
    IMS Online Recovery Service for z/OS V1.1, product number 5655-E50
    IMS Connect for z/OS, V1.2, product number 5655-E51

The PSP subsets are included with CBPDO and ServerPac orders. They can
also be obtained from ShopzSeries, IBMLink, and by contacting the IBM support
center. PSP subsets can also be viewed on the World Wide Web at:
   http://www.ibm.com/software/data/ims/support.html



                                Chapter 5. Health check after the SMP/E installation   69
5.2 Enhanced HOLDDATA and SYSMOD processing
                 HOLDDATA is SMP/E documentation that identifies both High Impact or
                 Pervasive (HIPER) APARs and exception SYSMODs. The significance of the
                 HOLDDATA to your SMP/E process is that it can be obtained on a regular basis,
                 received into your SMP/E environment and then reviewed to help determine the
                 currency of your IMS maintenance.


5.2.1 HIPER APARs
                 HIPER APARs are today defined as those that fix a high impact problem for some
                 customers. Pervasive problems are not automatically included in HIPERs as they
                 were in the past; another HIPER symptom must also be identified along with the
                 potential to affect many customers.

                 All HIPER APARs must have one or more of the following characteristics:
                    Causes the customer to IPL or recycle the system or subsystem
                    Destruction and/or contamination of customer data
                    Causes major loss of function to the IMS system
                    Causes severe impact to system performance/throughput


5.2.2 Exception SYSMODs
                 When exception SYSMODs are sent, additional SMP/E data is also sent that
                 indicates the reason ID that prevents installation of the SYSMOD. This additional
                 documentation is HOLDDATA.

                 SYSMODs may be considered exception SYSMODs for several reasons.

                 First, a SYSMOD was sent out to correct a problem but the SYSMOD either does
                 not correct the problem, OR, the SYSMOD introduces a new problem. These are
                 called PTFs in error, or PE PTFs.

                 Second, a SYSMOD requires special installation processing. An ACB generation
                 might be required to utilize the change brought in with this SYSMOD or additional
                 maintenance may be required concurrently with this SYSMOD are several
                 examples.

                 Third, a SYSMOD might introduce changes into the system that you should be
                 aware of prior to installing the SYSMOD. An example of this might be that the
                 format of an IMS message may have changed and this may have an affect on
                 your system automation.




70   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
5.2.3 Reviewing HOLDDATA
          The process to obtain and process current HOLDATA requires several steps.
          Additional information regarding SMP/E processing is available in Chapter 8,
          “Managing Exception SYSMODs”, in z/OS SMP/E User’s Guide, SA22-7773.

          The following are steps can be used to process and check available HOLDDATA:
             Obtain the latest Enhanced HOLDDATA.
             Execute the SMP/E RECEIVE for the current Enhanced HOLDDATA.
             Execute SMP/E REPORT ERRSYSMODS command.
             Execute SMP/E command APPLY CHECK with BYPASS HOLDERROR.
             Examine and process the identified APARs accordingly; use the FIND
             command to search on GIM35934. One of these messages is produced for
             each unresolved exception SYSMOD (PE).
             Analyze all SMP/E messages
             Order additional IMS maintenance.
             Process additional IMS maintenance.

          You should obtain the latest HOLDDATA and process it with your installation. You
          should also obtain, RECEIVE, and review the current Enhanced HOLDDATA on a
          periodic basis.

          The SMP/E REPORT ERRSYSMODS process provides a summary report of
          missing HIPER service and PE exposure. It identifies any fixing Program
          Temporary Fixes (PTFs) that are missing or in RECEIVED status (available for
          installation).



5.3 Sources of Enhanced HOLDDATA
          Enhanced HOLDDATA is available from several different IBM methods. You might
          use several of the methods to obtain the most current information.


5.3.1 CBPDO and ServerPac orders
          Enhanced HOLDDATA is delivered on CBPDO and ServerPac orders. The
          HOLDDATA on the service order is current as of when the order was processed.




                                           Chapter 5. Health check after the SMP/E installation   71
5.3.2 Downloading from the World Wide Web
                 The most current Enhanced HOLDDATA is available through the World Wide
                 Web. All the files are updated daily. The IBM Web site is:
                    http://techsupport.services.ibm.com/390holddata.html

                 This site allows you to download Enhanced HOLDDATA to your desktop for the
                 prior Month (last 30 days), Quarter (last 90 days), Year (last 365 days), and FULL
                 (last 730 days).

                 The data can be downloaded to your desktop, then you can upload the data from
                 your desktop to your OS/390 system. The data can also be sent via FTP to your
                 OS/390 system. All delivery methods are fully explained on the Web site.

                 The HOLDDATA that is delivered, contains HOLDDATA for all products, not just
                 for the FMIDs you have installed. When you receive the HOLDDATA however,
                 only the HOLDDATA for the FMIDs you have installed are received. Example 5-1
                 contains a sample of the Enhanced HOLDDATA you might expect.

                 Example 5-1 Excerpt from the Enhanced HOLDDATA
                 ++NULL. /********************************************************/
                 ++NULL. /* Enhanced HOLDDATA from 02/26/2001 to 02/26/2002      */
                 ++NULL. /* Current updates and additional information regarding */
                 ++NULL. /* Enhanced HOLDDATA is available on the world-wide web */
                 ++NULL. /* at http://service.boulder.ibm.com/390holddata.html   */
                 ++NULL. /********************************************************/
                 ++RELEASE(HMK7700) FMID(HMK7700) REASON(AQ31812) ERROR DATE(01115).
                 ++HOLD(HMK7700) FMID(HMK7700) REASON(DQ31812) ERROR DATE(01115)
                  COMMENT(SMRTDATA(FIX(UQ37634) SYMP(IPL,FUL)
                  CHGDT(010425))) CLASS(HIPER).
                 ++RELEASE(HMK7700) FMID(HMK7700) REASON(AQ32205) ERROR DATE(01115).
                 ++HOLD(HMK7700) FMID(HMK7700) REASON(DQ32205) ERROR DATE(01115)
                  COMMENT(SMRTDATA(FIX(UQ37599) SYMP(IPL)
                  CHGDT(010425))) CLASS(HIPER).
                 ++RELEASE(HMK7700) FMID(HMK7700) REASON(AQ32580) ERROR DATE(01115).
                 ++HOLD(HMK7700) FMID(HMK7700) REASON(DQ32580) ERROR DATE(01115)
                  COMMENT(SMRTDATA(FIX(UQ37049) SYMP(IPL)
                  CHGDT(010425))) CLASS(HIPER).




72   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
5.4 Receiving HOLDDATA
        Once the Enhanced HOLDDATA is loaded onto your OS/390 system, you will
        have to receive it into your SMP/E environment. Example 5-2 is sample JCL that
        can be used to receive HOLDDATA.

        Example 5-2 Sample JCL to RECEIVE HOLDDATA
        //SMPRCVER JOB (999,POK),'RECEIVE ',NOTIFY=&SYSUID,
        //    CLASS=A,MSGCLASS=T,TIME=1439,
        //    REGION=64M,MSGLEVEL=(1,1)
        //RECEIVE EXEC PGM=GIMSMP,REGION=0M
        //SMPCSI   DD DISP=SHR,DSN=IMS710C.GLOBAL.CSI
        //SMPHOLD DD DISP=SHR,DSN=SMPE.HOLDDATA
        //SYSPRINT DD SYSOUT=*
        //SMPPUNCH DD SYSOUT=*
        //SMPCNTL DD *
          SET BOUNDARY(GLOBAL) .
          RECEIVE SYSMODS HOLDDATA .
        //




5.5 Report ERRSYSMODS
        SMP/E provides a command that can be used to identify HIPER service that is
        not currently installed as well as any PE PTF installed without resolving
        SYSMOD. Once you have received the HOLDDATA, you can execute the SMP/E
        command REPORT ERRSYSMODS for the report. Typical JCL that you can use for
        REPORT ERRSYSMODS is shown in Example 5-3.

        Example 5-3 Sample JCL for REPORT ERRSYSMODS
        //ERSYSMOD JOB (999,POK),'ERSYSMOD',NOTIFY=&SYSUID,
        //    CLASS=A,MSGCLASS=H,TIME=1439,
        //    REGION=64M,MSGLEVEL=(1,1)
        //*****************************************************************
        //* REPORT ERRSYSMODS FOR IMS V7
        //***************************************************************
        //ERRREPO EXEC PGM=GIMSMP,REGION=0M
        //SMPCSI   DD DISP=SHR,DSN=IMS710C.GLOBAL.CSI
        //SYSPRINT DD SYSOUT=*
        //SMPPUNCH DD SYSOUT=*
        //SMPCNTL DD *
          SET BDY(GLOBAL).
          REPORT ERRSYSMODS ZONES(targetzone) .
        /*




                                        Chapter 5. Health check after the SMP/E installation   73
                  The command produces SMPRPT data set into the job output that contains
                  EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT information per FMID and EXCEPTION
                  SYSMOD REPORT SUMMARY. For the missing service, the REPORT ERRSYSMODS
                  command also produces SMPPUNCH data set that contains the applicable
                  RECEIVE and APPLY statements, that can be used for SMP/E processing.

                  Several REPORT ERRSYSMODS jobs were executed. The reports from these
                  jobs are discussed in the following sections. The job listings are available in
                  Appendix A, “Output lists for SMP/E REPORT ERRSYSMODS” on page 177.to
                  help explain the.

                      Note: The output for these reports has been truncated at 80 characters.


5.5.1 ERRSYSMODS report before receiving HOLDDATA
                  Example 5-4 is a partial output listing from an execution of the REPORT
                  ERRSYSMODS. The report was generated after IMS Version 7 SMP/E
                  environment was established by installing CBPDO and BEFORE any current
                  HOLDDATA was received.

                  Notice in the EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT that SYSMOD UQ55863 is in
                  HELD status. The FIXES FOR HELD RESOLVING SYSMODS report shows that
                  same SYSMOD has no resolving fixes and is in a HOLD CLASS of PE.

Example 5-4 ERRSYSMODS (SMPOUT) report before RECEIVE HOLDDATA
EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT FOR ZONE IMSTZ71

HOLD     SYSMOD   APAR      ---RESOLVING SYSMOD----   HOLD    HOLD
FMID     NAME     NUMBER    NAME    STATUS RECEIVED   CLASS   SYMPTOMS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HMK7700     HMK7700 DQ36564 UQ55863 HELD          YES       HIPER  DAL
JMK7701     JMK7701 AQ54590 ***NONE                         HIPER  DAL,IPL,PRV
JMK7702     JMK7702 AQ32271 ***NONE                         HIPER  IPL
                    VQ55548 ***NONE                         HIPER  IPL
                    VQ56144 ***NONE                         HIPER  DAL,IPL,FUL,PRV
PAGE 0003    - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE              DATE 03/09/02 TIME 16:06:55 SMP/E

EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT FOR ZONE IMSTZ71




74   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
FIXES FOR HELD RESOLVING SYSMODS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HOLD     SYSMOD   APAR      ---RESOLVING SYSMOD----   HOLD    HOLD
FMID     NAME     NUMBER    NAME    STATUS RECEIVED   CLASS   SYMPTOMS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HMK7700 UQ55863 DQ54672 ***NONE                       PE
PAGE 0004 - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE           DATE 03/09/02 TIME 16:06:55 SMP/E

EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT SUMMARY

 ZONE     FMID       TOTAL APARS        TOTAL RESOLVING
                    AGAINST FMID      SYSMODS AGAINST FMID
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

IMSTZ71   HMK7700             2                   1
          JMK7701             1                   0
          JMK7702             3                   0



5.5.2 ERRSYSMODS report after receiving HOLDDATA
                 Example 5-5 is a partial output listing from an execution of REPORT ERRSYSMODS.
                 This report was generated after IMS Version 7 SMP/E environment was
                 established and AFTER the current HOLDDATA had been RECEIVED.

                 Notice in the EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT that SYSMOD UQ55863 is still in
                 HELD status. However, the report also lists many other SYSMODS that are in
                 GOOD status. These SYSMODS have not yet been ordered and received so
                 their RECEIVED status is NO. You should consider ordering and installing the
                 SYSMODs that are in GOOD status.

                 The FIXES FOR HELD RESOLVING SYSMODS report now shows that
                 SYSMOD UQ55863 is in a status of GOOD and the associated RESOLVING
                 SYSMOD UQ61996 is listed. You could now review these two SYSMODS and if
                 appropriate for your system, consider ordering and installing them.




                                                  Chapter 5. Health check after the SMP/E installation   75
Example 5-5 ERRSYSMODS (SMPOUT) report after RECEIVE HOLDDATA
EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT FOR ZONE IMSTZ71

HOLD     SYSMOD   APAR      ---RESOLVING SYSMOD----   HOLD    HOLD
FMID     NAME     NUMBER    NAME    STATUS RECEIVED   CLASS   SYMPTOMS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HIR2101    HIR2101    AQ53589    UQ62822    GOOD    NO         HIPER   IPL
                      AQ55447    UQ62605    GOOD    NO         HIPER   IPL
                      AQ56535    UQ62522    GOOD    NO         HIPER   IPL,FUL,PRV
HMK7700    HMK7700    DQ36564    UQ55863    HELD    YES        HIPER   DAL
                      DQ45221    UQ62657    GOOD    NO         HIPER   IPL
                      .
.
.
UQ61666   DQ57124 ***NONE                    PE
                   DQ57654 ***NONE                     PE
 JMK7701 JMK7701 AQ51070 UQ62751 GOOD       NO         HIPER   IPL
                   AQ54308 UQ62034 GOOD     NO         HIPER   FUL,PRF
                   AQ54590 UQ61948 GOOD     NO         HIPER   DAL,IPL,PRV
                   .
                   .
JMK7702 JMK7702 AQ32271 ***NONE                       HIPER   IPL
                   VQ52052 UQ62148 GOOD     NO         HIPER   IPL
                   VQ54839 UQ63348 GOOD     NO         HIPER   IPL
                   VQ55548 UQ61832 HELD     NO         HIPER   IPL
                   VQ56144 UQ62002 GOOD     NO         HIPER   IPL,FUL,PRV
                   VQ56333 UQ62004 GOOD     NO         HIPER   IPL
                   VQ57751 ***NONE                     HIPER   IPL
 FIXES FOR HELD RESOLVING SYSMODS
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 HOLD     SYSMOD   APAR      ---RESOLVING SYSMOD----   HOLD    HOLD
 FMID     NAME     NUMBER    NAME    STATUS RECEIVED   CLASS   SYMPTOMS
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 HMK7700 UQ55863 DQ54672 UQ61996 GOOD       NO         PE
 JMK7702 UQ61832 VQ57751 ***NONE                       PE
PAGE 0005 - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE           DATE 03/09/02 TIME 16:19:45 SMP/E

EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT SUMMARY

ZONE      FMID     TOTAL APARS        TOTAL RESOLVING
                    AGAINST FMID      SYSMODS AGAINST FMID
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

IMSTZ71    HIR2101                3                        3
           HMK7700               43                       25
           JMK7701               11                        8
           JMK7702                7                        5




76     IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
5.5.3 SMPPUNCH generated by REPORT ERRSYSMODS
                Example 5-6 is a partial output listing from an execution of the REPORT
                ERRSYSMODS. This report was generated after IMS Version 7 SMP/E
                environment was established and AFTER the current HOLDDATA had been
                RECEIVED.

                This report provides SMP/E statements that can be used to RECEIVE and
                APPLY and have a GOOD status.

Example 5-6 ERRSYSMODS (SMPPUNCH) report after RECEIVE HOLDDATA
********************************* TOP OF DATA **************************
 SET BDY (GLOBAL ). /* REMOVE COMMENT IF DOING RECEIVE
 RECEIVE SELECT (
          UQ62822
          UQ62605
          .
          .
          .
          UQ62004
                  )
            SYSMODS.
                      REMOVE COMMENT IF DOING RECEIVE */
 RESETRC.
 SET BDY (IMSTZ71).
 APPLY    SELECT (
  /* UQ62822               RESOLVES AQ53589 FOR HIR2101 FMID(HIR2101) */
  /* UQ62605               RESOLVES AQ55447 FOR HIR2101 FMID(HIR2101) */
     .
     .
     .
     .
  /* UQ62004               RESOLVES VQ56333 FOR JMK7702 FMID(JMK7702) */
                     )
            GROUP REDO.




5.6 HOLDERROR processing
                A practical method that can be used to determine SYSMODs in error is SMP/E
                HOLDERROR processing. With this process you execute APPLY CHECK
                BYPASS HOLDERROR command against SYSMODs you already received. The
                output from the SMP/E command are then searched for an SMP/E message
                (GIM35934) that identifies a SYSMOD in error. Another method for determining
                the SYSMODs in error would be to examine the SMP/E CAUSER report.



                                                Chapter 5. Health check after the SMP/E installation   77
5.6.1 Executing APPLY CHECK BYPASS(HOLDSYS,HOLDERROR)
                 The primary SMP/E command used for this process are APPLY CHECK
                 BYPASS(HOLDSYS,HOLDERROR). Example 5-7 contains the SMP/E
                 commands that can be used to generate the SMP/E listing.

                 Example 5-7 HOLDERROR sample SMP/E commands
                 //SMPEIN   DD *
                    SET    BOUNDARY (IMSTZ71) .
                    APPLY CHECK GROUPEXTEND
                           BYPASS(HOLDSYSTEM,HOLDERROR).
                 /*



5.6.2 Reviewing the SMP/E reports
                 Example 5-8 is a output listing from an execution of the SMP/E APPLY CHECK
                 BYPASS(HOLDSYS,HOLDERROR) command. The report was generated after
                 IMS Version 7 SMP/E environment was established.

                 While reviewing the listing, a FIND GIM35934 command was performed. That
                 command found the following in the listing:
                    GIM35934I       ERROR HOLD DQ54672 WAS BYPASSED.

                 There will be one of these messages for each unresolved hold error in the SMP/E
                 zone. It is necessary to repeat FIND commands until there are no other GIM35934
                 messages found.

                  Note: The output for this report has been truncated at 80 characters


Example 5-8 APPLY CHECK BYPASS(HOLDSYS, HOLDERROR) output
APPLY CHECK GROUPEXTEND             /* APPLY FOR THIS FMID    */
   BYPASS(HOLDSYS,HOLDERROR).

GIM42001W    THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS FOR SYSMOD UQ51605 WERE      NOT SATISFIED, BUT
             WAS SPECIFIED. PROCESSING CONTINUES.
GIM35966I    SYSTEM HOLD DOC ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ51605 WAS      BYPASSED.
GIM42001W    THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS FOR SYSMOD UQ51639 WERE      NOT SATISFIED, BUT
             WAS SPECIFIED. PROCESSING CONTINUES.
GIM35966I    SYSTEM HOLD DOC ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ51639 WAS      BYPASSED.
GIM42001W    THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS FOR SYSMOD UQ53718 WERE      NOT SATISFIED, BUT
             WAS SPECIFIED. PROCESSING CONTINUES.
GIM35966I    SYSTEM HOLD DOC ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ53718 WAS      BYPASSED.
GIM42001W    THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS FOR SYSMOD UQ54647 WERE      NOT SATISFIED, BUT
             WAS SPECIFIED. PROCESSING CONTINUES.



78   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
GIM35966I   SYSTEM HOLD DOC ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ54647 WAS BYPASSED.
GIM42001W   THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS FOR SYSMOD MOD UQ54647 WAS BYPASSED.
            WAS SPECIFIED. PROCESSING CONTINUES.
GIM35966I   SYSTEM HOLD DOC ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ54648 WAS BYPASSED.
GIM42001W   THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS FOR SYSMOD UQ54962 WERE NOT SATISFIED,           BUT
            WAS SPECIFIED. PROCESSING CONTINUES.
GIM35966I   SYSTEM HOLD DEP ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ54962 WAS BYPASSED.
GIM42001W   THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS FOR SYSMOD UQ55863 WERE NOT SATISFIED,           BUT
            WAS SPECIFIED. PROCESSING CONTINUES.
GIM35934I   ERROR HOLD DQ54672 WAS BYPASSED.
GIM42001W   THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS FOR SYSMOD UQ57027 WERE NOT SATISFIED,           BUT
            WAS SPECIFIED. PROCESSING CONTINUES.
GIM35966I   SYSTEM HOLD DOC ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ57027 WAS BYPASSED.
GIM35966I   SYSTEM HOLD ACTION ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ57027 WAS BYPASSED.
GIM42001W   THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS FOR SYSMOD UQ58403 WERE NOT SATISFIED,           BUT
            WAS SPECIFIED. PROCESSING CONTINUES.
GIM35966I   SYSTEM HOLD DOC ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ58403 WAS BYPASSED.
GIM42001W   THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS FOR SYSMOD UQ61481 WERE NOT SATISFIED,           BUT
            WAS SPECIFIED. PROCESSING CONTINUES.
GIM35966I   SYSTEM HOLD DEP ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ61481 WAS BYPASSED.
GIM35966I   SYSTEM HOLD ACTION ORIGINATED BY SYSMOD UQ61481 WAS BYPASSED.
GIM20501I   APPLY PROCESSING IS COMPLETE. THE HIGHEST RETURN CODE WAS 04.


               Once the unresolved hold errors are identified, you would need to do one of the
               following:
                  Process corrective PTF — If there is a fixing PTF, it should be processed.
                  Keep the PTF in error off the system.
                  Ask the IBM support center for recommendations.
                  Apply APAR — If there is an APAR fix available and if you cannot tolerate the
                  error should it be encountered, then obtain and apply the APAR.
                  Obtain a fixtest — If there is a fixtest available and if you cannot tolerate the
                  error should it be encountered, then obtain and apply the fixtest.
                  BYPASS the error — If the component involved in the PE is not implemented
                  on this system, the hold error can safely be bypassed.

                Important: Be sure to analyze all SMP/E messages.




                                                  Chapter 5. Health check after the SMP/E installation   79
80   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                          6


    Chapter 6.    Using the IVP dialog
                  In this chapter we describe the IMS INSTALL/IVP dialog for both CBPDO and
                  ServerPac features from the point at which your SMP/E environment is
                  established through the completion of the installation and verification process.

                  Once your IMS SMP/E environment is established, the INSTALL/IVP process is
                  identical between the CBPDO and ServerPac features. Therefore, this portion of
                  the INSTALL/IVP process is discussed for both features together. Included in this
                  chapter are steps Cx through Zx of the INSTALL/IVP dialog.

                  The install process, from receiving your order through establishing your IMS
                  SMP/E environment, is discussed separately for each feature. Chapter 3,
                  “Installing IMS using CBPDO” on page 19 explains how to use the CBPDO
                  feature. Chapter 4, “Installing IMS using ServerPac” on page 45 describes the
                  use of the ServerPac feature.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                           81
6.1 Processing execution list members
                 When processing members in the execution phase, ALWAYS use the ‘eNt’ action
                 to review instructions. The member will list instructions on the tasks to perform or
                 jobs to execute.

                 After you review the member instructions, use the ‘Edm’ or ‘eXe’ actions. It is
                 recommended to use the ‘Edm’ action so that the JCL can be reviewed prior to
                 submitting the job. For a list of actions used during the execution phase, please
                 refer to 3.11.3, “Actions against execution list” on page 36.



6.2 Executing Cx steps: IMS system definition
                 The items within the ‘Cx’ series of steps perform the jobs and tasks required to
                 execute IMS system definition. This completes the installation of the IMS code.


6.2.1 Steps C1xx
                 The jobs and tasks in steps C1xx define the data sets required for IMS system
                 definition. For a more detailed description on IMS system definition, refer to
                 Chapter 7, “IMS system definition” on page 93.


6.2.2 Steps C2xx
                 The jobs and tasks in steps C2xx create the IMS system. The following
                 processes are performed:
                    Review IMS source deck:
                     – Use the ‘Edm’ action to edit the stage 1 source deck, if required.
                     – Notice that the ONEJOB parameter in the IMSGEN macro has a default
                       option of YES in the IVP source deck. This will create one job that contains
                       all steps required for the IMS stage 2 processing. Doing this guarantees
                       that the steps necessary for IMS stage 2 processing will be executed in the
                       correct order.
                     – Fast Path support is defined to IMS using the FPCTRL macro. If you do
                       not want to include Fast Path in your system, then simply remove this
                       macro. However, removing Fast Path affects many INSTALL/IVP
                       verification jobs and tasks. Informational APAR II11421 explains how to
                       EXCLUDE Fast Path in the INSTALL/IVP process. Available with IMS
                       Version 8, the IVP dialog provides an option which allows you to either
                       include or exclude Fast Path.




82   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           Note: Adding or deleting the FPCTRL macro requires a minimum of an
           ON-LINE system definition. Therefore, it may be desirable not to include the
           Fast Path support even in the INSTALL/IVP environment, if it is not needed.

           If you run the system definition with FPCTRL included followed by JCLIN, then
           you will have to follow the steps in informational APAR II08928 to remove Fast
           Path from the SMP/E zones, if it is not needed.

             Execute the IMS system definition preprocessor utility.
             Perform IMS system definition stage 1 processing


6.2.3 Steps C3xx
          The jobs and tasks in steps C3xx perform the IMS system definition stage 2
          processing.


6.2.4 Steps C4xx
          Job IV3_C401J and the following tasks in steps C4xx are used for:
             Updating the IMS SMP/E target zone with JCLIN information. This should be
             run after every system generation.
             Applying outstanding service for other products.
             Reviewing IMS PROCLIB members.



6.3 Executing Dx steps
          The items within the ‘Dx’ series performs the jobs and tasks necessary to
          establish the interfaces between:
             IMS and OS/390
             IMS and VTAM

          Many of the processes contained in these steps have previously been
          accomplished if you have installed a prior IMS release. However, you need to
          ensure that the latest versions of the OS/390 interface modules are used with the
          new release and that the new libraries are specified for OS/390.

           Note: Prior to continuing, you should verify with your OS/390 and VTAM
           systems programmers which steps are required in your installation.




                                                            Chapter 6. Using the IVP dialog   83
6.3.1 Steps D1xx: IMS interfaces to OS/390 and VTAM
                 The jobs and tasks allocate the VTAM interface data sets. Usually these steps
                 are already done on your system if you have an IMS system installed.


6.3.2 Steps D2xx: OS/390 interfaces
                    Update the JES PROCLIB concatenation:
                    Refer to the discussion in the section 3.9.3, “Variables requiring special
                    attention” on page 29.
                    Define the IMS Offline Dump Formatting and IRLM Dump Formatting
                    modules to OS/390 if they have not already been done.
                    Establish APF authorization for the IMS system data sets:
                    Add IMS data sets requiring APF authorization to either members IEAAPFxx
                    or PROGxx in SYS1.PARMLIB. The data sets required are:
                     –   SDXRRESL (if IRLM is used)
                     –   SDFSRESL
                     –   MATRIXA
                     –   MATRIXB
                     –   MODBLKSA
                     –   MODBLKSB
                    You can also issue the OS/390 command:
                         SETPROG APF ADD DSNAME(IMS710.MATRIXA) VOLUME(TOTIMH)
                    In this command, IMS710.MATRIXA is the IMS data set name and TOTIMH
                    is the volume where that data set resides.
                    This command must be issued for each IMS data set requiring APF
                    authorization and is only valid between system IPLs.
                    Identify modules which will accessed via MLPA to OS/390:
                    Update the IEALPAxx modules as required.
                    Identify the IRLM and JRLM subsystem names to OS/390:
                    The IRLM subsystem names must be defined to OS/390. These are the
                    variable default names. If you changed these names during the Variable
                    Gathering phase, define those sub-system names.
                    Update your IEFSSNxx member of SYS1.PARMLIB with the IRLM subsystem
                    names which you plan to use. Ignore this step if you are not using IRLM.
                    The OS/390 command SETSSI ADD,S=IRLM can also be used. This must be
                    issued for each subsystem and is only valid between system IPLs.




84   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Define the IMS type 2 SVC and the DBRC type 4 SVC to OS/390:
The SVCs are defined in the IEASVCxx member of SYS1.PARMLIB.
The type 2 and type 4 SVCs are downward compatible. Refer to Chapter 4,
“Coexistence”, in IMS version 7 Release Planning Guide, GC26-9437.
It is recommended that a different set of SVC numbers be used than that of
the previous release. You can define two sets of SVC numbers, then use them
alternately between IMS releases. If you are sharing SVCs between IMS
versions, the SVCs from the latest version must be used. Please refer to the
manual IMS Version 7 Release Planning Guide, GC26-9437, for more
information on SVC downward compatibility.
Define modules to Program Properties Table (PPT):
Define IMS module DFSMVRC0, IRLM module DXRRLM00, and Shared
Message Queues module CQSINIT0 to the OS/390 Program Properties Table
(PPT). This is done by updating member SCHEDxx in SYS1.PARMLIB.
These entries may be already defined with the previous installations of IMS or
OS/390.
Install the type 2 SVC:
Install the IMS type 2 SVC by either link-editing with the OS/390 nucleus or
loaded from SYS1.NUCLEUS using the Nucleus Module Loader facilities.
If both IEANUC0x and the Nucleus Module Loader facility are used, the
precedence is IEANUC0x.
To remove a CSECT from IEANUC0x, refer to informational APAR OY45706.
IMS utility DFSUSVC0 can be used update the type 2 SVC during the life of
IPL.
Link-edit the type 4 SVC:
Link-edit the DBRC type 4 SVC into either SYS1.LPALIB or your MLPA library.
Link-edit the module DFSMRCL0:
Link-edit the IMS Resource Cleanup module, DFSMRCL0, into either
SYS1.LPALIB or your MLPA library.
Link-edit the module DFSAFMD0:
Link-edit IMS Online Dump Formatting module, DFSAFMD0, into either
SYS1.LPALIB or your MLPA library.
Add the module DFSMRCL0 to IEAVTRML CSECT of IGC0001C:
The IMS Resource Cleanup module, DFSMRCL0, must be defined to
OS/390. Perform the ZAP necessary to accomplish this action. This step is
usually already done.




                                              Chapter 6. Using the IVP dialog   85
                    Add the module DFSAFMD0 to IEAVADFM CSECT of IGC0805A:
                    The IMS Online Dump Formatting module, DFSAFMD0, must be defined to
                    OS/390. Perform the ZAP necessary to accomplish this action. This step is
                    usually already done.

                  Note: All these steps can be affected during an upgrade to the OS/390
                  system. You should verify with your OS/390 systems programmer that these
                  remain in effect.


6.3.3 Steps D3xx: VTAM interfaces
                    Define VTAM Application Nodes:
                    Define the VTAM application nodes used by the INSTALL/IVP sample system
                    to VTAM.
                    Define VTAM Network Nodes:
                    Define the VTAM network nodes used by the INSTALL/IVP sample system to
                    VTAM.
                    Define VTAM Logon Mode Tables:
                    Define he VTAM MODETBL entries used by the INSTALL/IVP sample system
                    to VTAM.
                    Define VTAM Interpret Tables:
                    Define the VTAM Interpret Table. This is used to permit user terminals to
                    connect to IMS. The contents of the Interpret Table will depend on whether
                    you are creating a DB/DC, XRF, or DCCTL system.
                    Define the VTAM USS Table:
                    This should already be complete. Verify with VTAM systems programmer.
                    Define VTAM Configuration List (ATCCONxx):
                    This should already be complete. Verify with VTAM systems programmer.
                    Define VTAM Start Option List (ATCSTRxx):
                    This should already be complete. Verify with VTAM systems programmer.
                    Copy VTAM Procedure to SYS1.PROCLIB:
                    This should already be complete. Verify with VTAM systems programmer.




86   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
6.3.4 Steps D4xx: Activating changes
              IPL OS/390 with the MLPA or CLPA option:
              To make the IMS SVCs, updated JESx procedures, and make the LPA/MLPA
              modules available for use, it is necessary to IPL OS/390:
              – If you are using LPALIB, include the CLPA option when you IPL.
              – If you are using MLPA, be sure to specify the correct MLPA= parameter.



6.4 Executing Ex steps: Preparing IVP systems
           The items within the ‘Ex’ series of steps perform the jobs and tasks required to
           prepare the sample applications and the sample IMS system for execution.


6.4.1 Steps E1xx: Allocating IMS data sets
           These jobs allocate the IMS data sets needed for IMS system execution with the
           exception of the RECON data sets.


6.4.2 Steps E2xx: Creating application control blocks
           These jobs creates the application control blocks required for the test application.
           They include:
           DBDGEN           Uses the DBDGEN utility to create data base definitions.
           PSBGEN           Uses the PSBGEN utility to create program specification blocks.
           ACBGEN           Uses the ACBGEN utility to create application control blocks.
                            This is the first job that uses the type 2 SVC. A failure in this job
                            likely indicates a problem with the SVC, either how the SVC is
                            loaded into the operating system nucleus, or with the SVC itself.
                            Example 6-1 shows an abend issued due to the SVC not being
                            linked correctly into the operating system nucleus. The SVC
                            name being loaded is 249 and the module name is IGC249.

                             Note: The SYSTEM COMPLETION CODE=FF9. F9 is the
                             hex equivalent of 249. This completion code is dependent on
                             the name of the TYPE 2 SVC you use.




                                                               Chapter 6. Using the IVP dialog   87
                 Example 6-1 Example of ACBGEN abend
                 SYSTEM COMPLETION CODE=FF9
                   TIME=06.17.41 SEQ=00109 CPU=0000 ASID=0027
                   PSW AT TIME OF ERROR 070C1000    80FDDA46 ILC 2 INTC 0D
                     NO ACTIVE MODULE FOUND
                     NAME=UNKNOWN
                     DATA AT PSW 00FDDA40 - 00181610 0A0D4110 016D182F
                     GPR 0-3 80000000 80FF9000 007DB768 00FCFF40
                     GPR 4-7 007DB260 007FF738 80FDDA20 00F99D80
                     GPR 8-11 00000000 80FDD49C 007FF7F8 7FFDC668
                     GPR 12-15 00008DD0 00005D9C 00FDC600 80000001
                   END OF SYMPTOM DUMP
                  IEF450I IV3E203J G ACBGEN - ABEND=SFF9 U0000 REASON=00000000


                 MFS language utility
                    Uses the Message Format Services (MFS) language utility to create screen
                    format blocks (MFSs) for the online transactions.
                 Assembly/link-edit applications
                    Assembles and/or link-edits the application programs and sub-routines that
                    will be used by the INSTALL/IVP. If variable IXUSMACT does not specify the
                    data set containing the High Level Assembler Toolkit Feature macro library,
                    step DBFSAMA3 will fail because COPY member ASMMSP is not found.


6.4.3 Steps E3xx: Customizing the IMS system
                 The items in the E3 series of steps perform customizing for the IMS system.
                 Following are the steps performed:
                    Create dynamic allocation definitions.
                    Create default parameters:
                    The parameter members used by IMS are created and loaded with default
                    values. These are created in the IMS.PROCLIB data set.
                    Assemble and link-edit the DRA startup table:
                    The DRA startup table is used by the CICS interface to DBCTL. The module
                    is not used by the INSTALL/IVP.
                    Verify the Time Controlled Operations (TCO) scripts that will be used by
                    INSTALL/IVP:
                    Customize the IMS procedure members:
                    This function is the primary area where errors occur during the INSTALL/IVP
                    process. Use the ‘eNt’ option to review documentation.




88   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
            Copy IMS execution procedures:
            The IMS execution procedures are copied to the designated data set.
            The procedures are also renamed, based on the names specified during the
            variable gathering phase. The procedures are also copied into the
            IMS.PROCLIB data set.
            Copy the IMS jobs to the IMS.JOBS data set.
            Copy the DBRC skeletal JCL members to the IMS.PROCLIB data set:
            These members have been customized for use by the INSTALL/IVP.
            Assemble and link-edit module DFSISIS0:
            The module being assembled and link-edited is a replacement for the one
            shipped. The INSTALL/IVP uses application group name (AGN) security. This
            replacement module PERMITS all access through the AGN User Exit (the
            IMS default module DENIES all access).
            Perform security generation:
            Assemble and link-edit the security matrix tables used by the INSTALL/IVP
            sample systems into IMS.MATRIX data set.
            Initialize the IMS.MODSTAT data set.
            Copy the staging libraries:
            Copy the IMS staging libraries to the active libraries by use of the online
            change utility.
            Back up the INSTALL/IVP system:
            When the last job in series ‘Ex’ steps is complete, the setup for the
            INSTALL/IVP sample applications and sample systems is also complete. This
            is a good place to backup the INSTALL/IVP system.

             Note: The remaining series of steps are used to verify the IMS system.



6.5 Executing the IVP
         The remaining jobs and tasks, steps ‘Fx’ through ‘Nx’ (‘Ox’ in IMS Version 8),
         perform the IVP function. The IVP function consists of performing various tasks
         that test and exercise IMS functionality for the newly created system. Many of the
         same tasks are performed repeatedly to test similar IMS functions.

         Refer to 3.11.5, “Execution steps” on page 37 for the description of the naming
         convention of the jobs and tasks.




                                                            Chapter 6. Using the IVP dialog   89
                 The jobs and tasks created for you to test your IMS installation were built based
                 upon the type of IMS system defined. Executing the remaining jobs will
                 thoroughly test your IMS system. A brief description of the main tasks follows.
                 This is intended to only provide an overview on the type of verification process
                 that takes place throughout the IVP verification process.


6.5.1 Establishing the IMS test environment
                 The IMS application processing environment is created for each type of IMS
                 function being tested. You may perform these functions many times, depending
                 on which IMS functions you have installed.

                 The data base environment is created by performing several tasks. The data
                 base data sets are defined, the RECON data sets are initialized, and the data
                 bases are registered with DBRC. The data bases are then loaded, image copies
                 are performed, and the OS/390 SYS1.DUMPxx data sets are cleared.


6.5.2 Verifying the IMS environment
                 Once the environment is established, IMS functionality is tested by executing
                 IMS batch update programs, BMPs, and on-line transactions against the data
                 bases. The first execution of these programs test normal processing functionality.
                 The programs are executed and allowed to successfully complete.

                 The second execution of the programs is used to test recovery features. The
                 programs are executed again but are forced to fail. IMS utilities are then executed
                 against the data bases to back out updates.

                 The third execution of the programs is to test the recovery features for a failed
                 IMS control region. The programs are once again executed but during their
                 execution, the IMS control region is brought down abnormally. The IMS control
                 region is then brought up with an emergency restart.


6.5.3 Verifying partitioned data bases and HALDB
                 The functionality for the High Availability Large Data Base (HALDB) feature is
                 verified during the ‘Nx’ series of steps. A partitioned data base is created,
                 loaded, and image copied, and unloaded to test this function. A series of tasks
                 are then performed that verifies the HALDB.

                 Partitions in the HALDB are not defined in DBDGEN, but are defined by use of
                 the HALDB Partition Definition Utility, an ISPF based application. You will use this
                 utility to supply values and define the HALDBs based on those values.




90   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           Use the ‘eNt’ action on member IV_N206T for the steps required to access these
           panels and to perform the HALDB IVP functions. Additional information on the
           HALDB Partition Definition Utility is available in Appendix E. Using HALDB
           Interfaces, IMS Version 7 Administration Guide: Database, SC26-9419.

            Note: INSTALL/IVP defines the HALDB by using the ISPF-based HALDB
            Partition Definition Utility. After the IMS Version 7 general availability, support
            has been added to initialize a HALDB and the associated partitions by using
            the new DBRC command in batch. Refer to APAR PQ35893 for the details.


6.5.4 Verifying IMS reporting functions
           The IVP process also verifies that reporting and documentation functions are
           installed correctly. There are several types of reporting and documentation
           processes tested for IMS and OS/390.

           The RECON data sets are listed using DBRC commands. Reports are generated
           from DB monitor data and IMS monitor data, and IMS log records are printed
           using the IMS File Select and Print utility.

           Also performed is dump formatting of a SYSDUMP data set by the IMS Offline
           Dump Formatting facility and printing of a log data set by using the DFDSS dump
           utility.



6.6 The Zx steps
           The ‘Zx’ series of steps provide an INDEX for the parts which support the JOBs
           that are executed during the INSTALL/IVP process. These items will only appear
           within the file tailoring phase.
           Step Z1          The parts INDEXED by this step are members of the DFSSLIB
                            data set. These File Tailoring skeletons are IMBEDs during the
                            File Tailoring process. IMBEDs are used (typically) when the
                            skeleton will be used by two or more JOBs.
           Step Z2          The parts INDEXED by this step are members of the DFSISRC
                            data set. These parts include the DBD, PSB, MFS, and PGM
                            source for all of the sample applications. The distribution version
                            (unmodified) of the DBRC skeletal JCL is also included.

           The ‘brS’ action may be used within the file tailoring phase of the INSTALL/IVP
           dialog to browse these parts.




                                                                Chapter 6. Using the IVP dialog   91
92   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                    7


    Chapter 7.    IMS system definition
                  This chapter contains information about IMS system definition, also called
                  system generation. We describe all elements involved in the IMS system
                  generation once IMS installation has been completed successfully. We also
                  discuss the relationship between SMP/E maintenance and system generation.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                 93
7.1 IMS system definition
                 The direction of the IMS product is moving towards eliminating the current two
                 stage system definition process to increase the usability of IMS. This is being
                 implemented gradually, with each new release of IMS removing additional
                 elements from system definition. An example of this commitment is the Extended
                 Terminal Option (ETO), whereby terminals no longer need to be defined in a
                 system generation.

                 Beginning with IMS/ESA Version 6, there are both system definition and
                 non-system definition elements. Since IMS version 6, the system generation
                 process no longer builds a complete system. The non-system definition elements
                 are built during the installation process. The IVP process will also run JCLIN so
                 that subsequent processing of maintenance for non-system definition elements
                 will process the service correctly. With the ServerPac installation method, this is
                 done when the order is packaged.

                 For IMS Version 7, a job is provided in member DFSJCLIN in the library
                 IMS.ADFSISRC that contains the JCL necessary to build or rebuild the
                 non-system definition elements should it be necessary after IVP. The members
                 DFSJIRLT and DFSJIDLT contain the JCL to build or rebuild the additional
                 non-system definition components associated with optional Remote Site
                 Recovery (RSR) Recovery Level Tracking (RLT) and RSR Database Level
                 Tracking (DLT) features.

                 For IMS Version 8, the DFSJCLIN member is no longer provided. The
                 non-system definition parts are created during SMP/E APPLY processing.
                 SMP/E uses inline ++JCLIN that is provided with the FMIDs to accomplish this.
                 The SMP/E GENERATE command can be used to create the JCL to build the
                 non-system definition elements with the elements actually being created during
                 SMP/E APPLY processing. It is necessary to set up ACCJCLIN in the distribution
                 zone before processing the FMIDs.

                  Attention: Since IMS Version 6, you cannot build an entire IMS system by
                  running an ALL system generation. Some features like Base Primitive
                  Environment (BPE) and Shared Message Queue (SMQ) have their modules in
                  SDFSRESL, but they are not generated during the system definition process.




94   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
7.1.1 What is IMS system definition?
           IMS uses the system generation process to tailor each system to the customer’s
           unique environment. Macros are supplied as input to the system generation
           process which determines the makeup of the system to be built. These macros
           are used to define which features and components (Fast Path, MSC, ...), as well
           as which resources (databases, PSBs, ...), are to be included in the system.

           A unique set of modules and other components are built based upon the
           presence or absence of certain keywords in the macros, as well as the presence
           or absence of certain macros. Please refer to the manual IMS Installation Volume
           2: System Definition and Tailoring, GC26-9430 for the details of the system
           definition process.


7.1.2 Why perform IMS system definition?
           IMS system definition defines the resources that are to be made available to the
           system. Resources such as databases, transactions, programs, terminals and
           Multiple Systems Coupling (MSC) links are allocated based on macros supplied.
           IMS System definition also defines the environment in which the system is to be
           run.

            Note: To add new resources to IMS you need to modify IMS stage 1 input.
            There is an assembler macro for each type of resource. The system definition
            process assembles and link-edits these macros into the modules that IMS
            loads during execution.

           The type of IMS system to be run is also defined through the system definition
           process — for example, the type of IMS (DB/DC, DBCTL, DCCTL or BATCH) to
           be built, default allocations for items such as pool definitions, the SVCs used
           (type 2 SVC and type 4 SVC), and so on.



7.2 System generation phases
           The following paragraphs describe the IMS system generation process.


7.2.1 Coding macros in stage 1 input
           The first phase of system definition is the coding of the IMS macros which define
           the system. This phase consists of coding the appropriate IMS macros,
           keywords, and parameters to define the system you wish to build. These macros
           are used as input to stage 1.



                                                            Chapter 7. IMS system definition   95
7.2.2 Running the preprocessor
                 Running the preprocessor is a step to verify the system definition (optional if not
                 using the Large Generation (LGEN) option. The preprocessor can be run to do
                 resource name checking, which consists of ensuring that the names are the
                 appropriate length, are alphanumeric, and are not duplicated within the resource
                 type. This step is optional unless you are using LGEN.

                  Tip: LGEN is faster than standard generation for a large system. LGEN was
                  required if you needed more than 4 MB of private storage below the 16MB line
                  in stage 1. This was an Assembler H restriction. With high level assembler,
                  ASMA90, this restriction has been removed. The LGEN option is still
                  supported because, for a large system, it runs much more quickly than a
                  standard system generation.


7.2.3 Assembly stage 1 input
                 IMS system definition stage 1 consists of IMS macros that are executed by the
                 assembler or the preprocessor (if using LGEN). This step creates jobs to be run
                 as stage 2.


7.2.4 Submitting stage 2 jobs
                 The IMS system definition stage 2 process is to run the job(s) built by stage 1 to
                 actually build the system. The number and content of the jobs/steps built will vary
                 depending on the input. The following is a list of the types of jobs/steps:
                    Execution of IEBUPDTE. There may be multiple steps of this type. They are
                    used to create members in various PDSs.
                    Execution of the assembler (ASMA90). These steps assemble various source
                    modules. The source can come from a distribution library (ADFSSRC) or
                    inline. In the case of LGEN they can come from the LGENOUT data set as
                    well.
                    Execution of the binder (IEWL). These steps bind the load modules.
                    MFS generations for default formats (04 is an acceptable return code from
                    these steps).
                    Execution of DFSLGD00. This step is built if using LGEN. It deletes members
                    from the LGENIN and LGENOUT data sets.
                    Execution of DFSSS000. This step is built if using LGEN. It splits members
                    into the LGENOUT data set into sections for subsequent assemblies.




96   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           The jobs must be run in the proper order. A return code of '0' is expected from all
           steps with the exception of the steps for MFS generation.


7.2.5 Rebuilding SMP/E relations among IMS mods: JCLIN
           SMP/E JCLIN must be run after every system generation to update the target
           zones. This informs SMP/E of the makeup of the newly built system. If any
           SMP/E maintenance is ever going to be applied to this system, you should
           always run the JCLIN after every system generation.

           SMP/E zones have a description about relationship among modules (MOD), load
           modules (LMOD) and macros. Every time you APPLY a SYSMOD against a
           module or a macro, SMP/E knows which other modules have to be assembled
           and bound again and what parameters should be used when doing so.

           When you install IMS, these relationships are built by running job IV_C401J from
           the INSTALL/IVP dialog. Use this job as an example and run it each time you run
           a system definition.

            Important: You must run JCLIN with stage 2 stream as input each time you
            run a system definition if SMP/E service is later processed in this environment.
            Missing this step can lead to a mismatch between IMS modules’ maintenance
            levels and unpredictable errors may occur.


7.2.6 Security Maintenance Utility (SMU)
           Depending on the security options chosen, the Security Maintenance Utility
           (DFSISMPO) may need to be run. If so, it has to be run after every system
           generation. This utility will update the IMS.MATRIX data set. Using security
           macros, you may decide for example which transactions can be executed by a
           terminal and which commands can be executed from these terminals and these
           transactions.

           Other security software like RACF can be used in addition to or instead of SMU
           security.

            Note: Refer to IMS Administration Guide: System, SC26-9420, for a complete
            explanation of IMS security.




                                                             Chapter 7. IMS system definition   97
7.2.7 Applying and accepting maintenance
                 You need to APPLY and ACCEPT maintenance to IMS as described in
                 Chapter 8, “General maintenance recommendations” on page 103. System
                 definition is run against distribution libraries. This means that it uses only
                 accepted SYSMOD modules to build new IMS target libraries.

                  Important: You must ACCEPT maintenance before running system definition.
                  Regression of non-accepted maintenance may take place during system
                  definition.

                 If you don’t want to ACCEPT new maintenance or you use USERMODs or
                 APARs, you can execute APPLY REDO S(xxx,yyy) NOJCLIN for all the
                 SYSMODs in apply-only status. This avoids a mismatch between SMP/E
                 information and target libraries.



7.3 Types of system generation
                 The TYPE parameter of the SYSTEM operand on the IMSCTRL macro specifies
                 the level of system definition being done. Table 7-1 describes the types of system
                 definition specified in the IMSCTRL macro, their typical use, and the results.

                 The TYPE specified should be that causing the least amount of system definition
                 necessary to accommodate the changes being made. There is a chart in IMS
                 Version 7 Installation Volume 2: System Definition and Tailoring, GC26-9430,
                 showing the types of system definition that can be done to effect various
                 changes.

                 To implement changes that require a CTLBLKS, NUCLEUS, ON-LINE, or ALL
                 system definition, a cold start of the IMS subsystem must be done. When running
                 one of these types of IMS system definition, the SDFSRESL data set is updated
                 during stage 2 processing. Be sure that this processing is not done against a
                 currently active copy. Changes that can be introduced by a MODBLKS
                 generation, can be implemented using the online change process.

                 Table 7-1 IMS system definition types
                  Type            When Used                         Result

                  ALL             Typical initial generation, not   Builds most libraries, includes
                                  usually needed for                ON-LINE and BATCH. Prior to IMS
                                  maintenance.                      Version 6, built all executable
                                                                    modules.




98   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
 Type          When Used                      Result

 ON-LINE       Major update or initial        Builds most modules, includes all but
               generation, may be required    BATCH option.
               for maintenance.

 NUCLEUS       For major maintenance and      Build IMS nucleus and control blocks,
               for adding a new suffix.       includes CTLBLKS and MODBLKS.

 CTLBLKS       Convenience update             Control blocks are built, includes
               includes binding of existing   MSVERIFY and MODBLKS.
               nucleus with same suffix.

 MODBLKS       Convenience update, used       Builds blocks for database, program,
               with the online change         transaction, and fast path routing
               option.                        codes.

 BATCH         Only for the batch             Builds batch libraries, was used for
               environment.                   local DL/I environments.

 MSVERIFY      Only for MSC.                  Builds control blocks for MSC
                                              Verification Utility.


Figure 7-1 shows the relationship between different types of system generations.




                                               ON-LINE
                 ALL
                                                NUCLEUS

                                                CTLBLKS

               BATCH                             MODBLKS




Figure 7-1 System generation types diagram




                                                   Chapter 7. IMS system definition   99
7.4 Minimizing the need for system definition
                Many of the parameters defined by the system definition process can be
                overridden at execution time. Overriding values can be provided in either an IMS
                PROCLIB member (normally the parameter block member DFSPBxxx) or in the
                execution JCL. The following is the precedence of these overrides (from lowest to
                highest):
                    IMS default value
                    System generation supplied value
                    DFSPBxxx PROCLIB member
                    Specified on execution JCL


7.4.1 Online change
                During IMS subsystem initialization, control blocks are built to represent various
                resources. Online change provides the ability to add, change, or delete control
                blocks for certain types of resources without having to bring the IMS subsystem
                down and back up.

                Online change can be used to implement changes to the following resources:
                    APPLCTN
                    DATABASE
                    RTCODE
                    TRANSACT
                    SMU security tables
                    MFS blocks (formats)
                    ACBLIB

                The following libraries can be affected by online change:
                MODBLKS            Contains blocks associated with resources defined to the IMS
                                   subsystem. Updated by the IMS system definition process.
                MATRIX             Optional data set containing information relating to IMS security.
                                   Updated by the IMS Security Maintenance Utility (SMU).
                ACBLIB             Contains application description and database control blocks. In
                                   systems that use data sharing, the ACBs used by all the sharing
                                   IMS subsystems must be identical. One way of ensuring this is
                                   for all sharing IMS systems to use the same ACBLIB data sets.
                                   Updated by the ACBGEN process.
                FORMAT             Contains Message Format Service (MFS) definitions (screen
                                   layouts). Updated by the MFS generation process.




100   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           For APPLCTN, DATABASE, RTCODE, and TRANSACT macros, the online
           change process consists of the following steps:
           1.   A MODBLKS type of system generation (stage 1 and stage 2), JCLIN
           2.   Security maintenance utility, if MATRIX is used
           3.   Online change utility
           4.   /MODIFY PREPARE MODBLKS command
           5.   /MODIFY COMMIT command

            Note: Changes to existing transactions cannot be introduced via a MODBLKS
            generation if those attributes are changeable by online commands (such as
            /ASSIGN). However, system generation is needed to make the changes
            permanent.

           For introducing changes to ACBs, the online change process consists of the
           following steps:
           1.   ACBGEN utility
           2.   Online change utility
           3.   /MODIFY PREPARE ACBLIB command
           4.   /MODIFY COMMIT command

           For introducing changes to MFS, the online change process consists of the
           following steps:
           1.   MFS language utility
           2.   Online change utility
           3.   /MODIFY PREPARE FMTLIB command
           4.   /MODIFY COMMIT command


7.4.2 Extended Terminal Option (ETO)
           One of the most common reasons for doing a system definition is to add
           terminals to the system. Without the Extended Terminal Option (ETO) feature,
           this requires the minimum of a CTLBLKS generation. Adding or deleting support
           for a specific non-ETO terminal type requires the minimum of a NUCLEUS
           system definition. ETO allows you to add additional ACF/VTAM terminals to the
           IMS subsystem dynamically without having to define them in the IMS system
           definition.




                                                         Chapter 7. IMS system definition   101
102   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                       8


    Chapter 8.    General maintenance
                  recommendations
                  As a systems programmer, you are responsible for the task of maintaining your
                  IMS systems software and operating environments. Decisions must be made
                  regarding how to create your software environment, how to maintain that
                  environment, and how to manage your operating IMS systems.

                  In this chapter we offer recommendations regarding the handling of continuous
                  maintenance policies. Chapter 5, “Health check after the SMP/E installation” on
                  page 67 describes more specific and detailed techniques to help recognize
                  which fixes your installation requires.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                    103
8.1 IMS maintenance philosophy
                This section discusses some concepts about IMS system maintenance. It
                provides some ideas about policies and benefits of software changes. Also
                discussed are considerations about acceptable levels of risk.

                  Note: For a further discussion on OS/390 maintenance philosophy, see
                  Chapter 2, “Maintenance Philosophy” in the IBM Redbook OS/390 Software
                  Management Cookbook, SG24-4775.

                Although it has been said “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”, one should not view
                maintenance changes from such a negative point of view. Serious consideration
                should be given to adopting a dynamic maintenance strategy over that of a static
                maintenance policy.

                As IMS software and its features become more interrelated with other products,
                the notion of a static maintenance strategy has become outdated. Adopting a
                dynamic maintenance philosophy allows for a smooth transition of maintenance
                from one cycle phase to the next. See Figure 8-1, which looks at the main steps
                of a dynamic maintenance installation cycle.


                    Environment                              Installation
                      Design                                  Decision




                                                                                           Installation
                                   Implementation
                                                                                              Plan




                                                   Testing                  Installation




                Figure 8-1 Dynamic maintenance installation cycle



104   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
8.1.1 Reasons for change
          There are many reasons your IMS systems may require additional maintenance.
          Some of these situations may be under your control, while others may not. In the
          following sections, we discuss the various reasons why you may need to perform
          additional software maintenance.

          Environmental changes
          Operating systems, software applications, and hardware micro code are
          constantly changing in response to the demand for higher performance and new
          services. Your IMS systems must be updated to be consistent with the evolution
          of the environment.

          Avoidance of reported problems
          Implementing IMS preventative maintenance will correct problems that have
          already been found and reported, thus allowing you to avoid these problems
          before they occur. You and your business must consider the cost of implementing
          preventative maintenance versus the cost of sustaining a potential system
          outage that could be avoided by the preventative maintenance.

          New functionality
          As new functions become available to your systems, you need to be in a position
          to take advantage of that functionality. New functionality is often received with a
          new release of IMS; however, general IMS maintenance may also include new
          functionality. If you or your business chooses not to pay attention to new
          functionality as it becomes available, you may one day find that your system has
          become obsolete.

          Processing improvements
          Software code is often written to match specific environmental characteristics
          such as storage, CPU, concurrency, reusability, serialization and addressing
          modes. These characteristics can change from time to time. Code is periodically
          reviewed and changed to take advantage of new system characteristics that help
          improve performance and functionality.

          Emergency situations
          If you encounter a known error that needs to be fixed immediately, the effort
          needed to put on the required maintenance is likely to be less on a system with
          current maintenance. This is because the likelihood of the prerequisites already
          being processed is greater.




                                           Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   105
8.1.2 Accessing risk
                Every change has a risk. The degree of risk for any change may be very minimal
                or very high. You and your business must strike an acceptable balance between
                the risk of changing and the risk of not changing your IMS systems.

                The cost of risk
                Consideration should be given to the cost of system outages potentially caused
                by new maintenance. Just as important, you must consider the costs you will
                avoid because system outages are averted due to implementing preventative
                system maintenance. These costs must be factored together to determine the
                cost or risk for implementing or not implementing maintenance.

                The risks of changing
                All IBM software delivered is extensively tested before shipment. PTFs are code
                changes that have been tested as well. This minimizes the risk for additional
                problems, however the risk is not zero. There is always some potential for new
                problems.

                With all this said, most of the PE PTFs are discovered relatively soon after the
                PTF becomes available. With the use of better testing techniques, the number of
                problems introduced by PTFs is continuing to decline. The risks involved with
                introducing change can be further reduced by following the Consolidated Service
                Test (CST) methodology. The CST methodology is further discussed in
                paragraph “Consolidated Service Test” on page 109.

                The risks of not changing
                Deciding not to process IMS maintenance to your systems, does not guarantee
                that there will be no system problems. If no maintenance is implemented, your
                system becomes out of date and is vulnerable to problems already reported.

                A long delay in maintenance increases the number of system changes and
                requisite PTFs required when maintenance is implemented. Also, PTFs with hold
                actions may take considerable time to implement. If maintenance is not kept
                relatively current, the time required to apply emergency maintenance most likely
                will be increased. Preferably, IMS maintenance should be implemented in a non
                emergency situation.

                Even when there may be no problems to correct, IMS code is improved to
                provide increased performance and capabilities. In order to maintain a
                competitive edge, your business should apply IMS maintenance that takes
                advantage of new functions as they become available.




106   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
8.1.3 What are acceptable risks?
           Installing or not installing maintenance has associated costs and risks. You must
           consider a balance between both points.

           By not changing your system, there is an increased risk of encountering
           problems that can be avoided by maintenance. By changing your system, there is
           an increased risk of encountering new problems introduced by the maintenance.
           Figure 8-2 depicts the correlation between these two risks.


             RISK
                 Potential risk                                                     Potential for
                 for incurring                                                         problems
                 system problems                                                  introduced by
                                                                                   maintenance




                                                                                   Outstanding
                                                                                    problems
                                                                                   corrected by
                                                                                   maintenance



               Non-current maintenance                                   Current maintenance

           Figure 8-2 Potential risk chart


8.1.4 How current should IMS maintenance be?
           Depending on your risk assessment, the currency of your IMS system may vary.
           Following are IBM’s recommendations on IMS maintenance currency.

           IMS maintenance recommendations
           These general IMS recommendations provide guidelines that when implemented
           are intended to produce a more stable IMS environment.




                                             Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations         107
                The general IMS maintenance recommendation for implementing new
                maintenance to an IMS production system is based on a six-month cycle as
                follows:
                    Service levels should be six months behind the planned implementation date.
                    PE resolution must be performed.
                    HIPERs up to three months back should be included.
                    A three-month test cycle is recommended prior to production implementation.
                    Obtain and process current Enhanced HOLDDATA throughout the cycle:
                    – Download Enhanced HOLDDATA.
                    – RECEIVE Enhanced HOLDDATA.
                    – Run REPORT ERRSYSMODS.
                    – Analyze output from REPORT ERRSYSMODS to determine missing
                      HIPERs and PE exposure.
                    – Process service as needed to resolve missing HIPER and PE exposure.
                    – Contact IBM support for assistance as needed.

                If you are planning to migrate to a new IMS release in July, 2002 you would
                process all service to a point in January 2002. You should also review all HIPER
                PTFs through July, 2002 and include when appropriate. You could use an SMP/E
                SOURCEID parameter similar to the one that follows:
                SOURCEID(PUT00*,PUT01*,PUT0201,HIPER)

                Guidelines for ongoing IMS production service level:
                    Fully tested fixes for significant software problems encountered
                    Fully tested HIPER SYSMODs that are of direct applicability to the specific
                    IMS environment and deemed significant
                    Fully tested SYSMODs which resolve PE PTFs that are directly applicable to
                    the specific IMS environment and deemed significant

                A fix is considered “significant” when consequences which could not be tolerated
                may be encountered without the application of that fix.

                These recommendations should be followed on an ongoing basis and should
                also be included as part of the initial production implementation.




108   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
8.2 IMS maintenance strategies
           To effectively manage IMS maintenance on your systems, strategies concerning
           various types of maintenance situations, IVP testing, and installation practices
           should be in place. Preventative service, corrective service, and emergency
           service are three areas of maintenance where a clear strategy is needed.


8.2.1 Preventative maintenance strategy
           Preventative maintenance is the additional maintenance implemented to your
           system that corrects product errors or provides additional product functionality.
           This maintenance is usually implemented to avoid reported errors or to
           implement needed product functionality. This maintenance is most likely installed
           at a leisurely pace across your systems.

           A preventative maintenance strategy should be developed and used to provide a
           systematic approach for keeping your IMS systems current. This strategy might
           include guidelines and necessary steps that are similar to the following:
              Determine how often the strategy is to be implemented. Twice a year or once
              every three months are examples.
              Decide upon an acceptable time frame for implementing preventative
              maintenance and deploying it to all your IMS systems.
              Choose an acceptable level the maintenance will be brought up to. This may
              be based on general IMS maintenance recommendations and your
              acceptable level of risk as discussed in 8.1.2, “Accessing risk” on page 106.
              Determine what maintenance level is currently implemented.
              Determine the level of required maintenance.
              Order the maintenance.
              Process the maintenance.
              Install and test the maintenance on appropriate IMS systems.
              Install maintenance on production IMS systems.

           Consolidated Service Test
           Consolidated Service Test (CST) provides a consolidated, tested, and
           recommended set of service for z/OS on a quarterly basis with published results.




                                           Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   109
                CST allows you to install service for products using a single, tested,
                recommended service package. The goals for CST are to make maintenance
                safer to put on, and to reduce confusion caused by differing recommended
                service strategies between the operating system and the major subsystems thus
                reducing potential business outages due to conflicting service levels and
                products failing to work consistently together.

                CST is made by the CST team consisting of cross product test representatives
                who test recommended maintenance packages in a user-like sysplex
                environment, using industry representative workloads from major z/OS and
                OS/390 subsystems including IMS, CICS, DB2, MQSeries, and IRLM. This is in
                addition to testing that was already being performed. This additional testing is to
                fulfill the goal of making maintenance safer to put on.

                CST provides a quarterly report with recommended maintenance level and
                monthly reports including recommended maintenance updates for those users
                whose maintenance strategies require more frequent maintenance updates. This
                addresses the goal of reducing confusion caused by different strategies.

                The quarterly CST report consists of:
                    CST hardware environment
                    Software environment including maintenance levels
                    Rollout recommendations
                    Highlights for the quarter year
                    Problems encountered
                    Excluded maintenance list

                  Note: The service recommendations made in association with CST are based
                  on testing in our own environment. Your environment and applications will
                  differ, and therefore, your results may also. All of the information, download
                  files, and recommendations are provided on an “AS-IS” basis without
                  warranties of any kind, express or implied, including without limitation any
                  implied warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose or title.
                  Reliance on this document is at the customer's sole risk and IBM will not be
                  liable for any damages, direct or indirect, in connection with CST or actions
                  taken based on the CST recommendations.

                For more information about the Consolidated Service Test, see this URL:
                    http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/zseries/zos/servicetst/




110   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           Recommended Service Upgrade
           Recommended Service Upgrade (RSU) is a preventive service philosophy for the
           OS/390 and z/OS platforms. Its intent is to reduce the volume of PTFs customers
           need to apply for preventive maintenance as well as the chance of encountering
           a PTF in error (PE PTF) This can result in a more stable system, due to the
           additional testing being performed.

           Once service has passed CST testing, it is marked with RSUyymm SOURCEID
           notation, where yy indicates the last two digits of the year and the mm indicates
           the month. For example:
              Quarterly year = RSUyy03, RSUyy06, RSUyy09, RSUyy12
              Monthly = RSUyy01, RSUyy02, ...

           RSU levels are available on ESO, CBPDO, ServerPac deliverables and orderable
           in SUF and ShopzSeries.

           It is IBM's recommendation that customers process the RSU PTF set as
           preventive maintenance. With the introduction of Consolidated Service Test, the
           criteria of inclusion in the RSU has been redefined to include:
              Severity 1, 2, 3, and 4 APARs — once per quarter year

           Then, the testing of quarterly RSUs consists of the following actions:
              Exercise three 30-day test cycles.
              Install all service from the end of the prior quarter year.
              Run existing industry representative workloads.
              Develop and run new test scenarios.
              Identify problems and apply fixes.
              Apply new HIPERs, PE fixes, security, integrity, and fixes to CST problems
              on a monthly basis.
              Run high stress environments, saturation tests, failure and recovery
              scenarios, and rolling IPL maintenance test of previous quarterly RSU to the
              current quarterly RSU.


8.2.2 Corrective maintenance strategies
           Corrective maintenance is usually thought of as additional maintenance that is
           implemented to your system to correct a product error. Because corrective
           maintenance is usually processed to correct a current system problem, a more
           aggressive pace is generally used to apply and deploy the system fix across your
           systems.




                                             Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   111
                A corrective maintenance strategy should be developed and used that provides a
                systematic approach for processing and installing program fixes in a timely
                fashion. This strategy might include guidelines and necessary steps that are
                similar to the following:
                    Decide upon an acceptable time frame for processing corrective maintenance
                    and deploying it out to all your IMS systems. This time frame is very fluid in
                    nature because the criticality of errors, and their impact on your system is not
                    always constant.
                    Determine what corrective maintenance is required.
                    Obtain the corrective maintenance.
                    Process the corrective maintenance.
                    Install and test the maintenance on appropriate IMS systems.
                    Install the maintenance on production IMS systems.

                Regression and mismatch of maintenance
                Regression occurs when elements are at a level prior to the level that is
                expected. Mismatch occurs when an inconsistent level of elements is
                encountered, such as a fix being partially applied. Both of these situations may
                produce unpredictable results. These conditions can occur under several
                circumstances, such as these:
                    System generation regressed an element that is in apply-only status.
                    System generation used a back-level version of a macro.
                    System generation jobs were executed out of sequence. This can be avoided
                    by using the ONEJOB parameter during system generation processing.
                    SMP/E processing used a back-level version of a macro.

                  Attention: If you are encountering SMP/E zone problems or have SMP/E
                  processing questions, it is recommended that you contact IBM support center
                  for assistance.

                Section 8.6, “APAR and USERMOD SMP/E regression” on page 123 explains
                some of the errors received when regression occurs.

                Correcting regression and mismatch problems would normally be handled by
                doing either of the following:
                    Re-applying SYSMODs that are in apply-only status.
                    Accepting SYSMODs in apply-only status, executing an ALL system
                    generation, followed by running JCLINs (DFSJCLIN, DFSJIRLT, DFSJIDLT
                    and SMP/E GENERATE).



112   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
          Correcting IMS SMP/E problems
          You may encounter SMP/E zone relationship problems that occur based on how
          IMS maintenance has been implemented to your systems in the past. If a zone
          mismatch occurs, your SMP/E target zone and data sets may need to be rebuilt
          from the distribution zone and data sets.

          APAR II08928
          Informational APAR II08928 provides documentation on performing several IMS
          SMP/E functions for IMS Version 6 and IMS Version 7 systems. These functions
          include:
             IMS SMP/E maintenance using ACCEPT BYPASS APPLYCHECK processing
             Removing features from the system generated IMS system
             Rebuilding of target zones and data sets from the distribution zones and data
             sets

          Informational APAR II13024 provides similar documentation for IMS Version 8.


8.2.3 Emergency maintenance strategies
          Emergency maintenance is usually thought of as maintenance implemented in
          your system to correct a problem that is impacting your system, or that has the
          potential to impact your system in an unacceptable manner. Because emergency
          maintenance is usually processed to correct a system impacting problem, a very
          aggressive pace is generally used to process and deploy the system fix across
          your systems.

          An emergency maintenance strategy is probably the most important strategy to
          have, because when required, this strategy is implemented very quickly and
          under stressful situations. Because of the limited time frame available for
          implementing emergency maintenance, a very structured and systematic
          approach is required. This strategy might include guidelines and necessary steps
          similar to the following:
             Decide upon an acceptable time frame for processing emergency
             maintenance. This time frame is very fluid in nature. Most likely you are given
             a time frame to process the maintenance which is based on the impact to
             your systems.
             Determine what corrective maintenance is required.
             Obtain the corrective maintenance.
             Apply the corrective maintenance.
             Install and test the maintenance on appropriate IMS systems.
             Install the maintenance on production IMS systems.



                                           Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   113
8.2.4 Maintenance testing strategies
                While keeping IMS maintenance current is important to minimize potential errors,
                the testing of the maintenance you are processing is equally as important.
                Testing of maintenance should be conducted on as many different types of IMS
                environments as time permits. These environments may be different because of
                their IMS functionality, they support different applications, or they support
                different levels of operations such as development and production systems.

                Several strategies could be developed and used that thoroughly tests the IMS
                subsystems. One strategy would be used to test all IMS functionality, while a
                second strategy would be used for testing only the IMS functionality affected by
                the maintenance. The testing strategy used would be based on the amount of
                IMS maintenance processed and the time frame you have to test.

                Testing can also be broken down into IMS functionality testing and IMS
                environments that are tested. Items that might be considered for IMS
                functionality testing are:
                    Execute jobs and tasks created by the INSTALL/IVP dialog. The jobs in
                    ‘IMS710.INSTALIB’ perform a variety of testing functions when they are
                    executed during the IVP phase of the INSTALL/IVP. These jobs can be
                    modified and used on a continual basis for testing maintenance.
                    Simulate production peak activity rates by using product such as
                    Teleprocessing Network Simulator (TPNS) for instance.
                    Stress test the system by using the maximum throughput that the system can
                    process. TPNS can be used to create the workload.
                    Test a variety of different application programs that performs all functionality.
                    Test a variety of IMS data base functions such as image copies and data base
                    reorganizations.
                    Test a variety of different hardware and software combinations such as 3270
                    and SLU2 type devices or APPC and OTMA.
                    Test interaction between IMS and other products both IBM’s and third party
                    vendors.
                    Monitor all test results closely. Maintain a set of output generated from the
                    prior test for comparison.




114   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
        These are various types of IMS environments that you may wish to test:
           IVP system created by the INSTALL/IVP dialog
           IMS subsystems on a sandbox system that may be used to test various
           operating system upgrades
           IMS development subsystems used by multiple applications
           IMS test subsystems used by multiple applications
           IMS acceptance test or system test subsystems used by multiple applications
           IMS production subsystems that are less critical
           IMS production subsystems that are very critical

        A matrix can be used to help keep track of the IMS functionality as it is tested
        against each IMS environment. A matrix can be created based on your own
        requirements and then used each time maintenance is implemented. One side of
        the matrix would include the items required to test IMS functionality. The second
        side of the matrix would include the type of IMS environments you wish to test.

        Table 8-1 is a sample matrix that can be used.

        Table 8-1 Sample IMS maintenance testing MATRIX
                        peek      App A      App B     data       APPC      other     verify
                        rates     tests      tests     base       OTMA                tests

         IVP IMS

         sand box

         development

         test

         system test

         acceptance

         IMSPROD1

         IMSPROD2



8.3 Processing IMS maintenance
        Once IMS maintenance is obtained, various methods could be used to process
        that maintenance, depending on how the maintenance was obtained. CBPDO
        and ServerPac features could be used to obtain IMS maintenance as well as
        several others. The following describes a process that can be used to implement
        IMS maintenance.



                                          Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   115
8.3.1 Process flow
                The processes used to implement IMS maintenance include the RECEIVE,
                APPLY, ACCEPT, and RESTORE SMP/E commands. The CHECK operand
                should also be used with the commands throughout the process. The order that
                these steps are executed, varies between IMS shops.

                Your shop most likely already has standards set up on how to process IMS
                maintenance. If you have any questions regarding processing IMS maintenance,
                it is recommended that you contact IBM support for assistance.

                These are some common methods:
                1. RECEIVE, ACCEPT BYPASS(APPLYCHECK)
                    – System backup
                    – RESTORE APARs and USERMODs
                    – RECEIVE new maintenance
                    – ACCEPT CHECK verify effect of ACCEPT processing
                    – ACCEPT outstanding maintenance
                    – ZONEMERGE distribution libraries to target libraries
                    – Execute an ALL IMS system generation
                    – Perform JCLIN processing
                    – RECEIVE APARs and USERMODs
                    – APPLY CHECK APARs and USERMODs to verify effect of APPLY
                      processing
                    – APPLY APARs and USERMODs

                      Note: Informational APAR II08928 contains additional details for the
                      RECEIVE, ACCEPT BYPASS(APPLYCHECK) method.

                2. RECEIVE,APPLY, and ACCEPT
                    – system back up
                    – RESTORE APARs and USERMODs
                    – RECEIVE new maintenance
                    – APPLY CHECK verify effect of the APPLY
                    – APPLY new maintenance
                    – ACCEPT CHECK verify effect of ACCEPT processing
                    – ACCEPT
                    – Execute IMS system generation, if needed
                    – perform JCLIN processing, if the system generation was done
                    – APPLY CHECK APARs and USERMODs to verify effect of APPLY
                      processing
                    – APPLY APARs and USERMODs




116   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Figure 8-3, “SMP/E SYSMOD processing flow” on page 117 shows one flow that
a SYSMOD can take through the SMP/E process.




                                   SYSMOD




                                       RECEIVE
                                     SMP/E
                                    Data Sets
                                     Global
                                     Zone
                                                  AC
                                                    CE
                         PLY                          PT
                      AP


     Target                                                            Distribution
    Libraries                                                           Libraries
     Target                           RESTORE                          Distribution
      Zone                                                                Zone



Figure 8-3 SMP/E SYSMOD processing flow

Additional information on SMP/E is available in the manual z/OS SMP/E User’s
Guide, SA22-7773.

Backing up the IMS environment
IMS maintenance should NEVER be processed against active IMS system
libraries. Maintenance should be processed to SMP/E target staging libraries.

 Attention: Prior to performing actions that update SMP/E data sets and IMS
 libraries, you should take a backup of the environment.



                                Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations        117
                RESTORE processing
                Restore processing removes SYSMODs from the SMP/E environment.
                Depending on SMP/E global zone’s clean-up REJECT option, you may need to
                RECEIVE restored SYSMODs again prior to re-applying them. If REJECT is set
                to YES, this will be the case. This is desired option for example when you need to
                modify your USERMOD for any reason before receiving it again, but if you just
                need to RE-APPLY the SYSMODs later on, it is better to set the REJECT option
                to NO.

                RECEIVE processing
                The receive process loads new maintenance into the SMP/E environment so you
                can process it. Example 8-1 shows SMP/E commands that can be used to
                RECEIVE maintenance.

                Example 8-1 SMP/E RECEIVE statements
                //SMPCNTL DD *
                  SET BDY(GLOBAL) OPTIONS(IMS710).
                      RECEIVE LISTS
                          SYSMODS
                          HOLDDATA
                          FORFMID(
                                   HMK7700    /* SYSTEM      */
                                   JMK7701    /* DB          */
                                   HIR2101    /* IRLM        */
                                   JMK7702    /* TM          */
                                   JMK7703    /* ETO         */
                                   )
                           .
                /*


                APPLY CHECK processing
                The APPLY CHECK processing is used to verify that the SYSMODs will be
                installed correctly and that you understand what libraries and load modules will
                be affected by the maintenance. You need to verify the reports that are generated
                by the APPLY CHECK process.

                When verifying the reports, look for the following information and resolve:
                    Were any errors messages produced? If so, determine the cause and fix the
                    problem.
                    Will any SYSMODs be regressed? If so, determine how to resolve the
                    problems.
                    Are there any other areas of the system affected? If so, determine how to
                    resolve any problems found.


118   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           APPLY processing
           After the APPLY CHECK has completed to satisfactorily, the SMP/E APPLY can
           be executed. The APPLY process installs the maintenance into the target zones
           and associated data sets.

           ACCEPT processing — considerations
           After you have installed maintenance into the target libraries, a decision must be
           made regarding when to update the distribution libraries via the ACCEPT
           process. You should base your decision on the maintenance being installed and
           your own processing requirements.

           A consideration for not accepting maintenance is that for corrective service, it
           has not been tested and therefore, may be found in error at a later date.

           Considerations for accepting maintenance are:
              If the SYSMODs are not accepted and you perform a system generation, the
              maintenance may be regressed and must be reapplied.
              If a SYSMOD must be restored, the work increases with the number of
              SYSMODs that have been applied but not accepted. All the intersecting
              SYSMODs must be restored, and then all the desired SYSMODs must be
              reapplied.

           ACCEPT CHECK and ACCEPT processing
           ACCEPT CHECK processing is used to verify that the SYSMODs will be
           accepted correctly. ACCEPT processing accepts maintenance into the SMP/E
           environment. ACCEPT places maintenance permanently into the distribution
           zone and associated data sets.


8.3.2 PE PTF inadvertently applied on system
           There are times that a PE PTF may be applied to your system. Should this
           happen, here are several courses of actions you may consider:
              Apply corrective APAR/PTF fix if available.
              RESTORE PTF in error if not already accepted.
              Leave the PTF in place if the reported PE symptom is not significant.
              Put in place operator procedures to restrict access to reported areas of
              exposure.
              Request a FIXTEST for the reported problem from the software service.
              Request a USERMOD code bypass for the reported problem from software
              service.



                                            Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   119
8.4 APARs
                An Authorized Problem Analysis Report (APAR) fix, provides service explicitly
                requested by a customer to fix a problem that has occurred in an IBM system
                control program or licensed program. An APAR fix is a temporary fix that is
                normally replaced by a PTF. For a complete explanation of SYSMODs and their
                relationships, refer to Chapter 4, “Sysmod Types and Relationships”, in Standard
                Packaging Rules for MVS-Based products, SC23-3695.


8.4.1 APAR management
                PTFs, when available, should always be applied, rather than the associated
                APAR. However, this cannot always be done for several reasons. First, there is
                usually a delay of two to three weeks between the time the PTF and the APAR
                are closed. Second, there may not be a PTF available for the problem you are
                encountering.

                PTFs require all previous PTFs affecting the modules involved to be included as
                REQ, PRE, and IFREQ. APARs only define as requisites those SYSMODs for
                which the APAR has code dependencies. Then a PTF can ask for more PTFs to
                be applied than an APAR.

                When an emergency fix is needed and the PTF is still not available or requires
                other PTFs, you could apply the APAR as a bypass.

                When APARs are applied by SMP/E, some potential regression messages may
                be encountered. See 8.6, “APAR and USERMOD SMP/E regression” on
                page 123.

                PTFs will supersede (SUP) their corresponding APARs, so the APARs will not
                have to be removed when the PTF is processed.

                APAR fixes should NEVER be accepted. The corresponding PTFs should be
                processed as a final solution.


8.4.2 APAR naming conventions
                The APAR naming convention for IBMLink is as follows:

                PQxxxxxz
                    Q represents the second character of the APAR prefix.
                    xxxxx represents the number of the APAR.
                    z represents A for IMS version 6 and F for IMS version 7.




120   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
         For instance: APAR PQ04906 is named PQ04906A in version 6, and APAR
         PQ33460 is named PQ33460F.

         One APAR may result in multiple SYSMODs if it affects more than one
         component or FMID. The prefix of each SYSMOD varies depending on these
         FMIDs. Table 8-2 shows what prefixes are associated to some FMIDs.

         Table 8-2 SYSMOD prefix associates to FMIDs
                          IMS 6.1                                      IMS 7.1

              HMK6600                  AQ                 HMK7700                   DQ

              JMK6601                  VQ                  JMK7701                  AQ

              JMK6603                  WQ                  JMK7702                  VQ

              JMK6604                  XQ                  JMK7703                  GQ

         For instance:
            PQ31581 affects FMID HMK7700 so the SMP/E SYSMOD name is DQ31581
            PQ31618 affects FMID JMK7701, so the SMP/E SYSMOD name is AQ31618

         This information is documented in the PSP file for each release under the
         “General Information Section”.



8.5 USERMODs
         USERMODs are code changes for specific customer requirements. Code
         changes can be made by both, customers and IBM based on specific needs.


8.5.1 USERMOD management
         Periodically, IMS support provides USERMODs to customers for the following
         reasons:
            As an APAR fixtest, to ensure that a problem reported by an APAR is
            corrected and/or to provide relief until the APAR/PTF is available.
            As a circumvention to a problem. This is to provide relief until the final fix is
            available.
            As a trap to obtain additional documentation necessary to diagnose and
            trouble shoot a problem.

         USERMODs should NEVER be accepted. As mentioned in 7.2.7, “Applying and
         accepting maintenance” on page 98 APPLY REDO processing should be performed
         after every system definition for USERMODs.


                                            Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   121
8.5.2 USERMOD naming conventions
                The naming conventions for APARs and USERMODs varies depending on the
                type of USERMOD.

                Fixtest for an APAR
                The fixtest for an APAR naming convention is as follows:

                FQxxxxxz:
                    F identifies this as a fixtest.
                    Q indicates the second character of the APAR currently being used.
                    xxxxx is the number portion of the APAR associated with this fixtest.
                    z is the version of this fixtest (A=1st, B=2nd, etc.).

                For instance:
                    The first fixtest for APAR PQ00014 will be named ‘FQ00014A’.
                    The second fixtest for APAR PQ00014 will be named 'FQ00014B'.

                Relief for an APAR
                The naming convention for the relief for an APAR is as follows:

                RQxxxxxz:
                    R identifies this as a relief.
                    Q indicates the second character of the APAR currently being used.
                    xxxxx is the number portion of the APAR associated with this fixtest.
                    z is the version of this fixtest (A=1st, B=2nd, etc.).

                For instance:
                    The first relief code for APAR PQ00243 will be named ‘RQ00243A’.
                    The second relief code for APAR PQ00243 will be named 'RQ00243B'.

                Fixtest and relief for an APAR
                The naming convention for the fixtest and relief for an APAR is as follows:

                PZxxxxx:
                    P is the APAR prefix depending on the FMID/COMPID.
                    Z is the version of the fixtest relief (A=first, B=second, and so on).
                    xxxxx is the number portion of the APAR associated with this fixtest.

                If the code in APAR PQ31582 affects the 'HMK7700' FMID, the name of the
                corresponding USERMOD is 'DA31582'.




122   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
       Trap or bypass that does not have an APAR number
       The naming convention for the trap or bypass that does not have an APAR
       number is as follows:

       PZxxxxx:
          P is the APAR prefix depending on the FMID/COMPID.
          Z is the last character of the fix name supplied by the internal CLIST.
          xxxxx is the number portion supplied by the internal CLIST.

       If the name provided by the internal CLIST is KN57799T affects the JMK7701
       component, the SYSMOD name is 'AT57799'.



8.6 APAR and USERMOD SMP/E regression
       USERMODs and APARs change the code of one or a set of elements. They
       define only required prerequisites in the ++PRE statement. New maintenance
       affecting these elements can cause one of the following errors:
          GIM38201 THERE IS A MODID ERROR FOR aaaaaaaa ENTRY bbbbbbbb IN SYSMOD
          ccccccc.
          GIM38202 THERE IS A MODID ERROR FOR ASSEMBLY aaaaaaaa FOR bbbbbbbb
          ENTRY ccccccc IN SYSMOD dddddddd.
          GIM31901 SYSMOD aaaaaaa DOES NOT SPECIFY bbbbbbb ON THE PRE OR SUP
          OPERAND. bbbbbbb IS THE RMID FOR ccccccc dddddddd THAT IS CURRENTLY
          INSTALLED.
          GIM31902 SYSMOD aaaaaaa DOES NOT SPECIFY bbbbbbb ON THE PRE OR SUP
          OPERAND. bbbbbbb IS THE UMID FOR ccccccc dddddddd THAT IS CURRENTLY
          INSTALLED.

       This may cause regression messages to be encountered when processing IMS
       supplied APARs and USERMODs. To determine if the regression actually took
       place, perform the following:
          Look at the prerequisite on the SYSMOD, and determine if the prerequisite
          match the PTF
          Look at the code to see if there are is any dependencies or intersections
          Contact the IBM support center for assistance

       If no actual regression will occur, you can ignore these messages and specify a
       bypass id.




                                        Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   123
8.7 Other IMS maintenance considerations
                There are other maintenance processes that an IMS system programmer must
                perform to maintain a smooth executing IMS environment. The concatenation
                order of system libraries (SYSLIB), reorganization of the RECON data sets and
                the upgrade of the operating system are discussed in this section.


8.7.1 System libraries concatenation
                The SYSLIB concatenation is used during the assembly process to retrieve
                macros and copy statements as specified in the assembly source. This
                concatenation will vary depending on the process you are following and the IMS
                release you are using. For SMP/E target and distribution zones, this
                concatenation can be defined via the SYSLIB DDDEF. For IMS system definition
                stage 1, it is defined in the JCL by having the SYSLIB DD statement and for IMS
                system definition stage 2, the SYSLIB DD statements are generated based on
                the IMSGEN macro definitions in stage 1.

                Syslib concatenation for pre-IMS Version 7 systems
                With pre-IMS Version 7 systems, you should use the following concatenation
                order for SMP/E APPLY processing:
                    IMS.OPTIONS
                    SMPMTS
                    IMS.MACLIB
                    IMS.GENLIB
                    IMS.GENLIBA
                    IMS.GENLIBB
                    MVS Macro Libraries

                With pre-IMS Version 7 systems, you should use the following concatenation
                order for SMP/E ACCEPT processing:
                    IMS.OPTIONS
                    IMS.GENLIB
                    IMS.GENLIBA
                    IMS.GENLIBB
                    MVS Macro Libraries

                With pre-IMS Version 7 systems, you should use the following concatenation
                order for IMS system definition stage 1:
                    IMS.GENLIB
                    IMS.GENLIBA
                    IMS.GENLIBB




124   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
         With pre-IMS Version 7 systems, you should use the following concatenation
         order for IMS system definition stage 2:
            IMS.OPTIONS
            IMS.GENLIB
            IMS.GENLIBA
            IMS.GENLIBB
            MVS Macro Libraries

         Syslib concatenation for IMS Version 7 systems
         With IMS Version 7 systems, you should use the following concatenation order
         for SMP/E APPLY processing:
            IMS.OPTIONS
            SMPMTS
            IMS.SDFSMAC
            MVS Macro Libraries
            SYS1.PP.MACLIB added for V7 (concept 14 macros, usually
            SYS1.SASMMAC2 or ASM.SASMMAC2)

         With IMS Version 7 systems, you should use the following concatenation order
         for SMP/E ACCEPT processing:
            IMS.OPTIONS
            IMS.ADFSMAC
            MVS Macro Libraries
            SYS1.PP.MACLIB added for V7 (concept 14 macros)

         With IMS Version 7 systems, you should use the following concatenation order
         for IMS system definition stage 1:
            IMS.ADFSMAC

         With IMS Version 7 systems, you should use the following concatenation order
         for IMS system definition stage 2:
            IMS.OPTIONS
            IMS.ADFSMAC
            MVS Macro Libraries


8.7.2 RECON maintenance
         Monitoring the status of IMS RECON data sets should be one of the IMS system
         administrator’s routine tasks. IMS RECON data sets can be considered as the
         heart of the IMS system, especially when data sharing has been enabled. Even
         without data sharing, RECON data sets are used to store recovery related




                                        Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   125
                information about subsystems, logs and utility executions along with other
                pertinent information. The RECON data sets are critical resources for IMS. If all
                RECON data sets are lost, IMS cannot continue processing and it terminates
                abnormally.

                RECON data sets are key-sequenced data set (KSDS) VSAM data sets that
                should be periodically reorganized. For recommendations and planning
                considerations about allocating RECON data sets, please refer to IMS Version 7
                DBRC Guide and Reference, SC26-9428.

                You can enter the TSO command LISTC ENT('IMS710.RECON1') ALL to
                determine the number of records, CI splits, and CA splits to give an idea if the
                RECON data sets may require reorganization. Another reasonable time to
                consider reorganizing the RECON data sets is when one of them is in a
                DISCARDED state. A RECON data set can become discarded by IMS due to a
                problem, or by issuing a DBRC change command.

                The RECON data sets can be reorganized by both an on-line process and a
                batch process. This process should be done during a slower period of processing
                because copying the RECON data sets from one data set to another may affect
                the IMS processing performance.

                If a RECON data set is discarded by IMS, you should at the minimum perform the
                delete and define step for the data set that has been discarded, to maintain two
                RECON data sets and one spare. The other RECON data sets could then be
                reorganized at a slower processing period.

                Following is a process that could be used to reorganize the RECON data sets. To
                execute the process while online IMS systems are accessing RECONs, the
                RECON data sets need to be dynamically allocated:
                1. Enter the DBRC command to determine the status of the RECON data sets. If
                   entering DBRC commands from the OS/390 MCS or E-MCS console, be sure
                   to enter the period at the end of the command or the IMS system will issue the
                   message DFS972A *IMS AWAITING MORE INPUT*. The syntax of the
                   command is as follows when entered as an IMS command:
                        /RML DBRC='RECON STATUS'.
                    This command can also be executed by submitting a job similar to the one in
                    Example 8-2. The command to be used LIST.RECON STATUS is provided in the
                    SYSIN stream.
                    You may also want to delete unnecessary log information from the RECON by
                    issuing DELETE.LOG INACTIVE command before starting the reorganization.
                    This can be done in the same job, as in our example.




126   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Example 8-2 Job for executing DBRC command
//JOUKO5RL JOB CLASS=A,MSGCLASS=X,REGION=4M
//******************************************
//*     USE: RECON LIST
//******************************************
//D        EXEC PGM=DSPURX00
//STEPLIB DD DISP=SHR,DSN=IMS710F.SDFSRESL
//SYSPRINT DD SYSOUT=*
//SYSUDUMP DD SYSOUT=*
//*-----------------------------------------
//SYSIN DD *
LIST.RECON STATUS
DELETE.LOG INACTIVE
//*


2. Example 8-3 shows the interesting part of the output from the command.

Example 8-3 LIST.RECON STATUS before starting the reorganization
-DDNAME-      -STATUS-       -DATA SET NAME-
  RECON1        COPY1          IMS710F.RECON1
  RECON2        COPY2          IMS710F.RECON2
  RECON3        SPARE          IMS710F.RECON3


3. Issue CHANGE.RECON REPLACE(RECON1) to discard RECON1. RECON2 will be
   copied to RECON3 and RECON1 will be discarded. Output of the command
   is shown in Example 8-4.

Example 8-4 Output of the CHANGE.RECON REPLACE(RECON1) command
CHANGE.RECON REPLACE(RECON1)
DSP0380I RECON2    COPY TO RECON3  STARTED
DSP0388I SSID=IMSF      FOUND
DSP0388I 0001 SSYS RECORD(S) IN THE RECON AT RECONFIGURATION
DSP0381I COPY COMPLETE, RC = 000
DSP0242I RECON1 DSN=IMS710F.RECON1
DSP0242I REPLACED BY
DSP0242I RECON3 DSN=IMS710F.RECON3
DSP0203I COMMAND COMPLETED WITH CONDITION CODE 00
DSP0220I COMMAND COMPLETION TIME 02.087 19:57:44.7


4. After the CHANGE.RECON REPLACE(RECON1) command, RECON2 is the new
   COPY1 and RECON3 is the new COPY2, and RECON1 is in DISCARDED
   status like in Example 8-5.




                                Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   127
                Example 8-5 LIST.RECON STATUS after replacing RECON1
                -DDNAME-         -STATUS-          -DATA SET NAME-
                  RECON2           COPY1             IMS710F.RECON2
                  RECON3           COPY2             IMS710F.RECON3
                  RECON1           DISCARDED         IMS710F.RECON1

                5. Now you need to delete and define the VSAM cluster for the discarded
                   RECON. Before you can delete the cluster, you must ensure there are no
                   other users, such as batch jobs, using the data set. Online IMS subsystems
                   release the RECON that has been discarded, when they next access
                   RECONs. You can force an IMS system to access the RECON by issuing
                   /RML DBRC=’RECON STATUS’. or /DIS OLDS command.

                      Note: In IMS Version 7, the command needs to be issued in every
                      subsystem that is sharing the same RECON data sets. In IMS Version 8,
                      the RECON reconfiguration can be automatically propagated to all sharing
                      subsystems by using the Structured Call Interface (SCI). This feature is
                      called Automatic RECON Loss Notification.

                6. Delete and define the discarded RECON by using the appropriate attributes.
                   It is a good practice to store the IDCAMS statements for each RECON, since
                   you may want to use the same attributes that were used when the RECON
                   was previously allocated.
                    For the above RECON listing, delete and define RECON1, which is currently
                    discarded. If you now display the RECON again, you will see that RECON1 is
                    now shown as a SPARE, as in Example 8-6.

                Example 8-6 LIST.RECON STATUS after redefining the VSAM cluster for RECON1
                -DDNAME-         -STATUS-          -DATA SET NAME-
                  RECON2           COPY1             IMS710F.RECON2
                  RECON3           COPY2             IMS710F.RECON3
                  RECON1           SPARE             IMS710F.RECON1


                7. Issue the CHANGE.RECON REPLACE(RECON2) command to discard RECON2.
                   RECON3 will be copied to RECON1 and RECON2 will be discarded.
                8. Now you need to delete and define the VSAM cluster for the discarded
                   RECON2. Before you can delete the cluster, you must ensure there are no
                   other users using the data set. Issue the /RML DBRC=’RECON STATUS’. or
                   /DIS OLDS command in all the online subsystems that are using the same
                   RECON data sets.
                9. Delete and define the discarded RECON2 by using the appropriate attributes.
                   RECON2 becomes the new spare.



128   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
          10.Issue the CHANGE.RECON REPLACE(RECON3) command to discard RECON2.
             RECON3 will be copied to RECON1 and RECON2 will be discarded.
          11.Now you need to delete and define the VSAM cluster for the discarded
             RECON3. Before you can delete the cluster, you must ensure there are no
             other users using the data set. Issue the /RML DBRC=’RECON STATUS’. or
             /DIS OLDS command in all the online subsystems that are using the same
             RECON data sets.
          12.Delete and define the discarded RECON3 by using the appropriate attributes.
             RECON3 becomes the new spare. All the VSAM clusters have now been
             redefined and RECON1 is now the COPY1 and RECON2 is COPY2 as in the
             starting point.

          You can automate this process by putting all the previous steps in the same job,
          but you need to schedule the job at a time when there are no other subsystems
          using the RECON. You must also ensure that the discarded RECON is released
          by all the sharing online systems. With only one online subsystem and no other
          users (batch jobs or utilities), you can perform the /DIS OLDS command for
          example by executing an Automated Operator BMP step that issues the
          command. With multiple systems sharing the RECON, you must propagate the
          command to the other systems.


8.7.3 Operating system upgrade
          When the operating system that IMS runs on is to be upgraded, several items
          should be verified prior to or after the upgrade. Verifying items such as the
          following can help avoid potential problems:
             Ensure that Preventative Service Planning (PSP) files for all products involved
             are reviewed.
             Ensure that both type 2 and type 4 SVCs are properly installed.
             Ensure that modules DFSMRCL0 and DFSAFMD0 are properly installed.
             Ensure that the IMS system is brought up during the maintenance window
             and that the IVP processing performed.

           Note: Refer to INSTALL/IVP ‘Dx’ steps for a complete list of the items to check
           when upgrading the operating system.




                                           Chapter 8. General maintenance recommendations   129
130   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                         9


    Chapter 9.    Managing IMS software
                  In this chapter we provide some guidelines about IMS software maintenance
                  strategies and different SMP/E philosophies that support those strategies. We
                  also explain how Parallel Sysplex can be used to improve application availability,
                  and then describe various aspects of software management related specifically
                  to IMS.

                  We discuss the considerations relating to sharing IMS libraries between
                  subsystems, assuming that the subsystems are in an IMS data sharing group.
                  We then show how this can reduce the maintenance overhead and reduce the
                  chance of experiencing system problems.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                      131
9.1 IMS software maintenance strategies
                The way your IMS environment is defined greatly impacts how IMS maintenance
                and system definitions are applied to your systems. Two areas with the most
                impact on IMS maintenance are the type of SMP/E topology used and whether or
                not IMS system libraries are shared among subsystems.


9.1.1 SMP/E structures
                IMS uses SMP/E to maintain software integrity and currency. SMP/E is the IBM
                product that also maintains OS/390 and z/OS software maintenance. SMP/E
                uses global, distribution, target zones, and libraries to RECEIVE, APPLY, and
                ACCEPT IMS maintenance to your system.

                A global zone contains SMP/E processing options and the necessary entries
                required to identify each distribution and target zone to SMP/E. Also included is
                status information and exception data for SYSMODs being processed.

                Distribution libraries contains all elements such as modules and macros used as
                input for generating a set of target libraries. The distribution libraries are
                managed by the distribution zone.

                Target libraries contain all the executable code and elements needed to run the
                IMS system. The target libraries are managed by the target zone.

                The topology of the SMP/E zones can vary from a one-to-one correlation
                between the different types of zones to a one-to-many relationship. The SMP/E
                topology used in your shop may be a variation of these and is based on the
                particular needs for your business.

                No matter which SMP/E topology you use, it is imperative that the zones and
                libraries maintained by SMP/E remain in-sync so that IMS maintenance is not
                inadvertently regressed (regression commonly occurs during the IMS system
                generation process).


9.1.2 SMP/E zone topologies
                There are many ways that your SMP/E environment can be defined to support
                single or multiple IMS systems. Each method has merits that should be
                considered when determining how to define or change your SMP/E environment.
                Consideration should also be given to general maintenance situations such as
                preventative service, emergency service and IMS system definition when
                choosing the type of SMP/E topology to use.




132   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
SMP/E OS/390 global zone topology
The SMP/E global zone used by your IMS systems could be one that is shared
with other OS/390 products or one that is used only by the current release of
IMS.

Considerations for using one global zone for multiple OS/390 products include:
   This allows searches for dependencies between zones of different products
   on the same image.
   This allows searches for dependencies between zones of the same product
   but on different images.
   This requires only one set of SMP/E data sets related to the global zone.

Considerations for using one global zone for IMS subsystems only are:
   This requires multiple sets of SMP/E data sets, one set for each global zone
   This allows separation of functions:
   – Only IMS system programmers can update IMS zones.
   – There may be security reasons for doing so.
   – It enables independent maintainability.

Topology with one zone to one IMS subsystem
The simplest way to set up the IMS SMP/E environment is to have one zone for
each IMS subsystem. There is one set of global, distribution, and target zones
and their associated libraries for each IMS subsystem. This structure is the most
straightforward and is the easiest to understand.

This topology, however, requires the most human and system resources. The
same SMP/E processing must be done for each IMS subsystem and a unique
SMP/E environment is also required for each IMS subsystem.

Even though this is the easiest method to understand, the amount of resources
required might make this impractical in many shops.

Topology with one target library per IMS subsystem
Another SMP/E topology that can be used is to have one distribution zone for
multiple target zones. This allows for IMS maintenance to be applied
systematically across the different target zones.




                                              Chapter 9. Managing IMS software   133
                With this topology, care must be taken when performing ACCEPT processing to
                ensure that maintenance is applied to all target zones prior to performing the
                ACCEPT processing. Maintenance can also be regressed if a IMS system
                generation is performed before all outstanding IMS maintenance has been
                accepted. The APPLY REDO command in SMP/E could be used to re-apply
                maintenance that might have been regressed.

                One zone to many IMS subsystems topology
                The most complex SMP/E topology is to have one distribution zone and one
                target zone used by multiple IMS subsystems. These zones create a base set of
                IMS libraries that are then used by multiple IMS subsystems. The libraries
                required for IMS system generation must then be propagated from this base
                SMP/E system to each IMS system.

                Considerations for using this strategy are:
                    IMS SMP/E processing is only performed one time.
                    Only one set of SMP/E data sets are required.
                    Requires a manual process to propagate data sets to each IMS subsystem.
                    May incur greater number of system generation problems due to manual
                    processes required.

                Considerable system and human resources can be saved by using this topology.
                However, you should greatly consider the manual processes also required for this
                scenario when choosing this or any topology.

                  Note: To ease the maintenance, we recommend that SDFSRESL does not
                  contain any user-customized exits or dynamic allocation modules. These
                  modules should go into separate libraries and these libraries placed ahead of
                  SDFSRESL in the concatenation. We recommend having a separate library
                  for dynamic allocation members and a separate library for user exits (IMS
                  exits, database randomizers,...). If concatenated in STEPLIB, these data sets
                  need to be APF authorized.

                  If the library containing dynamic allocation members is referred to by the
                  IMSDALIB DD statement instead of the STEPLIB DD statement in the IMS
                  control region, DLI/SAS region and DBRC procedures, then it does not have
                  to be APF authorized. This enhancement was introduced in IMS Version 6
                  APARs PQ12171 and PQ29833.




134   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
9.1.3 Sharing IMS specific libraries
           When establishing an IMS maintenance environment, you should also consider if
           your IMS libraries are to be shared among IMS systems.

           One scenario is to have IMS system libraries specific for each IMS subsystem.

           A second scenario is to have several IMS subsystems share the IMS libraries.
           The IMS subsystems that share these libraries would most likely share several
           factors in common; for example, they support the same IMS applications and
           they are all development or production IMS subsystems. Sharing IMS libraries
           would minimize the maintenance implementation process.

           Some things to consider are:
              IMS subsystem specific data set names would be alias to the shared IMS
              libraries.
              Each IMS subsystem would require an additional APF authorized data set
              that contains IMS specific modules such as different exits, randomizing
              modules and dynamic allocation members for RECON, OLDS, and WADS.
              (The library containing dynamic allocation members does not need to be
              APF-authorized if referred using the IMSDALIB DD statement).
              Each IMS subsystem would need a unique suffix so that uniqueness is
              maintained between IMS suffixed modules residing in the shared libraries.

           For more information of sharing libraries in a Parallel Sysplex environment, refer
           to 9.2.7, “Sharing IMS online data sets” on page 140.


9.2 Configuring IMS libraries for availability
           In this section, we talk about how to configure your IMS data sets in a manner
           that will make it easier to introduce a change into the environment, while still
           providing for fast and simple backout should any problems arise. The
           methodology works for both a single IMS subsystem and also a group of
           subsystems doing sysplex data sharing.

           The following sections are based on the previous IBM Redbook Parallel Sysplex -
           Software Management for Availability, SG24-5451. These sections contain some
           updates to information from this book.

            Tip: In as far as possible, we strongly recommend sharing as many data sets
            as possible between IMS subsystems in a data sharing group. The main
            benefit of this is reduced operational complexity, eliminating the opportunity for
            multiple versions of an element getting out of step with each other, or of you
            accidentally using (or even deleting!) the wrong version.



                                                           Chapter 9. Managing IMS software   135
9.2.1 Rolling IMS restarts
                The tasks involved in activating a change across multiple IMS subsystems will
                vary depending on the way the subsystems are set up. It is recommended that
                the change be implemented to one IMS subsystem at a time if possible. This
                entails bringing the IMS subsystem down, implementing the change, and
                bringing the IMS subsystem back up.

                Should there be any problem with the change, only the one IMS subsystem will
                be affected and the remaining IMS subsystems continue to operate as before.
                Once the change is considered stable, it can then be implemented in the next
                IMS subsystem in the same manner and so on until it is in all IMS subsystems in
                the sysplex. In order to do this, there must be more than one SDFSRESL — one
                at the level prior to the change, and another one that contains the change. The
                change could be the application of service, or it could be a change caused by a
                change in your environment.

                To provide customers with the maximum flexibility in this process, IBM has
                committed to providing coexistence support between the current IMS and up to
                the two previous consecutive releases. This means that release migrations within
                three consecutive IMS releases can be accomplished without a sysplex-wide
                stopping of the subsystems.

                To further protect the availability of applications in a Parallel Sysplex, the
                intention is that corrective or preventive service should not require a sysplex-wide
                IPL or IMS restart. A sysplex-wide IPL is defined as a concurrent IPL of all
                systems in the sysplex at the same time. It may be necessary to install a PTF on
                all systems in the sysplex to resolve a problem, but no PTF should need to be
                installed on all systems at the same time.

                To get the maximum benefit from rolling restarts, your systems configuration
                should support both data sharing and dynamic workload balancing features such
                Shared Message Queue (SMQ) and VTAM Generic Resources. This gives you
                the ability to stop one system or subsystem at a time to implement required
                changes without impacting availability.


9.2.2 Library structure
                An obvious prerequisite to the ability to do rolling restarts is that there must be
                more than one set of software libraries available to the subsystems that share
                libraries. So while all the production IMS subsystems are running off the
                PRDLVL1 set of libraries, a change can be made to the PRDLVL2 set of libraries.
                The IMS subsystems can then be moved in a rolling manner to the PRDLVL2
                libraries. Once implementation begins, both sets of libraries will be in use until
                implementation is completed.



136   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
            If there was only one set of libraries, it would be necessary to stop all the IMS
            subsystems while the change is being installed in the libraries.


9.2.3 Facilitating rolling restarts
            DFSMS 1.5, introduced with OS/390 V2.7, introduced a new facility called
            Symbolic Alias Facility. Symbolic Alias Facility provides the ability to include a
            system symbol in a catalog alias. The alias gets resolved at the time the data set
            is allocated. This support was originally intended to help customers move to a
            shared master catalog.

            However, as well as enabling the sharing of master catalogs, there is another,
            even more significant, benefit of the Symbolic Alias Facility. Symbolic Alias
            Facility can also be used to simplify the implementation of rolling restarts for
            non-system volume products. Figure 9-1 on page 137 contains a diagram
            showing how a set of IMS subsystems are gradually moved from one set of IMS
            libraries to another, simply by changing the value of a system symbol on each
            system.


             &IMSLVL=V7R1A   &IMSLVL=V7R1A &IMSLVL=V7R1A        &IMSLVL=V7R1A   &IMSLVL=V7R1A &IMSLVL=V7R1B




              IMSA             IMSB          IMSC                 IMSA           IMSB           IMSC



                                                       All JCL says
                                                    DSN=IMS.SDFSRESL


                   IMS.V7R1A.*        IMS.V7R1B.*                       IMS.V7R1A.*       IMS.V7R1B.*

             &IMSLVL=V7R1A   &IMSLVL=V7R1B &IMSLVL=V7R1B        &IMSLVL=V7R1B   &IMSLVL=V7R1B &IMSLVL=V7R1B




              IMSA             IMSB          IMSC                 IMSA           IMSB           IMSC




                     IMS.V7R1A.       IMS.V7R1B.                       IMS.V7R1A.       IMS.V7R1B.



            Figure 9-1 Rolling restarts of IMS




                                                                Chapter 9. Managing IMS software        137
                The benefits of this approach are as follows:
                    No JCL changes are required to switch between the two sets of IMS libraries.
                    There is no need to recatalog any data set.
                    There is no need to rename any data set.
                    There is no copying involved (apart from the creating the V7R1B libraries in
                    the first place).
                    If there is a problem, all that is required is that the subsystem is stopped, the
                    system symbol changed to set it back to V7R1A, and the subsystem
                    restarted.

                Having more than one set of libraries means that the change can be
                implemented with minimal disruption — all you have to do is stop IMS, change
                the system symbol to point it at the new set of libraries, and restart it. If there is a
                problem in the new software level, all you need to do to back out the change is
                stop IMS again, change the symbol to point back at the original set of libraries,
                and restart IMS.

                At the moment, there is no official way to change a symbol without an IPL.
                However, IBM has provided a program, called SYMUPDTE, that provides the
                capability to change OS/390 System Symbols without an IPL. The SYMUPDTE
                program and some supporting documentation are available in the Additional
                Materials section for the IBM Redbook Parallel Sysplex - Managing Software for
                Availability, SG24-5451 on the Internet at the IBM Redbooks site:
                    ftp://www.redbooks.ibm.com/redbooks/SG245451/


9.2.4 HFS considerations
                The use of the Hierarchical File System (HFS) by IMS Java Application Support
                introduces some additional complexity in relation to switching between different
                service or release levels of IMS. Prior to this, you might have two sets of IMS
                libraries, each with an associated SMP/E target zone. Now, you also must have
                an HFS data set associated with each target zone. The data set name of the HFS
                data set should contain the same identifier that you use to identify your traditional
                IMS libraries.

                For example, if your SDFSRESL libraries are called IMS.V7R1A.SDFSRESL and
                IMS.V7R1B.SDFSRESL, then your HFS data set names could be something like
                OMVS.IMSV7R1A.HFS and OMVS.IMSV7R1B.HFS. This gives you the ability to
                mount whichever HFS corresponds to the traditional IMS libraries.




138   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
9.2.5 OS/390 interface considerations
           If you are going to use the mechanism we recommend, there are some things
           that you must consider. The first is the question of APF-authorized data sets. As
           APF processing does not use the master catalog (you must specify the volume
           the data set resides on if it is not SMS-managed), the system symbol that you
           use to identify the IMS libraries will not be picked up. Therefore, you must
           explicitly include all the IMS authorized libraries in the IEAAPFxx or PROGxx
           members of SYS1.PARMLIB. For example, if your libraries are called
           IMS.V7R1A.SDFSRESL and IMS.V7R1B.SDFSRESL, then you must include
           both of these libraries in the relevant SYS1.PARMLIB member.

           The next thing you must consider are the IMS SVCs, and how to handle them if
           you have more than one IMS subsystem on an OS/390 image. IMS allows you to
           specify which SVC you wish to use for each subsystem. So you could have three
           IMS subsystems on one OS/390 image, potentially each using a different SVC.

           However, as the SVCs are always downward compatible, there should not be a
           need to have more than two SVCs on an OS/390 image — one for all the
           subsystems running the current IMS release, and one for all the subsystems
           running the new level. You could just install the new SVC for the new level and
           have all the IMS subsystems use that one, but you would probably prefer to test it
           with the test subsystems before you start using it with your production systems.
           The mechanism that we suggest does not have any impact on this ability, or on
           how you manage it. The IMS SVCs are discussed in more detail in 9.4,
           “Considerations for mixed releases of IMS” on page 145.

           You should also think about the resource cleanup module (DFSMRCL0) and the
           abend formatting routine (DFSAFMD0). There is only one copy of these per
           OS/390 image, and the use of an old level of these modules by a higher level IMS
           is not supported. However, the considerations relating to these modules are
           unaffected by whether you use our suggestion or not — no matter how you
           manage your IMS libraries, you have to make sure that the version of these
           modules that you use corresponds to the highest installed release of IMS. This is
           discussed in 9.4, “Considerations for mixed releases of IMS” on page 145.

           Another thing to consider is the use of LNKLST and/or LPA for IMS libraries.
           There have been problems in the past where customers inadvertently pick up an
           old or incorrect copy of an IMS module from the LNKLST. For example, if the IMS
           STEPLIB contains a library that is not APF-authorized, IMS will attempt to find
           IMS modules in the LNKLST. In this case, it might pick up a copy of the module
           that is at a different service level (or even release level!) than the IMS in the
           STEPLIB. This can happen in any system, but especially so if there are multiple
           IMS subsystem per OS/390 image, each potentially using a different SDFSRESL
           with a different service level. For this reason, we recommend against the use of
           LNKLST for IMS.


                                                         Chapter 9. Managing IMS software   139
                IMS also provides an option to change the search order for directed load. Rather
                than using the standard search order, if you specify SRCH=1 in the IMS startup,
                LPA will be searched ahead of STEPLIB. Some installations use this as a way of
                reducing IMS CSA utilization. However, if you have multiple IMS subsystems on a
                single OS/390 image, you have to be very careful with this use of this facility. If
                you implement service to IMS.V7R1B.SDFSRESL, and the IMS startup JCL
                contains that library on the STEPLIB DD, but LPA still contains modules from
                IMS.V7R1A.SDFSRESL, you are going to end up with some modules at the old
                service level, and others at the new service level—a sure recipe for problems.
                Therefore, we recommend that you do not use this option.


9.2.6 Other methods of activating a change
                Another approach is to bring all IMS subsystems in the sysplex down at the same
                time, implement the change and bring the IMS subsystems back up. If there is a
                problem with the change, all IMS subsystems may be affected, thus reducing
                availability. In a data sharing environment, this approach would not be
                recommended. There is little benefit, more risk, and more application impact than
                is necessary in a data sharing environment.


9.2.7 Sharing IMS online data sets
                When deciding which data sets are going to be shared between the IMS
                subsystems, there are trade-offs to be made. When making the decision of what
                to share and what not to share, your maintenance strategy, change control
                policies, operational procedures, recovery implications, and so on, must all be
                taken into account.

                Maximum availability and flexibility infers that you do not share any data sets you
                do not have to. However, this increases the complexity of coordinating changes
                and managing the separate data sets, which in turn adversely affects availability.
                The more data sets that are shared the less data sets have to be kept track of
                and managed. The trade-off is that when data sets are shared, you introduce a
                single point of failure, and changes to those data sets affect multiple subsystems,
                as does a hardware or software problem with a shared data set.

                On balance, and given the availability features available in most modern DASD,
                we recommend sharing wherever possible. Even if you have a data sharing
                group, but some applications only run on a subset of systems in the group, we
                still recommend sharing all the definitions. If you want to stop certain applications
                running on some members, you can stop the transactions and the databases on
                those members. To ensure they cannot run, you could even use RACF, or an
                equivalent product, to remove that subsystem’s access to the associated
                databases.



140   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Data sets that must be shared
The following data sets must be shared between all IMS subsystems in the
sysplex:
RECONx                DBRC Recovery Control data sets.
Shared databases      Database data sets for databases participating in data
                      sharing.
Common exit library A library containing user code that must be used for all
                    IMS subsystems. These include randomizers,
                    compression routines, and so on.

The following data sets must be shared when using Shared Message Queue
(SMQ):
   Two pairs of structure recovery data sets (SRDSs).
   MVS logger offload data sets for each shared queue structure pair.
   MVS logger staging data sets are optional, but must be shared if used.

Data sets that must be unique
The following IMS data sets must be unique within the data sharing group:
Logging data sets     OLDS, RLDS, SLDS, and WADS. These data sets contain
                      IMS log records.
Message queue         QBLKS, SGMSG, LGMSG used for message queueing
data sets             in non-SMQ environments.
RDS                   Restart data set(s), contains information required for
                      recovery of the online IMS subsystem.
MODSTAT               Points to active DDNAMES.
IMSMON                IMS monitor data set, contains output from the IMS
                      monitor.
DFSTRA0x              External trace data sets, contains external trace data.
MSDB data sets        Main Storage Database data sets, checkpoint, dump, and
                      initialization data sets. MSDBs are not supported by IMS
                      sysplex data sharing.
TM SYSOUT             IMS transaction manager data sets defined by LINEGRP
                      macros.
DBRC JCLOUT           Output from DBRC GENJCL processing.
Unique exits          Library that contains routines that are unique to a specific
                      IMS subsystem.
Unique dynamic     Library that contains dynamic allocation members
allocation members unique to a particular IMS subsystem.


                                             Chapter 9. Managing IMS software   141
                SMQ checkpoint             If using Shared Message Queue (SMQ).
                data sets

                Data sets that may be shared
                The following optional IMS data set may be shared, but will probably be unique:
                DFSTCF                     Contains Time Controlled Operations (TCO) scripts. At
                                           this time, TCO does not support system symbols, so you
                                           would probably need a separate set of scripts for each
                                           IMS subsystem.

                We recommend that the following execution-time IMS data sets be shared:
                FORMAT data sets           MFS definitions, data sets included are FORMAT,
                                           FORMATA, FORMATB, and TFORMAT.
                JCLPDS data set            Contains DBRC skeletal JCL.
                Program libraries          Data sets containing application programs.
                DBDLIB                     Used in batch and contains Data Base Descriptor
                                           modules (DBD).
                PSBLIB                     Used in batch and contains Program Specification Block
                                           modules (PSB).
                Common dynamic Library that contains dynamic allocation members
                allocation members common to all subsystems, those for shared databases.

                Data sets that may be shared within same IMS release
                The following IMS data sets may also be shared, but only as long as the IMS
                subsystems sharing them are at the same release level. While it is possible that
                these libraries may be indirectly affected by service, such service would be rare,
                and would always be marked with a ++HOLD to indicate that a system
                generation is required after the service has been applied. Given the infrequence
                of such an event, we recommend that you share these data sets between all the
                members of the IMS data sharing group.
                SDFSRESL                   Contains IMS execution modules and IMS nucleus. We
                                           recommend that SDFSRESL does not contain any
                                           user-customized exits or dynamic allocation modules.
                MODBLKSx                   Contains control blocks built by IMS system definition
                                           process. Data sets included are MODBLKS, MODBLKSA,
                                           and MODBLKSB.
                MATRIXx                    Contains security tables built by IMS Security
                                           Maintenance Utility (SMU). Data sets included are
                                           MATRIX, MATRIXA, and MATRIXB.




142   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
        ACBLIBx                Contains Application Description and Database Control
                               Blocks (ACB). Data sets included are ACBLIB, ACBLIBA,
                               and ACBLIBB. These data sets are not normally affected
                               by maintenance, however different libraries are required
                               for each release of IMS.
        Exit libraries         Some exits have to reassembled using macros for the
                               corresponding release. If you are running with mixed
                               releases in a data sharing environment, you will have to
                               have a separate exit library for each release.

        The following non-execution time IMS data sets will likely be shared:
        REFERAL                Used during the MFS generation process.
        LGENIN                 Used when doing a Large Generation (LGEN) system
                               definition.
        LGENOUT                Used when doing an LGEN system definition. Output from
                               sort splitter program.
        OBJDSET                Output from system definition assembler processing.
        OPTIONS                Macro data set updated by system definition processing.

        For additional information regarding considerations for the sharing of data sets
        see the redbook IMS/ESA V6 Parallel Sysplex Migration Planning Guide for IMS
        TM and DBCTL, SG24-5461.



9.3 Cloning IMS subsystems
        In a Parallel Sysplex environment, where databases are all defined as being
        shared, and transactions can be executed on any IMS in the data sharing group,
        we recommend that you clone your IMS subsystems. This means that all the IMS
        subsystems are exactly alike and provide the same capabilities. Cloning has
        several advantages:

        Increased availability: If one IMS subsystem becomes unavailable, the other
        IMS subsystems in the data sharing group can continue to maintain application
        availability.

        Increased capacity: As the workload grows, additional IMS subsystems can
        easily be added to accommodate the workload.

        Reduced management complexity: It is much easier to set up five identical
        IMS subsystems than five completely different ones.




                                                      Chapter 9. Managing IMS software   143
                Various factors may force subsystems to be other than clones of one another.
                This can occur for many reasons, some of which are:
                    A specific device may have to be allocated to a specific IMS subsystem.
                    Multiple Systems Coupling (MSC) and Intersystem Communications (ISC)
                    definitions have to be unique. The use of Shared Message Queue (SMQ)
                    feature can eliminate the need for this.
                    Application requirements such as the need to process certain functions on a
                    particular system.

                If multiple IMS subsystems use the same functions and features, but require a
                different set of resources, the same set of libraries (SDFSRESL, MODBLKS, and
                MATRIX) can be used to support these different IMS subsystems. This is done by
                specifying a different value for the SUFFIX parameter on the IMSGEN macro in
                the stage 1 input. This will cause IMS system definition to build different modules
                containing blocks unique for each IMS subsystem. During control region
                initialization only control blocks for that specific system will be loaded.


9.3.1 Cloning methods for IMS
                The task of cloning your IMS subsystems is greatly simplified if you can share as
                many IMS data sets as possible. See 9.2.7, “Sharing IMS online data sets” on
                page 140 for lists of IMS system data sets that can be shared.

                There are valid concerns that sharing data sets creates a single point of failure.
                However, modern DASD features such as RAID, Dual Copy, and mirroring reduce
                the risk of hardware failures to acceptable levels.

                Data sets that cannot be shared are basically those data sets that are written to
                or updated by an IMS subsystem. When creating a new cloned IMS subsystem, it
                is only necessary to allocate new, empty versions of these data sets. Sample
                JCL for allocating data sets can be found in the IVP process.

                When creating a new IMS subsystem, many customers build the new
                SDFSRESL, MODBLKS, and MATRIX data sets by doing an ALL IMS system
                definition. As of Version 6 this will no longer be adequate as IMS system
                definition no longer creates all required modules. The non-system definition
                elements can be built by running job DFSJCLIN in data set IMS.ADFSISRC.




144   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
9.3.2 IMS naming guidelines
           Most customers already have naming standards, so existing standards must be
           considered when developing a naming convention for IMS. Good naming
           conventions can reduce the complexity of managing the IMS subsystems in the
           sysplex. Naming conventions should be considered for the following
           components:
              IMS data sharing group names
              IMS shared queue group names
              IMS VTAM Generic Resources group names
              Subsystem names - IMS, FDBR, IRLM
              Data set names
              Started task and job names

           The IMS system data set names should ideally reflect the IMS group in which a
           data set is used, and whether it is used by a unique subsystem within that group.
           For example, assume the IMSID is IMex, where e is for sysplex environment
           (for instance, D for development sysplex, P for production sysplex) and x is 0 for
           the group name, 1 - 9, A-Z for the individual IMSIDs. The following shows a
           naming convention:
              IMS.imsgrp.ACBLIB --> IMS.IMP0.ACBLIB
              IMP0 is the group ID that can be used for the shared library names
              IMS.imsid.WADS0 --> IMS.IMP1.WADS0
              IMP1 is IMSID and it can be for the non-shared library names for IMP1

           For additional suggestions regarding naming conventions see the redbook
           IMS/ESA V6 Parallel Sysplex Migration Planning Guide for IMS TM and
           DBCTL,SG24-5461.



9.4 Considerations for mixed releases of IMS
           Changes in releases of IMS do not require changes to databases or to
           application programs. This is assuming of course that all rules have been
           followed, as new releases tend to enforce some rules that were not previously
           enforced. New releases normally change the format of the RECON data sets.

           Utility programs are provided to UPGRADE current RECON data sets to the
           upgraded format. Toleration service is also provided for prior releases to enable
           them to share the RECONs in their new format. Refer to manuals IMS Version 7
           DBRC Guide and Reference, SC26-9428 and IMS Version 7 Release Planning
           Guide, GC26-9437 for information of the RECON upgrade process.




                                                         Chapter 9. Managing IMS software   145
                Probably the most important consideration with mixed releases is that IMS
                ACBLIB cannot be shared between different releases of IMS. If you have to run
                with two ACBLIBs for an extended period, there is a risk that a change might be
                made to just one ACBLIB (by accident) resulting in possible database corruption.

                This is a valid concern, however strong change management should ensure that
                this does not happen, and the alternate is a data sharing group outage as all the
                members are moved to the new release at one time. IBM recommends that
                customers minimize the amount of time they run with different releases of a
                database manager in the one data sharing group. This recommendation is purely
                to minimize the additional operational complexity (such as keeping your ACBLIBs
                in sync) that is caused by having mixed releases in a data sharing group.

                When upgrading to a new release of IMS, any user-written exits that use IMS
                macros should be reassembled with the macros from the new release. This
                means that separate load libraries for these exits will need to be maintained for
                each release.

                Modules DFSMRCL0 (resource cleanup) and DFSAFMD0 (abend formatting)
                must reside in LPA. Each new release of these modules will work with previous
                releases that are supported. The versions shipped with previous releases may
                not work with higher level releases—so versions from the most current release
                must be used.

                The type 2 and type 4 SVCs generally work with previous releases, but the
                manual IMS Version 7 Release Planning Guide, GC26-9437 needs to be
                examined for specific release compatibility. In release 5.1 the Dynamic SVC
                Utility (DFSUSVC0) was provided to allow the type 2 SVC to be updated
                dynamically, this updated version lasting until the next system IPL.

                The IMS Version 7 Release Planning Guide, GC26-9437 and corresponding
                manuals for each release provides chapters on migration considerations and
                coexistence. These chapters need to be reviewed when changing releases as
                they contain specific information relating to the new release. If skipping releases,
                we recommend reviewing the release planning guides for each release being
                skipped.

                PSP buckets are updated with information relating to dependencies between
                different products as well as between different releases of IMS; be sure to review
                this when planning an upgrade.


9.4.1 Effect of mixed releases on key IMS control blocks
                Changes in key IMS control blocks from release to release are normal and
                should be expected.



146   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           The most noticeable of these is changes in the ACBs. Every time you move to a
           new release, an ACB generation specifying BUILD PSB=ALL is required, which
           will rebuild the ACBLIB. ACBs built on different releases are not compatible, so
           you will need separate libraries for each release.


9.4.2 Effect of mixed releases on IMS system definition
           IMS system definition will need to be performed using the corresponding libraries
           for each release. Normally the macro input from earlier releases will work on
           higher releases. When macros and/or parameters are no longer used, they are
           usually not flagged in error, rather they are ignored for compatibility reasons.
           Changes to stage 1 input macros are not downward compatible, so using a new
           macro or new keyword will not work on a previous release and will be flagged in
           error.

           Compatibility issues are documented in IMS Version 7 Release Planning Guide,
           GC26-9437 and the corresponding manual for each other release.


9.4.3 Sharing IMS data sets in mixed releases
           Generally speaking, the list of data sets that can be shared in a mixed release
           environment is the same as the data sets that can be shared when all sharing
           systems are at the same release level (see 9.2.7, “Sharing IMS online data sets”
           on page 140), with the following exceptions:
           SDFSRESL               IMS execution modules and IMS nucleus
           MODBLKSx               IMS control blocks built by IMS system definition
           MATRIXx                Security tables built by SMU
           ACBLIBx                application control blocks (ACBs) built by ACBGEN
           User exits             Libraries containing exits that use IMS macros

           This is a general list and may not be all inclusive depending on requirements of a
           specific release.



9.5 Miscellaneous information
           There are some situations that can cause the IMS target zone and product data
           sets to be out of synchronization with either the corresponding distribution zone
           or SMP/E. These situations can be corrected by rebuilding the target zone and
           libraries from the distribution zone and libraries. This process is documented in
           explicit detail in information APAR II08928. If you have any questions regarding
           this, contact the IBM support center.




                                                         Chapter 9. Managing IMS software   147
                Once a function or feature of IMS has been defined by using the system
                definition process, the target zones and data sets will have to be rebuilt from the
                distribution zones and data sets if you wish to remove it. Failure to rebuild the
                target environment after a function/feature is removed can cause subsequent
                apply processing to not work properly with unpredictable results. This is a
                common problem for IMS subsystems that do not have Fast Path because the
                IVP process implements Fast Path. This process of rebuilding the target
                environment is a subset of the information provided in APAR II08928.

                When installing a new release and/or processing service, be sure to look at the
                PSP buckets, as they may contain critical information.




148   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                     Part 2


Part        2     Problem management
                  and technical support
                  In this part of the book, we discuss topics regarding managing problems in your
                  IMS systems. We make suggestions that should help you gather the necessary
                  documentation to effectively diagnose problems. Also discussed are available
                  tools that can be used to order software and maintenance, report problems, and
                  obtain documentation.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                   149
150   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                  10


   Chapter 10.    Problem management
                  In this chapter, we offer several recommendations about problem management.
                  Although you cannot diagnose most of the problems that could appear in your
                  IMS systems, there are some strategies and methodologies that could help IBM
                  to fix them as soon as possible. Some advice is also given about gathering
                  information and how to report it.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                 151
10.1 Identifying problems
                IMS can encounter multiple types of problems. The first step is always to
                examine the system and look for the main symptoms. The manual IMS Version 7
                Diagnosis Guide and Reference, LY37-3738, has seven different procedures to
                follow based on the type of the problem. The type of failure keywords are
                presented below. Select the one that best describes the failure, and then go the
                procedure in the manual for that type of failure. One failure may have several of
                these symptoms.

                Use these keywords as a main subject when you report problems to IBM:
                ABENDxxx                   System terminates abnormally with a system abend
                                           completion code xxx. It is commonly called system abend.
                                           An abend produces an SVCDUMP, SYSABEND dump, or
                                           SYSUDUMP.
                ABENDUxxxx                 An IMS application program terminates abnormally with
                                           an abend completion code xxxx. Also called as user
                                           abend. An abend produces a SYSABEND dump,
                                           SVCDUMP, or SYSUDUMP.
                DOC                        A deficiency is found in documentation through omission
                                           or inaccuracy.
                PERFM                      Performance is other than what is expected.
                MSGx                       Unexpected messages are shown by IMS.
                INCORROUT                  Output is missing or incorrect.
                WAIT/LOOP                  There is no response from IMS functions.



10.2 Setting your system for gathering information
                There are some parameters you can adjust in order to gather most of the
                information about a problem. You can find more information about tuning tips in
                the following manuals:
                    OS/390 MVS Diagnosis: Tools and Services Aids, SY28-1085
                    OS/390 MVS Initialization and Tuning Guide, SC28-1751




152   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
10.2.1 OS/390 settings
           The following sections describe some specific OS/390 recommendations for
           gathering diagnostic information.

           Set system trace table size to 999K
           The default value for system trace table size is only 64K, which is usually too
           small. You can modify it with TRACE ST,999K MVS command. You can display
           the current value with display command D TRACE. You can specify it at
           SYS1.PARMLIB(COMMNDxx) member.

           Set MVS master trace size on 72K
           The default size for MVS master trace size is only 24K, and that is room for only
           336 log messages approximately. You can modify it with TRACE MT,72K. Master
           table keeps last operator commands and last events.

           Turn on the MVS common storage tracking function
           Use this function to track ownership of CSA/ECSA. Set DIAGxx in IPL
           parameters or use SET DIAG=xx operator command. An example of DIAGxx
           member: VSM TRACK CSA(ON). SVC dumps and Resource Measurement Facility
           (RMF) reports will provide CSA/ECSA ownership information with jobname, time,
           and requesting module information.

           Ensure adequate CHNGDUMP MAXSPACE is specified
           The default size for the dumps is 500M. You should change it to 2500M to hold
           the internal SVC dump. 2500M is the standard for large multi-address space
           SVC dumps. Having too small a size specified for the dumps causes partial
           dumps to be taken, and often partial dumps are unusable or inadequate in
           problem resolving. You must ensure as well that your local page data sets are
           large enough to contain their normal peak load plus additional SVC dumps.

           Automatic data set allocation
           Ensure that automatic dump data set allocation is in place.

           Use DUMPDS NAME=, DUMPDS ADD, DUMPDS ALLOC=ACTIVE. For more
           information, refer to the following manuals:
              OS/390 MVS Diagnosis: Tools and Services Aids, SY28-1085
              OS/390 MVS System Commands, GC28-1781




                                                         Chapter 10. Problem management   153
10.2.2 IMS settings
                The following sections describe some specific IMS recommendations for
                gathering diagnostic information.

                Specify IMS control region parameter FMTO=D
                Setting IMS parameter FMTO=D produces an SDUMP for terminating and
                non-terminating errors.

                Non-terminating errors include:
                    IMS dynamic allocation failures
                    Some External Subsystem Attach Facility (ESAF) failures

                Specify SYSMDUMP DD
                You should specify SYSMDUMP DD in the JCL of the following regions:
                    IMS control region
                    IMS DL/I separate address space (DLISAS) region
                    IMS DBRC region

                Thus, if SDUMP fails, then the SYSMDUMP specification is used.

                The following dump options should be specified in the member
                SYS1.PARMLIB(IEADMR00) to ensure that adequate areas of MVS storage are
                dumped to diagnose the problem under most circumstances:
                    SDATA=(CSA,GRSQ,LSQA,RGN,SQA,SUM,SWA,TRT)

                Specify SYSUDUMP DD
                Specify SYSUDUMP DD in the JCL of the following regions:
                    IMS dependent regions

                The SYSUDUMP specification will be used IMS dependent regions for failure
                events.

                The following dump options should be specified in the MVS
                SYS1.PARMLIB(IEADMP00) member to ensure that adequate areas of MVS
                storage are dumped:
                    SDATA=(CB,ERR,SUM) PDATA=(JPA,LPA,PSW,REGS,SA,SLPS)

                Table traces
                Several traces are available, but you should turn the following IMS traces on:
                    Dispatcher trace
                    Scheduler trace
                    DL/I trace
                    Lock traces


154   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
        Specify the following options in the IMS PROCLIB member, DFSVSMxx:
           DISP=ON, SCHD=ON, DL/I=ON, LOCK=ON

        You can also use /TRA SET ON TABLE [DISP, SCHD, DL/I, LOCK] IMS command
        to turn them on. Other traces are normally used only if requested by IBM support
        center.

        External trace environment
        IMS external tracing allows for IMS trace table output to be placed on IMS trace
        data sets rather than on the IMS OLDS when:
           DISP=OUT option is used in the DFSVSMxx PROCLIB member
           LOG option is used with the IMS trace commands

        External trace data sets are allocated in the following order:
        1. DASD JCL - DFSTRA01 and DFSTRA02 DDNAMES
        2. DASD MDA - DFSTRA01 and DFSTRA02 dynamic allocation members
        3. TAPE MDA - DFSTRA0T dynamic allocation member
        4. IMS OLDS - if none of above is found



10.3 CQS settings
        Specify the Common Queue Server (CQS) execution parameter
        BPECFG=nnnnnnnn. It points to the nnnnnnn PROCLIB member where CQS
        trace definitions are set. Example 10-1 shows the definitions for the most
        common CQS traces.

        Example 10-1 CQS Traces Parameters
        DEFINITIONS FOR BPE SYSTEM TRACES
        TRCLEV=( AWE, LOW, BPE) /* AWE SERVER TRACE *
        TRCLEV=( CBS, LOW, BPE) /* CONTROL BLK SRVCS TRACE *
        TRCLEV=( DISP, LOW, BPE) /* DISPATCHER TRACE *
        TRCLEV=( LATC, LOW, BPE) /* LATCH TRACE *
        TRCLEV=( SSRV, LOW, BPE) /* GEN SYS SERVICES TRACE *
        TRCLEV=( STG, LOW, BPE) /* STORAGE TRACE *
        TRCLEV=( USRX, LOW, BPE) /* USER EXIT TRACE *
        -- DEFINITIONS FOR CQS TRACES
        TRCLEV=( CQS, LOW, CQS) /* CQS GENERAL TRACE *
        TRCLEV=( STR, LOW, CQS) /* CQS STRUCTURE TRACE *
        TRCLEV=( INTF, LOW, CQS) /* CQS INTERFACE TRACE *




                                                       Chapter 10. Problem management   155
10.4 Preservation of standard documentation
                You should consider implementing some automation procedures to preserve the
                following documentation near the time of error:
                    MVS console (SYSLOG)
                    JES joblogs (IMS control region, IMS DLI separate address space, IMS
                    DBRC region, IMS IRLM address space, CQS regions, dependent regions
                    suspicious, and any other address space involved)
                    IMS master console log
                    An IFCEREP1 software detail report produced from SYS1.LOGREC
                    Any dumps produced
                    IMS OLDS and SLDS
                    Additional manual dump intervention

                  Attention: In a sysplex environment it could be necessary to keep data sets
                  and logs from other members of the sysplex.



10.5 Troubleshooting
                Before reporting IBM your problem is highly recommended you use IBM
                databases to match if any other customer has already reported your problem.

                You can find the support information by navigating through the IMS Web site:
                    http://www.ibm.com/ims

                The IMS support Web site is discussed in more detail later in section “IMS
                support Web site” on page 162. You can also access IBM databases from the
                IBM technical support Web site at:
                    http://techsupport.services.ibm.com/server/solveproblems

                Figure 10-1 on page 157 shows how IBM Support for zSeries products Web
                page looks like.

                You can select several options:
                    Service bulletins
                    Search technical databases
                    Report problems
                    Forums
                    Manage performance



156   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Figure 10-1 zSeries Web site technical support

                 Refer to Figure 10-2, showing some search engines that are provided to look for
                 error messages and keywords in APAR databases.

                 This site provide the following options:
                    Error messages
                    General APAR database
                    Enhanced APAR database
                    PSP buckets
                    Service bulletins and advisories


                                                              Chapter 10. Problem management   157
Figure 10-2 Trouble shooting



10.6 Reporting problems
                  When no fix is already available, you can submit your problem and open a new
                  Problem Management Record (PMR). You can now do this from IBM Web site.
                  Figure 10-3 shows how it currently appears.




158    IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Figure 10-3 Reporting selection Web site




                                           Chapter 10. Problem management   159
160   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                     11


   Chapter 11.    Tools for technical support
                  IMS software, maintenance, and technical support are available from many
                  different IBM sources. In this chapter we discuss some of the sources available.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                     161
11.1 IMS support Web site
                Currently, IMS support Web site (Figure 11-1) can be used to download PTFs to
                your system:
                    http://www.ibm.com/software/data/ims/support.html

                You must register to use this service just to provide an e-mail address. After
                selecting a PTF, an order number is assigned to you. Two messages are sent to
                that e-mail address:
                    The first e-mail is the acknowledgement of your order. It contains the number
                    of the order and you can use it to check the status of the order via the same
                    Web site. This message should arrive no later than 5 minutes.
                    The second e-mail gives you some information about where to find the
                    selected PTF, other PTFs that are requisites for the main one, and some text
                    files with a more detailed explanation. This message can take about 30
                    minutes.

                You need an FTP client to download the PTFs from the IBM FTP server. That
                e-mail gives you another userid and passwords to connect to the IBM FTP
                server. The PTFs are downloaded to your workstation in tersed files using FTP.
                You must send the files to your OS/390 host and unterse them before applying.

                If you need an application for untersing files, a version for OS/390 (TRSMAIN)
                is available via anonymous FTP from ftp.software.ibm.com in
                /s390/mvs/tools/packlib:
                    ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/s390/mvs/tools/packlib

                Instructions for downloading the TRSMAIN program and a procedure for
                installing it from the IBM FTP site to OS/390 system can be found at:
                    ftp://ftp.software.ibm.com/s390/mvs/tools/packlib/README.HTML




162   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
        Figure 11-1 IMS support Web site



11.2 TechSupport Web site
        The IBM TechSupport Web site allows you to access technical support for many
        platforms. To access the Web site use URL:
           http://techsupport.services.ibm.com/




                                                  Chapter 11. Tools for technical support   163
                 Figure 11-2 shows the Home page for the TechSupport Web site.




Figure 11-2 TechSupport Home Web site




164    IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
        Enhanced HOLDDATA
        Enhanced HOLDDATA is available from the TechSupport Web site.The following
        URL will bring you directly to the HOLDDATA
           http://techsupport.services.ibm.com/390holddata.html



11.3 ShopzSeries
        ShopzSeries is a Web application that allows you to order z/OS, z/OS.e and
        OS/390 software over the Internet. You can also use this site to review your
        software licenses for all zSeries and S/390 platforms, including z/OS, z/OS.e,
        OS/390, z/VM, VM/ESA and VSE/ESA.

        For getting service from in ShopzSeries, you can order and receive corrective or
        preventive service for z/OS and OS/390 electronically over the Internet or by
        standard physical media if you prefer. Service in ShopzSeries reduces your
        research time and effort by using your uploaded SMP/E Consolidated Software
        Inventory (CSI) to ensure all applicable service, including reach-ahead service,
        for the installed FMIDS in the target zones is selected.

        The ShopzSeries Web site is available for all to visit and explore the product
        catalog, but orders can only be accepted from users in the following countries:
        Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy,
        Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom,
        United States. Support for other countries is planned.

        ShopzSeries is IBM's strategic method for ordering and delivering the electronic
        service on the zSeries platform. Visit the Web site for updated details. The
        ShopzSeries Web site is accessed with the following URL:
           https://www14.software.ibm.com/webapp/ShopzSeries/ShopzSeries.jsp




                                                   Chapter 11. Tools for technical support   165
11.3.1 ShopzSeries features
                ShopzSeries has several features that make this product worth using:
                    Plenty of help available throughout the Web site
                    ShopzSeries is a free service intended to make it easier to order IBM
                    software
                    ShopzSeries is a standard Internet Web site, requiring only an Internet
                    connected workstation with a Web browser
                    ShopzSeries stores your information in a customer profile so it does not need
                    to retype it for every order
                    ShopzSeries automatically tailors orders to match hour installed software
                    Automatically includes the latest releases of products in your order
                    Saves your orders for tracking and reference purposes
                    Checks your orders for missing requisites and incompatibilities


11.3.2 Service order options
                Using the ShopzSeries, you can order the following type of service:
                Corrective service         You can select options to “eliminate superseded service”
                                           and “include requisite checking” or just send the PTFs or
                                           APARs requested.
                Preventive service         The options are current Recommended Service Upgrade
                                           (RSU), or HIPERs/PEs or All Service. You can eliminate
                                           “superseded service” for all preventive service order
                                           options.

                With each corrective and preventive service order, you will receive Enhanced
                HOLDDATA. The maximum compressed service package size for Internet
                delivery is 1-gigabyte. If the maximum service package size is exceeded, then if
                an alternate media type was selected during order entry it will be shipped
                physically to you. Otherwise the service order status will be updated to “rejected”
                and the reason will be posted in the order record.




166   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
11.3.3 Accessing ShopzSeries Web site
          From your Internet browser, select the as specified. This should return to you the
          ShopzSeries home Web site. The first item to perform is to select the country you
          are visiting from. Next either enter as a guest or register as a user. Figure 11-3
          shows the ShopzSeries home Web site.




          Figure 11-3 ShopzSeries home Web site




                                                     Chapter 11. Tools for technical support   167
11.3.4 Entering a guest order
                From the ShopzSeries home Web site, you are able to enter as a guest.
                Double-clicking on that option will bring you to the screen that allows you to
                create a sample order. Select the operating environment and Package type, then
                press GO.

                This brings you to the Order for Guest screen. From this screen, use the various
                pull-down menus to populate the sample order. Figure 11-4 is the first half of the
                screen displayed. Scroll down and complete the order.




                Figure 11-4 Order for Guest screen 1




168   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
11.3.5 Registering as a user
           You can also register as a user. Upon entering the registration screen, you will be
           required to enter the information necessary to register. This information includes
           provide basic contact information, your customer number(s) and system
           type-serial(s). Figure 11-5 shows the ShopzSeries registration screen.




           Figure 11-5 ShopzSeries registration screen

           Once you are registered, you can immediately create and save orders, but you
           will not be able to submit orders until your registration information has been
           authenticated by an IBM or enterprise administrator. You will receive a
           confirmation notice by e-mail when your authentication is complete.




                                                         Chapter 11. Tools for technical support   169
11.3.6 User access level
                Users of ShopzSeries can have a variety of access levels. Your access level
                defines what tasks you are permitted to perform in ShopzSeries. The access
                levels are:
                    Non-user: As a visitor to ShopzSeries Web site, you immediately have the
                    ability to view the online help facility, submit feedback and ask questions.
                    Guest: As a guest, you can create sample orders, browse the product
                    catalogs, and research products.
                    Unauthenticated user: You become an unauthenticated user by filling out
                    and submitting the ShopzSeries registration form. You can immediately
                    upload software inventories for you systems and create and save real orders.
                    You will not be able to view any of your enterprise’s private information,
                    request price quotes, or submit orders.
                    Authenticated user and submitter: Once your account information has
                    been verified by a ShopzSeries administrator, your user ID will be marked as
                    an authenticated user or a submitter and you will be notified via e-mail. As an
                    authenticated user, you will be able to view your enterprise’s private
                    information and request price quotes. As a submitter you are also permitted to
                    submit orders.


11.3.7 Accessing ShopzSeries as a user
                Once you are a registered user of ShopzSeries, enter your User ID, Password
                and press the LOGIN button to sign into the system. You will be brought to the
                main user screen. Figure 11-6 shows the main user screen. From this screen you
                can use the menus to select the Operating environment and Package type and
                place an order.




170   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
           Figure 11-6 ShopzSeries user screen


11.3.8 Uploading installed software inventories
           You will not be able to enter a custom order until you have uploaded your
           installed software inventories. To perform this task, double-click on the Upload
           Your Software Inventories button. Figure 11-7 shows the upload software
           screen.




                                                      Chapter 11. Tools for technical support   171
Figure 11-7 Upload Software Inventories screen

                 After completing the uploading of software inventory, you will be able to enter a
                 customized order from the main user screen.


11.3.9 Tracking orders
                 Once you have submitted an order, their progress will be displayed on the main
                 user screen. From this screen, you can also obtain information regarding:
                     Account information
                     Software inventories
                     Licenses information
                     Users guide
                     Customer information




172    IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
11.4 S/390 Service Update Facility
         S/390 Service Update Facility (SUF) is an Internet-based S/390 software service
         tool available for ordering and receiving z/OS, OS/390, z/VM, VM, and VSE
         software service. z/OS, OS/390, z/VM, and VM service, both corrective and
         preventive, can be delivered through the Internet or by standard physical media
         delivery. The features of the SUF include:
            Allows corrective and preventive service to be requested via the Internet, with
            recommended levels of preventive service.
            Provides Internet delivery of the service and generates service status report,
            appended to service requests.
            Supports upload and installation of service packages received from the
            Internet.
            The latest enhanced HOLDDATA is shipped and automatically received (if set
            up) with every SUF order.

         Details of SUF is available from S/390 Service Update Facility's Web site at:
            http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/zseries/zos/suf/

          Note: SUF is not being enhanced anymore, as the function it provided is being
          added to ShopzSeries.



11.5 IBMLink
         IBMLink is a comprehensive information retrieval system providing a convenient
         point of electronic access for IBM customers, business partners, alliances, and
         others. Using IBMLink, you can get information on IBM products, pricing, product
         configurations, technical support for hardware and software

         IBMLink is divided into five general categories of offerings each with a set of
         applications tailored to specific needs. ServiceLink is used for problem
         resolution, preventive service, and questions and answers.

         IBMLink is available via standard 3270 connectivity or from the IBM Web site:
            http://www.ibmlink.ibm.com/




                                                     Chapter 11. Tools for technical support   173
174   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                               Part 3


Part        3     Appendixes




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002          175
176   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                                                A


  Appendix A.     Output lists for SMP/E
                  REPORT ERRSYSMODS
                  This appendix provides complete output listings for SMP/E REPORT
                  ERRORSYSMOD jobs discussed in 5.5, “Report ERRSYSMODS” on page 73.

                  The SMPOUT listings are from ERRSYSMODS reports that were executed prior
                  to receiving HOLDDATA and after receiving HOLDDATA. The SMPPUNCH listing
                  is from an ERRSYSMODS report that was executed after receiving HOLDDATA.




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                             177
SMPOUT list prior to receiving HOLDDATA
                   This is a SMPOUT listings for a ERRSYSMODS report that was executed prior to
                   receiving HOLDDATA

Example: A-1 ERRSYSMODS (SMPOUT) report before RECEIVE HOLDDATA
E NOZ LAB OLG OT TES WO N - 1 0 0 0 EGAP                   E/PMS 45:60:61 EMIT 20/90/30 ETAD

  SET BDY(GLOBAL).
GIM20501I    SET PROCESSING IS COMPLETE. THE HIGHEST RETURN CODE WAS 00


  REPORT ERRSYSMODS ZONES(IMSTZ71) .
PAGE 0002 - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE                     DATE 03/09/02   TIME 16:06:55 SMP/E

EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT FOR ZONE IMSTZ71

HOLD     SYSMOD   APAR      ---RESOLVING SYSMOD----   HOLD    HOLD
FMID     NAME     NUMBER    NAME    STATUS RECEIVED   CLASS   SYMPTOMS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HMK7700     HMK7700 DQ36564 UQ55863 HELD             YES        HIPER  DAL
JMK7701     JMK7701 AQ54590 ***NONE                             HIPER  DAL,IPL,PRV
JMK7702     JMK7702 AQ32271 ***NONE                             HIPER  IPL
                    VQ55548 ***NONE                             HIPER  IPL
                    VQ56144 ***NONE                             HIPER  DAL,IPL,FUL,PRV
PAGE 0003    - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE                  DATE 03/09/02 TIME 16:06:55 SMP/E

EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT FOR ZONE IMSTZ71

FIXES FOR HELD RESOLVING SYSMODS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HOLD     SYSMOD   APAR      ---RESOLVING SYSMOD----   HOLD    HOLD
FMID     NAME     NUMBER    NAME    STATUS RECEIVED   CLASS   SYMPTOMS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
HMK7700 UQ55863 DQ54672 ***NONE                       PE
PAGE 0004 - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE           DATE 03/09/02 TIME 16:06:55 SMP/E

EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT SUMMARY

 ZONE       FMID     TOTAL APARS        TOTAL RESOLVING
                    AGAINST FMID      SYSMODS AGAINST FMID
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

IMSTZ71  HMK7700           2                              1
         JMK7701           1                              0
         JMK7702           3                              0
PAGE 0005 - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE                     DATE 03/09/02   TIME 16:06:59 SMP/E



178     IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                  SMP REPORT   FILE ALLOCATION REPORT


ZONE    DDNAME     DDDEFNAM SMPDDNAM TYPE       --------------DATA SET OR PATH---------

        IMSTZ71                         PERM    IMS710C.TZONE.CSI
        SMPCNTL                         SYSIO   JOUKO3.ERSYSMOD.JOB10775.D0000101.?
        SMPCSI                          PERM    IMS710C.GLOBAL.CSI
        SMPLOG     SMPLOG               DUMMY
        SMPLOGA    SMPLOGA              DUMMY
        SMPOUT     SMPOUT               SYSIO   JOUKO3.ERSYSMOD.JOB10775.D0000104.?
        SMPPUNCH                        SYSIO   JOUKO3.ERSYSMOD.JOB10775.D0000103.?
        SMPRPT     SMPRPT               NODDF
PAGE 0006 - NOW    SET TO GLOBAL ZONE               DATE 03/09/02   TIME 16:06:59 SMP/E

GIM20501I    REPORT PROCESSING IS COMPLETE. THE HIGHEST RETURN CODE WAS 00.


GIM20502I    SMP/E PROCESSING IS COMPLETE. THE HIGHEST RETURN CODE WAS 00. SMP/E




                                            Appendix A. Output lists for SMP/E REPORT ERRSYSMODS   179
SMPOUT list after receiving HOLDDATA
                 This is an SMPOUT listing from a ERRSYSMODS report that was executed after
                 receiveing HOLDDATA.

Example: A-2 ERRSYSMODS (SMPOUT) report after RECEIVE HOLDDATA
E NOZ LA BOLG OT TES WO N - 1 0 0 0 EGA P1                E/PMS 54:91:61 EMIT 20/90/30 ETAD

  SET BDY(GLOBAL).
GIM20501I    SET PROCESSING IS COMPLETE. THE HIGHEST RETURN CODE WAS 00


   REPORT ERRSYSMODS ZONES(IMSTZ71) .
1PAGE 0002 - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE                      DATE 03/09/02    TIME 16:19:45 SMP/E

EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT FOR ZONE IMSTZ71

HOLD     SYSMOD   APAR      ---RESOLVING SYSMOD----   HOLD    HOLD
FMID     NAME     NUMBER    NAME    STATUS RECEIVED   CLASS   SYMPTOMS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

HIR2101   HIR2101    AQ53589   UQ62822    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL
                     AQ55447   UQ62605    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL
                     AQ56535   UQ62522    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL,FUL,PRV
HMK7700   HMK7700    DQ36564   UQ55863    HELD      YES           HIPER    DAL
                     DQ45221   UQ62657    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL
                     DQ52683   UQ62422    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL
                     DQ53046   UQ62007    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL
                     DQ53501   UQ62188    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL
                     DQ54110   UQ62897    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL
                     DQ54380   UQ62650    GOOD      NO            HIPER    FUL
                     DQ54460   UQ61904    GOOD      NO            HIPER    PRF
                     DQ54672   UQ61996    GOOD      NO            HIPER    PRF
                     DQ54684   UQ63257    GOOD      NO            HIPER    FUL
                     DQ55197   ***NONE                            HIPER    DAL,PRV
                     DQ55223   UQ62595    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL
                     DQ55232   UQ63089    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL
                     DQ55274   UQ62658    GOOD      NO            HIPER    FUL
                     DQ55558   UQ62070    GOOD      NO            HIPER    DAL,IPL
                     DQ55828   UQ62646    GOOD      NO            HIPER    FUL
                     DQ55888   ***NONE                            HIPER    FUL
                     DQ55903   UQ62698    GOOD      NO            HIPER    DAL
                     DQ55959   UQ62503    GOOD      NO            HIPER    IPL
                     DQ55985   ***NONE                            HIPER    IPL
                     DQ56000   UQ62394    GOOD      NO            HIPER    DAL
                     DQ56012   ***NONE                            HIPER    DAL,IPL
                     DQ56113   ***NONE                            HIPER    IPL
                     DQ56137   ***NONE                            HIPER    IPL



180    IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                        DQ56255 UQ62699     GOOD   NO          HIPER  FUL
                        DQ56403 UQ62051     GOOD   NO          HIPER  DAL
                        DQ56553 ***NONE                        HIPER  DAL
                        DQ56564 UQ62180     GOOD   NO          HIPER  FUL
                        DQ56611 UQ62919     GOOD   NO          HIPER  FUL
                        DQ56804 UQ62920     GOOD   NO          HIPER  IPL,FUL
                        DQ56908 ***NONE                        HIPER  IPL
                        DQ56955 UQ62564     GOOD   NO          HIPER  IPL,FUL,PRV
                        DQ56973 ***NONE                        HIPER  IPL
                        DQ56993 ***NONE                        HIPER  FUL,PRF
                        DQ57113 UQ62602     GOOD   NO          HIPER  FUL,PRF
                        DQ57323 ***NONE                        HIPER  DAL
                        DQ57654 ***NONE                        HIPER  IPL,PRV
                        DQ57981 ***NONE                        HIPER  IPL
             UQ53849    DQ56044 ***NONE                        PE
             UQ55252    DQ56489 ***NONE                        PE
             UQ55295    DQ55039 ***NONE                        PE
             UQ57407    DQ58740 ***NONE                        PE
             UQ61401    DQ57113 UQ62602     GOOD   NO          PE
             UQ61540    DQ56955 UQ62564     GOOD   NO          PE
             UQ61666    DQ57124 ***NONE                        PE
                        DQ57654 ***NONE                        PE
JMK7701      JMK7701    AQ51070 UQ62751     GOOD   NO          HIPER  IPL
                        AQ54308 UQ62034     GOOD   NO          HIPER  FUL,PRF
                        AQ54590 UQ61948     GOOD   NO          HIPER  DAL,IPL,PRV
1PAGE 0003    - NOW    SET TO GLOBAL ZONE             DATE 03/09/02 TIME 16:19:45 SMP/E

EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT FOR ZONE IMSTZ71

HOLD     SYSMOD   APAR      ---RESOLVING SYSMOD----   HOLD    HOLD
FMID     NAME     NUMBER    NAME    STATUS RECEIVED   CLASS   SYMPTOMS
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

JMK7701           AQ55085 UQ61938
             JMK7701                        GOOD   NO          HIPER  IPL
                  AQ55197 ***NONE                              HIPER  DAL,PRV
                  AQ55234 UQ62961           GOOD   NO          HIPER  DAL
                  AQ55535 UQ62165           GOOD   NO          HIPER  FUL,PRF
                  AQ56012 ***NONE                              HIPER  DAL,IPL
                  AQ56536 UQ63195           GOOD   NO          HIPER  IPL
                  AQ56879 UQ62600           GOOD   NO          HIPER  FUL
                  AQ57852 ***NONE                              HIPER  PRF
 JMK7702 JMK7702 AQ32271 ***NONE                               HIPER  IPL
                  VQ52052 UQ62148           GOOD   NO          HIPER  IPL
                  VQ54839 UQ63348           GOOD   NO          HIPER  IPL
                  VQ55548 UQ61832           HELD   NO          HIPER  IPL
                  VQ56144 UQ62002           GOOD   NO          HIPER  IPL,FUL,PRV
                  VQ56333 UQ62004           GOOD   NO          HIPER  IPL
                  VQ57751 ***NONE                              HIPER  IPL
1PAGE 0004 - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE                   DATE 03/09/02 TIME 16:19:45 SMP/E



                                              Appendix A. Output lists for SMP/E REPORT ERRSYSMODS   181
EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT FOR ZONE IMSTZ71

 FIXES FOR HELD RESOLVING SYSMODS
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 HOLD     SYSMOD   APAR      ---RESOLVING SYSMOD----    HOLD   HOLD
 FMID     NAME     NUMBER    NAME    STATUS RECEIVED    CLASS  SYMPTOMS
 -------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 HMK7700 UQ55863 DQ54672 UQ61996 GOOD       NO          PE
 JMK7702 UQ61832 VQ57751 ***NONE                        PE
1PAGE 0005 - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE            DATE 03/09/02 TIME 16:19:45 SMP/E

EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT SUMMARY

 ZONE       FMID     TOTAL APARS        TOTAL RESOLVING
                    AGAINST FMID      SYSMODS AGAINST FMID
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

IMSTZ71   HIR2101           3                              3
          HMK7700          43                             25
          JMK7701          11                              8
          JMK7702           7                              5
1PAGE 0006 - NOW SET TO GLOBAL ZONE                     DATE 03/09/02   TIME 16:19:49 SMP/E


                                                     SMP REPORT   FILE ALLOCATION


ZONE      DDNAME       DDDEFNAM SMPDDNAM TYPE       --------------DATA SET OR PATH--------

         IMSTZ71                            PERM    IMS710C.TZONE.CSI
         SMPCNTL                            SYSIO   JOUKO3.ERSYSMOD.JOB10779.D0000101.?
         SMPCSI                             PERM    IMS710C.GLOBAL.CSI
         SMPLOG        SMPLOG               DUMMY
         SMPLOGA       SMPLOGA              DUMMY
         SMPOUT        SMPOUT               SYSIO   JOUKO3.ERSYSMOD.JOB10779.D0000104.?
         SMPPUNCH                           SYSIO   JOUKO3.ERSYSMOD.JOB10779.D0000103.?
         SMPRPT        SMPRPT               NODDF
1PAGE 0007 - NOW       SET TO GLOBAL ZONE               DATE 03/09/02   TIME 16:19:49 SMP/E
1PAGE 0007 - NOW       SET TO GLOBAL ZONE               DATE 03/09/02   TIME 16:19:49 SMP/E

GIM20501I          REPORT PROCESSING IS COMPLETE. THE HIGHEST RETURN CODE WAS 00.


 GIM20502I    SMP/E PROCESSING IS COMPLETE. THE HIGHEST RETURN CODE WAS 00. SMP/
******************************** BOTTOM OF DATA ********************************




182     IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
SMPPUNCH list after receiving HOLDDATA
                This is an SMPPUNCH listing from a ERRSYSMODS report that was executed
                after receiveing HOLDDATA.

Example: A-3 ERRSYSMODS (SMPPUNCH) report after RECEIVE HOLDDATA
************************** ATAD FO POT *********************************
SET BDY (GLOBAL ). /* REMOVE COMMENT IF DOING RECEIVE
RECEIVE SELECT (
         UQ62822
         UQ62605
         UQ62522
         UQ62657
         UQ62422
         UQ62007
         UQ62188
         UQ62897
         UQ62650
         UQ61904
         UQ61996
         UQ63257
         UQ62595
         UQ63089
         UQ62658
         UQ62070
         UQ62646
         UQ62698
         UQ62503
         UQ62394
         UQ62699
         UQ62051
         UQ62180
         UQ62919
         UQ62920
         UQ62564
         UQ62602
         UQ62751
         UQ62034
         UQ61948
         UQ61938
         UQ62961
         UQ62165
         UQ63195
         UQ62600
         UQ62148
         UQ63348
         UQ61832
         UQ62002



                                        Appendix A. Output lists for SMP/E REPORT ERRSYSMODS   183
         UQ62004
                )
          SYSMODS.
                     REMOVE COMMENT IF DOING RECEIVE */
RESETRC.
SET BDY (IMSTZ71).
APPLY    SELECT (
 /* UQ62822                RESOLVES   AQ53589   FOR   HIR2101   FMID(HIR2101)   */
 /* UQ62605                RESOLVES   AQ55447   FOR   HIR2101   FMID(HIR2101)   */
 /* UQ62522                RESOLVES   AQ56535   FOR   HIR2101   FMID(HIR2101)   */
 /* UQ55863    PTF         RESOLVES   DQ36564   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62657                RESOLVES   DQ45221   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62422                RESOLVES   DQ52683   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62007                RESOLVES   DQ53046   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62188                RESOLVES   DQ53501   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62897                RESOLVES   DQ54110   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62650                RESOLVES   DQ54380   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ61904                RESOLVES   DQ54460   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ61996                RESOLVES   DQ54672   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ63257                RESOLVES   DQ54684   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62595                RESOLVES   DQ55223   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ63089                RESOLVES   DQ55232   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62658                RESOLVES   DQ55274   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62070                RESOLVES   DQ55558   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62646                RESOLVES   DQ55828   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62698                RESOLVES   DQ55903   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62503                RESOLVES   DQ55959   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62394                RESOLVES   DQ56000   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62699                RESOLVES   DQ56255   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62051                RESOLVES   DQ56403   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62180                RESOLVES   DQ56564   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62919                RESOLVES   DQ56611   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62920                RESOLVES   DQ56804   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62564                RESOLVES   DQ56955   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62602                RESOLVES   DQ57113   FOR   HMK7700   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62602                RESOLVES   DQ57113   FOR   UQ61401   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62564                RESOLVES   DQ56955   FOR   UQ61540   FMID(HMK7700)   */
 /* UQ62751                RESOLVES   AQ51070   FOR   JMK7701   FMID(JMK7701)   */
 /* UQ62034                RESOLVES   AQ54308   FOR   JMK7701   FMID(JMK7701)   */
 /* UQ61948                RESOLVES   AQ54590   FOR   JMK7701   FMID(JMK7701)   */
 /* UQ61938                RESOLVES   AQ55085   FOR   JMK7701   FMID(JMK7701)   */
 /* UQ62961                RESOLVES   AQ55234   FOR   JMK7701   FMID(JMK7701)   */
 /* UQ62165                RESOLVES   AQ55535   FOR   JMK7701   FMID(JMK7701)   */
 /* UQ63195                RESOLVES   AQ56536   FOR   JMK7701   FMID(JMK7701)   */
 /* UQ62600                RESOLVES   AQ56879   FOR   JMK7701   FMID(JMK7701)   */
 /* UQ62148                RESOLVES   VQ52052   FOR   JMK7702   FMID(JMK7702)   */
 /* UQ63348                RESOLVES   VQ54839   FOR   JMK7702   FMID(JMK7702)   */
 /* UQ61832                RESOLVES   VQ55548   FOR   JMK7702   FMID(JMK7702)   */
 /* UQ62002                RESOLVES   VQ56144   FOR   JMK7702   FMID(JMK7702)   */



184   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
/* UQ62004             RESOLVES VQ56333 FOR JMK7702 FMID(JMK7702) */
/* UQ61996             RESOLVES DQ54672 FOR UQ55863 FMID(HMK7700) */
               )
         GROUP REDO.




                                     Appendix A. Output lists for SMP/E REPORT ERRSYSMODS   185
186   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Abbreviations and acronyms
ACB                   application control block       DLT     database level tracking (RSR)
AGN                   application group name          DRA     database resource adapter
AOI                   automated operator interface    ECSA    extended common system
APAR                  authorized program analysis             area
                      report                          EMCS    extended multiple consoles
APF                   authorized program facility             support

APPC                  advanced program to program     ESAF    external subsystem attach
                      communication                           facility

ARM                   Automatic Restart Manager       ESO     Extended Service Offering

BMP                   batch message program           ETO     Extended Terminal Option

BPE                   Base Primitive Environment      EX      execution (IVP)

CBPDO                 custom built product delivery   FDBR    Fast Database Recovery
                      offering                        FMID    function modification identifier
CI                    control interval                FT      file tailoring (IVP)
CICS                  Customer Information Control    FTP     File Transfer Protocol
                      System                          GSAM    generalized sequential
CQS                   Common Queue Server                     access method
CSA                   common system area              HALDB   High Availability Large
CSI                   consolidated software                   Database
                      inventory                       HFS     hierarchical file system
CST                   Consolidated Service Test       HLQ     high-level qualifier
DASD                  direct access storage device    HTML    Hyper Text Markup Language
DB/DC                 database/data                   HTTP    Hyper Text Transfer Protocol
                      communications                  IBM     International Business
DB2                   DATABASE 2                              Machines Corporation
DBA                   database administrator          IFP     IMS Fast Path program
DBCTL                 database control                IMS     Information Management
DBD                   database description                    System

DBDS                  database data set               IPL     initial program load

DBRC                  data base recovery control      IRLM    Integrated Resource Lock
                                                              Manager
DEDB                  data entry database
                                                      ISC     intersystem communication
DL/I                  Data Language/I
                                                      ISD     independent software delivery
DLI/SAS               DL/I separate address space




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                               187
ISPF                  Interactive Systems            MSDB       Main Storage Data Base
                      Productivity Facility          MVS        Multiple Virtual System
ITSO                  International Technical        ODBA       open database access
                      Support Organization
                                                     OLDS       online log data set
IVP                   installation verification
                      program                        OM         Operations Manager

J2C                   J2EE Connector Architecture    ORS        Online Recovery Service

J2EE                  Java 2 Platform, Enterprise    OSAM       overflow sequential access
                      Edition                                   method

JBP                   Java batch processing region   OTMA       open transaction manager
                                                                access
JCL                   job control language
                                                     OTMA C/I   OTMA callable interface
JDBC                  Java database connectivity
                                                     PCB        program communication block
JDK                   Java Development Kit
                                                     PDS        partitioned data set
JES                   job entry subsystem (JES2 or
                      JES3)                          PDSE       partitioned data set extended

JMP                   Java message processing        PIA        package input adapter
                      region                         PMR        problem management record
JVM                   Java Virtual Machine           PPT        program properties table
KSDS                  key sequenced data set         PPT        program properties table
LE                    Language Environment           PSB        program specification block
LMOD                  load module                    PSP        preventive service planning
LPA                   link pack area                 PTF        program temporary fix
LPAR                  logical partition              QPP        Quality Partnership Program
LTERM                 logical terminal               RACF       Resource Access Control
LU                    logical unit                              Facility

LU2                   Logical Unit 2                 RDS        restart data set

MCS                   multiple consoles support      RIM        related installation material

MFS                   message format services        RLDS       recovery log data set

MLPA                  modifiable link pack area      RLT        recovery level tracking (RSR)

MNPS                  Multi-Node Persistent          RM         Resource Manager
                      Sessions                       RMF        Resource Measurement
MOD                   message output descriptor                 Facility
                      (MFS)                          RNR        Rapid Network Recovery
MOD                   module (SMP/E)                 RSR        Remote Site Recovery
MPP                   message processing program     RSU        recommended service
MPR                   message processing region                 upgrade

MSC                   multiple systems coupling      SCI        structured call interface

MSC                   multiple systems coupling



188     IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
SDSF     spool display and search
         facility
SLDS     system log data set
SMP/E    System Modification
         Program/Extended
SMQ      shared message queues
SMU      security maintenance utility
SPOC     single point of control
SRDS     structure recovery data set
SSA      sub-system alias
SVC      supervisor call
SVL      Silicon Valley Laboratories
TCB      task control block
TCO      time controlled operations
TCP/IP   Transmission Control
         Protocol/Internet Protocol
TPNS     Teleprocessing Network
         Simulator
TSO      Time Sharing Option
USS      Unix System Services
USS      unformatted system services
         (SNA)
VG       variable gathering (IVP)
VOLSER   volume serial (number)
VSAM     virtual storage access method
VSO      Virtual Storage Option (DEDB
         VSO)
VTAM     virtual telecommunication
         access method
WADS     write ahead data set
WAS      WebSphere Application
         Server
WWW      World Wide Web
XML      Extensible Markup Language
XRF      Extended Recovery Facility




                                         Abbreviations and acronyms   189
190   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Related publications

                  The publications listed in this section are considered particularly suitable for a
                  more detailed discussion of the topics covered in this redbook.



IBM Redbooks
                  For information on ordering these publications, see “How to get IBM Redbooks”
                  on page 193.
                      OS/390 Software Management Cookbook, SG24-4775
                      IMS/ESA Shared Queues: A Planning Guide, SG24-5257
                      IMS Primer, SG24-5352
                      Parallel Sysplex - Software Management for Availability, SG24-5451
                      IMS/ESA V6 Parallel Sysplex Migration Planning Guide for IMS TM and
                      DBCTL, SG24-5461
                      IMS Version 7 High Availability Large Database Guide, SG24-5751
                      A DBA’s View of IMS Online Recovery Service, SG24-6112
                      IMS Version 7 Performance Monitoring and Tuning Update, SG24-6404
                      IMS e-business Connectors: A Guide to IMS Connectivity, SG24-6514
                      IMS Version 7 Java Update, SG24-6536
                      Ensuring IMS Data Integrity Using IMS Tools, SG24-6533


Other resources
                  These publications are also relevant as further information sources:
                      IMS Version 7 Administration Guide: Database Manager, SC26-9419
                      IMS Version 7 Administration Guide: System, SC26-9420
                      IMS Version 7 DBRC Guide and Reference, SC26-9428
                      IMS Version 7 Installation Volume 1: Installation and Verification, GC26-9429
                      IMS Version 7 Installation Volume 2: System Definition and Tailoring,
                      GC26-9430
                      IMS Version 7 Release Planning Guide, GC26-9437




© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                         191
                   IMS Version 7 IMS Java User’s Guide, SC27-0832
                   IMS Version 7 Diagnosis Guide and Reference, LY37-3738
                   Program Directory for Information Management System Transaction and
                   Database Servers, GI10-8334
                   z/OS SMP/E User’s Guide, SA22-7773
                   ServerPac: Using the Installation Dialog, SA22-7815
                   S/390 Service Update Facility: User's Guide, GC23-3499
                   Standard Packaging Rules for MVS-Based products, SC23-3695
                   OS/390 MVS Initialization and Tuning Guide, SC28-1751
                   OS/390 MVS System Commands, GC28-1781
                   OS/390 MVS Diagnosis: Tools and Services Aids, SY28-1085



Referenced Web sites
                These Web sites are also relevant as further information sources:
                   IBM Redbooks homepage:
                   http://www.redbooks.ibm.com
                   IBM IMS homepage:
                   http://www.ibm.com/ims
                   IBM IMS technical support Web page:
                   http://www.ibm.com/software/data/ims/support.html
                   IBM Consolidated Service Test and the RSU:
                   http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/zseries/zos/servicetst/
                   Java for OS/390 and Series:
                   http://www.ibm.com/s390/java/
                   S/390 Service Update Facility:
                   http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/zseries/zos/suf/
                   ShopzSeries Web page:
                   https://www14.software.ibm.com/webapp/ShopzSeries/ShopzSeries.jsp
                   IBMLink Web page:
                   http://www.ibmlink.ibm.com/
                   IBM Technical Support Web page:
                   http://techsupport.services.ibm.com/



192   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
             IBM HOLDDATA web site:
             http://techsupport.services.ibm.com/390holddata.html



How to get IBM Redbooks
          You can order hardcopy Redbooks, as well as view, download, or search for
          Redbooks at the following Web site:
             ibm.com/redbooks

          You can also download additional materials (code samples or diskette/CD-ROM
          images) from that site.


IBM Redbooks collections
          Redbooks are also available on CD-ROMs. Click the CD-ROMs button on the
          Redbooks Web site for information about all the CD-ROMs offered, as well as
          updates and formats.




                                                                    Related publications   193
194   IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
Index
                                                 APAR report 65
Symbols                                          APF authorization 84, 135, 139
/ASSIGN 101
                                                 APPC 114
/DIS OLDS 128
                                                 Application Description and Database Control Block
/MODIFY COMMIT 101
                                                 (ACB) 143
/MODIFY PREPARE 101
                                                 application group name (AGN) 89
/RML RECON STATUS 128
                                                 APPLY 18, 41, 77, 94, 116, 118–119, 124–125, 132
                                                 APPLY CHECK 43
A                                                APPLY CHECK with BYPASS HOLDERROR 71,
ACBGEN 87, 101                                   77–78
ACBLIB 100, 143, 146–147                         APPLY REDO 134
ACCEPT 18, 41, 116, 119, 124–125, 132            ASM.SASMMAC2 29, 125
ACCEPT BYPASS(APPLYCHECK) 39                     ASMA90 96
ACCEPT CHECK 43                                  ASMMSP 29, 88
ACCJCLIN 94                                      Authorized Problem Analysis Report (APAR) 120
ADFSBASE 16–17                                   Automatic RECON Loss Notification 128
ADFSCLST 15                                      Automatic Restart Manager (ARM) 5
ADFSDATA 17
ADFSEXEC 15
ADFSISRC 15, 94, 144
                                                 B
                                                 Base Primitive Environment (BPE) 94
ADFSJCIC 17
                                                 BUILD PSB=ALL 147
ADFSJDC8 17
ADFSJDOC 17
ADFSJHF8 17                                      C
ADFSJHFS 17                                      CA splits 126
ADFSJIVP 17                                      CALLJOB 51, 56–57
ADFSJLIB 42                                      CALLLIB entry 56
ADFSJTOL 17                                      CALLLINK 51, 56–57
ADFSLOAD 15                                      CBPDO 13, 20, 41, 68–69, 71, 74, 81, 115
ADFSMAC 14–15, 125                               change accumulation 9
ADFSMLIB 15                                      Change Summary 69
ADFSPLIB 15                                      CHANGE.RECON REPLACE 127–129
ADFSRTRM 15                                      CI splits 126
ADFSSLIB 15                                      CICS 88, 110
ADFSSMPL 17–18                                   Common Queue Server (CQS) 155
ADFSSRC 14–15, 18                                concept 14 macros 125
ADFSTLIB 15                                      Configure function 49
Advanced Program to Program Communications       Consolidated Service Test (CST) 106, 109–110
(APPC) 6                                         Consolidated Software Inventory (CSI) 62
AHEAD report 65                                  coordinated global online change 7
Alias function 50                                corrective maintenance 111, 113
ALLOCDS 51, 54                                   corrective service 109
ALTCAT 51, 55                                    CQSINIT0 85
APAR 62, 68–70, 79, 82, 111, 116, 119–123, 157   Cross Product Dependencies 69



© Copyright IBM Corp. 2002                                                                    195
CSA 140, 153                                        DFSJRECV 43
CST 110                                             DFSJSMKD 42
CTLBLKS 98–99                                       DFSMLIB 15
Custom Built Product Delivery Offering (CBPDO)      DFSMLIBA 15
12, 19                                              DFSMRCL0 85, 129, 139, 146
CustomPac 48                                        DFSMS 137
CustomPac installation dialog 46–47                 DFSMVRC0 85
                                                    DFSPLIB 15
                                                    DFSPLIBA 15
D                                                   DFSRTRM 15
Data Base Descriptor (DBD) 142
                                                    DFSRTRMA 15
Data base management 39
                                                    DFSSLIB 15, 91
Data Base Recovery Control (DBRC) 5, 12
                                                    DFSSLIBA 15
Data Entry Data Base (DEDB) 5
                                                    DFSTCF 142
data sharing 131, 135–136, 140, 143, 145–146
                                                    DFSTLIB 15
Database Level Tracking (DLT) 94
                                                    DFSTLIBA 15
DB2 110
                                                    DFSTRA0x 141
DBCTL 88
                                                    DFSUSVC0 85
DBDGEN 87, 90
                                                    DOCLOAD job 22
DBDLIB 142
                                                    Documentation Changes 69
DBFSAMA3 88
                                                    DRA Startup Table 88
DBRC 39, 90, 126, 141, 154
                                                    DXRRLM00 85
DBSOURCE 14–15
                                                    dynamic allocation 88, 134, 141–142, 154–155
DDDEF 124
                                                    Dynamic LE Runtime Parameters 10
DEFCAT 51, 54
                                                    Dynamic SVC Utility (DFSUSVC0) 146
DEFSSA 51, 54
DELCSI 52, 59
DELDSN 52, 59                                       E
DELETE.LOG INACTIVE 126                             ECSA 153
DELSSA 52, 59                                       Enhanced HOLDDATA 71–73, 108, 165
DELTRANS 52, 59                                     exception SYSMOD 70
DFSAFMD0 85, 129, 139, 146                          EXCEPTION SYSMOD REPORT 74–75
DFSALA 16                                           execution (EX) 26
DFSALB 16                                           execution phase 30, 82
DFSCLST 15                                          Extended Multiple Console Support (EMCS) 6
DFSCLSTA 15                                         Extended Recovery Facility (XRF) 4
DFSEXEC 15                                          Extended Service Offering (ESO) 60
DFSEXECA 15                                         Extended Terminal Option (ETO) 12, 39, 94, 101
DFSISIS0 89                                         External Subsystem Attach Facility (ESAF) 154
DFSISRC 15, 91
DFSISRCA 15
DFSJACPC 43
                                                    F
                                                    Fast Path 82, 148
DFSJALLC 42
                                                    File Tailor All 32
DFSJAPPC 43
                                                    file tailoring 26, 32, 91
DFSJCLIN 18, 94, 112, 144
                                                    file tailoring (FT) 26
DFSJDDDF 42
                                                    FIXTEST 119
DFSJIDLT 94, 112
                                                    FMID 12, 18, 62, 68, 72, 94, 121
DFSJIRLT 94, 112
                                                    FORCED SYSMOD 64
DFSJMKDR 42
                                                    FORMAT 100, 142



196    IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
FPCTRL 82                                         IMS system definition 82
FTP 162                                           IMS trace data sets 155
Function Modification Identifier (FMID) 12        IMS.JOBS 89
                                                  IMSCPY 52, 58
                                                  IMSCTRL macro 98
G                                                 IMSGEN macro 14, 82, 124, 144
General Information 69
                                                  IMSGROUP 8
Generalized Sequential Access Method (GSAM) 5
                                                  IMSID 145
GENERATE 94, 112
                                                  IMSMON 141
GENJCL 141
                                                  IMSPARM 52, 58
GENLIB 14–15, 124–125
                                                  IMSplex 7
GENLIBA 14–15, 124–125
                                                  Independent Software Delivery (ISD) 12–13
GENLIBB 14–15, 124–125
                                                  INSTALL 16
GIM35934 71, 77–78
                                                  INSTALL/IVP 12–13, 16, 19–24, 26–27, 32, 35, 40,
global online change 7
                                                  45, 52, 57–58, 81–82, 86, 88–89, 91, 114–115
Global Update in Progress 25
                                                  INSTALL/IVP dialog 16
                                                  Installation function 50
H                                                 Installation Information 69
HALDB 63                                          INSTATBL 33, 52, 58
HALDB Partition Definition Utility 90             INSTMLD job 22
HFS 51, 138                                       Integrated Resource Lock Manager (IRLM) 5
Hierarchical File System (HFS) 42, 138            Interactive System Productivity Facility (ISPF) 46
High Availability Large Data Base (HALDB) 90      IPL 58, 70, 84–85, 87, 111, 136, 146, 153
High Level Assembler Toolkit Feature 29, 88       IRLM 12, 40, 110
high-level qualifier (HLQ) 50                     IRLM Dump Formatting module 84
HIPER 60, 62, 69, 73, 108, 111                    IVP 16, 94, 109, 148
HOLDDATA 38–39, 56, 67–68, 70–75, 77,             IVP dialog 16
165–166, 173                                      IXUJESC1 30–31
HOLDERROR processing 77                           IXUJESC5 30–31
                                                  IXUSMACT 29, 88
                                                  IXUUPROC 29–31
I
IBMLink 69, 173
IDCAMS 128                                        J
IEAVADFM CSECT 86                                 J2C Runtime Support 9
IEAVTRML CSECT 85                                 J2EE Connector Architecture 9
IEBUPDTE 96                                       Java Application Support 17
IEWL 96                                           Java Batch Processing region (JBP) 10
IFREQ report 62                                   Java Development Kit (JDK) 10
IGC0001C 85                                       Java Message Processing region (JMP) 10
IGC0805A 86                                       Java Virtual Machine (JVM) 10
IMS Connect 8                                     JCLIN 40, 83, 94, 97, 112
IMS Java Application Support 12, 19, 41–42, 138   JCLLIB ORDER statement 30
IMS Java classes 10                               JCLPDS 142
IMS Offline Dump Formatting 84, 91                JDBC 10
IMS Online Dump Formatting module (DFSAFMD0)      JES2 PROCLIB 31
85
IMS Online Recovery Service 9
IMS Resource Cleanup module (DFSMRCL0) 85         K
                                                  key-sequenced data set (KSDS) 126



                                                                                        Index   197
L                                                   Online Recovery Service (ORS) 9
Language Environment (LE) 10                        Open Transaction Management Access (OTMA) 6
Large Generation (LGEN) 96, 143                     Opening Text 69
LGENIN 143                                          Operations Manager (OM) 7
LGENOUT 143                                         OPTIONS 124–125, 143
LGMSG 141                                           OS/390 132, 137, 139, 173
LIST.RECON 126                                      OS/390 interface modules 83
LMOD 18, 97                                         OTMA 114
LNKLST 139
LOAD 15
LOADCSI 51, 55
                                                    P
                                                    Parallel Sysplex 4–5, 131, 135–136, 143
LOADRIM 53                                          Partition Definition Utility 91
Logging system services 39                          PDSE 38, 42
                                                    PE PTF 70, 73, 106, 111, 119
M                                                   Phase Selection 26
MACLIB 14–15, 124                                   preprocessor 96
Main Storage Database (MSDB) 5, 141                 Preventative Service Planning (PSP) 14
MATRIX 97, 100, 142, 144                            preventive maintenance 105, 111
Message Format Service (MFS) 100                    preventive service 109, 173
Message Format Services (MFS) Language Utility      Preventive Service Planning (PSP) 67–68
88                                                  Problem Management Record (PMR) 158
MFS 100, 142                                        PROCLIB 29, 83–84, 88–89, 100, 155
MFS Language Utility 88                             ProductPac 47
migration considerations 146                        Program Properties Table (PPT) 85
MOD 18                                              Program Specification Block (PSB) 142
MODBLKS 98–100, 142, 144                            Program Temporary Fixes (PTFs) 71
Modify function 50                                  PSBGEN 87
MODSTAT 89, 141                                     PSBLIB 142
MQSeries 110                                        PSP 68
MSDB 141                                            PTF 79
Multiple Console Support (MCS) 6
MVS logger offload data set 141
MVS logger staging data set 141
                                                    Q
                                                    QBLKS 141
MVS master trace 153                                Quality Partnership Program (QPP) 4
                                                    quarterly RSU 111
N
NO SERVICE 64
non-system definition elements 94, 144
                                                    R
                                                    RACF 51, 55, 97, 140
NUCLEUS 98–99                                       RACFDRV 51, 54
                                                    Rapid Network Recovery (RNR) 5
O                                                   RDS 141
OBJDSET 143                                         RECEIVE 18, 38–39, 41, 71, 77, 116, 118, 132
OFFLINIT 51, 53                                     RECHOLD 51, 56
OLDS 141, 155–156                                   Recommended Service Upgrade (RSU) 60, 111
ONEJOB parameter 82, 112                            RECON 90–91, 124–125, 128–129, 145
ON-LINE 98–99                                       Recovery Level Tracking (RLT) 94
online change 7, 89, 98                             Redbooks Web site 193



198    IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
   Contact us xvii                             SDFSSMPL 16, 18
REFERAL 143                                    SDFSSRC 16
RefreshPac 47                                  SDFSTLIB 15, 52
Regression of non-accepted maintenance 98      SDUMP 154
Remote Site Recovery (RSR) 40, 94              SDXRRESL 84
Remote Site Recovery/Database Level Tracking   Security Maintenance Utility (SMU) 97, 142
12                                             Selection report 62
Remote Site Recovery/Recovery-Level Tracking   ServerPac 12–13, 41, 45–47, 58–60, 62, 68–69,
12                                             71, 81, 94, 111, 115
REPORT ERRSYSMODS 71, 73, 77                   Service Recommendation Summary 69
RESLIB 15                                      Service Recommendations 69
RESOLVED PE report 63                          ServiceLink 173
Resource Manager (RM) 7                        SGMSG 141
resource name checking 96                      Shared Message Queue (SMQ) 6, 94, 136,
RESTFSI 51, 55                                 141–142, 144
RESTORE 51, 55, 116                            ShopzSeries 69, 111, 165–166, 168–170
RIM tape 46                                    ShopzSeries Web site 165
RIMLOD job 21                                  Single Point of Control (SPOC) 7
RLDS 141                                       SLDS 141, 156
RSU 111                                        SMP/E 13, 16, 18, 20–21, 29, 40, 45, 51, 62,
                                               67–68, 70, 73, 75, 77, 81, 83, 93, 97–98, 112–113,
                                               118–119, 124–125, 131–134, 138, 147
S                                              SMPLTS 38
S/390 Service Update Facility (SUF) 173
                                               SMPMTS 15, 124
Save Used Configuration function 60
                                               SMPSTS 15, 18
SCPPLENU 51
                                               SMS 55
SDFSBASE 16
                                               SOURCEID 108, 111
SDFSCLST 15
                                               SRDSs 141
SDFSDATA 16
                                               SSA function 50
SDFSEXEC 15
                                               stage 1 83, 95, 124, 144, 147
SDFSISRC 15, 33
                                               stage 2 82–83, 96–97, 124–125
SDFSJCIC 17
                                               structure recovery data sets 141
SDFSJDC8 17
                                               Structured Call Interface (SCI) 128
SDFSJDOC 17
                                               Sub-Option selection 24
SDFSJHF8 17
                                               SUF 111
SDFSJHFS 17
                                               SUFFIX 144
SDFSJIVP 17
                                               SUMTERM 54
SDFSJJCL 17
                                               SVC 139
SDFSJLIB 42
                                               SVCDUMP 152
SDFSJSAM 17
                                               SVSOURCE 14–15
SDFSJTOL 17
                                               Symbolic Alias Facility 137
SDFSLIB 58
                                               SYS1.AMACLIB 29
SDFSMAC 14–15, 125
                                               SYS1.AMODGEN 29
SDFSMLIB 15
                                               SYS1.LOGREC 156
SDFSPLIB 15
                                               SYS1.LPALIB 85
SDFSRESL 15, 55, 84, 98, 136, 138–139, 142,
                                               SYS1.MACLIB 29
144, 147
                                               SYS1.MODGEN 29
SDFSRTRM 15
                                               SYS1.NUCLEUS 85
SDFSSLIB 15, 33
                                               SYS1.PARMLIB 52, 57–58, 84–85, 139, 153–154



                                                                                     Index   199
SYS1.PP.MACLIB 29, 125                              Variables function 49
SYS1.PROCLIB 86                                     Virtual Storage Option (VSO) 5
SYS1.SASMMAC2 29, 125                               VSAM 126, 128–129
SYSABEND 152                                        VTAM 83, 86
SYSLIB concatenation 124                            VTAM Configuration List (ATCCONxx) 86
SYSMDUMP 154                                        VTAM Generic Resources 6, 136, 145
SYSMOD 38, 70, 74–75, 77, 97, 108, 112,             VTAM interface 84
118–121, 123, 132                                   VTAM Interpret Table 86
system definition 93–95, 98, 100, 124, 142–144,     VTAM Logon Mode Table 86
147–148                                             VTAM Multi-Node Persistent Sessions (MNPS) 5
system generation 93, 95–96, 100, 112, 132, 134,    VTAM Start Option List (ATCSTRxx) 86
142                                                 VTAM USS Table 86
SYSTEM operand 98
System services 39
system trace table 153
                                                    W
                                                    WADS 141
SystemPac 12, 47
                                                    WebSphere Application Server (WAS) 9
SYSUDUMP 152, 154
                                                    workload balancing 136

T                                                   X
Table Merge 25
                                                    XML 52, 59
TechSupport Web site 163
                                                    XMLGNR8 52, 59
Teleprocessing Network Simulator (TPNS) 114
Time Controlled Operations (TCO) 88, 142
TMSOURCE 14–15                                      Z
Toleration service 145                              z/OS 18, 110, 132, 173
Transaction management 39                           z/OS msys 59
type 2 SVC 85, 95, 129, 146                         ZONEMERGE 40
type 4 SVC 85, 95, 129, 146                         zSeries 165
TYPE parameter 98


U
UCLIN 52, 57
UNINSTALLABLE SYSMOD CHAIN report 65
UNIX System Services 55
UNLDBOOK 51, 54
UNLDSCPP 51, 54
UNLODOC 51, 53
UNRESOLVED PE report 63
UNRESOLVED SYSTEM HOLD report 64
UPDBCK 52, 59
UPDCSI 51, 55
UPDDDD 51, 55
UPDDEF 52, 59
USERMOD 98, 116, 119, 121–123


V
variable gathering 26–27, 30, 32–33



200    IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
IMS Installation and Maintenance Processes
                                                (0.2”spine)
                                              0.17”<->0.473”
                                             90<->249 pages
                                                            Back cover                                         ®




IMS Installation and
Maintenance
Processes
Examine IMS             This IBM Redbook is intended to help systems programmers
installation and        who are responsible for IMS systems in performing their daily
                                                                                         INTERNATIONAL
verification            tasks. It describes the different options available in the       TECHNICAL
methodologies           installation of IMS and IMS service maintenance.                 SUPPORT
                                                                                         ORGANIZATION
                        This book is suitable for experienced IMS professionals as
Review your upgrade
                        well as for someone relatively new to IMS who has had to
strategy along with
                        come in and take over. It provides a review of the steps
recommendations         involved in installation, installation verification (IVP), and   BUILDING TECHNICAL
                        system definition of IMS.                                        INFORMATION BASED ON
Utilize IMS technical                                                                    PRACTICAL EXPERIENCE
support effectively     General recommendations are given regarding when and how
                        to upgrade the maintenance level of IMS systems. Also            IBM Redbooks are developed by
                        discussed are the important topics of problem management:        the IBM International Technical
                        how to search resolution for a problem, how to report a new      Support Organization. Experts
                                                                                         from IBM, Customers and
                        problem to IBM, and how to get service for the problem.
                                                                                         Partners from around the world
                        Examples of the new Web based tools and Web sites are            create timely technical
                        included. The examples cover the IMS and z/OS technical          information based on realistic
                        support Web sites and the usage of ShopzSeries.                  scenarios. Specific
                                                                                         recommendations are provided
                                                                                         to help you implement IT
                        This book is based on the usage of IMS Version 7, but also
                                                                                         solutions more effectively in
                        anticipates the changes that are introduced by IMS Version 8.    your environment.
                        It can be used as a reference when migrating to these
                        versions of IMS or when upgrading the existing version to the
                        newer maintenance level.
                                                                                         For more information:
                                                                                         ibm.com/redbooks

                          SG24-6574-00                     ISBN 0738425400

				
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