Docstoc

Opportunities at Harvard College 2010-2011

Document Sample
Opportunities at Harvard College 2010-2011 Powered By Docstoc
					 Public
 Service
Directory
 Opportunities at
 Harvard College




   2010-2011
                                                      Academic Year 2010-2011         1




                       Public
                       Service
                      Directory
        Opportunities at Harvard College 2010-2011



A description of student-led public service organizations on
     campus and resources for volunteers and groups



  This directory was compiled by the Harvard Public Service Network (PSN)
     with the assistance of the Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA)


               Edited by Kyle R. Bevan ’10 and Travis Lovett




                         The Harvard Public Service Network and the Phillips Brooks House
                         Association would like to thank The Harvard Coop for its generous
                         support and the Coop Public Service Grants, which provide grants
                         to student groups for special public service projects.
2           Harvard College Public Service Directory

                                                                     Table of Contents
Public Service at Harvard College .........................................................................................................................................5
The Public Service Academy (PSA) ......................................................................................................................................6
Public Service Groups by Issue Area .....................................................................................................................................8
Key Dates 2010-2011...........................................................................................................................................................12
Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA)........................................................................................................................14
PBHA Term-Time Programs ................................................................................................................................................15
             Admissions Scholars ......................................................................................................................................15
             AHEAD ..........................................................................................................................................................15
             Alternative Spring Breaks (ASB) ...................................................................................................................15
             Asthma Swim .................................................................................................................................................15
             Athena Program..............................................................................................................................................15
             Best Buddies ...................................................................................................................................................16
             Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment (BRYE) ..................................................................................................16
             Cambridge 1-2-1.............................................................................................................................................17
             Cambridge Afterschool Program (CASP) ......................................................................................................17
             CHANCE .......................................................................................................................................................17
             Chinatown Committee....................................................................................................................................18
             CIVICS ...........................................................................................................................................................19
             Codman Square Health Center Program ........................................................................................................20
             Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA) .......................................................................................................20
             David Walker Scholars Program (DWSP) .....................................................................................................20
             Elderly Affairs Committee .............................................................................................................................20
             Environmental Action Committee (EAC) ......................................................................................................21
             ExperiMentors ................................................................................................................................................22
             Franklin Afterschool Enrichment (FASE) ......................................................................................................22
             Franklin Teen Mentoring ................................................................................................................................22
             Habitat for Humanity (HFH) ..........................................................................................................................23
             HARMONY ...................................................................................................................................................23
             Harvard College Youth Leadership Institute (HYLI) .....................................................................................23
             Harvard Emergency Medical Services Program (HEMS) .............................................................................23
             Harvard Emerging Literacy Project (HELP) ..................................................................................................24
             Harvard Progressive Advocacy Group (HPAG) .............................................................................................24
             Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS) ....................................................................................................24
             Harvard Undergraduate Legal Committee .....................................................................................................24
             Housing Opportunities Program (HOP) .........................................................................................................25
             Keylatch Afterschool Program (KASP) .........................................................................................................25
             Keylatch Mentor .............................................................................................................................................25
             Kids with Special Needs Achievement Program (KSNAP) ...........................................................................26
             King School Buddies ......................................................................................................................................26
             LEADERS!.....................................................................................................................................................26
             Marshall Afterschool Program .......................................................................................................................27
             Mission Hill Committee .................................................................................................................................27
             Partners Empowering Neighborhoods (PEN) ................................................................................................28
             Peer Health Exchange (PHE) .........................................................................................................................28
             Pets as Therapy ...............................................................................................................................................28
             Prisoner Education Programs .........................................................................................................................28
             Recent Immigrant Term Enrichment (RITE) ................................................................................................. 29
             Refugee Youth Term Enrichment (RYTE) ..................................................................................................... 30
             Roxbury Youth Initiative - Term (RYIT)........................................................................................................ 30
             Small Claims Advisory Service (SCAS) ........................................................................................................ 30
             South Boston Afterschool (SAS).................................................................................................................... 31
             South Boston Outreach Big Sibling ............................................................................................................... 31
             Spanish Acquisition Beginning in Elementary School (SABES) .................................................................. 31
             STAGE ...........................................................................................................................................................31
             STRIVE ..........................................................................................................................................................31
             Strong Women, Strong Girls .........................................................................................................................32
             Student Labor Action Movement (SLAM) ................................................................................................... 32
                                                                                                                   Academic Year 2010-2011                                 3


            Wilderness 1-2-1 ............................................................................................................................................32
            Youth Recreation Program .............................................................................................................................32
            Youth Recreation - HOOPS............................................................................................................................33
PBHA Summer Programs ....................................................................................................................................................34
            Summer Urban Program (SUP)......................................................................................................................34
            Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment Summer Program (BRYE Summer) ......................................................34
            Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program (CYEP) ...........................................................................................34
            Chinatown Adventure (CHAD) ......................................................................................................................35
            Franklin I-O Summer Program.......................................................................................................................35
            HARMONY Summer .....................................................................................................................................35
            Keylatch Summer ...........................................................................................................................................36
            Mission Hill Summer Program (MHSP) ........................................................................................................36
            Native American Youth Enrichment Program (NAYEP) ...............................................................................36
            Refugee Youth Summer Enrichment (RYSE) ................................................................................................36
            Roxbury Youth Initiative (RYI) ......................................................................................................................37
            St. James Summer Homeless Shelter .............................................................................................................37
            South Boston Outreach Summer (SBOS) ......................................................................................................37
            Summer Science .............................................................................................................................................37
Harvard Public Service Network (PSN) Supported Student Groups ...................................................................................38
            A Stitch In Time .............................................................................................................................................38
            Advocating Success for Kids (ASK) ..............................................................................................................38
            Alberta V. Scott Leadership Program (AVS) ..................................................................................................38
            Beta Buddies ..................................................................................................................................................38
            Cambridge Microfinance Initiative ................................................................................................................39
            CityServe ........................................................................................................................................................39
            CityStep ..........................................................................................................................................................39
            Class Clowns ..................................................................................................................................................40
            Crimson in the Community ............................................................................................................................40
            Cultural Agents at Harvard College ...............................................................................................................40
            Digital Literacy Project ..................................................................................................................................40
            Foundation for International Medical Relief for Children (FIMRC) .............................................................40
            Harvard Cancer Society..................................................................................................................................41
            Harvard China Care (HCC) ............................................................................................................................42
            Harvard College Act on a Dream Club ..........................................................................................................42
            Harvard College Engineers Without Borders (EWB) .................................................................................... 42
            Harvard College Fed Challenge .....................................................................................................................42
            Harvard College for Free the Slaves (HCFTS) .............................................................................................. 43
            Harvard College Friends of Scouting .............................................................................................................43
            Harvard College Global Health and AIDS Coalition (HCGHAC).................................................................43
            Harvard College Global Hunger Initiative .....................................................................................................44
            Harvard College Health Advocacy Program (HAP) ......................................................................................44
            Harvard College Helping Heroes ...................................................................................................................44
            Harvard College Human Rights Advocates....................................................................................................45
            Harvard College Human Rights in Equatorial Guinea (HREG) ....................................................................45
            Harvard College International Bridges to Justice...........................................................................................45
            Harvard College Korean Adoptee Mentorship Program (HCKAMP) ...........................................................45
            Harvard College Shani A Cappella.................................................................................................................46
            Harvard College Special Olympics ................................................................................................................46
            Harvard College Stories for Orphans ............................................................................................................. 46
            Harvard College Team HBV ..........................................................................................................................46
            Harvard College UNICEF (HUNICEF) .........................................................................................................46
            Harvard Defense Against Genocide (HDAG) ................................................................................................47
            Harvard Friends of the American Red Cross..................................................................................................47
            Harvard LowKeys ..........................................................................................................................................47
            Harvard Program for International Education (HPIE) ...................................................................................47
            Harvard Project for Sustainable Development (HPSD) ................................................................................. 47
            Harvard Story-Time Players ...........................................................................................................................48
4            Harvard College Public Service Directory

              Harvard-Radcliffe MIHNUET .......................................................................................................................48
              Harvard Undergraduate Legal Aid Volunteers ...............................................................................................48
              Helping Hand and Heart (HHH) ....................................................................................................................48
              House and Neighborhood Development Program (HAND) ..........................................................................49
              Kidney Disease Screening and Awareness Program (KDSAP) .....................................................................49
              Let’s Get Ready! (LGR) .................................................................................................................................49
              LIFT-Cambridge ............................................................................................................................................49
              Project HEALTH ............................................................................................................................................50
              REACH ..........................................................................................................................................................50
              Students Taking on Poverty (STOP) .............................................................................................................. 50
              Unite for Sight ................................................................................................................................................51
              William Monroe Trotter Scholars Program (WMTSP) ..................................................................................51
Getting Started: Volunteers ..................................................................................................................................................52
Getting Started: Student Groups ..........................................................................................................................................53
              Registering with the Office of Student Life ...................................................................................................53
              Becoming a Member of PBHA ......................................................................................................................53
              Receiving Support from PSN .........................................................................................................................54
The Center for Public Interest Careers (CPIC) at Harvard College.....................................................................................55
Making Public Service Pay ..................................................................................................................................................56
Federal Work-Study Program (FWSP) ................................................................................................................................56
              Americorps Student Leaders in Service (SLIS) .............................................................................................57
              Other Sources of Funding for Individuals ...................................................................................................... 57
              Funding for Student Groups ...........................................................................................................................57
Bridging Academics and Public Service ..............................................................................................................................58
              Activity-Based Learning ................................................................................................................................58
              FAS Committee on Public Service 2010-2011 ...............................................................................................58
              Personal Development and Public Service.....................................................................................................59
House Public Service Tutors 2010-2011 ..............................................................................................................................60
Public Service Professional Staff .........................................................................................................................................61
Contacts at Other Campus Offices .......................................................................................................................................63
                                                                        Academic Year 2010-2011             5

               Public Service at Harvard College
This directory provides a listing of public service programs in which you can become involved. It also provides
tips and advice that can strengthen your public service organizations.
Public service is one of the largest extracurricular pursuits on campus, with activities taking place throughout
the Greater Boston and Cambridge areas and beyond. Students become involved in public service at a variety
of levels depending on their interests. Most students involved in public service on campus participate through
either the Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) or the Harvard Public Service Network (PSN). In addition,
both PBHA and PSN provide information and support to House Public Service Tutors (page 60), and together
provide staff support to the FAS Standing Committee on Public Service (page 58).
Both PBHA and PSN are located in Phillips Brooks House (PBH), which serves as the home to public service
on campus and is the base for over 130 individual public service programs. Located in the northwest corner of
Harvard Yard, the building was founded in 1900. The building is the focal point for Harvard College students
interested in serving the community through volunteer or social change programs.




                                                About Us
PBHA is the largest undergraduate public service organization on campus. It is a student-led, independent
nonprofit with a Board of Trustees and professional staff that administer over 85 programs. These programs help
children, teenagers, adults, elderly, the homeless, imprisoned, disabled, and impoverished. PBHA also operates
a fleet of vans and provides year-round programming, including summer camps for Boston area children. (All
floors; pages 15-37.)
http://www.pbha.org




PSN was developed to raise the level of discourse on campus about undergraduate public service and to increase
the amount of resources available to all students and student-led public service groups. PSN staff provides
guidance, support, and resources to approximately 50 independent, student-led service groups and operates the
Center for Public Interest Careers (CPIC) at Harvard College (3rd floor; pages 38-51).
http://www.psn.fas.harvard.edu
http://www.cpic.fas.harvard.edu
6       Harvard College Public Service Directory



                                The Public Service Academy
                                  http://www.publicservicetraining.org

                 The Public Service Academy was formed in 2002 in order to provide students
                 with new tools and strategies to help them in their public service work. Public
                     Service Academy trainings teach students numerous skills, ranging from
                volunteer management to literacy through puppet making. Trainings are offered
                 throughout the year by experienced staff, faculty, and community partners. To
                   register for all Public Service Academy sessions, request a training, or find
                    resources for training, please visit http://www.publicservicetraining.org.



How does training increase program efficiency?
Studies show three elements that are crucial to the success of any volunteer program:
1. Screening potential volunteers to ensure appropriate entry and placement;
2. Orientation and training to provide volunteers with the skills and outlook needed;
3. Management and ongoing support of volunteers.



Trainings
Program Management Certificate
This is a seven-session training series that provides tools and knowledge all program directors and leaders should
possess! Launched in the Spring of 2007, the Program Management Certificate was designed by staff and student
leaders to include best practices applicable to all programs. By attending, directors build their own skills while
learning ways to improve their programs. The following topics are addressed:

    •   Visioning, Goal Setting, and Leadership
    •   Working with Communities
    •   Volunteer Management
    •   Project and Time Management
    •   Meeting and Reflection Facilitation
    •   Finances and Fundraising
    •   Program and Self Evaluation


Mentor Certificate Program
The Mentor Certificate Program is a four-hour intensive course that will cover the fundamental skills necessary
to be a good mentor. These include stages of the mentor/mentee relationship, liability concerns, and ideas for
mentoring activities. This is mandatory for new PBHA mentors and recommended for Public Service Network
(PSN) volunteers working in similar programs.
                                                                           Academic Year 2010-2011   7


Tutor Certificate
The Tutor Certificate program will provide a uniform basic training for
new volunteers in tutoring programs! The program will cover tools
for tutoring, behavior management, safety and liability, and reflection.
This is mandatory for new PBHA tutors and recommended for Public
Service Network (PSN) volunteers working in similar programs.

Electives
Additional trainings are offered throughout the year. Check the training
calendar at http://www.publicservicetraining.org for updates.

Request a Workshop
Students leaders can request specific workshops for their programs by
filling out a Request for Training application available at
http://www.publicservicetraining.org.


Contact
For more information, to register for all listed workshops, or to
request a training, visit
http://www.publicservicetraining.org. If you have additional questions
not answered by the site, please call 617-496-1886.
8       Harvard College Public Service Directory

                      Public Service Groups by Issue Area

             Advocacy/Activism
                                                    PSN
PBHA
                                                    Let’s Get Ready!
Alternative Spring Breaks (ASB)
Environmental Action Committee (EAC)
Habitat for Humanity
Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS)
Harvard Undergraduate Legal Committee (HULC)
Housing Opportunities Program (HOP)                                      Construction
Small Claims Advisory Service (SCAS)                PBHA
St. James Summer Homeless Shelter                   Alternative Spring Breaks (ASB)
Student Labor Action Movement (SLAM)                Habitat for Humanity (HFH)

                                                                       Education: Adult
PSN                                                 PBHA
First-Year Urban Program (FUP)                      Best Buddies
Harvard Cancer Society (HCS)                        Chinatown ESL
Harvard China Care (HCC)                            Chinatown Citizenship Program
Harvard College for Free the Slaves                 Elderly 1-2-1
Harvard College Global Health and AIDS Coalition    Partners Empowering Neighborhoods
Harvard College Global Hunger Initiative            Pets as Therapy
Harvard College Health Advocacy Program (HAP)       Prison Education: Connelly Youth Center Program
Harvard College Helping Heroes                      Recent Immigrant Term Enrichment (RITE)
Harvard College Human Rights Advocates              Suffolk County Corrections
Harvard College Human Rights in Equatorial Guinea   Vernon Hall
Harvard College International Bridges to Justice    Women’s Resource Center
Harvard Darfur Action Group (HDAG)
Harvard Undergraduate Legal Aid Volunteers
LIFT-Cambridge                                      PSN
Project HEALTH                                      A Stitch In Time
Students Taking on Poverty (STOP)                   Cambridge Microfinance Initiative
                       Arts
PBHA
HARMONY
STAGE

PSN
A Stitch In Time
CityStep
Class Clowns
Cultural Agents at Harvard College
Harvard College Shani A Cappella
Harvard College Stories for Orphans
Harvard LowKeys
Harvard Story-Time Players
Harvard-Radcliffe MIHNUET


                 College Prep
PBHA
Admissions Scholars
CHANCE
                                                                    Academic Year 2010-2011               9


           Education: Afterschool                             Education: Awareness/General
PBHA                                                 PBHA
AHEAD                                                Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)
Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment (BRYE) Extension     Environmental Action Committee (EAC)
Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment (BRYE) Tutoring      Peer Health Exchange (PHE)
Chinatown Afterschool Program (CHTNASP)
CIVICS                                               PSN
Cambridge Afterschool Program (CASP)                 Cultural Agents at Harvard College
EnviroEd                                             Digital Literacy Project
Experimentors                                        Harvard Global Health and AIDS Coalition
Franklin Afterschool Enrichment (FASE)               Harvard Global Hunger Initiative
HARMONY                                              Harvard Darfur Action Group (HDAG)
Harvard Emerging Literacy Program (HELP)             Kidney Disease Screening and Awareness Program (KDSAP)
Harvard College Youth Leadership Initiative (HYLI)   Unite for Sight
Keylatch Afterschool Program (KASP)
Marshall After School Enrichement Program
Mission Hill Afterschool Program (MHASP)                            Education: In-School
Peer Health Exchange (PHE)                           PBHA
Roxbury Youth Initiative Term (RYIT)                 CIVICS
Spanish Acquisition Beginning in Elementary School   EnviroEd
(SABES)                                              ExperiMentors
South Boston Afterschool (SAS)                       HARMONY
Student Theater Advancing Growth and Empowerment     Harvard Emerging Literacy Project (HELP)
(STAGE)                                              Peer Health Exchange (PHE)

                                                     PSN
PSN                                                  CityStep
CityServe                                            Harvard Program for International Education (HPIE)
CityStep                                             Housing and Neighborhood Development (HAND)
Crimson in the Community
Harvard College Fed Challenge
                                                                              Elderly
Harvard College Friends of Scouting
House and Neighborhood Development (HAND)            PBHA
Project HEALTH                                       Alzheimer’s Buddies for the Arts
Prospect Hill Afterschool Tutoring (PHAST)           Elderly 1-2-1
                                                     Elderly Affairs Committee
                                                     Pets as Therapy
                                                     Vernon Hall

                                                     PSN
                                                     Harvard-Radcliffe MIHNUET

                                                                        Environment
                                                     PBHA
                                                     Environmental Action Committee (EAC)
                                                     EnviroEd

                                                     PSN
                                                     Harvard Project for Sustainable Development (HPSD)
  10      Harvard College Public Service Directory


                         Health                                                  Mentoring
PBHA                                                       PBHA
Asthma Swim                                                Admissions Scholars
Codman Square Health Center Program                        Asthma Swim
Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)                         Athena Program
Harvard Emergency Medical Services Program (HEMS)          Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment (BRYE) 1-2-1
King School Buddies                                        Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment (BRYE) Teen
Peer Health Exchange (PHE)                                 Cambridge 1-2-1
STRIVE                                                     CHANCE
                                                           Chinatown Big Sib
PSN                                                        Chinatown Teen
Advocating Success for Kids (ASK)                          Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)
Beta Buddies                                               David Walker Scholars (DWS)
Foundation for International Medical Relief of Children    Franklin Teen
Harvard Cancer Society (HCS)                               Leaders! Term-Time
Harvard College Global Health and AIDS Coalition           Keylatch Mentor
Harvard College Global Hunger Initiative                   Kids with Special Needs Achievement Program (KSNAP)
Harvard College Health Advocacy Program (HAP)              King School Buddies
Harvard College Human Rights in Equatorial Guinea (HREG)   Mission Mentor
Harvard College Team HBV                                   Native American Youth Enrichment Program (NAYEP)
Harvard Friends of the American Red Cross                  South Boston Big Sib
Harvard Story-Time Players                                 STRIVE
Harvard-Radcliffe MIHNUET                                  Strong Women Strong Girls (SWSG)
Helping Hand and Heart (HHH)                               Youth Recreation
Kidney Disease Screening and Awareness Program (KDSAP)
Project HEALTH
Unite for Sight                                            PSN
                                                           Alberta V. Scott Leadership Academy (AVS)
                       Homeless                            Beta Buddies
PBHA                                                       Harvard College Friends of Scouting
Harvard Square Homeless Shelter                            Harvard College Korean Adoptee Mentorship Program
St. James Summer Homeless Center                           (HCKAMP)
                                                           Harvard College Special Olympics
PSN                                                        House and Neighborhood Development (HAND)
A Stitch In Time                                           Project HEALTH
LIFT-Cambridge                                             REACH
Students Taking on Poverty (STOP)                          William M. Trotter Afterschool Program
                     International
PSN
Digital Literacy Project
Foundation for International Medical Relief for Children
Harvard China Care (HCC)
Harvard College Act on a Dream Club
Harvard College Global Health and AIDS Coalition
Harvard College Global Hunger Initiative
Harvard College Human Rights Advocates
Harvard College Human Rights in Equatorial Guinea (HREG)
Harvard College UNICEF (HUNICEF)
Harvard Defense Against Genocide (HDAG)
Harvard Program for International Education (HPIE)
Harvard Project for Sustainable Development (HPSD)
Unite for Sight
                                                   Academic Year 2010-2011   11


                     Summer
PBHA
BRYE Summer
Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program (CYEP)
Chinatown Adventure (CHAD)
Chinatown Citizenship Summer Program
Chinatown ESL Summer Program
Franklin I-O Summer Program
HARMONY Summer
Harvard Undergraduate Legal Committee Summer
Housing Opportunities Program (HOP) Summer
Keylatch Summer Program
Mission Hill Summer Program
Native American Youth Enrichment Program (NAYEP)
Refugee Youth Summer Enrichment (RYSE)
Roxbury Youth Initiave (RYI)
St. James Homeless Shelter
Small Claims Advisory Service (SCAS) Summer
South Boston Outreach Summer (SBOS)
Summer Science
Summer Urban Program (SUP)

PSN
Crimson in the Community
Harvard-Radcliffe MIHNUET
Let’s Get Ready!
LIFT-Cambridge
Project HEALTH


                        Teen
PBHA
Admissions Scholars
Best Buddies
BRYE Teen
CHANCE
Chinatown Teen Program
Connelly Youth Center Education Program
Franklin Teen Mentoring
Keylatch Mentor
LEADERS!
Mission Mentor
Peer Health Exchange (PHE)
Refugee Youth Term Enrichment (RYTE)
Youth Prison Tutoring Program

PSN
Alberta V. Scott Leadership Academy (AVS)
Crimson in the Community
Harvard College Fed Challenge
Let’s Get Ready!
12         Harvard College Public Service Directory

                       Key Dates 2010-2011 - Fall 2010 Dates
 Public service activities occur year-round. The following events have a public service focus, or have components
 that may touch on a particular aspect of service, such as summer internships in the nonprofit sector.


Fall Dates

Aug. 26 -                                                     Nov. 15          Liman Public Interest Law
Sept. 3          PBHA Plant Sale                                               Fellowship Information Session
                                                                               contact asglynn@fas.harvard.edu
Sept. 1          Student Activities Fair
                 contact sao@fas.harvard.edu                  TBD              OCS Summer Opportunities Fair

Sept. 2          PSN Groups Information Session               Dec. 6           CPIC Fellowship and Internship
                 contact asglynn@fas.harvard.edu                               Program Information Session
                                                                               contact tlovett@fas.harvard.edu
Sept. 3          PBHA Open House
                                                              Dec. 6           Steamboat Summer Scholar Program
                 contact pbha@pbha.org
                                                                               Applications Due
                                                                               contact asglynn@fas.harvard.edu
Sept. 4-6        Get Involved Weekend
                 contact osl@fas.harvard.edu
                                                              Dec. 8           Liman Public Interest Law
                                                                               Fellowship Application Due
Sept. 24         OCS Career Forum
                                                                               contact asglynn@fas.harvard.edu

Sept. 25         PBHA Bike Sale
                 contact pbha@pbha.org

Oct. 15-17       PBHA Alumni Weekend
                 pbha@pbha.org

Oct. 27          Steamboat Summer Scholar
                 Program Information Session
                 contact asglynn@fas.harvard.edu

Oct. 13          Careers in Public Service Dinner
                 contact tlovett@fas.harvard.edu

Nov. 8           Program Information Session
                 contact tlovett@fas.harvard.edu

Nov. 9           CPIC-Heckscher Fund for Service
                 Internship (FSI) Program Information
                 Session
                 contact asglynn@fas.harvard.edu




                                                              *Note: Some key dates may change after printing.
                                                              Please check the Web for the most up-to-date
                                                              information.
                                                         Academic Year 2010-2011        13

                   Key Dates 2010-2011 - Spring 2011 Dates


Spring Dates

Jan. 27        CPIC Fellowship and Internship + FSI
               Program Applications Due
               contact tlovett@fas.harvard.edu

TBD            PBHA Spring Open House
               contact pbha@pbha.org

Jan. 31        CPIC Fellowship Application Orientation
               contact tlovett@fas.harvard.edu

TBD            SUP Counselor Applications Due
               contact pbha@pbha.org

Feb. 1         FSI Applicant Orientation

Feb. 2         CPIC Internship Applicant Orientation
               contact tlovett@fas.harvard.edu

Feb. 3         PSN Groups Spring Information Session
               contact asglynn@fas.harvard.edu

Feb. 7-11      CPIC Fellowship + FSI Interviews
               contact tlovett@fas.harvard.edu

Feb. 15-18     CPIC Internship Interviews
               contact tlovett@fas.harvard.edu

March 1        Harvard Clubs Summer Community
               Service Fellowship Applications Due
               contact asglynn@fas.harvard.edu

March 9        OCS Summer Public Service Grant
               Applications Due
               contact bohlmann@fas.harvard.edu

April 25       Summer Public Service Work-Study Grant
               Applications Accepted (Rolling)
               contact jhlee@fas.harvard.edu

Early May      PBHA Public Service Celebration
               contact pbha@pbha.org


                                                         *Note: Some key dates may change after
                                                         printing. Please check the Web for the
                                                         most up-to-date information.
14     Harvard College Public Service Directory


                  Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA)

                        Kaitlin Koga, President
                        pbha@pbha.org
                        495-5526
                        http://www.pbha.org



The Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) is an independent, student-run nonprofit organization, as well
as Harvard’s largest public service organization. Its programs include afterschool activities, summer day camps,
activist groups, and the only student-run homeless shelter in the country. Through social service and social
action, PBHA endeavors to meet community needs and promote social awareness and community involvement
at Harvard and beyond.

PBHA provides abundant resources to its member committees in the areas of financial support and fundraising
assistance, professional human service support, and physical resources. PBHA has over 80 public service and
advocacy programs and approximately 1,600 student volunteers. PBHA is governed by the Cabinet (the body
of program directors), which elects the Officers and Board of Trustees for the organization.

(For a listing of professional staff, please see pages 61-62. PBHA 2010 Officers are listed below. Individual
program descriptions, along with contact information for directors, are listed on page 15-37).


                                              PBHA Officers
President                                         Kaitlin Koga            kslkoga@gmail.com
Executive Vice President                          Christopher Loney       christopher.loney@gmail.com
Treasurer                                         Kathryn Wilcox          klwilcox@fas.harvard.edu
Secretary                                         Iris Tian               itian@fas.harvard.edu
Programming Chairs                                Edwin Hargate           ehargate@fas.harvard.edu
                                                  Tara Venkatraman        tara.venkatraman@gmail.com
Student Development Chair                         Katie Coulson           kjcoulson@gmail.com
Resource Development Chairs                       Stanley Zheng           szheng@fas.harvard.edu
                                                  John Zhao               zhao.john.z@gmail.com
Events Fundraiser                                 Nadia Farjood           nadiafarjood@college.harvard.edu
Public Relations Chair                            Peter Grbac             pgrbac@fas.harvard.edu
Community Organizing Chair                        Karla Reyes             kreyes07@gmail.com
Summer Program Group Officer                      Meaghan Durgin          mdurgin@fas.harvard.edu
Afterschool Program Group Officer                 Katherine Hahn          khahn@fas.harvard.edu
Mentoring Program Group Officer                   Seth Pearce             sethapearce@gmail.com
Adult Services Program Group Officer              Kylee Clyatt            kjclyatt@gmail.com
Advocacy & Housing Program Group Officer          Bradley Craig           bradley.craig@college.harvard.edu
Alumni Relations Chair                            Amanda Morejon          amandamorejon@college.harvard.edu
Vehicles & Space Coordinator                      Carolyn Chou            carolyn1022@gmail.com
Historian                                         Ekene Obi-Okeye         e.obiokoye@gmail.com
                                                                           Academic Year 2010-2011              15

                                  PBHA Term-Time Programs
(Please note that some contacts may change as programs transition to new leadership. If you are unable to reach a

                       particular group, please contact Iris Tian at itian@fas.harvard.edu.)


Admission Scholars
Lindsay Tanne                             ltanne@fas.harvard.edu

Together with the dedicated teachers and college counselors at Madison Park High School, we provide SAT
training, college advising, and essay writing assistance to high school juniors and seniors. Our volunteers offer
strategic guidance and personal encouragement, designing and running workshops that target low-income students.
It is our goal to increase the number of students graduating from high school in four years and going on to college.
We also strive to help our students recognize their personal and professional aspirations. Our volunteers go to
Madison Park twice per week and are invited to hold office hours at the school whenever they wish.

AHEAD
Rachel Granetz                            rgranetz@fas.harvard.edu

AHEAD (Aiming for Higher Emerson Academic Development) is a tutoring program based at the Emerson
School in Roxbury. Our afterschool program includes homework tutorial and enrichment activities for elementary
school students (age 5-12). Tutors have the opportunity to plan activities and design lesson plans and can choose
which age group(s) they would like to work with. In addition to the afterschool program, we have a field trip
each semester on campus or at another location in Boston. We are looking for enthusiastic tutors with a diverse
range of interests who can tutor one or two afternoons each week. We hope you’ll consider joining the AHEAD
community!

Alternative Spring Breaks (ASB)
Vicky Guo                                 vguo@fas.harvard.edu
Terry Ding                                tding@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~asb

Alternative Spring Breaks (ASB) runs public service trips during Spring Break. We travel to rural and urban
areas throughout the eastern United States. We work closely with community organizations to renovate homes,
churches, community centers, and playgrounds and to learn about the social, economic, and political issues
affecting the region. There is also time for fun activities like bowling, skating, and visiting national parks. With
a motto of “community service, cultural exchange, and fun,” ASB provides a worthwhile experience during
Spring Break.

Asthma Swim
Molly Siegel                              msiegel@fas.harvard.edu
Samantha Fang                             sfang@fas.harvard.edu

PBHA’s Asthma Swim partners with the HMS Office of Enrichment Programs/Division of Service Learning and
the South Cove Community Health Center, HMS students and volunteers provide health education and swimming
lessons at the Chinatown YMCA for children with asthma and their families.

Athena Program
harvard.athena@gmail.com

The Athena Program is dedicated to increasing awareness, empowerment and activism of high school girls from
Boston and Cambridge. The Program aims to unite young women from underserved, low-income communities
16       Harvard College Public Service Directory

in the greater Boston and Cambridge areas with undergraduate mentors who support and challenge each other
in discussion and skill building around gender empowerment, community leadership, and youth activism. It
includes a year-long mentoring program and a semi-annual conference, both focusing on topics relating to
women and gender issues.

Best Buddies
Jess Caplin                                jcaplin@fas.harvard.edu

Harvard’s Best Buddies places individuals with intellectual disabilities in one-to-one friendships with non-disabled
peers. Students who become Peer Buddies are expected to contact their Buddies weekly and participate in two
activities per month. In the past, individuals with intellectual disabilities have not had the opportunity to have
friends outside of their own environment, and we are similarly limited at Harvard. Many buddy pairs go on to
be lifelong friends by going on the many fun group activities and outings throughout the year.

Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment (BRYE)
The Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment (BRYE) program is dedicated to helping Southeast Asian refugee
children adapt and flourish in an environment which offers them few resources. Our children, ages 6-16, live
in Dorchester, where there is a large Vietnamese immigrant population. BRYE strives to meet the needs of the
community through tutoring and mentoring programs.

     BRYE 1-2-1
     Rachel Park                           rspark@fas.harvard.edu

     BRYE 1-2-1 is a big sibling program for children who already have a working knowledge of English and
     would benefit from a one-on-one mentoring relationship. Through this program, we seek to help them
     experience parts of American culture they might otherwise miss, give them role models to look up to, and
     make friendships that endure. Volunteers meet with their little siblings once per week on Saturdays, sometimes
     spending time one-on-one and other times taking part in organized “optional activities” or group field trips
     (for example, to the Boston Children’s Museum, the Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey’s Circus, ice
     skating lessons, etc.).

     BRYE Extension
     Tin Dinh                              tin.vh.dinh@gmail.com
     Brennan Vail                          bvail@fas.harvard.edu

     BRYE Extension provides academic enrichment to Vietnamese and Cape Verdean refugee children after
     school in a small classroom setting. Our students come from elementary and middle schools in Dorchester
     and are divided into three classes by age. All classes focus on improving English literacy skills while the
     two older classes also provide quantitative enrichment through interactive experiments and activities. The
     program runs from 4:00pm - 5:30pm on Friday afternoons at our site in Dorchester. You don’t need to speak
     Vietnamese to join! Only a smile, some creativity, and lots of enthusiasm is necessary!

     BRYE Teen
     Kerry McGowan                         kmcgowan@fas.harvard.edu
     Sarah Siegel                          ssiegel@wellesley.edu

     BRYE Teen is a program for 13-17 year-old multi-ethnic immigrant youth in Dorchester. BRYE Teen has a
     different focus—not just academics or mentoring, but also youth development and empowerment/diversity
     training. We meet every Saturday from 4:00pm - 6:00pm in Dorchester, and we spend the first hour doing
     homework help and test prep and the second hour doing enrichment activities. Last year, we explored the
     theme of art and community and explored other modes of expression through music and art. In addition, we
                                                                           Academic Year 2010-2011               17

   read immigration stories, watched documentaries, and participated in spoken word poetry. Each semester, we
   also work on a project. We finished a photography project where the teens took pictures of their community
   and what is important to them and added text to tell a story. Our volunteers build long-lasting relationships
   with the teens and also gain facilitation skills, as we take turns leading the discussion groups and activities.
   Your talents, ideas, and creativity are an important part of this program!

   BRYE Tutoring
   Diana Bartenstein                       diana.bartenstein@gmail.com

   The BRYE Tutoring program, founded in 1987, strives to give children of immigrants from various countries
   (such as Vietnam, Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Cape Verde) a foothold in America through instruction in
   the English language. By fostering a close, mentoring relationship between tutor and tutee, BRYE Tutoring
   is dedicated to bridging the cultural barrier not only through knowledge of language, but also by inspiring
   confidence and increasing self-esteem through a solid friendship. Tutors do not have to know any foreign
   languages or have previous experience in ESL tutoring to be in the program. BRYE’s application process
   chooses highly dedicated, outstanding tutors who devote Monday or Thursday (or both!), from 3:30pm-6:00
   pm (including travel time), to tutoring. Tutors create their own curriculum tailored to their individual students,
   ages 6-12. BRYE Tutoring also takes two field trips per semester.

Cambridge 1-2-1
Stephanie McCartney                        mccartney.steph@gmail.com
Devon Stewart                              devon.marie.stewart@gmail.com

Cambridge 1-2-1’s mission is to connect Harvard undergraduates to high school students at the Community
Charter School of Cambridge (CCSC) through one-on-one mentoring. Each mentor-mentee pair meets on a
schedule that they determine, and attends our monthly program-wide outings to restaurants, colleges, and other
locations in the greater Boston area. Mentors with Cambridge 1-2-1 serve as big brothers/sisters as well as
personal and academic advisers for their mentees and are widely perceived as hugely valuable influences by
both students and faculty at CCSC.

Cambridge Afterschool Program (CASP)
Katie Hahn                                 khahn@fas.harvard.edu
Kathryn Wilcox                             klwilcox@fas.harvard.edu

The Cambridge Afterschool Program (CASP) strives for social justice in the Cambridge community. CASP
focuses on providing affordable and accessible afterschool programming for low-income Cambridge youth. By
following this mission, CASP hopes to combat socioeconomic disparity and empower Cambridge youth, allowing
them to realize their full potential. Through the unique tutoring/workshop structure of the program, CASP not
only provides academic assistance, but also engages youth to explore interests in the fields of art, technology,
athletics, and more. As a partner program to the Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program, CASP also seeks to
foster and continue relationships made over the summer. Above all, CASP seeks to provide a safe space for
Cambridge youth, a helping hand to Cambridge parents, a partner to the Cambridge community, and a rewarding
experience to Harvard volunteers.

CHANCE
chance@hcs.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~chance/

Harvard CHANCE (College High-school Alliance: A Nexus for Creative Education) offers free SAT tutoring,
homework help, and college advising to Cambridge Rindge and Latin High School (CRLS) students. CHANCE
generally meets once per week at CRLS, which is within walking distance of the Science Center. Several times
18       Harvard College Public Service Directory

per year, CHANCE holds weekend workshops on Harvard’s campus. In the past, these have included a college
advising workshop and an SAT Saturday, where students can take a full-length practice SAT exam. Dedicated
CHANCE participants may apply for college scholarships during their senior year.

Chinatown Committee
Amy Li                                      amyli@fas.harvard.edu
Vicky Guo                                   vguo@fas.harvard.edu
Angela Sun                                  asun@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~chtn/

Boston’s Chinatown is the oldest Asian-populated neighborhood in New England. Its residents live in a community
characterized by the lowest median income and the highest rate of overcrowding of all of the neighborhoods in
Boston. The growing population of Asian-Americans in Greater Boston and the increasing elderly population have
caused a dramatic rise in the issues and challenges faced by the Chinatown community. Through its programs, the
volunteers of the Chinatown Committee devote themselves to helping the community deal with its challenges,
as well as strengthening intergenerational and cultural ties and awareness. Please note that the programs do not
require volunteers to speak an Asian language.

     Chinatown Afterschool Program
     Amy Li                                 amyli@fas.harvard.edu
     Iris Tian                              tian.iris@gmail.com
     Jeff Ye                                jzye@fas.harvard.edu
     http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~chtnasp

     Chinatown Afterschool Program brings 50 Harvard and Wellesley counselors together with approximately
     60 children in Grades 1-6 three times per week. Admission is based on residence in Chinatown, academic
     and/or social need for an afterschool program, and attendance of our program and/or the summer program
     (Chinatown Adventure). The first half of our daily program consists of homework help and tutoring. The
     highlight of our day is the second half, when counselors lead the children in fun and enriching projects designed
     by the counselors. The children also participate in field trips throughout the year, including Halloween at
     Harvard, group field trips in the spring, and potlucks with families at the end of each semester. Our team of
     counselors, group coordinators, and directors also enjoy group bonding events and dimsum runs. With new
     events planned for the upcoming year, such as an open house and parent night, we hope to learn more about
     our Chinatown community and find ways to better serve it.

     Chinatown Big Sibling Program
     Flora Luo                              fluo@fas.harvard.edu

     Chinatown Big Sibling is an afterschool mentoring program that matches volunteers to children of all ages
     referred by guidance counselors, social workers, and other community members. Volunteers meet one-to-one
     with their little siblings for at least three hours per week, during both group gatherings in Chinatown and
     individual outings to Boston. Volunteers have taken their little sibs to such popular sites as the Frog Pond at
     Boston Common, the Freedom Trail, Quincy Market, the Children’s Museum, and the New England Aquarium.
     Through establishing lasting relationships, Big Sibling hopes to explore exciting new opportunities and
     experiences for both big and little siblings. Volunteers commit to the program for at least one year, though
     most continue until graduation. Big Sib is ideal for volunteers who wish to make a personal, long-term impact
     with children whose parents spend long hours at work and who may need additional positive role models.
                                                                          Academic Year 2010-2011             19


   Chinatown Citizenship Program
   Benny Zhu                              yinanzhu@fas.harvard.edu
   Florence On                            florenceon11@college.harvard.edu
   Lydia Lo                               llo@fas.harvard.edu
   Nancy Lin                              nancylin@fas.harvard.edu

   Citizenship tutors drill students for the oral interview or teach basic American history and government in
   order to prepare their students for the naturalization process. Citizenship is held in Boston’s Chinatown;
   the two-hour classes take place on the weekends. All volunteers teach in pairs. Volunteers are trained and
   provided with curriculum materials but still retain full creative flexibility in designing lesson plans to best
   fit the needs of their students. Chinatown Citizenship is a fun, valuable, and rewarding program for its
   participants, teachers, and students alike.

   Chinatown ESL Program
   Cynthia Cheung                         cicheung@fas.harvard.edu
   Alan Chiu                              achiu@fas.harvard.edu
   Vidya Viswanathan                      viswanat@fas.harvard.edu
   Wendy Ying                             wying@fas.harvard.edu

   Chinatown ESL allows its volunteers the unique opportunity to teach English to a class of enthusiastic,
   motivated adults, mostly recent Chinese immigrants. Our free classes are incredibly popular in the Chinatown
   community, so we are always looking for new tutors! No teaching experience or Chinese language ability
   is necessary, although Cantonese speakers are always in demand. ESL offers five levels of classes, from
   beginning fundamentals to advanced conversation; lessons focus on developing practical conversational,
   reading, and writing skills useful for everyday situations. Curriculum is provided and classes are on campus
   once per week for two hours.

   Chinatown Teen Program
   Chen Yan                               cyan@fas.harvard.edu
   Joan How                               cjhow@fas.harvard.edu

   As a Chinatown Teen counselor, you will have the opportunity to be an influence in a middle schooler’s life
   through interacting with them in a group environment. Teens are encouraged to develop relationships with
   both the counselors and their fellow teens through a two hour program on Tuesdays and Thursdays, as well
   as various field trips throughout the semester. Regular programming consists of a mixture of homework
   time and a fun and skill building project designed to foster maturity, creativity, leadership, teamwork, and
   responsibility. The time commitment is one to two hours per week.

CIVICS
Liz Towle                                 etowle@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~civics

CIVICS strives to inspire students to take an active participatory role in their community by educating them on
what our government is and how it affects their lives. Students are encouraged to think critically about their
rights and responsibilities as citizens through lessons on the Constitution and Bill of Rights. With challenging
discussions and simulations, children in Grades 5 and 8 learn to evaluate, critique, and appreciate the democratic
process through approximately eight weekly classes. Groups of two or three CIVICS instructors teach in social
studies classrooms of 15 to 25 students in public schools in Boston, Allston, and Cambridge.
20      Harvard College Public Service Directory

Codman Square Health Center Program
Xun Zhou                                   xunzhou@fas.harvard.edu
Nevin Britto                               nbritto@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.edu/~codman

Become part of a new and exciting program on campus! The Codman Volunteer Program is looking for new
volunteers in the recently opened and renovated child-care area of the Codman Square Health Center! Codman
is dedicated to serving underprivileged members of the Dorchester community who do not have access to health
insurance. Students interested in volunteering at the health center will be involved in staffing the child-care
areas, as well as teaching health education in areas such as health, nutrition, and hygiene. Students will also have
the opportunity to work closely with neighborhood leaders, shadow doctors at the clinic, and learn more about
community organizing. Volunteers must be able to commit to one two-hour weekday shift and weekly Sunday
meetings for at least two semesters. Interest in health care and education preferred.

Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA)
West Resendes                              west.resendes@gmail.com
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~coda

The Committee on Deaf Awareness (CODA) works to promote understanding and awareness of the Deaf
community. CODA offers on-campus American Sign Language (ASL) classes for Harvard students taught by a
professional ASL instructor. Students can then use their ASL skills to participate in CODA’s mentoring program,
which pairs Harvard students with deaf children in the Boston area.

David Walker Scholars Program (DWSP)
Obinnaya Kelechukwu Okwara                 okwara@fas.harvard.edu
Arian Razzaghi                             razzaghi@fas.harvard.edu

The David Walker Scholars Program strives to empower young men in under-resourced African American
communities by helping them realize their agency in achieving productive goals for academic and personal success.
We aim to accomplish our mission of empowerment through the following objectives: exemplifying the ideal of
respect for self and others in our speech and in our actions; challenging the young men to accept responsibility
for the outcomes of their actions; showing them how lessons from the past can be applied to situations today;
leading them in critical discussion of issues that are relevant to them; broadening their perspectives by connecting
them to resources available to them; connecting them to a community which supports their personal and academic
success; facilitating a collaborative relationship between teachers and parents.

DWSP was started by members of Harvard’s Black Men’s Forum who recognized a need to augment the paucity
of positive black male influences in the lives of boys (grades 6-8) within socioeconomically disadvantaged
communities. Now entering its seventh year, the David Walker Scholars Program meets at the Higginson-Lewis
K-8 School and the Henry Dearborn Middle School both in Roxbury, MA three days per week in addition to
occasional weekend field trips.

Elderly Affairs Committee
Katie Grosteffon                           kgrostef@fas.harvard.edu

Elderly Affairs serves Cambridge senior citizens who often receive little attention. Each volunteer is paired with a
senior citizen and, through weekly visits, forms a strong personal relationship with him or her. This intergenerational
program allows students to benefit from the wisdom and experience of senior citizens while the elders receive
the time, caring, and enthusiasm of the students. In addition, we are currently exploring more ways of helping
the older population this semester.
                                                                           Academic Year 2010-2011               21

   Alzheimer’s Buddies for the Arts
   Kyle Chen                               kylechen@fas.harvard.edu

   Alzheimer’s Buddies for the Arts is one of the programs of the Elderly Affairs Committee. This program
   pairs students with residents at Cadbury Commons, an assisted living retirement facility. Students and their
   elderly buddies will work on art projects together at Cadbury Commons and also go on some group art
   excursions (e.g. Museum of Fine Arts in Boston) to engage the cognitive abilities of those in the early stages
   of Alzheimer’s. Cadbury Commons is about a 10-minute walk from the Quad. We volunteer from about
   3:00pm-5:00pm on Sunday afternoons.

   Elderly 1-2-1
   Sanjin Tunovic                          stunovic@fas.harvard.edu

   Elderly 1-2-1 is another program of the Elderly Affairs Committee. In this program, a volunteer is paired with
   one elderly citizen (although volunteers may opt to be matched up with more than one elderly individual)
   with whom the volunteer visits weekly at a time mutually convenient for the student and the elderly citizen.
   1-2-1 participants have the liberty of deciding what activities he or she would like to carry out with the elderly
   individual (activities could constitute simply conversing or taking the senior citizen on a leisurely stroll).
   Student volunteers should plan on forging a strong, personal relationship with his or her elderly friend.

   Vernon Hall
   Daniel Lage                             dlage@fas.harvard.edu
   Taylor LiCausi                          tlicausi@gmail.com

   Vernon Hall is one of the programs of the Elderly Affairs Committee. Volunteers visit nursing home patients
   together as a group and entertain the elderly individuals by playing exciting rounds of bingo, leading bi-weekly
   art classes, and coordinating outings. We also plan themed parties for the residents (Halloween, Holidays,
   Valentine’s Day). The Vernon Hall nursing home is a 10-15 minute walk from Harvard Square. We volunteer
   from approximately 2:00pm-3:30pm on Saturday afternoons.


Environmental Action Committee (EAC)
Jackson Salovaara                          jsalov@fas.harvard.edu
John Beatty                                jbeatty@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.greencrimson.com

The Environmental Action Committee (EAC) is Harvard’s leading undergraduate environmental organization.
The EAC deals with a variety of environmental issues on campus through international levels. We are interested
in spreading awareness of current topics, improving education on diverse ecological subjects, and organizing
events and activities to celebrate and preserve our environment. Weekly meetings on Wednesdays from 8:00pm
-9:00pm in the Quincy House Spindell Room are open to anyone interested in guiding the organization toward
the future, and frequent committee-wide events bring everyone together for a common cause or interest. The
EAC also includes what are called ‘Project Groups,’ groups of students working on an issue different or more
specific than the project that the larger EAC is working on at the time. Active projects group include: EnviroEd,
Sustainable Allston, Environmental Justice, and Earth Day. Many members of the EAC are involved with one or
several project groups in addition to their work with the EAC-general, though of course all levels of commitment
are more than welcomed.
22       Harvard College Public Service Directory

     Environmental Education (EnviroEd)
     Patrick Behrer                       behrer@fas.harvard.edu

     Environmental Education is an afterschool program working with middle school children (Grades 6-8)
     in Boston Public Schools. EnviroEd’s mission is to educate children about the environment and foster an
     appreciation for the natural world in which we live. The EnviroEd program gives undergraduate volunteers
     the opportunity to work with the same group of students throughout two, 10-week semesters, leading up to a
     final presentation to the school community. The program is based on an exciting and established curriculum
     which allows volunteer teachers to establish a close relationship with students and watch them grow.

ExperiMentors
Danielle Streifthau                       dstreift@fas.harvard.edu
Joe Chen                                  zhaochen@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~xmentors

Volunteers in the ExperiMentors program teach science lessons to Cambridge public school children in Grades
1-6 which emphasize hands-on learning, the scientific method, and questioning and discovery. Partnerships of
two volunteers develop a curriculum and teach the class one hour per week during school hours. Ultimately, the
choice of the lesson topic is up to the volunteers who find it very rewarding to teach areas of particular interest.
ExperiMentors emphasizes the importance of hands-on learning. This program affords Harvard students the
opportunities to gain skills in teaching, exercise their creativity in the development of lesson plans, combine
academic interests with community service, and most importantly, develop young children’s curiosity and
fascination in the natural and physical world of science around them.

Franklin Afterschool Enrichment (FASE)
Noni Carter                               ncarter@college.harvard.edu
Afaf Ibraheem                             afaf211@gmail.com
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~fase

Franklin Afterschool Enrichment (FASE) is a one-on-one tutoring program serving grade-school children in the
Franklin Field and Franklin Hill public housing developments and surrounding areas of Dorchester. Our program
has two main goals: to reinforce academic skills through individual tutoring and group activities and to bring
together a diverse group of children and counselors to increase tolerance and ease tensions between Franklin Hill
and Franklin Field. Serving approximately 20 children three afternoons per week, FASE is an intimate program
that provides a valuable resource for Franklin families.

Franklin Teen Mentoring
Kit Carroll                               kcarroll@fas.harvard.edu

The Franklin Teen Mentoring Program gives college students the opportunity to establish relationships with
youth, ages 12-16, from the Franklin Hill and Franklin Field housing developments in Dorchester. Besides
allowing for the growth of mentor-mentee relationships, the program promotes friendship and understanding
among youth from the two housing developments, which have had long-standing issues with gang-tensions and
gun violence. Mentors act as positive role models, offering friendship, academic support, and access to key
resources. Franklin Teen meets twice per week in the afternoons. We also go on numerous weekend field trips
throughout the year. No experience is necessary; we are just looking for individuals who are enthusiastic about
becoming involved and mentoring teens.
                                                                         Academic Year 2010-2011              23

Habitat for Humanity (HFH)
Lydia Karch                               lkarch@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.harvardhabitat.org

Habitat for Humanity (HFH) is a nonprofit “housing ministry” that seeks to eliminate homelessness and
poverty housing. Working with partner families, Habitat builds and/or renovates simple, decent houses which
are then sold to the families through affordable, no-interest loans. Harvard Habitat for Humanity serves as
a link between Harvard University students and HFH chapters in Eastern Massachusetts. Though Harvard
HFH does not manage its own work sites, it does connect local Habitat sites with student volunteers on
Saturdays during term. These volunteers help see sites through from foundation to furniture, and work side
by side with other college students, members of the community, and partner families to get the job done.
Harvard HFH’s link expands every Spring Break, when it sends groups of volunteers to other work sites in
the Eastern United States. Harvard HFH also works on raising awareness of housing issues, combining forces
with other Boston-area chapters, and sharing ideas and experiences with college chapters around the world.

HARMONY
Saki Takahashi                            takahash@fas.harvard.edu
Shami Entenman                            entenman@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~harmony

HARMONY (Harvard and Radcliffe Musical Outreach to Neighborhood Youth) offers volunteers the opportunity
to act as mentors and music teachers to elementary, middle and high school students in the Cambridge public
schools. HARMONY targets children who have an interest in music but are unable to afford private music lessons;
our volunteers teach hour-long lessons on a weekly basis to their student in the practice rooms of Harvard’s music
building. Students and volunteers also participate in group musical enrichment activities together, attending
concerts both on campus and in Boston. Volunteers can use method books from the HARMONY music library or
shape their own curriculum. At the end of each semester, all of our students come together at our program-wide
recital, which in the past has featured everything from “Chopsticks” to Chopin. HARMONY welcomes vocalists
and instrumentalists from diverse musical backgrounds including jazz, folk, and rock, as well as classical. Last
year, we had close to 30 student-teacher pairings, and we are always looking to expand our program!

Harvard College Youth Leadership Initiative (HYLI)
Tom Wang                                  tomwang223@gmail.com
Elizabeth Fryman                          emfryman@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hyli.org

The Harvard College Youth Leadership Institute (HYLI) offers a leadership development program to middle school
students from Cambridge public and charter schools. We focus on teaching our students essential leadership
skills using hands-on, experiential learning techniques. The program takes place on-campus once a week and a
variety of student groups serve as classroom guests throughout the semester.

Harvard Emergency Medical Services Program (HEMS)
Anupriya Singhal                          asinghal@fas.harvard.edu

Harvard Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) offers students two exciting opportunities to serve their community
in a medical context. First, HEMS provides students with the training to become fully certified CPR/First Aid/
AED instructors so that they can then teach Harvard, Cambridge, and Boston community members these crucial
life-saving skills. Second, a newly launched program trains students to be certified as an EMT-basic so that they
can volunteer or work for local ambulance companies.
24       Harvard College Public Service Directory

Harvard Emerging Literacy Project (HELP)
Jessica Setless                           jsetless@fas.harvard.edu

Harvard Emerging Literacy Project (HELP) recognizes that if economically disadvantaged children do not have
the resources to practice the skill of reading, their chances for later academic success and future learning are
significantly diminished. Volunteers visit Cambridge Head Start preschools in pairs once per week for an hour
to read and play with the children, who have poor access to books and potential readers. We seek to close the
gap in their literacy capability by showing them that reading is fun and preparing our students for Grade 1 to the
extent of their more fortunate peers.

Harvard Progressive Advocacy Group (HPAG)
Matt Garcia                               mgarcia@fas.harvard.edu

Harvard Progressive Advocacy Group works for community-directed social change in Massachusetts. Through
our political advocacy efforts, we collaborate with marginalized communities as they build power. Currently,
HPAG focuses on prison advocacy, working with the Criminal Justice department of the American Friends
Service Committee on projects that involve lobbying policy-makers, conducting research, and creating advocacy
resources.

Harvard Square Homeless Shelter (HSHS)
For general inquiries:                    hshs.info@gmail.com
To volunteer:                             hshs.volunteer@gmail.com
http://hshshelter.org

The Harvard Square Homeless Shelter operates an emergency homeless shelter at the University Lutheran Church
(UniLu) in Harvard Square. We provide shelter, food, and resource counseling for 24 guests each night, as well
as dinner plates for all who come to the door. The shelter is open seven nights per week from November 15th
through April 15th, and volunteers work a weekly 2-10 hour shift.

Harvard Undergraduate Legal Committee
Pierre Berastain                          pberast@fas.harvard.edu
Katherine O’Leary                         koleary47@gmail.com
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~legalcom

The Harvard Undergraduate Legal Committee (HULC) coordinates a number of activities and events for students
who want to explore public interest law. The Internship Program provides Harvard undergraduates with meaningful
public service law opportunities while serving the local community through unpaid internships. Students learn to
use law as a tool for social justice while expanding public interest law organizations’ abilities to offer resources
and assistance to those in the community who need legal help. In addition, the annual Public Interest Law
Conference brings together students, faculty, and leaders in the community to discuss issues pertinent to public
interest law. HULC also coordinates an advocacy campaign, a Mentor Program, a Speaker Series, field trips,
and a community service project.
                                                                          Academic Year 2010-2011             25

Housing Opportunities Program (HOP)
hop@hcs.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~hop

The Housing Opportunities Program (HOP) is concerned with finding permanent solutions to homelessness.
We provide interest-free loans to those who are threatened with eviction from their homes or to those who are
looking for permanent housing in the greater Boston area. The clients we serve are working poor or low-income
citizens who often fall behind in their rent due to circumstances such as job transition or a sick family member.
Volunteers operate the loan program through reviewing a client’s application and conducting personal interviews.
Whether you are interested in the logistics of running a nonprofit loan program (billing, collection, legal issues,
grant-writing, public speaking) or specifically in affordable housing, check out HOP. We are also involved in
research and community building around housing concerns. Time commitment is flexible, but the program
requires a commitment.

Keylatch Afterschool Program (KASP)
Emily Villa                               evilla@college.harvard.edu
Victor Flores                             bluefores91@gmail.com
Ben Gusberg                               james.gusberg@college.harvard.edu
Mark Kopelman                             mkopelm@fas.harvard.edu

The Keylatch Afterschool Program works with children (ages 5-11) from a low-income, predominantly black and
Latino neighborhood in Boston’s South End. As the oldest afterschool program in PBHA, Keylatch takes pride
in its 28 years of public service. Over the years, Keylatch has maintained deep ties with children, parents, and
schools in the community. Children in the program experience valuable academic growth and enrichment as they
develop strong interpersonal skills. Volunteers are required to commit at least three hours per week to service.

Keylatch Mentor
Evan Hoese                                eghoese@fas.harvard.edu

Keylatch Mentor’s mission is to serve middle-school-aged children in Boston’s South End at a time in their
lives when they are starting to make important life choices and to see themselves and the world around them in
new ways. We strive to serve as resources for mentees during the confusing, overwhelming, and often traumatic
years that constitute early adolescence; we hope to fulfill our mission by providing them with both academic
assistance and access to new environments and experiences. Mentors meet with their mentees independently
once per week for a few hours, during which time they go on specially planned outings and/or engage in tutoring.
The programmatic focus of these weekly meetings is tailored to fit the individual mentee’s needs, as told to the
mentor by the mentee and his or her parents (and as determined by the mentor, once he or she comes to know
the mentee). We go on fun group outings twice per semester, as well!
26      Harvard College Public Service Directory

Kids with Special Needs Achievement Program (KSNAP)
Kelly McPherson                          kmcpherson12@college.harvard.edu
Julia Hansford                           julia.hansford@gmail.com

Kids with Special Needs Achievement Program (KSNAP) provides a unique opportunity for Harvard students
to form meaningful, long-term relationships with
elementary-aged children with disabilities. These
children may be stigmatized by their peers and are thus
often in need of a stable friend and role model on whom
they can rely to build their self-confidence and share their
struggles. KSNAP works in special education classrooms
in both the Quincy and Condon Elementary Schools in
Boston. Volunteers have fostered relationships through
fun and educational school activities and one-on-one
mentoring with their students. As a group, KSNAP takes
at least one field trip per semester to such places as the
New England Aquarium, Boston Children’s Museum,
and Boston Public Garden. KSNAP is a once per week
commitment in addition to the always exciting field trips.
Many kids are in need of a Big Sib!

King School Buddies
Sarah Ashburn                            sashburn@fas.harvard.edu
Shannon Flynn                            sflynn@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~bestbuds

Harvard’s King School Buddies chapter matches Harvard volunteers with developmentally delayed and learning
disabled kids and adults from Cambridge Rindge and Latin High School, the King Elementary School, and a
Specialized Housing Group Home near the Quad. Since all three sites are within easy walking distance of the
Yard, volunteers can make their own schedules for visiting their Buddies each week. The goal of the program
is to form friendships that are rewarding both for volunteers and for Buddies. In its ten years at Harvard, King
School Buddies has grown to include nearly 30 committed members.

LEADERS!
Michael Burks                            mdburks@fas.harvard.edu
Meaghan Glisczinksi                      megliscz@fas.harvard.edu

LEADERS! is the term-time component to the summer Junior Counselor program of the PBHA Summer Urban
Program (SUP). LEADERS! strives to provide continued mentorship and academic/personal support during the
year for high school teenagers from communities throughout Boston. LEADERS! emphasizes personal growth
and creating a safe space and opportunity for individual leadership development and personal expression through
various forms of media. Many of the participants in the LEADERS! program return to be captains of the Junior
Counselors the following summer.
                                                                          Academic Year 2010-2011              27



Marshall Afterschool Program
Sarah Maxwell                             marshallafterschoolprogram@gmail.com
Elizabeth Elrod                           marshallafterschoolprogram@gmail.com

The Marshall Afterschool Program is an exciting new program addressing the great need of academic support
at the John Marshall Elementary School in Dorchester,
MA. After Mayor Menino began the “Step Up Initiative”
and identified the Marshall School as one of the lowest
achieving schools in Boston, our program began as a
pilot program in the spring of 2008. We help at-risk
and low achieving students succeed academically (with
an emphasis on reading and writing comprehension)
by closely working with students on their homework
and through a creative and individualized curriculum.
The program also provides an engaging community, in
which the students will develop strong relationships with
other volunteers in the program. As our program resides
directly within the school, we have access to teachers
who are responsible for their day-to-day learning. The
program collaborates with the Harvard Achievement
Support Initiative, which not only provides us additional
trainings on child development, but also many valuable learning resources and support.

Mission Hill Committee

   Mission Hill Afterschool Program (MHASP)
   Irina Vaynerman                        mission.hill.after.school@gmail.com

   The Mission Hill Afterschool Program was created in 1983 at the request of residents of the Mission Main
   and Alice Taylor housing developments in Roxbury. Serving 50 children (ages 5-14) divided into four age
   groups, MHASP volunteers strive to provide individual attention within a classroom setting, with both
   homework assistance and by working with the children on a creative curriculum designed by coordinators.
   Additionally, optional biweekly field trips to museums, cultural events, and recreational facilities enhance
   counselor-child friendships. Counselors work with the same one or two children for the entire semester to
   provide the most consistent and rewarding relationship. The time commitment is 3.5 hours per week during
   one afternoon Monday through Thursday.

   Mission Mentor
   Samantha Connolly                      connoll@fas.harvard.edu
   Theo Skeadas                           tskeadas@fas.harvard.edu

   Mission Mentor’s role is to facilitate one-on-one interaction between our mentors and mentees and to create
   a space for shared learning. In addition to providing 18 pre-teens and teens with a fun, safe place to socialize
   on Friday afternoons, Mission Mentor’s one-on-one mentoring design helps to enrich the lives of both
   Mission Hill youth and the college students that they interact with. Our program’s mentors act as positive
   role models and “resource brokers” to their mentees, while the mentees are given the opportunity to share
   their neighborhood, school, family, and other important aspects of their lives with their mentor.
28       Harvard College Public Service Directory


Partners Empowering Neighborhoods (PEN)
Elizabeth Mrema                           elizabeth.mrema@gmail.com

PEN volunteers teach English as a Second Language and Computer Literacy Skills to adult learners on the
Harvard campus. Previous teaching experience is not necessary, and most of our classes are co-taught by two
instructors. There is also some one-on-one tutoring. The average weekly time commitment is about four hours
including teaching, preparation, and program meetings. PEN also runs a summer program with the same goals
and objectives.

Peer Health Exchange (PHE)
Patrick Gordon                            pagordon@fas.harvard.edu
Cynthia Tsai                              ctsai@college.harvard.edu

Peer Health Exchange (PHE) is an organization whose mission is to give teenagers the knowledge and skills
they need to make healthy decisions. We do this by training our volunteers to teach a comprehensive health
curriculum in public high schools that lack health education and in which a majority of students live at or below
the poverty line. Each PHE volunteer, in addition to attending weekly meetings, travels to a Boston public high
school every week to teach a health workshop on a variety of topics, from healthy relationships, to contraception,
to nutrition and physical activity. PHE volunteers also help high school students develop skills such as decision-
making and effective communication so they can make informed decisions about their health that will enable
them to stay and excel in school, to join and remain part of the workforce, and to become healthy adults capable
of producing healthy families.

Pets as Therapy
Veronica Shi                              vshi@fas.harvard.edu
Kylee Clyatt                              kjclyatt@fas.harvard.edu

Pets as Therapy is a group dedicated to serving the elderly residents of Vernon Hall Nursing Home. Volunteers
visit the nursing home every Sunday afternoon and bring dogs from the Harvard Square area. In doing so,
volunteers provide companionship to residents and enable them to spend therapeutic time with the dogs. Many
residents rarely receive visitors and always look forward to our visits! We also work with other groups on the
Elderly Affairs Committee to provide more activities for the residents, such as art classes, parties, and trips.

Prisoner Education Programs

     Connelly Youth Center Education Program
     William Peck                         pecko99@gmail.com
     Jake Sloane                          jake7sloane@gmail.com

     The Youth Prison Tutoring Program, part of PBHA’s Prison Ed Committee, is dedicated to tutoring and
     mentoring young men, generally between 15 and 18 years old, incarcerated in juvenile detention facilities.
     A small group of volunteers travels once per week, currently Mondays, to a juvenile detention facility where
     the volunteers work with young adults who choose to attend the tutoring sessions. Volunteers typically leave
     Harvard by van at 6:30pm and can expect to return by 8:15pm. The program, formerly named Connelly
     Youth Center Program, switched to STS, a facility located in nearby Somerville, this past year. The program
                                                                          Academic Year 2010-2011              29

   incorporates both one-on-one and group teaching approaches. Depending on the desires of the students present,
   tutors often work with students on history, literature, math, and current events, among other topics. Sessions
   at the facility also provide opportunities for mentoring. Many conversations often move away from academics
   towards discussions on race, socioeconomic conditions, and future career opportunities. The Youth Prison
   Tutoring Program is looking into expanding to new facilities in the coming year. Volunteers are expected to
   attend sessions every week in order to build strong relations with the students.

   Suffolk County House of Corrections
   Joseph Gaspard                         josephgaspard12@college.harvard.edu
   Chloe Goodwin                          cgoodwin@fas.harvard.edu

   We tutor male and female inmates at a medium security prison, supplementing their classroom work with
   individualized academic attention. We help inmates with reading (from sounding out words to discussing
   political theory), writing (from subject-verb agreement to effective prose), and math (from addition to
   calculus). The majority of the inmates need help at basic levels or at GED level. Tutors usually assist with
   homework from daytime classes, but may also design curricula on their own. Directors will gladly help to
   plan lessons and find materials for any tutor. The program runs Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays from
   6:45pm - 10:00pm. Volunteers commit to one night per week. Tutors usually work with the same inmate each
   week, which makes dedication and attendance essential. The Suffolk House of Correction in South Boston
   houses about 1800 prisoners: 90% male, most between ages 21-30, most black or Latino, and convicted of
   crimes carrying sentences of no more than two years each. We help our inmates build the skills necessary to
   get jobs and live as responsible citizens.

   Women’s Resource Center
   Connor Bell                            mbell@fas.harvard.edu
   Devon MacLaughlin                      maclaugh@fas.harvard.edu

   The Women’s Resource Center at the Boston Courthouse serves as the Suffolk County Community Corrections
   Center for women transitioning from correctional facilities into their communities under conditional pre-release
   status. Take an hour out of your week to work with the women on academics (primarily GED preparation such
   as arithmetic, reading, and writing skills) or in searching for a job. This program offers a flexible schedule.
   Classes run every weekday in the morning and afternoon. Your student may still be in high school or may
   have graduated 30 years ago.

Recent Immigrant Teen Enrichment (RITE)
rite.harvard@gmail.com

RITE is a weekly tutoring program that serves high school students from Boston’s diverse and ever-increasing
immigrant populations, including students from places like Haiti, Cuba, Somalia, El Salvador, China, and
Afghanistan. The program pairs Harvard undergraduates with high school students in need of help with English
skills, SAT preparation, or other academic subjects. What makes RITE a unique program is the type of students
we cater to: high school students, ages 15-21, who have been in the U.S. anywhere from 1 month to 7 years.
Many of these young adults are expected to perform well in high school, to attend college, or to work - all right
alongside their American peers, and RITE helps them prepare. Tutors and tutees meet weekly on either Thursday
or Saturday. Thursday sessions take place at a Eritrean Community Center near Cambridge 4pm to 6pm, and
Saturday sessions take place here at Harvard for any 2 hours between 1 p.m. and 5 p.m. (RITE meets students at
the Harvard Square T-stop, and program then takes place in the Science Center.) RITE also conducts a college
conference for high school seniors in the fall and is planning on publishing a literary magazine featuring student
work this spring.
30      Harvard College Public Service Directory

Refugee Youth Term Enrichment (RYTE)
Maddy Finucane                            ryte.harvard@gmail.com
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~ryte

RYTE is a weekly tutoring program that serves high school students from Boston’s diverse and ever-increasing
refugee populations, including students from Somalia, Haiti, and Afghanistan. The program pairs Harvard
undergraduates with high school students in need of help with English skills, SAT preparation, or other academic
subjects. What makes RYTE a unique program is the type of students we cater to: high school students, ages
15-19, who have been in the U.S. anywhere from one month to seven years. Many of these young adults are
expected to attend college or join the workforce after high school by parents and family members, so RYTE helps
to prepare them for both outcomes. Without the ability to achieve high grades in the classroom, where they are
competing with native English speakers, or even to speak the language, it is extremely difficult for these refugees
to keep up and have chances at a bright future. Tutors and tutees meet weekly on Tuesday, Friday, or Saturday
afternoons. Tuesday sessions take place at Boston International High School in Jamaica Plain from 2:00pm -
4:00pm. Friday sessions take place at Chelsea High School from 2:00pm - 4:00pm, and Saturday sessions take
place here at Harvard from 1:00pm - 3:00pm. (Tutors meet their students at the Harvard Square T-stop, and then
work together in campus classrooms.) RYTE also conducts a college conference for high school seniors in the
fall and publishes a literary magazine featuring student work in the spring.

Roxbury Youth Initiative – Term (RYIT)
Maria Centeio                             mdcenteio@gmail.com

PBHA’s Roxbury Youth Initiative Term (RYIT) strives to provide continuous, year-round academic and emotional
support to youth of our summer program (Roxbury Youth Initiative). Our main focus is on homework and
academic help and providing a safe, educational space for youth after the school day. We follow a model of
positive youth development, seeking to build on youths’ strengths and community assets. Through hands on
enrichment activities and field trips, RYIT allows participating youth to explore their neighborhood, gain academic
skills and confidence, and learn from positive role models.

Small Claims Advisory Service (SCAS)
Marsha Sukach                             msukach@fas.harvard.edu
masmallclaims.org

The Small Claims Advisory Service (SCAS) helps advise individuals on their rights and options in small claims
court through direct service, education, and advocacy. Many socioeconomically-disadvantaged individuals are
unaware of their rights, especially regarding consumer law, debt collection and landlord-tenant law. We believe that
this disparity in information and access detracts from the legitimacy of our legal system. SCAS takes individuals’
cases through our telephone service in Phillips Brooks House and assists clients in person at our community
offices at Greater Boston Legal Services in downtown Boston, at our Mandarin/Cantonese office in Chinatown,
and at our Spanish office in Cambridge. In 2010, SCAS has already helped over 2400 clients and is continuing to
grow. SCAS also makes presentations in the communities we serve, publishes brochures, manuals, and manages
a website, in addition to advocating for structural (i.e. legislative) reform of the small claims system.
                                                                           Academic Year 2010-2011              31


South Boston Afterschool (SAS)
southieafterschool@gmail.com

South Boston After School (SAS) is an arts-based literacy program for low-income youth who reside in
South Boston. SAS utilizes an enrichment curriculum to promote the positive youth development of first and
second graders who attend the James F. Condon Elementary School. SAS strives to empower youth through an
academic enrichment and arts-based literacy curriculum, emphasizing academic confidence, conflict resolution,
interdependence, prevention of risk-taking behaviors, and respect for diversity. Each Monday and/or Wednesday
(2:00 – 5:30 PM), tutors will support one or two students with their homework and then participate in group-wide
workshop activities. SAS participants and volunteers also attend events like field trips and Family Fun Nights
so that students, families, and volunteers can build meaningful relationships. SAS also builds upon connections
made over the summer by providing programming for the same students served by the South Boston Outreach
Summer program (SBOS, under Summer Programs).

South Boston Outreach Big Sibling
Thomaz Kula                                tkula@fas.harvard.edu

South Boston Outreach Big Sibling is a one-on-one mentoring program that matches volunteers with children
ages 6-13. Our little siblings come primarily from three major housing projects in the South Boston area and are
all participants in the South Boston Outreach Summer Program. As most of the children in our program come
from single parent families and lack stable adult role models, volunteers are asked to see their little siblings once
per week for 3 hours. Volunteers also participate in monthly group outings and volunteer reflection sessions.

Spanish Acquisition Beginning in Elementary School (SABES)
Caitlin Marquis                            marquis@fas.harvard.edu

Spanish Acquisition Beginning in Elementary School (SABES) is an afterschool program that teaches Spanish at
the Maria L. Baldwin School on Oxford Street. Our goal is to get kids excited about foreign language and culture
from an early age through fun and creative exposure. Pairs of volunteers teach Kindergarten through Grade 6
on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 3:00pm - 4:15pm. Our volunteers have all different backgrounds in
Spanish—our only requirements are lots of enthusiasm for the language and a love for kids.

STAGE
Jacqueline Palumbo                         stage@hcs.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/stage

STAGE (Student Theater Advancing Growth and Empowerment) is a theater and public service organization
providing a weekly theater program for youth in the Greater Boston community. Throughout the school year
STAGE members work with middle and elementary school children in under-funded Boston schools who would
otherwise have little or no exposure to the performing arts. STAGE teaches its students the basics of theatrical
performance, from improv to character development, ultimately helping students write and perform their own
show which is showcased at Harvard at the end of the year. Theater experience is encouraged but not required;
STAGE provides teacher training at the start of the academic year.

STRIVE
Jesus-Mario Luevano                        jesus.m.luevano@college.harvard.edu

PBHA’s STRIVE is a mentoring program for teenagers with sickle cell disease. The full acronym stands for Sickle
cell Teens Raising awareness, Initiating change, Voicing opinions, and Empowering themselves. The full name
encapsulates the values of the program. We aim to build a support network for teenagers to help them cope with
32      Harvard College Public Service Directory

chronic pain, foster confidence and self-advocacy, and guide students towards an auspicious future. We aim to
do this through close one-on-one and group relationships with a focus on education and healthcare.

Strong Women, Strong Girls (SWSG)
Brittany Llewellyn                        bllewell@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.swsg.org

Looking for a great way to help young girls build positive self-esteem? Interested in spreading the word about the
awesome accomplishments of strong women? The Strong Women, Strong Girls program is a weekly mentoring
program designed to provide elementary school-aged girls with the skills they will need to become strong and
successful women. Using fun project-based activities, mentors will work with small groups of girls after school
to teach important life skills including public speaking, critical thinking, and cultural sensitivity.

Student Labor Action Movement (SLAM)
Seth Pearce                               spearce@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/slam

The Student Labor Action Movement (SLAM) is committed to activism and education in support of social and
economic justice. SLAM campaigns have been directed toward worker and labor issues on campus and on a
national level; they include the Living Wage Campaign and the Anti-Sweatshop Campaign, as well as campaigns
initiated by local unions and community organizations. SLAM members participate in and help lead campaigns,
as well as organize new ones.

Wilderness 1-2-1
Melissa Hoyos                             hoyos@fas.harvard.edu
Joshua Kearney                            kearney@fas.harvard.edu

Wilderness 1-2-1 combines mentoring, education, and outdoor adventure. We provide Saturday programming to
a group of 16 lively 8 to 12-year-old Cambridge children, taking them to places that they might not otherwise be
able to visit and helping them to develop a respect for their environment. Each trip is structured to include both
large whole-group activities such as running games as well as small team-building activities such as scavenger
hunts and get-to-know-you games, which pairs a volunteer with one or two children. In addition, you can structure
your own time to spend with your mentee.

Youth Recreation Program
Connor Bell                               mbell@fas.harvard.edu
Casey O’Donnell                           codonnel@fas.harvard.edu
Anne McKenna                              amckenna@fas.harvard.edu
David Johnson                             drjohns@fas.harvard.edu
Devon MacLaughlin                         maclaugh@fas.harvard.edu

Youth Recreation volunteers act as coaches and teachers for youth at Cambridge schools. We currently focus
on two sports: basketball and swimming. Every Friday afternoon, we teach, coach, and play basketball with
students in Grades 4-6, and every Monday afternoon, we teach swimming to students at the Harvard MAC.
The programs emphasize having fun and raising confidence rather than merely perfecting a skill. We also send
volunteers to a Cambridge ice skating program on Saturday mornings.
                                                                      Academic Year 2010-2011            33



Youth Recreation - HOOPS
Billy Hubbard                           billyhubbard12@gmail.com
Matt Zapf                               mazapf@fas.harvard.edu

PBHA’s Youth Recreation volunteers act as coaches and teachers for youth at Cambridge schools. We currently
focus basketball. Every Friday afternoon, we teach, coach, and play basketball with 4th – 6th grade students.
Our programs emphasize having fun and raising confidence rather than merely perfecting a skill.
34     Harvard College Public Service Directory


                                 PBHA Summer Programs

Summer Urban Program (SUP)
programs.pbha.org/sup

The Summer Urban Program (SUP) is one of the most
remarkable, intensive, student-run service experiences
available to undergraduates, and it has had a profound impact
on undergraduates and community youth alike. Each summer,
approximately 180 college students live and work in various
communities in Boston and Cambridge. Serving over 830
youth ages 6-14, the summer programs consist of mornings
of curricular, classroom-based enrichment and afternoons
of field trips in and around Boston. Each camp uses the city
as a classroom without walls, with the summer culminating
in talent shows and final trips. Community partnership is an
essential element of SUP; often former campers are hired as
Junior Counselors, and parents and community leaders play an
important role in shaping and working with the program. Many
camps have been operating for decades. Senior Counselors
(SCs) receive a stipend of up to $3,400 (the stipend for RYSE
SCs is slightly less), paid weekly over the entire summer. SCs
also receive housing at Harvard or in the community where
they work. The dates of the summer commitment are from
early June through late August.


Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment Summer Program (BRYE Summer)
Olivia Marcucci                           marcucci@fas.harvard.edu

Boston Refugee Youth Enrichment (BRYE) Summer builds upon the internal strengths of refugee and immigrant
communities, complementing their collective motivation and answering the academic and social needs of their
children. We provide intensive, low-cost ESL programming to promote children’s success in school and beyond.
BRYE’s commitment extends year-round; we place many of our students in affiliated academic-year tutoring
and mentoring programs. BRYE Summer’s benefits extend beyond the classroom, inspiring all parts of the
BRYE community including students, families, teachers, advisors, and supporters. BRYE Summer shapes itself
to fit the needs of the changing community and creates a secure environment in which children are encouraged
to express themselves and feel comfortable meeting this challenge. Please contact us if you would like to get
involved with BRYE.

Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program (CYEP)
Meaghan Durgin                            mdurgin@fas.harvard.edu

The Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program is a summer day camp for children ages 6-13 years old living in the
Cambridge community. Most come from community housing developments. We provide a safe and stimulating
environment for 150 children, as well as empowering job opportunities for local high-school students, and an
affordable summer option for overworked parents. CYEP remains one of the most affordable summer camps in
Cambridge. The Cambridge Youth Enrichment Program is focused on addressing four main issues: the disparity
between low-income and high-income students in the classroom and on standardized tests; the lack of affordable
summer-time activities; the tension and crime associated with socioeconomic differences and gaps in absence
of alternatives; and the missing emphasis on creativity, exploration (especially in the sciences and technology),
and self-expression. CYEP is glad to celebrate 35 years helping the Cambridge community!
                                                                         Academic Year 2010-2011             35

Chinatown Adventure (CHAD)
Aja Jovanovski                            ashley.jovanovski@gmail.com

Chinatown Adventure (CHAD) seeks to enrich and improve the quality of life for underprivileged youth in
Boston’s Chinatown community. As such, it is committed to the academic, social, and personal development of
youth ages 6-13. CHAD was founded in 1986, and it is one of eight PBHA programs that cater specifically to
the unique needs of Chinatown residents. Specifically, CHAD is a community-based summer camp that strives
to meet the needs of underprivileged youth in Chinatown. Each year, two co-directors are hired to operate
CHAD. Co-directors, in turn, hire a staff of seven Senior Counselors and nine Junior Counselors. While Senior
Counselors are usually college students from Harvard and other nearby colleges, Junior Counselors are high
school students who, in many cases, were former campers themselves. For seven weeks during the summer, each
Senior Counselor collaborates with one or two Junior Counselors to mentor and teach a classroom of campers.
Senior Counselors and Junior Counselors are encouraged to be creative and are expected to design their own
curricula each week. All camp activities are designed to foster academic, social, and personal growth while
promoting fun and safety at the same time!

Franklin I-O Summer Program
David Dance                              ddance@fas.harvard.edu

The Franklin I-O Summer Program serves 80 children and their families from the Franklin Field and Franklin Hill
housing developments in Dorchester. The program aims to provide year-round academic support in conjunction
with the Franklin Afterschool Education (FASE) and Franklin Teen programs to help overcome gang violence
and other challenging conditions of the urban setting. This is accomplished by bringing the children together
in a safe, enriching, and fun environment, and to foster relationships between the children and Counselors of
diverse backgrounds where learning is reciprocal. The inter-generational camp brings together fun-loving children
ages 6-13, ambitious local teenagers as Junior Counselors, passionate college-aged Senior Counselors, and the
local elderly community. Senior and Junior Counselors engage the campers in a curriculum that works to build
self-esteem and aid them in making informed decisions by supporting them in exploring their identity, values,
and physical world. The curriculum incorporates math, science, reading, and writing in a dynamic way that
stimulates the campers’ interest in learning, and is complemented by daily exciting and educational field trips
throughout the Boston area and beyond, as well as collaborations with other community groups. For the 9-week
program, Senior Counselors receive training, a stipend, housing, and an unforgettable experience. Successful
applicants will possess passion for sharing, learning, service, and fun.

HARMONY Summer
Amrita Dani                              adani@fas.harvard.edu

PBHA’s HARMONY Summer works with PBHA’s SUP camps to teach music to youth. Do you have a love
of music? How would you like to spread your love of Bob Dylan, Bach, Biggie, Barber, Britney, the Beatles,
Beethoven, whomever, to adorable, adoring children? And have fun, live school-free at Harvard at no financial
cost, create unexpectedly wonderful friendships and memories in the process, and have enough time of your own
to squeeze in something else on top of all that? Join HARMONY (Harvard and Radcliffe Musical Outreach to
Neighborhood Youth) to spend your summer sharing your enthusiasm for music with cute kids. Please join us
in teaching and loving music this summer!
36      Harvard College Public Service Directory

Keylatch Summer
Daniel Alfino                             dalfino@fas.harvard.edu
Karla Reyes                               kareyes@fas.harvard.edu

The Keylatch Summer Program provides under-served children from Boston’s South End with a high quality,
enriching summer camp experience. Community leaders, families, and Keylatch staff engage campers in activities
that allow them to explore new opportunities, deepen cultural and community pride, and foster a love of learning.
In creating and sharing in this experience, college and high school-aged staff members gain tangible leadership
skills, a deeper understanding of themselves, and a compelling awareness of social service.

Mission Hill Summer Program (MHSP)
Yini Zhang                                zhang30@fas.harvard.edu

The Mission Hill Summer Program (MHSP) is a 7-week, affordable academic camp which serves families from
Roxbury’s Mission Main and Alice Taylor Housing Developments, both predominantly African-American and
Latino communities. Founded at the request of community members, the camp seeks to provide a safe space
for the 80 campers, ages 6-13, for the price of $100 for the entire summer. Each morning is strictly academic,
as campers learn literacy and math in order to prevent summer learning loss and to prepare them for the next
year in the classroom. In the afternoons, the campers go on field trips and perform their own service projects
across the greater Boston area in order to provide them with deeper experiences within their greater community
than they generally get in school. MHSP provides crucial services for families who struggle to find affordable,
innovative childcare. Many have siblings in the program and return year after year, and MHSP has become a
fixture in the community. MHSP also hires 12 teens from the community to work as Junior Counselors. Senior
Counselors will live in Roxbury and will work closely with the families of their campers. MHSP is looking for
committed counselors with an interest in poverty, social justice, social work, and education.

Native American Youth Enrichment Program (NAYEP)
Michelle Kellaway                         kellaway@fas.harvard.edu
Ross Bloom                                bloom2@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~NAYEP

NAYEP is a 7-week summer program for Native American children ages 6-13. Unlike most summer programs,
we are not geographically centered. NAYEP serves children of all tribal ancestries from all across the Boston
area. Senior Counselors each lead a group of eight to 10 children between 9:00am - 4:00pm on weekdays. Our
mornings are focused on curriculum, and our afternoons are usually reserved for field trips and constructive
recreation (such as swimming lessons). Curriculum is developed by each Senior Counselor and therefore changes
each summer, but all major academic areas are covered. We focus a great deal on native culture, history, myth
and identity, as well as health and environmental issues, multiculturalism, and developing creativity. Each Senior
Counselor has a classroom in the basement of the North American Indian Center of Boston. We have a particular
challenge in that our campers come from all kinds of social and economic backgrounds. In-depth knowledge/
experience in native issues is not necessarily a prerequisite for the job of Senior Counselor. Anyone with a real
interest in learning and teaching is welcome and encouraged to apply.

Refugee Youth Summer Enrichment (RYSE)
Katie Coulson                             kcoulson@fas.harvard.edu
Terry Ding                                tding@fas.harvard.edu

Refugee Youth Summer Enrichment (RYSE) works with over 100 immigrant and refugee teens from all
neighborhoods in Boston to provide ESL, college access, and a safe and supportive space for intellectual, social,
and political growth. RYSE runs alongside the other SUP camps, but in the evenings: 4:30pm - 7:30pm each
                                                                            Academic Year 2010-2011              37

weekday, with field trips on Saturdays, to accommodate the students’ work or summer school commitments. RYSE
students come from over 27 different countries, including Haiti, Vietnam, China, El Salvador, Somalia, Ethiopia,
and Nicaragua. We emphasize empowerment through improving language skills and leadership development.

Roxbury Youth Initiative (RYI)
John Barry                                 jmbarry07@gmail.com
Mary Cate Curley                           marycatherine.curley@gmail.com

Roxbury Youth Initiative (RYI) is designed to give academic enrichment and personal support to campers ages
6-13 from the Roxbury community. All summer long, the camp provides daily morning classroom academics,
which are geared toward teaching fundamental concepts in math, science, and literacy, as well as teaching
concepts and ideas in the areas of government and history. The afternoons are spent participating in field trips
and activities that supplement the learning received in the classroom, as well as providing a source of recreation
for the children. The goal is not only to promote academic achievement, but also to cultivate excitement about
learning, to expose Roxbury children to a world not yet discovered by them, to foster an understanding of how
integral they are to the world, and to give the children concrete tools that they may use later in life to participate
in and better this world in its greater sense.

St. James Summer Homeless Shelter
Liz Durgin                                 eadurgin@fas.harvard.edu

St. James Summer Shelter, an entirely student-run shelter located in Porter Square, works to end a pressing
problem in the Cambridge community: homelessness. The eight-week program provides guests with a steady
bed to sleep in, something rare for a person accustomed to moving from place to place every few nights. We offer
daily hot dinners and case managers who work one-on-one with the guests to find employment and housing. Our
philosophy emphasizes the importance of helping guests to find long-term solutions for the obstacles that have
led to their homelessness.

South Boston Outreach Summer (SBOS)
Edwin Hargate                              ehargate@fas.harvard.edu

South Boston Outreach Summer (SBOS) is a summer urban camp that works with youth ages 6-12 from the three
housing developments in South Boston. The program combines academic enrichment activities in the morning
(designed especially for the campers by Senior and Junior Counselors) with field trips to introduce these youth
to new places, ideas, and skills. Some of the highlights planned for this summer are a week of sailing for our
oldest boys and girls groups, a trip to a pow-wow for our younger groups, and a final trip to Philadelphia for the
older campers.

Summer Science
Noah Bruegmann                             bruegm@post.harvard.edu

Summer Science is an amazing opportunity to teach kids in the camps PBHA runs each summer. Teachers are
paired with another undergraduate to develop original activities for each of the seven weeks the camps run. For
a 30 hour per week commitment, benefits include great staff friendships, extensive workshops on creative cur-
riculum development, and training for teaching skills.
38      Harvard College Public Service Directory


            Harvard Public Service Network (PSN) Programs
(Please note that some contacts may change as programs transition to new leadership. If you are unable to reach

                 a particular group, please contact Amanda Sonis Glynn at asglynn@fas.harvard.edu.)

A Stitch In Time
Yvette Ramirez                             yramirez@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~asit/

A Stitch in Time uses knitting to help fulfill community needs of warm clothing and caring outreach through three
unique branches. The Outbound Branch aims to empower women in local shelters by teaching them how to knit.
The Inbound program strives to teach and foster knitting among undergraduates on campus so that items knitted
can be donated. The Inbound-Outbound Connection serves as an intermediary between these two programs.

Advocating Success for Kids (ASK)
Carla Lewis                                celewis7@gmail.com
Winnie Lin                                 wlin@fas.harvard.edu
advocatingsuccessforkids@gmail.com

In order to help eliminate the link between low income and diminished access to education, Advocating Success
for Kids (ASK) works with children with special needs so they can benefit from resources for academic success.
ASK volunteers currently work at Children’s Hospital in Boston.

Alberta V. Scott Leadership Program (AVS)
Nadia Bhatti                               nbhatti@fas.harvard.edu
Maya Espada                                mespada@fas.harvard.edu

Named in honor of the first black woman to graduate from Radcliffe College, the Alberta V. Scott (AVS)
Leadership Academy gives participating girls in Grades 9-11 the opportunity to cultivate leadership skills and
individual creativity through semester-long projects. Each girl, or scholar, is assigned a mentor, and mentors and
scholars participate in weekly discussions on topics ranging from maintaining physical and emotional health to
setting and achieving goals. Mentors also counsel the girls on the college preparation process and expose them
to careers in which black women are traditionally underrepresented, emphasizing the limitless potential of both
the scholars and black women overall.

Beta Buddies
Rebecca Vitale                             rebeccavitale@gmail.com

The Beta Buddies mentoring program is the community service part of the College Diabetes Network, a student
organization that works for and with Type I diabetic college students and students interested in Type-I diabetes.
The program pairs college undergrads who have Type-I diabetes with children and teens with Type-I diabetes for
an informal mentoring relationship. Beta Buddies creates an opportunity to build a friendship that may include
discussion of Type-I diabetes (but doesn’t have to) as well as more traditional mentoring responsibilities and
general fun times. We do not provide medical care but instead work to support children and families dealing
with the day-to-day challenges of Type-I diabetes.
                                                                         Academic Year 2010-2011             39


Cambridge Microfinance Initiative
William Weingarten                        wweingar@fas.harvard.edu
Pichayut (Petch) Jirapinyo                jirapin@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.thecmi.org

Cambridge Microfinance Initiative is the first student group at Harvard solely dedicated toward helping local
aspiring small-business owners achieve their goals. We provide public service in helping clients secure
microfinance loans through our partnership with Accion USA. Our clients receive one-on-one consultation and
personalized business advice from our student volunteers.

CityServe
Winnie Liu                                wjliu@fas.harvard.edu
Jason Kleban                              jkleban@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.tenacity.org

CityServe is a Harvard student organization which provides tutors to Tenacity, Inc. Tenacity, Inc. is a nonprofit
organization which delivers free literacy training, homework help, and tennis instruction to Boston-area middle
school children. Students can tutor at any of the three afternoon sessions per week, all of which run for three
hours. The tennis program utilizes a fun, games-based approach designed to keep the kids moving and build a
love for the sport that hopefully can last a lifetime. Meanwhile, during “literacy block”, students work on their
homework, read books, and work on projects designed to engage and excite them about the texts, all under the
supervision of a literacy tutor. Sessions are split approximately evenly between tennis and “literacy block”, and
tutors may choose to help out with either side of the program. CityServe offers Harvard students a chance to
serve their community and be a mentor to local youth without even having to leave campus.

CityStep
Claire Eccles                             ceccles@fas.harvard.edu
harvard.citystep.org

CityStep is a unique public service organization
run entirely by undergraduates that introduces
public school youth to the performing arts as a tool
for building self-esteem and a means to mutual
understanding. The program combines a range of arts
(from dance to music to improv) to give Cambridge
youth an outlet for creative self-expression. The
program is one of the largest student organizations on
Harvard’s campus: approximately 75 undergraduates
work together to serve over 100 Cambridge public
school children annually. Through this year-long
dance-theater curriculum based on the Massachusetts
Arts Curriculum Framework, CityStep offers students
a valuable creative supplement to their traditional
education.
40      Harvard College Public Service Directory

Class Clowns
classclowns@hcs.harvard.edu

Class Clowns teaches members clowning skills – such as balloon twisting, face painting, magic, and juggling
– with the goal of using these skills to bring cheer to others through performances at charitable events, nursing
homes, and hospitals.

Crimson in the Community
Peter Zhu                                 pzhu@fas.harvard.edu

As the Harvard Crimson’s community service program, Crimson in the Community combines journalism with
public service. Volunteers work with local high school students from around Boston at schools with new or under-
funded journalism programs. Activities include brainstorming stories, editing pieces, and talking with students
about basic rules of design and writing. The program also extends into the summer, when the Crimson invites a
small group of high school students from around Boston to participate in a week-long journalism workshop. By
the end of the week, the students produce a paper of their own. While both programs are grounded in journalism
with a strong emphasis on writing skills, one of the program’s major goals is to encourage mentees to explore
college options early on.

Cultural Agents at Harvard College
Alexis Kusy                               alexis.kusy@gmail.com

The purpose of Cultural Agents at Harvard College is to activate art as a social resource by cultivating actions and
thought within the undergraduate student body that aim to make measurable contributions to the education and
development of local, national, and international communities. Culture is agency: it enables creative responses
to social constraints. Studying the creativity of artists, activists, administrators, and teachers encourages us
to investigate the effects of their creativity and to consider possible ways in which we as undergraduates can
creatively benefit society. Cultural Agents will focus this year on improving and expanding the creative writing
workshops in the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter.

Digital Literacy Project
Katelyn Foley                             kfoley@fas.harvard.edu

Digital Literacy Project promotes one-to-one computing around the globe by initiating laptop pilot programs
in elementary and middle schools. The organization has developed training materials and curricula for the XO
laptop, the low-cost laptop designed for children by One Laptop per Child. Digital Literacy Project has launched
a pilot program in Peru and is continuing to lead one-to-one computing initiatives in Boston area schools. The
overall goal is to seamlessly integrate the XO laptop into classrooms so that, rather than being an extension of
existing pedagogies, the XO becomes a tool for realizing creative potential.

Foundation for International Relief for Children (FIMRC)
Jessica Cheng                             jhcheng@fas.harvard.edu

FIMRC-Harvard is dedicated to improving the lives of children around the world primarily through health
education and medical supply distribution. Each year, groups of volunteers travel during intersession, spring break,
and the summer to international clinic sites to help in the local effort of disseminating invaluable information to
village residents. On campus, FIMRC members seek to broaden awareness on international health concerns and
fundraise to provide medical supplies. In a recent trip, volunteers traveled to Jasmin, Costa Rica to distribute
                                                                          Academic Year 2010-2011             41
water purification supplies and train the people in the community of their use. We hope to develop this initiative
to prevent the effects of water contamination in the coming year.

Harvard Cancer Society
Nina Jain                                  njain@fas.harvard.edu

The Harvard Cancer Society is an umbrella organization comprised of seven service programs that educate
and mobilize volunteers in the fight against cancer. Through education, advocacy, fundraising, and outreach
(and driven by the vision of a cancer-free society), the Harvard Cancer Society strives to prevent and eliminate
cancer, to heighten cancer awareness, to celebrate survivorship, and to support individuals and families affected
by cancer, both on the Harvard campus and in the broader community. Join us in the fall to get involved, or visit
our website (http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~cancer) to learn more.
   Bone Marrow Drive: Many individuals with leukemia, lymphoma, and other blood diseases need bone
   marrow transplants to recover. HCS organizes, fundraises, and runs a drive that recruits people (particularly
   minorities) to join the National Bone Marrow Registry.
   Cancer Prevention and Advocacy by Cambridge Teens (C-PACT): C-PACT volunteers work with students
   in Grades 7-9 at Community Charter School of Cambridge twice per week to educate them about cancer and
   teach them how to become active fundraisers and advocates.
   Chilton House Hospice: Chilton is a small, welcoming hospice which acts as a final home for up to five
   patients terminally ill with cancer. Volunteers help the
   nurses at Chilton with laundry and simple chores but more
   crucially act as mental support and somebody to talk to
   for the patients.
   Hoops Against Cancer: Hoops Against Cancer is a 3-on-3
   basketball tournament held each spring in conjunction with
   the Brothers McWilliam Foundation. We recruit volunteers
   to help with the logistics, publicity, and fundraising for the
   tournament.
   Massachusetts General Hospital Volunteer Program:
   The Massachusetts General Hospital Volunteer Program
   provides volunteers with the chance to interact with patients
   of all ages and from all units. Volunteers help out on the
   inpatient floors, talk to patients, play with the pediatric
   patients, or help patients’ families.
   Pediatric Oncology Program (POP): POP works on the bone marrow transplant unit of the Boston Children’s
   Hospital. Volunteers make routine visits to the hospital to play with and support the children on the floor.
   Relay for Life: Relay for Life is a fun-filled overnight walkathon that raises money for the American Cancer
   Society (ACS), celebrates survivorship, and empowers individuals to fight cancer. HCS works with ACS and
   other Boston-area universities to organize this All-University Relay held at Harvard each April in the fight
   against cancer.
42      Harvard College Public Service Directory

Harvard China Care (HCC)
Dianne Xiao                               djxiao@fas.harvard.edu
Daphne Xiao                               dyxiao@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~care

Harvard China Care (HCC), founded in 2003, was the first college branch of the national China Care organization.
HCC brings together a dedicated group of students committed to improving the lives of orphans in China. HCC’s
work has already had a life-altering impact on thousands of children throughout China, raising almost $200,000
to date for orphan support. HCC’s extensive summer internship program sends volunteers from Harvard to work
at orphanages in Luoyang, Saiqi, Beijing, and Southern China. HCC’s work not only takes place in China but
also extends to the greater Boston community: HCC organizes a bi-weekly playgroup called “Dumplings” for
adopted children from China and their families, and also coordinates a mentoring program to pair older adoptees
with student mentors from Harvard. Both groups expose the children to Chinese culture while allowing them to
interact with older role models. Whether you are looking to do direct public service with children in the U.S. or
China, interested in issues of medical care, excited to travel to China, or want to tackle large-scale fundraising
and event planning projects, HCC has something for you to do!

Harvard College Act on a Dream Club
Scott Elfenbein                           elfenb@fas.harvard.edu
Cecilia Venegas                           cvenegas@fas.harvard.edu

The purpose of this organization is to motivate college students nationwide, and especially those at Harvard
University, to become actively involved in immigration reform. We focus in part on providing immigrant students
equal educational opportunities by means of lobbying, educating the public, and raising awareness within campus
communities and throughout the nation. It is our hope that the Act on a Dream club will grant thousands of
hardworking students access to higher education and eventual citizenship while promoting political activism
among the nation’s youth.

Harvard College Engineers Without Borders (HCEWB)
Julie Xie                                 jxie@fas.harvard.edu
Alex Dolginow                             adolginow@gmail.com
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~ewb/

Harvard College Engineers Without Borders (HCEWB) is affiliated with Engineers Without Borders - USA,
a non-profit humanitarian organization established to partner with developing communities around the world
in order to improve their quality of life. As a result of the expanding School of Engineering and Applied
Sciences, HCEWB seeks to promote a global consciousness among students by working on environmentally
sound and economically sustainable engineering projects. The projects usually last 3-5 years and culminate
in a trip to the community in which they will be implemented. Members from a variety of concentrations are
encouraged to join. HCEWB is dedicated to the EWB mission: “Building A Better World, One Community At
A Time.”

Harvard College Fed Challenge
Akeel Rangwala                            fedchallenge@gmail.com

In the spring, the Harvard College Fed Challenge coaches an economics team from an inner-city high school.
Twice per week from January to April, tutors work with the students to help them prepare for the high school
economics competition at the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. Tutors have the opportunity to design and teach
lesson plans, run macroeconomic simulations, and work with students in small groups. No experience is necessary
in tutoring, and basic high school economics knowledge is adequate.
                                                                          Academic Year 2010-2011             43

Harvard College for Free the Slaves (HCFTS)
Catie Cook                                catie1989@gmail.com
Amanda Nguyen                             amandangocnguyen@gmail.com
http://www.harvardcollegefts.org

Harvard College for Free the Slaves (HCFTS) is an officially-recognized student organization of Harvard College.
It is an independent student organization that follows the mission of its international partner organization, Free
the Slaves (FTS). Its primary goals are threefold: 1) to raise awareness about modern-day slavery and the issues
surrounding this topic; 2) to raise funds for grassroots organizations worldwide that deal directly with the
rehabilitation, reintegration, and empowerment of former slaves; and, 3) to raise student-driven activism on the
topic of modern-day slavery through networking, research, publicity, and event planning and implementation. In
accordance with those principles, our program seeks to accommodate these goals through a variety of functions.
We provide many opportunities that include research about modern-day slavery/human trafficking with various
members of the university both student and faculty, networking with other school groups as well as Harvard
student groups, and exploration of creative endeavors promoting student activism and anti-human slavery in
the arts.

Harvard College Friends of Scouting
Marcel Moran                              mmoran@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~scouting

The Harvard Friends of Scouting is an organization that allows Harvard students that were once involved as
Boy Scouts themselves to give back to Scouts around the area. Harvard Friends of Scouting’s annual program is
called Merit Badge University, a program where Scouts around and beyond New England can take Merit Badge
courses on the Harvard Campus from qualified instructors. Highlights have been taking the Chemistry Merit
Badge in the Harvard Chemistry Labs, and the Journalism Merit Badge on the site of the Harvard Crimson. Last
year we had over 300 Scouts participate from four states.

Harvard College Global Health and AIDS Coalition (HCGHAC)
Marguerite Thorp                          hcghac@gmail.com
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/hac

The Harvard College Global Health and AIDS Coalition (HCGHAC) believes that health should be a fundamental
human right. Towards this end, HCGHAC strives to challenge and expand the role of both the university and
individual students in addressing global health and development needs. Through collaboration with various
agents both within and outside of Harvard, HCGHAC aims to engage students in a growing movement for global
health through education and awareness activities, effect policy change through advocacy and activism, both on
and off campus, and address local and global health needs through direct service and fundraising. By means of
its various initiatives, HCGHAC strives to build momentum behind global health as an avenue to social justice.
HCGHAC hopes the movement to which its work contributes will instill a lasting commitment to global health
among members of the Harvard community and empower these current and future leaders to carry out this
commitment in their personal and professional lives.
44      Harvard College Public Service Directory


Harvard College Global Hunger Initiative
Sarah Nam                                 globalhungerinitiative@gmail.com

The Harvard College Global Hunger Initiative works to address the underlying causes of the global food crisis
and chronic malnutrition by brainstorming and creating new developmental models that can alleviate the recent
food shortage, advance education, improve agricultural technologies, increase economic opportunity, and
tackle the root challenges in environmental sustainability. We advocate for policies that increase emergency aid
to those affected by the hunger crisis, as well as long-term developmental programs in affected countries. We
aim to have an agenda of both action and advocacy, bridging students from the undergraduate, graduate, and
professional schools, as well as community members in Cambridge and Allston to alleviate global hunger. We
are committed to helping families in poor communities improve their lives and achieve lasting victories over
poverty. We pursue our mission with both compassion and commitment. The Harvard College Global Hunger
Initiative focuses advocacy, education, and action. Current solutions to alleviating the global food crisis has
shown to be frail in recent years. We need creativity, novel thinking, and the bridging of disciplines to create
sustainable models to tackle chronic malnutrition.


Harvard College Health Advocacy Program (HAP)
Mary Miller                               memiller@fas.harvard.edu

Stemming from the rising burden of chronic diseases on minorities and the economically poor, Harvard College
Health Advocacy Program (HAP) is a student-led direct service organization that works closely with Citizen
Schools to provide middle school students with the opportunity to learn about healthy eating habits and lifestyles.
As an advocacy program, HAP also encourages students to realize their potentials as student advocates for health
in their community. HAP members will commute to McCormack Middle School in Dorchester once per week to
engage the middle school students in culinary and educational activities designed to foster nutritional awareness.
There are also weekly meetings to debrief and plan future projects as well as social events.

Harvard College Helping Heroes (HCHH)
Alex Warner Palmer                        harvardcollegehelpingheroes@gmail.com

The overarching goal of Harvard College Helping Heroes (HCHH) is to unite veterans, Harvard students, and
community members in public service. HCHH will work to achieve this goal in four main ways: by 1) increasing
student awareness of the fact that veterans are assets, not charity cases, and want to hear “we still need you”
as well as “thank you,” 2) facilitating student involvement in organizations that help as well as challenge and
engage veterans, like The Mission Continues and The Real Warriors Campaign, in order to support veterans’
efforts to contribute to the wellbeing of our society, 3) creating a more veteran-friendly environment on campus
by connecting veterans with undergraduates through the common goal of service, 4) hosting service projects
throughout the year in Cambridge and Boston that bring together veterans and non-veterans alike. HCHH will
work year-round to help veterans continue in public service after their military careers have ended, as well as to
increase undergraduate appreciation for what veterans have to offer as civic assets. We hope that this organization
will help lead to a fundamental shift in the way veterans are viewed both on campus and around the country and
inspire undergraduates to a lifetime of public service.
                                                                                 Academic Year 2010-2011    45

Harvard College Human Rights Advocates
Eric Horvath                                 ehorvath@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/hcsadvocates

The Harvard College Human Rights Advocates is an organization dedicated to cultivating student interest in
human rights advocacy and providing opportunities for student engagement in substantive human rights advocacy
work. We are committed to producing top-quality outputs, establishing enduring and fruitful relationships
with human rights faculty and organizations throughout the university, and ensuring the existence of advocacy
opportunities for future Harvard College students. We have mobilized into a highly active and organized student
group consisting of regionally-focused sub-committees on local advocacy, education, and research projects in
international human rights advocacy.


Harvard College Human Rights in Equatorial Guinea (HREG)
Weiqi Zhang                                  zhangweiqi@gmail.com
Chase Russell                                chaseyrp@gmail.com
http://www.harvardhreg.org

Harvard College Human Rights in Equatorial Guinea (HREG) is a student group dedicated to raising awareness
of the disturbing human rights situation in Equatorial Guinea. We strive to raise awareness about the issue on
campus and beyond, as well as mobilize Harvard students and community members to work for the cause. The
group also seeks opportunities to urge the U.S. government to take action and thereby improve the human rights
situation in Equatorial Guinea.

Harvard College International Bridges to Justice
Cessna Thai Mac                               hcibj-list@lists.hcs.harvard.edu
https://lists.hcs.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/hcibj-list

Harvard College International Bridges to Justice is a student-run organization committed to raising awareness
about the ongoing problems in the criminal justice systems in developing and developed countries, and to helping
support the innovative ideas of students and legal professionals to improve these systems.

Harvard College Korean Adoptee Mentorship Program (HCKAMP)
Clara Yoon                                   cyoon@fas.harvard.edu

Founded in 2005, the Harvard College Korean Adoptee Mentorship Program (HCKAMP) is an organization that
aims to expose internationally adopted Korean children from the Cambridge and Boston area to Korean culture
and heritage. Each child, or mentee, is matched with a Harvard undergraduate mentor at the beginning of the
school year, with whom he/she meets every month throughout the school year. In addition, there are also all-
HCKAMP meetings every month, in which all mentors and mentees come together for group activities. Parents
of HCKAMP mentees congregate monthly as a discussion and support group. Currently, there are more than 25
children and 25 mentors involved in the program.
46      Harvard College Public Service Directory

Harvard College Shani A Cappella
Rebecca Resnick                           rresnick@fas.harvard.edu

Shani (Hebrew for “crimson”) A Cappella is a dedicated group of Harvard undergraduates who come together to
rehearse and perform a diverse repertoire of Jewish and Israeli music. These music pieces are then performed at
various charity and other community outreach events throughout the year. With music spanning eight centuries
and two languages (English and Hebrew), Shani strives to introduce its audiences, both at Harvard and in the
broader community, to the fantastic variety that characterizes Jewish and Hebrew music.

Harvard College Special Olympics
Grier Tumas                               harvardcollegespecialolympics@gmail.com

Harvard College Special Olympics aims to empower individuals with intellectual disabilities by encouraging them
to develop physical fitness, gain self-confidence, have fun, and form lasting relationships with other athletes and
volunteers. Harvard College students, including both present and former varsity athletes, connect with Cambridge-
area community members to raise awareness and promote acceptance of individuals with intellectual disabilities.
No prior experience with sports or individuals with disabilities is necessary to become a volunteer.

Harvard College Stories for Orphans
Le Van Nguyen                             lvnguyen@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/stories

Harvard College Stories for Orphans integrates students’ interests in creative writing, drawing, and foreign
languages, coordinating their creative efforts for the benefit of orphaned children abroad. It is our hope that by
presenting each child with a book written, illustrated, and bound especially for him or her, we will inspire a love
of reading and of self.

Harvard College Team HBV
Francis Deng                              harvard@teamhbv.org

Harvard Team HBV (Hepatitis B virus) recognizes the pressing need to address ethnic health disparities and, in
particular, the disproportionate incidence of Hepatitis B in the Asian American population, both domestically and
globally. The organization strives to organize effective campus and community-wide events to raise awareness,
strengthen political advocacy, and promote the Jade Ribbon Campaign. In addition to educating and opening
multidisciplinary dialogues on campus, we hope also to implement outreach initiatives and mobilize collective
support on the community level. Harvard Team HBV will draw from a variety of perspectives in public health,
preventive medicine, and health policy to effect real change with a specific focus.

Harvard College UNICEF (HUNICEF)
hunicef@gmail.com

The overall goal of Harvard College UNICEF is to spread awareness of the situation of the world’s children,
and to encourage members to take action to help save lives. Harvard College UNICEF’s efforts will focus on
increasing local awareness about UNICEF’s mission both on campus and in the community. Harvard UNICEF
aims to 1) educate members on the state of the health and education of the world’s children 2) raise funds to be
used towards UNICEF’s work with these children, and 3) provide opportunities for members to directly advocate
to protect the lives of children in need. Harvard College UNICEF has an influence and opportunity that reaches
beyond life at college. Passionate members who wish to continue working with UNICEF after graduation may
do so on an individual basis by volunteering at http://www.unicefusa.org/volunteer, or through participating in
collective initiatives, trips, and boards.
                                                                          Academic Year 2010-2011              47

Harvard Defense Against Genocide (HDAG)
Jihae Lee                                 jihaelee@fas.harvard.edu

The Harvard Defense Against Genocide (HDAG) is the official Harvard chapter of the national organization
STAND: A Student Anti-Genocide Coalition. HDAG is committed to raising awareness about the ongoing
genocide in Darfur, Sudan, to waging campaigns to help end it, to support Darfur’s displaced citizens, and to
hold its perpetrators accountable. HDAG organizes conferences, film screenings, speaker events, rallies, vigils,
and more. HDAG hosts regular call-in days to involve students in political advocacy for Darfur legislation and
raises money for civilian protection in Darfur.

Harvard Friends of the American Red Cross
Ryan Juntado                              rjuntado@fas.harvard.edu
Daniel Oh                                 danieloh@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~redcross

The Harvard Friends of the American Red Cross is a volunteer organization within the Harvard community that
organizes blood drives on campus, runs first aid/CPR classes, and staffs a disaster services team. The organization
exists to provide Harvard students with the opportunity to learn about the public service functions provided by
the American Red Cross and to become directly involved in these efforts. In addition, the organization promotes
disaster preparedness and assistance, in a general sense, and may take an active role in supporting other disaster
relief efforts as circumstances and member interests dictate. Blood drive volunteers plan four three-day long
drives at Harvard and provide information on blood donation to raise awareness about its importance.

Harvard LowKeys
Susan Brinckerhoff                        lowkeys@hcs.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~lowkeys

This co-ed a cappella group strives to break new musical ground while maintaining its trademark friendly, low-
key attitude. With a diverse repertoire including contemporary pop, jazz, rock classics, and oldies, the group
holds two concerts per year in Sanders Theatre and also entertains in other campus venues, private engagements,
nearby colleges, and community service gigs. In addition to performing, the LowKeys also lead workshops at
high schools, where they teach students and chorus members about a capella singing. The LowKeys tour annually
during intersession and have performed in Paris, New York City, Florida, and Alaska.

Harvard Program for International Education (HPIE)
Reihan Nadarajah                          rnadaraj@fas.harvard.edu
Bita Assad                                bassad@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~hpie/

The Harvard Program for International Education (HPIE) is committed to bringing quality lessons with an
international focus into Boston public high school classrooms. Volunteers create individualized lesson plans and
teach once per week on topics as varied as human rights, immigration, nation-building, and the environment.

Harvard Project for Sustainable Development (HPSD)
Matt Mulroy                               hpsd@hcs.harvard.edu
Maria Xia                                 hpsd@hcs.harvard.edu

The Harvard Project for Sustainable Development (HPSD) is committed to fighting inequality and injustice in
the world by connecting members of the developed and developing world by building relationships based on
equality, trust, and partnership between these groups and by working together on important development issues
and bringing resources to help execute these projects to the highest possible standard. HPSD works throughout
48       Harvard College Public Service Directory
the year to bring speakers and guests to campus who can share important insights on the work of international
development with our members and with the Harvard community. We also fundraise and plan our yearly trip to
Nicaragua in order to implement various projects dealing with health, microfinance, and education. Members of
HPSD can expect not only to increase their knowledge of the issues that face these developing nations, but also
to work to formulate and apply real solutions to some of these very real problems.

Harvard Story-Time Players
Qi Yu                                        hstp@hcs.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~hstp

The Harvard Story-Time Players is a service and theater organization that writes, produces, and performs theater
for children in hospitals in the Boston area. Volunteers need no prior theater experience, and we create new
plays each semester.

Harvard-Radcliffe MIHNUET
Rui Wang                                     wang21@fas.harvard.edu
Beatrice Liem                                beatrice.liem11@college.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/~mihnuet

Harvard-Radcliffe MIHNUET (Music in Hospitals and Nursing Homes Using Entertainment as Therapy) is a
student-run public service group that visits local hospitals and nursing homes twice per week in order to perform
music for and form connections with the elderly and the ill. Musicians of all levels are welcome to join! MIHNUET
also has an a cappella group, the Crimson Crooners, that performs weekly and is open to all interested members.
Time commitment is as much or as little as you would like; we welcome you anywhere from once per semester
to twice per week!

Harvard Undergraduate Legal Aid Volunteers (HULAV)
Jessica Stein                                 hcibj-list@lists.hcs.harvard.edu
https://lists.hcs.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo/hcibj-list

The overall goal of the Harvard Undergraduate Legal Aid Volunteers (HULAV) is to promote social justice and
legal empowerment to low-income families in the greater Boston area. Through the No One Leaves program,
HULAV will go to the homes of residents facing eviction because of foreclosure to inform them of the services
and support available through the Harvard Legal Aid Bureau (HLAB) and its partnership with City Life/Vida
Urbana, a community organization which encourages residents to stay in their homes and pursue their legal rights
as tenants and owners against bank foreclosure.

Helping Hand and Heart (HHH)
Jimmy Feeney                                 jfeeney@fas.harvard.edu
Grace Kim                                    kim20@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.hcs.harvard.edu/hhh

Helping Hand and Heart (HHH) was created with the vision of bringing the compassionate face of healthcare to
the bedside. HHH currently serves the Boston Medical Center (BMC) rehabilitation ward, home to a subset of
patients who are particularly vulnerable to the novelty, loneliness, and trauma of medical care due to the sudden
and debilitating nature of their injuries. HHH is responsible for providing a team of diverse, warm, committed, and
compassionate volunteers who are both consistent in their dedication and able to adapt to the novel personalities
and dynamics of a hospital setting. The foundation of HHH is a commitment to building friendships as a means
to inspiring confidence, hope, and strength in patients.
                                                                          Academic Year 2010-2011              49

House and Neighborhood Development Program (HAND)
Julia Taylor                              taylor3@fas.harvard.edu
Daniela Dekhtyar                          ddekhty@fas.harvard.edu
hand@hcs.harvard.edu

Harvard HAND (House and Neighborhood Development) is dedicated to getting Harvard students involved
in public service projects in the Cambridge area. Currently, we provide afterschool mentoring at elementary
and middle schools around Cambridge. We run a study hall for students at the Graham and Parks School (next
to Cabot House) four days per week. We provide a way for students to get involved in the greater Cambridge
community without having to go too far from campus.

Kidney Disease Screening and Awareness Program (KDSAP)
Eric Shieh                                eshieh@fas.harvard.edu

The Kidney Disease Screening and Awareness Program (KDSAP) provides free screenings and community-
based health education to underserved Asian American, African American, and Hispanic communities in Greater
Boston. These groups are at increased risk for end-stage renal disease, in part due to language barriers and lack
of medical attention. Every month, KDSAP volunteers participate in a health screening led by one of Boston’s
leading nephrologists, held at our permanent facility in Chinatown or a mobile unit. In addition to dealing closely
with patients, volunteers provide basic health education, work with nephrologists, and gain experience in running
a nonprofit. Medical experience is not necessary. KDSAP welcomes anyone with an interest in helping others
through community medicine.

Let’s Get Ready! (LGR)
Jenny X. Chen                             letsgetready.boston@gmail.com
http://www.letsgetready.org

Coaches with Let’s Get Ready! (LGR) work with underserved Boston high school students to increase their scores
in either the Math or Critical Reading/Writing sections of the SAT I (or both). As students who have recently gone
through the college admission process themselves, these undergraduates provide college application guidance. In
particular, the College Choice aspect of the program concentrates on students filling out the Common Application,
completing a college essay, and learning more about scholarships and financial aid. Coaches chaperone students
on campus tours in nearby Boston colleges. Classes are free for students and are held at the Higher Education
Resource Center. Coaches find LGR a rewarding way of spending their time and affecting change in another’s
life.

LIFT-Cambridge
Jan van der Kuijp                         tjvan@fas.harvard.edu
Lizzy Majzoub                             emajzoub@fas.harvard.edu

LIFT-Cambridge recruits and trains a diverse corps of undergraduates who make a rigorous and sustained
commitment to service while in school. Our student advocates work side-by-side with low-income community
members, first helping them address immediate needs (e.g. employment, housing, health care, public benefits,
and/or education), then providing comprehensive, long-term support designed to help families break the cycle
of poverty. Simultaneously, our student leaders gain the direct exposure, insight, and compassion necessary to
be lifelong advocates for systemic change on poverty policy, regardless of the professional path they ultimately
pursue. Our local LIFT offices collaborate with a comprehensive network of social service agencies to guarantee
a meaningful client experience and to prevent duplication of community efforts. Since its inception in 1998, over
5,000 student advocates have helped more than 30,000 individuals and their families on a path out of poverty.
This group is formerly known as Cambridge Student Partnerships.
50      Harvard College Public Service Directory

Project HEALTH
Lisa Rotenstein                           lrotenst@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.projecthealth.org

Founded by Harvard undergraduates in 1996, Project HEALTH (Helping to Empower, Advocate & Lead Through
Health) is a national nonprofit that mobilizes undergraduate volunteers in six cities to provide high-impact
services to low-income families and, in the process, to transform our healthcare system into one that is more
effective and just.

At Project HEALTH’s flagship site in Boston, Harvard undergrads run three programs based out of Boston Medical
Center, the region’s largest safety-net hospital providing care to low-income families. The Family Help Desk
runs out of the Pediatrics Outpatient Clinic and works with families with children, Project Baby runs out of the
maternity ward and works with mothers who have recently given birth, and The Women’s Resource Center works
in the OB-GYN clinic with women ranging from teenagers to grandmothers. These programs assist families in
accessing resources to meet the non-medical needs (food, housing, child care, clothing, job training, and more)
that impact their children’s health. Project HEALTH volunteers collaborate with physicians and other providers
in their clinics to screen families for these needs, then help families identify appropriate services. Volunteers
then continue to follow up with families by phone to provide additional information, troubleshoot any barriers
families encounter in obtaining services, and ensure that the need is successfully resolved. Their services are
preventative in nature, aiming to help families avert crises and achieve increased stability, income, and education,
which have been documented to result in better long-term health outcomes for their children.

REACH
Lawrence Benjamin                         lbenjam@fas.harvard.edu
Shan Wang                                 wang38@fas.harvard.edu

REACH (Recreational Experience and Arts Creativity with Harvard) is a year-long, student-run mentoring
program for children with special needs. Our children are ages 5-13 from the greater Boston area and present
with cases of physical handicaps, developmental disabilities, and/or emotional/behavioral needs. REACH
seeks to provide an encouraging, stimulating, friendly, and safe environment through building solid one-to-one
relationships within a group setting. Each child is paired with a Harvard student and participates with them in
gym, theater, and art activities.

Students Taking on Poverty (STOP)
Rebecca Scaife           scaife@fas.harvard.edu
Ablorde Ashigbi          aashigbi@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.wix.com/harvardstop/stop-website

The Students Taking on Poverty (STOP) Campaign is a nation-wide, student-led effort to address and combat
issues of poverty. We seek to empower students to confront these issues through three avenues: information,
motivation, and action. We are dedicated to connecting our conversations and research about the issues with
actual deeds to tangibly affect change and take on poverty.
                                                                          Academic Year 2010-2011             51


Unite for Sight
Rui Wang                                  wang21@fas.harvard.edu
Sophie Cai                                scai@fas.harvard.edu
http://www.uniteforsight.org

Harvard Unite for Sight volunteers provide the medically underserved in the Greater Boston area with a variety
of resources including free preliminary vision screenings for children and adults, enrollment in free insurance
and health programs, and general vision education programs to reduce health disparities. Harvard Unite for Sight
also runs an ongoing eyeglass drive on campus and in the local community, collecting donated eyeglasses for
underprivileged communities abroad. In addition, volunteers fundraise for Unite for Sight’s international eye
care initiatives like free cataract surgeries in developing countries, such as India, Ghana, and Honduras.

William Monroe Trotter Scholar Program (WMTSP)
Sojourner Rivers                          rivers.sojourner@gmail.com

The William Monroe Trotter Scholars Program (WMTSP) aims to provide the youth of Mattapan with a well-
rounded curriculum in cultural history, finances, and reading literacy. We hope to provide our young scholars with
a meaningful, engaging, and inspirational experience through personal relationships with their mentors at Harvard.
We hope to encourage all of our young scholars to be active participants in the positive future of their community.
Our program is the only Harvard Program that targets the urban youth of Mattapan. Our expected enrollment is
35-40 scholars each school year ranging in ages 10-14. Starting in mid-October, we operate three days per week
in the early afternoon, working closely with the Mildred Ave. Community Center, which has a membership of
well over 100 families. WMTSP not only benefits the Mattapan community, but also provides powerful service-
learning experiences for its volunteers, including the director, mentors, and curriculum planners.
52         Harvard College Public Service Directory


                                               Getting Started: Volunteers
 Students can volunteer in a number of programs at Harvard and beyond. Whether you want to
 volunteer weekly, monthly, or a few times per semester, there are many opportunities available.
   Volunteer opportunities are available through programs at Phillips Brooks House, various
          student organizations, and community agencies in the Greater Boston Area.


Visit Phillips Brooks House (PBH)
Located in the northwest corner of Harvard Yard, PBH is home to PBHA, CPIC and PSN. PBHA and PSN
programs offer volunteer opportunities in the Harvard/Cambridge community and beyond. Students volunteer
in areas such as tutoring, mentorship, advocacy, and the arts. PBHA holds an open house for freshmen and
upperclassmen in the Fall, and PSN groups can be found at the Student Activities Fair.

Join a Student Group
Student groups volunteer throughout Greater Boston and beyond.
Students select the community that they are interested in serving
and the type of work they hope to do. The breadth and diversity
of volunteer programs is vast. Students can volunteer with the
homeless, prisoners, the elderly, or students in Boston and Cambridge
schools. Volunteers can do public health work, legal advocacy, or
international education. They can work in hospitals, community
centers, or Harvard classrooms.


Volunteer in Community Agencies
Many community organizations are eager to have Harvard students
volunteer. You can choose a particular interest and coordinate with
the organization in order to fit your schedules. Resources to help you
locate community organizations include:
   Student Employment Office.......................................                  Tel. 495-2585; http://www.seo.harvard.edu
   Shepard Library.........................................................          Second floor of Phillips Brooks House
   Volunteer Solutions.....................................................          http://www.volunteersolutions.org
   Idealist.org...................................................................   http://www.idealist.org


Sign up for the Weekly Public Service Update
To learn about volunteer, internship and job opportunities, speakers on and off campus, and funding availability for
yourself and your student group, sign up to receive the Weekly Public Service Update. The Harvard Public Service
Network sends this electronic newsletter every week during the fall and spring semesters. To subscribe:
   1) Go to lists.fas.harvard.edu/mailman/listinfo
   2) Click on “Public Service-list”
   3) Scroll down to “Subscribing to Public Service-list”
   4) Enter your name and email address
   5) Click “Subscribe”
                                                                             Academic Year 2010-2011              53


                              Getting Started: Student Groups
If you have an idea for a student group that currently does not exist on campus, you can submit a proposal to
the Office of Student Life to become recognized as an official student activity. Be advised that with over 125
public service groups on campus, it is very likely that you can find an existing organization with which you
may want to partner. Recognized student groups are eligible to receive grant funding and access to campus
space. To gain recognition, a group must have a constitution and by-laws, undergrduate officers, a financial
            statement and budget, and at least one advisor from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences.


Registering your Student Organization with the Office of Student Life
In order to enjoy the privileges that come with official recognition, your student organization must register with the
Office of Student Life. Organizations must register every year: this year the deadline is October 1. In addition,
presidents and treasurers of organizations must attend leader tranings in mid-Fall, and contact their faculty advisers
early in September in order to coordinate plans for the coming year. Further details can be found at the following
website from the Office of Student Life: sao.fas.harvard.edu/registration
Consult the Harvard College Handbook for Student Organizations for more registration information.
http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic699352.files/Student%20Organization%20Handbook.pdf
The handbook contains valuable information on organizing special events, publicizing your event, fundraising, and
financial considerations. The Office of Student Life Web site, located at http://www.osl.fas.harvard.edu, also contains
information about this..

Becoming a Member of the Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA)
PBHA membership gives groups access to additional resources. PBHA has many human service professionals on
staff to support programs. Each staff member has expertise in a type of programming (for example, afterschool, adult
education, or ESL) and long-standing relationships with communities in which PBHA operates. They help student
directors with planning, community relations, and training. PBHA’s Development Director meets with committees
to help them identify potential funders and foundations, write grants, and construct budgets. PBHA committees can
                                                                          use PBHA’s physical resources, such as its
                                                                          photocopier, computer lab, scanner, library,
                                                                          audio/visual equipment, meeting rooms, and
                                                                          van fleet. PBHA groups also are eligible
                                                                          for dining cards and for funding from the
                                                                          President’s Public Service Fund and the
                                                                          Harvard COOP Public Service Grants.
                                                                           PBHA’s application process requires that
                                                                           a group write a proposal, present it to the
                                                                           Programming Committee, and respond to
                                                                           questions on the group’s planned project.
                                                                           The Programming Committee then votes
                                                                           whether to recommend the proposal to
                                                                           Cabinet (PBHA’s governing body) for formal
                                                                           approval. Contact PBHA’s Programming
                                                                           Chairs for details.
                                                                           Prerequisites for Program Admission:
                                                                           Any program that wishes to become a part
                                                                           of Phillips Brooks House Association must
                                                                           complete this process in its entirety. The
                                                                           following projects are considered a new
                                                                           program:
54      Harvard College Public Service Directory

        * Programs serving a population not already served by other PBHA programs.
        * Programs advocating for an initiative not already addressed by other PBHA programs.
        * Programs which have their own budget, income, and expenditures.
        * Programs which are significantly different from all other programming currently happening at PBHA.
        * Any program that wishes to recruit independently at any PBHA Open House.
        * Programs that have been operating for more than a semester.
        Students interested in establishing new PBHA programs should contact the PBHA Programming Chairs: Edwin
        Hargate (ehargate@fas.harvard.edu) or Tara Venkatraman (tara.venkatraman@gmail.com).

Receiving support from the Public Service Network
If your student group is recognized by the College and registered with the Office of Student Life and its primary mission
is public service, it is eligible to receive support from the Harvard Public Service Network (PSN). PSN staff provide
guidance, support, and resources to approximately 50 independent, student-led groups. Student groups supported by
PSN receive resources such as group advising from the staff, grant application review, Charlie Cards for volunteer travel,
meeting rooms, and photocopying in the Phillips Brooks House.
In addition, PSN groups are eligible for funding from the President’s Public Service Fund and the COOP Public Service
Grants. PSN group leaders receive advising on fundraising, management, safety, and volunteer retention. Each group
also receives publicity through the PSN website and the Public Service Directory.
        All PSN Programs must:
        * Meet at least once per term with PSN staff.
        * Schedule site-visits for groups volunteering in the community with children or the elderly.
        * Follow all policies of the Office of Student Life.
For more information, contact: Amanda Sonis Glynn at asglynn@fas.harvard.edu, 496-8622 or Travis Lovett at
tlovett@fas.harvard.edu, 495-1842.
                                                                           Academic Year 2010-2011              55

    The Center for Public Interest Careers (CPIC) at Harvard
                             College
                                       http://www.cpic.fas.harvard.edu
The Center for Public Interest Careers (CPIC) engages and supports Harvard undergraduates and recent graduates
in expanding awareness of and exploring public interest careers. Working closely with university, alumni/ae,
and community partners, CPIC develops public interest fellowships, internships, networks, and opportunities
for personal and professional development.


CPIC Fellowship and Internship Program
Students apply through CPIC to work as a paid yearlong graduate Fellow ($30,000 plus health benefits) or summer
Intern (minimum of $10 per hour) at nonprofit organizations across the country. Applications are due January
27, 2011 and interviews with CPIC staff and alumni/ae are held in February. Students will interview with the
nonprofit organizations in March and learn of their status by mid-April. The program requires a commitment
to professional development, including meeting with a Harvard alumnus/a Mentor, attending a seminar series,
and participating in reflection sessions throughout the course of the Internship/Fellowship. Applications Due:
January 27, 2011
CPIC-Heckscher Fund for Service Internship (FSI) Program
Funded by the Heckscher Foundation for Children, this program offers students the opportunity to work in
nonprofits serving children in New York City and provides recipients with a stipend and housing. Interns will
participate in seminars throughout the spring and summer and are matched with alumni/ae mentors. Applications
and more information will be posted on the CPIC Web site. Applications Due: January 27, 2011
The Harvard Clubs Summer Community Service Fellowship Program
The Harvard Clubs Summer Community Service Fellowship Program (SCSF) enables Harvard undergraduates
to perform public service in Harvard Clubs’ local communities. SCSF is coordinated through the joint efforts of
CPIC and the Harvard Alumni Association (HAA). Local Clubs commit to funding a summer intern and raise
money from area alumni/ae. Students locate and arrange an unpaid internship with a nonprofit organization and
then apply to the local Club for the fellowship. Applications Due: March 1, 2011
The Arthur Liman Public Interest Law Fellowship
The Liman Fellowship Program supports Harvard undergraduates who perform domestic summer internships in
public interest law. Students must be sophomores, juniors, or seniors in the fall semester following the internship,
which must provide the student with a progression of learning experiences throughout the course of the summer.
Interns should act as more than information gatherers or general office administrators; they should gain significant
exposure to issues of law. Applications Due: December 7, 2010
Summer Work-Study Award for Public Service
Students eligible for federal work-study funding may apply to work during the summer with a nonprofit
organization at no financial obligation to the organization. The grant program covers the employer’s expected
contribution. Students locate organizations and arrange for staff members to provide supervision and guidance
throughout the course of the internship. Summer grant funding is limited. Applications Due: Starting April
25, 2011 (Rolling)
Steamboat Summer Scholar Program
The Steamboat Summer Scholar Program awards one third-year Harvard College student with a grant to work
at Facing History and Ourselves in Boston. Last year’s grant was $12,000. More information is available at
http://www.steamboatfoundation.org. Applications Due: December 6, 2010

For more information about any of CPIC’s programs, please contact Amanda Sonis Glynn, CPIC Director
at asglynn@fas.harvard.edu or 496-8622, or Travis Lovett, CPIC Assistant Director, at
tlovett@fas.harvard.edu or 495-1842.
56       Harvard College Public Service Directory

                                  Making Public Service Pay
  Students who make public service an integral part of their lives, as well as student groups whose
mission is public service, are eligible to receive funding from various sources on campus. Funding
 for individuals comes from sources both within Harvard College and through Federal Work-Study
Programs. Student groups may apply for funding from various grant-giving institutions on campus.


                                       Funding for Individuals
Federal Work-Study Program (FWSP)
     Students eligible for FWSP may receive an hourly wage of $9.50-12.50/hr for undergraduates and
     $9.50-18.15/hr for graduate students for certain public service work. If you are a US citizen or permanent
     resident, review your financial aid package to confirm your FWSP eligibility. You can earn FWSP pay
     for public service in many ways.
          • Harvard Reads and Harvard Counts. The Harvard Reads and Harvard Counts Program is part of a
          federal initiative that encourages elementary school students to improve their reading and math skills.
          Students tutor at schools or afterschool centers in Boston and Cambridge, depending on whether they
          volunteer through PSN, PBHA, or other groups. Students with FWSP awards are eligible to receive
          funding for their training, preparation, and volunteer hours. Application process is rolling.
          • Stride Rite Community Service Program. The Stride Rite Program selects a limited number of
          FWSP-eligible students committed to working in public service year-round. Participants apply in
          the spring for summer and term-time service and receive Work-Study support, service awards, and
          leadership training. Post-graduate fellowships for continued service work are also awarded to three
          graduating Harvard seniors. Please visit pbha.org/resources/funding/stride-rite, or contact Maria
          Dominguez at harvard.striderite@gmail.com to learn more.
          • Community Agencies. Off-campus employers,
          including nonprofit organizations, are eligible for
          a 75-100% reimbursement of your wages if they
          establish themselves as a FWSP site. While summer
          grant funding (see below) is limited, students are
          encouraged to use their Work-Study awards to
          work with nonprofit organizations throughout the
          academic year. In this arrangement, the organization
          pays 15-25% of the students’ wages. This provides
          students with the flexibility to design their own
          public service projects. Application deadline is
          rolling.
          • Summer Work-Study Award for Public Service.
          Harvard College Summer Public Service Work
          Study Award for Public Service, administered            Student volunteering with PBHA’s CHANCE program
          by CPIC and the Student Employment Office,
          enables FWSP-eligible students to receive pay
          for summer volunteer work at community agencies. Deadline to apply: Rolling, applications accepted
          starting April 25, 2011, provided funding is still available. Contact Jenny Lee at jhlee@fas.harvard.
          edu to learn more.
                                                                                 Academic Year 2010-2011                  57

        Americorps Student Leaders in Service
    The Phillips Brooks House Association (PBHA) and the Public Service Network (PSN), through Massachusetts
    Campus Compact (MACC), are once again participating in Americorps Student Leaders in Service.
    Participants who complete the program by serving 300 hours and meeting general program requirements are
    eligible to receive an AmeriCorps education award. Multiple Harvard students will receive this award, which
    can be used to pay college tuition or to repay student loans.
    All full-time undergraduate students are eligible to apply to the program, which is designed to acknowledge public
    service as an important part of a college education. Federal work-study students are eligible to participate. Award
    winners are required to·attend a MACC training session, meet monthly in staff, and attend one Public Service
    Academy training session each semester. Deadline: September 2010

Other Sources of Funding for Individuals
   • Center for Public Interest Careers (CPIC) at Harvard College. In addition to the CPIC Fellowship and
      Internship Program and the CPIC-Heckscher Fund for Service Internship (FSI) Program, students can
      propose projects in cities across the country and receive funding through the following three programs:
      1) Harvard Clubs Summer Community Service Fellowships; 2) Summer Work-Study Award for Public
      Service; 3) the Arthur Liman Public Interest Law Fellowship. CPIC also administers the Steamboat Summer
      Scholar Program. While each has a different funding scheme, all allow students to explore the nonprofit/
      public interest sector. See page 55 for more details. Deadlines vary.
   • Office of Career Services (OCS) Grants. The OCS Fellowships Office administers public service grants.
      Complete information about these and dozens of other opportunities can be found in The Harvard College
      Guide to Grants. Contact Paul Bohlmann at bohlmann@fas.harvard.edu for more information. Deadlines
      vary.
   •Institute of Politics (IOP). The Institute of Politics offers Harvard undergratuates Summer Stipends of up
      to $2,500, as well as $4,000 Director’s Internships annually through its Summer Internship Programs.
      Visit http://www.iop.harvard.edu/Political-Internships/The-Summer-Stipend-Program or email Amy
      Howell at amy_howell@harvard.edu for more details. Other resources for funded Research Assistants,
      Summer Thesis Research Awards, and Summer in Washington programs are also available. Deadlines
      vary.


                                   Funding for Student Groups
The Common Grant Application is an application for multiple grant-giving institutions (including the first
three below) available to student organizations at Harvard College. Each grant has its own deadlines and may
require supplemental application materials, so please make sure to follow the specific instructions for each grant
or fund to which you apply. Visit admin-apps.fas.harvard.edu/cga to complete the application.

President’s Public Service Fund (PPSF) supports student-led service groups by providing Project Grants for
one-time events or Operating Grants to assist with annual budgets. Project Grants are available on a rolling basis,
while Operating Grants, which provide funding for the next academic year, are due in early April. Applications
are available on the 3rd floor of Phillips Brooks House, as well as through the Common Grant website.

Harvard Undergraduate Council (UC) provides grants for student groups. Any recognized or unrecognized
campus organization may apply for funds. Any project that contributes to campus life or improves the well-
being of students is eligible. The Council has established standardized costs for particular types of events and
projects; consult the Council grant application for specific figures. Grant applications may be submitted weekly
to the UC, with a turnaround time for approval of approximately one week. For more information, visit uc.fas.
harvard.edu or stop by the Council Office in Hilles.
 58      Harvard College Public Service Directory
COOP Public Service Fund supports special projects for student groups. Applications are due in early March.
Visit the PSN website at http://www.psn.fas.harvard.edu.

Institute of Politics (IOP) offers grants of up to approximately $2,000 to support the participation of Harvard
students in activities that promote political awareness and involvement around the campus community. See
http://www.iop.harvard.edu/Political-Internships/Grants.




                       Bridging Academics and Public Service
                                     Activity-Based Learning Project
The Activity-Based Learning (ABL) Project involves a collection of courses that provide opportunities for
students to do public service, fieldwork, community-based research, and internships in conjunction with their
course work. The aim of these courses is to further enrich the academic experience and learning outcomes
through connecting theory and practice. The pedagogies offer opportunities for students to connect the theories,
methods, and concepts from courses to data and experiences in the community. For more information, see the
Bok Center’s ABL Web page at bokcenter.harvard.edu under the programs section, or contact John Girash at
girash@fas.harvard.edu.


                     FAS Standing Committee on Public Service 2010-2011
The FAS Standing Committee on Public Service is comprised of several members of the faculty as well
as student representatives who are selected each fall. The Committee considers the role of volunteer
programs in the educational life of students. The Committee uses meetings to examine and discuss
issues within the area of public service. In recent years the committee has devoted extensive time to
developing ways to bridge students’ academic and public service experiences.


                                       Co-Chairs of the Committee*

         Anya Bernstein                                             Richard Thomas
         Director of Undergraduate Studies                          Director of Graduate Studies
         Department of Social Studies                               Department of the Classics
         Hilles Library 16                                          Boylston 206
         Tel. 496-1838                                              Tel. 496-6061
         abernst@fas.harvard.edu                                    rthomas@fas.harvard.edu




* For a full list of committee members, please visit the PSN Web site at http://www.psn.fas.harvard.edu.
                                                                        Academic Year 2010-2011           59


                   Personal Development and Public Service
                                                 Reflection
       Reflection is an essential part of all public service. Setting aside time for reflection enables you
 to integrate your service experience into your everyday life. Making a conscious effort to draw les-
 sons from your service (either individually or with your fellow volunteers) helps you to frame your
 experiences, gain greater insight into your motivation for serving, and also to make connections to your
 academic work or future career path. Questioning your assumptions about your service may lead you
 to deepen your commitment to a specific issue, or to search for solutions to the problems that confront
 a particular population through advocacy or political work. For ongoing opportunities to reflect and
 develop as a reflection leader, join the PBHA Reflection Corps!

 Contact a member of the public service staff (pages 61-62) for assistance in creating a meaningful reflection
 component for your program.



                                Responsibilities of Student Leaders
As a leader of a student organization, you represent the Harvard community, and there are certain
responsibilities that accompany your desire to make a difference.

    • Sustainable and mutually beneficial community partnerships. Partnerships are founded on
    respect for the community and a long-term commitment to identifying strengths and problems
    and to implementing solutions.
    • Safety of program participants. In many public service programs, Harvard students interact
    with vulnerable populations, such as young people, the elderly, and those with special needs. By
    Massachusetts law, all volunteers working with these types of programs must submit and pass a
    background (CORI) check. Speak with your staff contact for more information.
    • Financial oversight. Student leaders are responsible for the funds controlled by their groups.
    Proper controls (reimbursement of expenses, two signers on every check, etc.) should be in place
    to protect you and your organization.
    • Assessment of programming. How do you know if your program is meeting community
    needs? Anecdotal information is important, but consider conducting more rigorous qualitative or
    quantitative analysis, as well.
    • Leadership development. Consider ways to leave your organization stronger than when you
    assumed a leadership role. There are Public Service Academy training sessions held throughout
    the year focused on leadership development.



For information on leadership training and development, including workshops offered by the Public Service
Academy, contact a member of the public service staff (pages 61-62) and subscribe to the Weekly Public
Service Update (page 52). Information is also available at the Public Service Academy Website: http://www.
publicservicetraining.org.
60      Harvard College Public Service Directory

                            Public Service Tutors 2010-2011
House Public Service Tutors are responsible for helping students find ways to participate in public service through
their Houses and student organizations. Tutors also support students in identifying term-time, summer and career
opportunities that are personally and professionally fulfilling and responsive to community needs. Tutors for
the 2010-2011 school year will be listed on the PSN Web site at http://www.psn.fas.harvard.edu.
                                                                             Academic Year 2010-2011       61

                            Public Service Professional Staff
Main Office
General communications, accounting, room reservations, and building policy
Phillips Brooks House                                      Bob Kelly
Front Office                                               Building Manager
Harvard Yard                                               Phillips Brooks House, 1st Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138                                        Tel. 496-0464 Fax 496-2461
Tel. 495-5526 Fax 496-2461                                 rskelly@fas.harvard.edu

Phyllis Fallon
Accounting Assistant
Phillips Brooks House, 2nd Floor (Monro Room)
Tel. 496-8621 Fax 496-2461
fallon@fas.harvard.edu

Steve Griffin
Coordinator of Vehicles/Maintenance Technician
Phillips Brooks House, 1st Floor
Tel. 495-5526 Fax 496-2461
griffinsteve@hotmail.com


Phillips Brooks House Association
Resources, advising, and training for PBHA programs

Robert Bridgeman
Director of Programs                                       Maria Dominguez Gray
Phillips Brooks House, 2nd Floor (Noble Room)              Deputy Director & Stride Rite Director
Tel. 496-9127 Fax 496-2461                                 Phillips Brooks House, Room 306
bridgem@fas.harvard.edu                                    Tel. 496-8620 Fax 496-8110
                                                           mdoming@fas.harvard.edu
Barbara Cone
Financial Administrator of PBHA                            Kerry McGowan
Phillips Brooks House, 2nd Floor (Monro Room)              Director of Programs
Tel. 496-3861 Fax 496-2461                                 Phillips Brooks House, 2nd Floor (Noble Room)
bcone@fas.harvard.edu                                      Tel. 495-3684 Fax 496-2461
                                                           kmcgowan@fas.harvard.edu
Gene Corbin
Executive Director
Phillips Brooks House, Room 304
Tel. 495-8851 Fax 496-2461
corbin@fas.harvard.edu

David Dance
Director of Programs
Phillips Brooks House, 2nd Floor (Whitlock Room)
Tel. 496-8710 Fax 496-2461
ddance@fas.harvard.edu
  62      Harvard College Public Service Directory

                   Public Service Professional Staff (continued)

Phillips Brooks House Association (continued)
Kate Johnsen Meunier                                         Louise Wills
Director of Programs                                         Grants, Technology, & Alumni Relations Coordinator
Phillips Brooks House, 2nd Floor (Whitlock Room)             Phillips Brooks House, Room 302
Tel. 496-9129 Fax 496-2461                                   Tel. 495-5842 Fax 496-2461
kmeunier@fas.harvard.edu                                     wills@fas.harvard.edu


Harvard Public Service Network & Center for Public Interest Careers (CPIC)
Student group and individual advising, public events, volunteer placement, guidebooks, and resources for all community
service groups at Harvard College

Amanda Sonis Glynn
Director, Harvard Public Service Network
Coordinator, Center for Public Interest Careers
Phillips Brooks House, Room 303
Tel. 496-8622 Fax 496-8110
asglynn@fas.harvard.edu

Jenny Lee
Fellow, Center for Public Interest Careers
Coordinator, Harvard Clubs Summer Community Service Fellowship
Program and Summer Work-Study Program
Phillips Brooks House, Room 307
Tel. 496-5788 Fax 496-8110
jhlee@fas.harvard.edu

Travis Lovett
Asst. Director, Harvard Public Service Network
Asst. Coordinator, Center for Public Interest Careers
Phillips Brooks House, Room 307
Tel. 495-1842 Fax 496-8110
tlovett@fas.harvard.edu

Hamida Owusu
Fellow, Center for Public Interest Careers
Coordinator, CPIC-Hecksher Fund for Service Internship (FSI) Program
Phillips Brooks House, Room 307
Tel. 495-3321 Fax 496-8110
howusu@fas.harvard.edu
                                                                                  Academic Year 2010-2011                  63

                               Contacts at Other Campus Offices
    Office of Student Life
    Apply to become a student group; re-register your group; assistance in handling organizational finances; application for
    party permits; room reservations; BAT requests
    David Friedrich                                               Suzy Nelson
    Assistant Dean of Harvard College for Student Life            Dean for Student Life
    University Hall, Ground Floor South                           University Hall, Ground Floor North
    Tel. 495-1558                                                 Tel. 495-1942
    david_friedrich@harvard.edu                                   smnelson@fas.harvard.edu

    Susan Marine
    Assistant Dean of Harvard College for Student Life
    Canaday Hall, B Entry Basement
    Tel. 495-1558
    marine@fas.harvard.edu

    Joshua McIntosh
    Associate Dean for Student Life
    University Hall, Ground Floor North
    Tel. 495-1942
    joshua_mcintosh@harvard.edu

   Student Organization Center at Hilles (SOCH)
   The SOCH serves as a meeting place for student organizations, offering office spaces, collaborative areas, conference
   meeting rooms, and technological support.
   Amy Vest
   Manager, Student Organization Center at Hilles
   59 Shepard St., Room 250
   Tel. 495-1020
   soch@fas.harvard.edu

The Harvard College Women’s Center (HCWC)
The Women’s Center offers student meeting and event space, grants for programs and events related to women, and other services.

    Susan Marine                                                 Gina Helfrich
    Assistant Dean of Harvard College for Student Life           Assistant Director, Harvard College Women’s Center
    Director, Harvard College Women’s Center                     Canaday Hall, “B” Entry, Basement
    University Hall, Ground Floor South                          Tel. 496-2029
    Tel. 496-5005                                                helfrich@fas.harvard.edu
    marine@fas.harvard.edu

    Institute of Politics (IOP) at the John F. Kennedy School of Government
    Internships, IOP Forum speakers, visiting and resident Fellows, study groups and, conferences.

    Eric Andersen                                                 Amy Howell
    Program Manager, Fellows & Study Groups                       Internships and Special Events Coordinator
    The Institute of Politics, 79 JFK Street                      The Institute of Politics, 79 JFK Street
    Tel. 496-8475                                                 Tel. 384-9378
    eric_andersen@harvard.edu                                     amy_howell@harvard.edu
64      Harvard College Public Service Directory

                Contacts at Other Campus Offices (continued)
Office of Career Services (OCS)
Public service career, internship, and fellowship advising.

Benny Belvin                                                  Gail Gilmore
Assistant Director for Careers in Law,                        Assistant Director, Office of Career Services
Entertainment Management, and Marketing/                      54 Dunster Street
Advertising                                                   Tel. 495-2595 Fax 495-3584
54 Dunster Street                                             ggilmore@fas.harvard.edu
Tel. 495-2595 Fax 495-3584
bbelvin@fas.harvard.edu

Paul Bohlmann
Director of Fellowships, Office of Career Services
54 Dunster Street
Tel. 495-8126 Fax 495-3584
bohlmann@fas.harvard.edu

The Harvard Foundation
The Harvard Foundation awards over 130 grants each fall and spring to student organizations whose projects promote
the understanding and sharing of racial and ethnic perspective.

Dr. S. Allen Counter                                           Loc Truong
Director, The Harvard Foundation                               Assistant Director, The Harvard Foundation
University Hall, First Floor                                   Thayer Hall, Basement Level, Room 02
Cambridge, MA 02138                                            Cambridge, MA 02138
allen_counter@harvard.edu                                      loc_truong@harvard.edu
      Harvard Public Service Network
     Phillips Brooks House Association

                     Phillips Brooks House
                          Harvard Yard
                 Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138




   The Arthur Liman Press at Phillips Brooks House is an endowed fund established by the efforts
  of the Liman family in honor of Arthur C. Liman ’54. Publications from the Arthur Liman Press
  promote lives of service and honor the life and commitment of this influential attorney. Although
 Mr. Liman represented an impressive array of clients including Time Warner and Michael Milken,
he spent much of his career defending the rights of the poor. He served as advisor to four governors,
  two mayors, and counselor to Secretaries of State and U.S. senators. He was chief counsel of the
Iran-Contra hearings. Liman also led an investigation of the Attica prison uprising, an investigation
 that many say changed the way the criminal justice system is viewed in America. He was also on
                   the Board of Overseers at Harvard University from 1988-1994.

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:177
posted:10/9/2011
language:English
pages:66