Momentum Evaluation Report - SICS

Document Sample
Momentum Evaluation Report - SICS Powered By Docstoc
					               Integrated Project on Pervasive Gaming 




                               WorkPackage WP11: ELARP 
                       Deliverable D11.8 Appendix C: 
                       Momentum Evaluation Report 
                            Jaakko Stenros, University of Tampere 
                            Markus Montola, University of Tampere 
                                     Annika Waern, SICS 
                                    Staffan Jonsson, SICS 



                                 Release date: May 15. 2007 
                                       Status: public




Public IPerG Deliverable                       i                     07/06/2007 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 



Executive Summary 
Prosopopeia Bardo 2: Momentum was a pervasive larp played in Stockholm that lasted for 
five weeks in October and November of 2006. The aim of the project was to wander the 
borderlands between ordinary and ludic, exploring the design space where reality and fiction 
merge into a seamless, immersive and coherent role­playing experience. The purpose of this 
report is describing our analysis and assessment of Prosopopeia Bardo 2: Momentum and 
discussing the implications of our findings. 

The report presents a brief description of the game and then discusses gameplay, game 
mastering, the technology involved and ethical questions raised by the game. In focus are 
design issues involving long duration larping, social play modes and game mastering. Special 
attention is also paid to how to integrate game and life in a seamless manner and what 
implications such a design philosophy has. Technology evaluation also considers, among 
other things authoring and orchestration. The evaluation of ethics of pervasive larping builds 
on previous work in WP5, but also expands it by considering the ethical questions raised if 
pervasive larp is placed in the context of art. 

Live­action role­playing (larp) is a form of role­playing games where each participant acts as 
his character bodily. Momentum build on the Nordic tradition of larping where character 
immersion is important, games are not interrupted and game mechanics are rendered as 
invisible as possible. The game was also influenced by MMORPGs, crossmedia gaming, 
urban exploration, political protest and alternate reality gaming. The game is also weighted in 
these contexts in order to show the complexity of the game.




                                                              2 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

Deliverable Identification Sheet 

IST Project No.           FP6 – 004457 
Acronym                   IPerG 
Full title                Integrated Project on Pervasive Gaming 
Project URL               http://iperg.sics.se/ 
EU Project Officer  Albert GAUTHIER 


Deliverable               Momentum Evaluation Report 
Work package              WP11 ELarp 


Date of delivery          Contractual        M31                   Actual               M31 
Status                                                             final p 
Nature                    Prototype p Report þ Dissemination p 
Dissemination             Public þ Consortium (CO) p 
Level 



Authors (Partner)  Jaakko Stenros (UTA), Markus Montola (UTA), Annika Waern (SICS) & 
                   Staffan Jonsson (SICS) 
Responsible               Jaakko Stenros                 Email  jaakko.stenros@uta.fi 
Author 
                          Partner  University of         Phone  +358­40­7530515 
                                   Tampere 



Abstract       This report evaluates the pervasive 
(for           larp Prosopopeia Bardo 2: Momentum 
dissemination) staged in Stockholm in the fall of 2006. 
               Report includes game description, 
               evaluations of gameplay, game 
               mastering, user technology and ethics. 
               The report can also be read as a 
               design guideline for pervasive larps. 
Keywords            pervasive games, larp, ethics of 
                    gaming, social play, game mastering, 
                    authoring, orchestration 


Version Log 
Issue Date  Rev No.               Author            Change 
Oct 25.          001              Montola           TOC and descriptions of Skism 
Mar 6.           008              Stenros           Added game mastering stuff and seamlessness 
Mar 15           009              Stenros           Added ethics. 
Apr 3            010              Stenros           Went through the whole document, harmonizing and 
                                                    editing, adding pictures.




                                                              3 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

Apr 4            011              Stenros           Added final version of chapters 4 and 5 sent by 
                                                    Waern, edited them a bit, added pictures. 
Apr 30           012              Stenros           Incorporated review comments from internal 
                                                    reviewer. 
May 3            013              Stenros           Incorporated review comments from external 
                                                    reviewer. 
May 7            014              Stenros           Final fine­tuning.




                                                              4 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 



Table of Contents 
Executive Summary ......................................................................................... 2 
Table of Contents ............................................................................................. 5 
1      Introduction .............................................................................................. 8 
       1.1  Evaluation Methodology .......................................................................................8 
       1.2  Prosopopeia Bardo 1: Där Vi Föll..........................................................................9 
       1.3  Goals and Success Criteria ....................................................................................9 
       1.4  Full Credits .........................................................................................................10 
       1.5  Publications.........................................................................................................11 
2      Game Description ................................................................................... 12 
       2.1  Off­game Workshop............................................................................................14 
       2.2  Second Seminar ..................................................................................................14 
       2.3  First Scenario: Across Lethe................................................................................15 
       2.4  Second Scenario: Saving 93 ................................................................................17 
               2.4.1      Air ................................................................................................................................. 17 
               2.4.2      Earth .............................................................................................................................. 18 
               2.4.3      Fire ................................................................................................................................ 18 
               2.4.4      Water............................................................................................................................. 19 
       2.5  The Node Game ..................................................................................................19 
       2.6  Third Scenario: Radical Saints ............................................................................21 
               2.6.1  Parade of the Dead ......................................................................................................... 21 
               2.6.2  Homegoing Party ........................................................................................................... 22 
       2.7  Aftermath............................................................................................................22 
               2.7.1  Interviews ...................................................................................................................... 23 
3      Gameplay Evaluation ............................................................................. 24 
       3.1  Challenges of long duration larping.....................................................................25 
               3.1.1      Pacing and scenario structure.......................................................................................... 25 
               3.1.2      Possession model ........................................................................................................... 26 
               3.1.3      Seamless Life/Game Merger........................................................................................... 27 
               3.1.4      Fabrication and reality hacking....................................................................................... 27 
               3.1.5      Content generation ......................................................................................................... 28 
               3.1.6      Life/game merger as an expression ................................................................................. 28 
               3.1.7      Runtime gamemastering in the context of seamlessness .................................................. 29 
       3.2  Evaluation of seamless merging of life and game ................................................31 
               3.2.1      Problems........................................................................................................................ 31 
               3.2.2      Coherent interactive game world .................................................................................... 31 
               3.2.3      Trapped in the magic circle............................................................................................. 32 
               3.2.4      Mixed signals................................................................................................................. 33 
               3.2.5      Player exhaustion ........................................................................................................... 34 
               3.2.6      Seamlessness as a tool .................................................................................................... 34 
       3.3  Social Play Modes...............................................................................................35 
               3.3.1      Playing with Other Players ............................................................................................. 36 
               3.3.2      Playing Alone ................................................................................................................ 37 
               3.3.3      Playing with Friends and Relatives ................................................................................. 38 
               3.3.4      Playing with Strangers.................................................................................................... 39


                                                                             5 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

               3.3.5  Playing in Public ............................................................................................................ 41 
               3.3.6  The Prosopopeia Proposal and Seamlessness .................................................................. 43 
               3.3.7  Interaction Model for Pervasive Larp.............................................................................. 44 
       3.4  Expanding the magic circle .................................................................................47 
               3.4.1  Case: The Art Gallery..................................................................................................... 48 
                    3.4.1.1 Ambivalence as fun.................................................................................................. 49 
                    3.4.1.2 Enabling radical social expansion............................................................................. 49 
               3.4.2  Case: Gullmarsplan ........................................................................................................ 50 
                    3.4.2.1 Careful use of symbols............................................................................................. 54 
                    3.4.2.2 A diegetic system of sanctions.................................................................................. 55 
       3.5  Momentum in the contexts of game genres..........................................................55 
               3.5.1     Momentum as a live­action role­playing game................................................................. 56 
               3.5.2     Momentum as a crossmedia game ................................................................................... 56 
               3.5.3     Momentum as a MMORPG............................................................................................. 58 
               3.5.4     Momentum as an ARG.................................................................................................... 58 
       3.6  Discussion...........................................................................................................59 
               3.6.1  Magician’s Curtain......................................................................................................... 59 
               3.6.2  Auteur Theory................................................................................................................ 60 
4      Game Mastering Evaluation .................................................................. 61 
       4.1  Game Master Techniques in Momentum .............................................................62 
               4.1.1     Technology for Surveillance and Communication ........................................................... 62 
               4.1.2     The Node Game ............................................................................................................. 63 
               4.1.3     Controllers and Participant Reports................................................................................. 64 
               4.1.4     Everyday Technology..................................................................................................... 64 
               4.1.5     The Game Mastering System .......................................................................................... 64 
       4.2  Experiences from Game Mastering Momentum...................................................65 
               4.2.1     Video Surveillance ......................................................................................................... 66 
               4.2.2     Experiences on Node Game............................................................................................ 66 
               4.2.3     The Game Master System............................................................................................... 66 
               4.2.4     In­game Diary................................................................................................................ 67 
               4.2.5     Controllers ..................................................................................................................... 68 
       4.3  Analysis ..............................................................................................................68 
               4.3.1     The Distancing Problem ................................................................................................. 68 
               4.3.2     Pacing............................................................................................................................ 69 
               4.3.3     The Risk of Railroading and Passivity ............................................................................ 69 
               4.3.4     Dynamic difficulty level ................................................................................................. 70 
5      User Technology Evaluation .................................................................. 72 
       5.1  Design factors .....................................................................................................72 
               5.1.1     In­game design or Indexical Propping............................................................................. 72 
               5.1.2     Seamfulness or Seamlessness ......................................................................................... 73 
               5.1.3     Magic or meta­game functionality .................................................................................. 75 
               5.1.4     Functionality for Technology.......................................................................................... 76 
       5.2  Example artefacts in Momentum .........................................................................78 
               5.2.1     The Player Diary ............................................................................................................ 78 
               5.2.2     Redesigned EVP Device................................................................................................. 79 
               5.2.3     The Ghost Chat and the Matrix Printer............................................................................ 81 
               5.2.4     Camera Surveillance....................................................................................................... 83 
               5.2.5     Omax phone, Thumin Gloves and the Steele ................................................................... 84 
       5.3  Analysis ..............................................................................................................86 
               5.3.1     Technology breaks and real world intervenes.................................................................. 86 
               5.3.2     Seamful Design and Indexical Propping.......................................................................... 87 
               5.3.3     The Importance of Aesthetics ......................................................................................... 88 
               5.3.4     The Importance of Usability ........................................................................................... 88



                                                                           6 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

6      Ethical Evaluation .................................................................................. 90 
       6.1  Surveillance and privacy .....................................................................................90 
       6.2  Fabrication ..........................................................................................................92 
       6.3  Accountability.....................................................................................................93 
       6.4  Momentum as Art and as Political Action ...........................................................95 
               6.4.1    Game master intention.................................................................................................... 96 
               6.4.2    Political action ............................................................................................................... 97 
               6.4.3    Art and transgression...................................................................................................... 99 
               6.4.4    Breaking the law .......................................................................................................... 100 
7      Meta­Evaluation ................................................................................... 102 
       7.1  Participant Observation .....................................................................................102 
       7.2  Unaware participation .......................................................................................103 
       7.3  Player demographics .........................................................................................103 
8      Conclusion............................................................................................. 104 
       8.1  Future research issues........................................................................................105 
       8.2  Acknowledgements ...........................................................................................105 
9  References ............................................................................................. 106 
10  Appendix A: Momentum Player agreement form .............................. 109 
11  Appendix B: Post Game Questionnaire............................................... 111




                                                                         7 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




1  Introduction 
Prosopopeia Bardo 2: Momentum was a pervasive game organized in Stockholm that lasted 
                                                                                   1 
for five weeks in October and November of 2006. Built upon the foundations of larp  , 
MMORPG, crossmedia gaming, urban exploration, political protest and alternate reality 
gaming Momentum was a pervasive game about conformism and revolution with an artistic 
agenda. The aim was to wander the borderlands between ordinary and ludic, exploring the 
design space where reality and fiction merge into a seamless, immersive and coherent role­ 
playing experience. 

Momentum was the second prototype produced in the eLARP showcase. It was also the 
second game placed within the Prosopopeia mythos. The first prototype and first part of the 
Prosopopeia series, Prosopopeia Bardo 1: Där vi föll, tested many of the concepts that were 
further developed, elaborated and fine tuned in Momentum. 

1.1  Evaluation Methodology 
The methodology of the evaluation is better described in the non­public evaluation plan. To 
summarize, mainly the data was gathered by the following variety of methods:


1 Live-action role-plating games (larp) are a style of games that evolved from role-playing games (RPG) in the early
1980’s. In larps the players usually play characters in bodily, acting out the character actions with their bodies.
Momentum builds especially on the Nordic tradition. For a definition, see Montola (forthcoming), for description of
the Nordic style, see Koljonen (2007). For more information on the other game genres listed here, see section 3.5 of
this document.


                                                              8 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

       ­    Participant observation (conducted by Jaakko Stenros) 
       ­    GM observation 
       ­    Post­game interviews 
       ­    Off­game questionnaires sent periodically to eight players during the game 
       ­    Ingameplayer reports 
       ­    Numerous photographs 

30 players participated in the game, 3 of whom were ‘controllers’ assisting the game masters 
on site, and one being both a controller and the observer. Seven of the players and one of the 
controllers, representing different factions in the game, were chosen for periodical surveys 
executed weekly. 

The photographs that open chapters 1, 2, 3 and 8 as well as Images 4, 9, 13 and 18 are staged. 
Image 19 is from Där vi föll and Images 21 and 22 is from Kejsartemplet. All other photos are 
from Momentum. 

1.2  Prosopopeia Bardo 1: Där Vi Föll 
Prosopopeia Bardo 1 was a 52­hour game mixing ludic and ordinary in as strong and 
seamless fashion as possible. A multitude of techniques were used to ensure that players 
would both consider game elements as parts of ordinary reality and to consider ordinary 
reality as part of the game. The game served as a proof of concept for such seamless life/game 
merger, demonstrating the thrilling emergent gameplay caused by such uncertainty. Där vi 
föll also demonstrated the strong potential in semi­improvisational runtime gamemastering, 
although the way it was done in that game was far too costly in terms of manpower. 

For a more thorough description of Prosopopeia Bardo 1, please see Jonsson & al. (2006) and 
                          2 
Montola & Jonsson (2006). 

1.3  Goals and Success Criteria 
Momentum was an attempt to scale up from the basic ideas of Där vi föll, by partially 
increasing the number of players, but mainly by extending the playing time from 52 hours (+ 
a preparatory week) to four main events and seamless life/game merger during low­intensity 
gametime of 36 days. The plan was to introduce a generic gaming infrastructure based on 
sensing, actuating, processing and communication technologies, allowing a relatively 
unmoderated gameplay for the whole duration of the game. 

In Momentum evaluation plan it’s stated that the game is a successful proof of concept if 

       1.  No significant practical or ethical problems emerge 
       2.  The game content emerging from the interaction with non­players provides sufficient 
           and interesting game content 
       3.  The majority of players are enjoying the game both during low­intensity gametime 
           and high­intensity weekends 

The Momentum evaluation plan lists the following research themes and issues (edited for 
clarity and conciseness): 

       1.  Dispersed gameplay (spatial expansion)

2   Many game materials can be seen in http://de-doda-lever.nu/, most of which are in Swedish.


                                                              9 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

               ­    Node game 
               ­    Breaking up the factions 
               ­    Timed, coordinated actions in Saving 93 
               ­    Larp teleparticipation 
               ­    Value of urban aesthetics 
               ­    Four spaces; transitions and preferences between home, work, streets and R1 

     2.  Extremely long larp duration (temporal expansion) 
            ­  Life­game merger over long duration 
            ­  Interruptability and possession model 
            ­  Game interrupting life; teammates calling players, pressure, stakes 
            ­  Sustaining the game after player missses a central event 
            ­  Iterated, more seamful possession model 
            ­  High vs. low intensity gametime, slow gameplay 
            ­  Game mastering over long duration 
            ­  Evolution of expectations on the game 

     3. Influence on outsiders (social expansion) 
             ­  Mapping more phenomena of outsider involvement 
             ­  Appearance of the game towards outsiders (friends, family…) 
             ­  Emergent, unpredicted interactions 
             ­  Use of info cards 

     4.  Technology and interface design 
            ­  Rule­based technology supporting role­playing 
            ­  Technology­guided activity 
            ­  Gamism vs. immersionism in technology 
            ­  Biological input and tactile feedback, physical connection to virtual content 
            ­  Artifact design and game aesthetics 
            ­  Transparency of the technology 

     5.  Other issues 
            ­  Intrusiveness of the game 
            ­  Meta­evaluation of participatory observation 
            ­  Public image of the game 
            ­  Ethical issues and observations 
                        3 
            ­  Diegetic  social structures emerging during long larp 

1.4  Full Credits 
Prosopopeia Bardo 2: Momentum was organized by Swedish Institute for Computer Science 
(SICS) and Interactive Institute (II) in collaboration with P Production, and with evaluators 
from The University of Tampere (UTA). The seamless life/game merger lasted for 36 days, 
                  th                                   th 
starting on the 30  of October and lasting until the 5  of November, 2006. 

Prosopopeia Bardo 2: Momentum was created by Staffan Jonsson (producer), Emil Boss, 
Martin Ericsson and Daniel Sundström (design), and Henrik Esbjörnsson (locations) with the 
help of a large team including Karl Bergström, Torbiörn Fritzon, Niclas Lundborg, Pernilla

3Diegesis is the constructed, fictitious reality of the game. Everything existing within diegesis is diegetic. We use the
word in the fashion it has been applied to role-playing earlier. See for example Loponen & Montola 2004.


                                                             10 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

Rosenberg, Sofia Stenler and Tobias Wrigstad (scenario design), Anders Muammar (props), 
Karim Muammar (rules), Linus Gabrielsson, Henrik Summanen and Jonas Söderberg 
(sounds), Anders Daven (graphics), and Moa Hartman (costumes). The game technology team 
also included Karl­Petter Åkesson, Henrik Bäärnheilm, Sofia Cirverius, Anders Ernevi, Pär 
Hansson, Niclas Henriksson, Tony Nordström, Erik Ronström, Olof Ståhl, Anders Wallberg, 
Peter Wilhemsson and Maria Åresund. 

The names of the thirty players are not listed, even though they are considered co­creators. 
For the sake of anonymity and privacy the names of both the players and the names of the 
characters that they played (i.e. the spirits that they were possessed by) have been changed in 
order to create anonymity when describing action. In the context of describing the game as a 
context, original character names are mentioned. If we need to differentiate characters and 
players, we use Henrik to denote the ghost character, and underlined name Henrik to denote 
the player “possessed” by him. 

1.5  Publications 
Parts of this evaluation report have already been published in other venues and some parts 
have been submitted to conferences but are waiting to be accepted or declined. Already 
published are three papers: 
                Jonsson,  S.,  Montola,  M.,  Stenros,  J.  &  Boss,  E.  “Five  Weeks  of  Rebellion.  Designing 
                Momentum.” in Donnis, J., Thorup, L. & Gade, M. (eds.) Lifelike. Copenhagen, Projektgruppen 
                KP07, 2007, 121­128. www.liveforum.dk/kp07book 
                Stenros,  J.,  Montola,  M.  &  Waern,  A.  “Post  Mortem  Interaction.  Social  Play  Modes  in 
                Momentum.” in Donnis, J., Thorup, L. & Gade, M. (eds.) Lifelike. Copenhagen, Projektgruppen 
                KP07, 2007, 131­145. www.liveforum.dk/kp07book 
                Waern A., Jonsson S., Montola M. & Stenros J. ”Game Mastering a Pervasive Larp – Experiences 
                from Momentum.” Presented at PerGames 2007, Salzburg. 
Waiting to be accepted is also paper submitted to Digra 2007: 
                Stenros, J., Montola M., Waern A. & Jonsson S. ”Play It for Real. Sustained Seamless Life/Game 
                Merger in Momentum.”




                                                             11 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




                   4 
2  Game Description 
In order to create a collective experience for all the 30 players and to make sure that they felt 
that the game was a coherent whole, the game was structured in high and low intensity 
periods, and the players were given an advance warning on when the game would go to high 
intensity. These periods were three weekends during the game, and at these times the players 
were supplied with lots of prepared game content. 

The lasted for 36 days and during this time the game was persistent. It was on all the time and 
events took place whether certain a players was actively participating or not. For the duration 
of the game all the players were in the game world and the game could contact them even 
when they were sleeping at home. 

If one person played only the mandatory weekends and another person played all the time, 
they could still play the same game – the different levels of activity and information create an 
interesting tension to the play. The players kept in touch during the game through meetings 
and a web community that they put together. 

The game structure was influenced by two things: first of all, the structure reflected that of a 
revolution, and secondly it was paced so that even player with no background in role­playing 
could participate. Playing a game where life and game merge is difficult, and thus a learning 
curve and a supporting context needed to be provided. In the beginning the game was strongly 
guided, but as the players learned to fly, it opened up into more challenging, performative, 
player­controlled and eventually public experience. 

The central theme of the scenario revolution, and thus the classical structure of revolution 
                5 
shaped the game  . In the beginning of a revolution the radicals have a common enemy as the
4 For a more complete picture of the game, please see also the post-game website at http://www.prosopopeia.se/
and the Momentum video.
5 It should be noted that the structure presented here was clearly visible only to the game masters. From the point of
view of the players, there were not three scenarios, but one long game where there was more action on some
weekends. Though the players did know when the high intensity weekends would be, the game still felt like a whole.
Also, the names of the different scenarios were not visible to the players. Furthermore, the subdivision to missions


                                                             12 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

central unifying force, but after the success or failure the rebels lose their unity. In the case of 
success a new society has to be built and new order needs to be established, and in the case of 
failure the rebels need to struggle for individual survival in an even more oppressive 
environment. This was reflected in the scenario structure, which started with collaboration 
culminating in the decision between victory and loss in the middle of the game, and left two 
last weeks for infighting over the future of rebellion. 




                    Figure 1: Structure of Momentum 

The game was preceded by a seminar where the players were given instruction on how to play 
a game where life and game merge and the safe word was introduced. As the game started, the 
first week and the first high intensity weekend was focused on introducing the world of 
Prosopopeia and mindset of the game rather than creating player­driven drama or facing 
challenges. The purpose of the tutorial week was to set up the scene for things to come. The 
first high intensity weekend, Across Lethe, represented the oppression of the time before a 
revolution. It set the stage and showed how the player headquarters was supposed to be used. 

This first week also taught the players how the high intensity weekends and low intensity 
game time works in practise. During the high intensity weekends the game masters initiated 
most of the elaborate plots which forced the players to carry out elaborate mission and 
generally play intensely. During the low intensity game time the game masters initiated less 
important plots (many of which were either personal to certain characters or set up upcoming 
plots of dealt with the aftermath of past events) and solving them did not require as many 
people as dealing with the plots of the high intensity weekend did. Thus the players were able 
to play constantly, but they were also able to take breaks during the low intensity game time if 
they wanted to. 

The second high intensity weekend, Saving 93, was played two weeks later. It opened up the 
drama; Saving 93 was about how the revolution was resolved, and decided whether the rest of 
the game was a success story about the victory or a tragedy about bitter survival. In this phase 
the players had to think, plan, coordinate and execute activities. Collaboration as a key 
ingredient in creating a revolution was emphasised, and thus the factions were working 
together and competing simultaneously. 

During the last high intensity weekend, Radical Saints, the players had to be competent, 
confident and organized enough to go public with the characters. It involved a lot of non­ 
players in the interaction and allowed the players to do whatever they wanted with the fact 
that they were playing a game in secret. In the culmination of the game there were two major 
public events on the last Saturday of gaming. First one of them was a public demonstration 
parading through downtown to honour the dead, and the second was a homecoming party 
where the vessels bid the spirits goodbye and celebrated their victory, before going home.

that each element was supposed to carry out was also much hazier in reality. People did not always play in their own
element, people from other elements were consulted in the middle of the scenario and sometimes players even
switched missions in the middle of a scenario.


                                                             13 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


The intent in these last events was to make the players feel that they had planned and executed 
the party and the demonstration by themselves, instead of having the game masters organize 
everything. The game masters had acquired a demonstration permit and informed the police in 
advance about the route it would take and organized the party venue, but the actual content 
was left for the players to produce in both cases. 

Descriptions of the intense gameplay events follow. This includes the three high intensity 
weekends, the node game that took mostly place during the last two weeks as well as the 
workshop that preceded the game and the “second seminar” which kicked off the game. The 
descriptions include a general account of what was supposed to happen as well as what 
actually took place. 

2.1  Off­game Workshop 
         th 
On the 15  of September the players and game masters met up for a preparations seminar at 
SICS in Stockholm. This was the occasion when the players were given all the instructions on 
how to play the game. 

Goal: To get the players to understand the basic concepts and key mechanics of the game as 
well as find confidence in playing in public. 

What happened: Game masters lead the players in a discussion of the pervasive form and 
taking part in basic drama work shops as well as a crash course in gameplay in public space ­ 
a full afternoon was spent making drama performances in the middle of the crowded Kista 
mall. 

Most importantly the players were taught that the safe word “prosopopeia” would be the only 
way to step outside of the game during the seamlessly interwoven life/game merger mode and 
that the spirits would not engage in violence (as there wasn’t, by design, a game mechanic for 
dealing with physical aggression). 

It was also explained what the players were expected to do as players in addition to 
participating. Before the game they were supposed to research their characters, during the 
game they should play as much as they can but at least on the high intensity weekends (as 
well as file their diegetic reports), and that after the game they were expected to participate in 
the research (though the players were at each turn given the chance to decline participating in 
the research). 

2.2  Second Seminar 
                              st 
Two weeks later, on Sunday 1  of October, the game masters had called for a meeting on 
research and evaluation issues at SICS. At the last minute, the players were told that this 
seminar was cancelled and they were instead instructed to go to a certain address in central 
Stockholm instead, where they were told to enter through a hidden door and descend into the 
darkness to an old bomb shelter – and into the fiction of the game.




                                                             14 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

                                                             6 
Goal: To kick start the game and initiate the seamless mode  in an elegant way while bringing 
all the players on board. Teaching the players how to do ritual in a diegetic fashion. 




                    Image 1: Players debating the rituals that they had just completed in a 
                    bomb shelter during the second seminar. 

What happened: In the candle­lit shelter cave the game masters informed the players that the 
Momentum project had been shut down by IPerG, that they personally were convinced that the 
ITC­ communication system (used for contacting the dead), actually worked and that the story 
line of the game had been created from sound messages received from "the other side". The 
players got to listen to some ITC transmissions and were given the choice to end the project 
there and then or to continue on their own. All players decided to go on with the strange quest 
of communicating with the spirits (and thus decided to continue their participating in the 
game) and immediately started to prepare themselves through i.e. a lecture on ritual magic 
security and an attempt to contact the dead by means of ceremonial invocation. In the dark 
bomb shelter the players called for the spirits through a form of self hypnosis, repeating a self 
manifesto until they felt the presence of the dead person in the cave, marking the starting 
point of the game. 

2.3  First Scenario: Across Lethe 
The first scenario, Across Lethe, was a tutorial part of the game. From the experiences of Där 
vi föll, it was expected that seamless life/game merger and role­playing with possession model 
was difficult to many players, so Momentum started with an introductory part. 

Goal: To give the players all the information they needed to start playing on their own in a 
diegetic fashion. This included instructions on how all the equipment works, where the 
headquarters is located and how it is supposed to be used, how the Enochian ritual magic 
works with the support of symbolic action, etc…


6Aka the seamlessness, the time during which life and game merge. It is important to note that seamlessness does
not refer so much to technological seamlessness, but to the merging of life and game. The concept is explained in
chapter 3.


                                                             15 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




                    Image 2: The main reactor room in R1 before additional scenography 
                    was brought in. 
                                            th 
What happened: Late at night on Friday 6  of October players entered what was to become 
their underground headquarters. Descending thirty meters below ground they entered the 
complex of R­One, consisting of 43 rooms and being Sweden’s first nuclear reactor. Down in 
the old reactor core, the players found a man strapped to an iron bed, using a vast array of 
strange machinery. Working with cables, radio equipment, crystals and laptops, he 
demonstrated a mind­wrecking discovery. By manipulating ethereal energies of ground zero 
he had twice established contact with what seemed to be a land beyond death. He replayed 
sound messages picked up in the reactor pit, describing a struggle for freedom and justice in 
the afterlife. 

The messages asked for help with sending an expeditionary force of dead radicals back to the 
living. The players agreed to lend their bodies to 29 spirits of this post mortem revolution and 
guided by the man, now introduced as Adam, they performed a possession ritual, bringing the 
dead back to life. 

During the weekend, they established contact with allies on the "other side", prepared for 
techno­occult missions in Stockholm, searched for magical artefacts out in the streets and 
staged their first street ritual in the heart of Stockholm. For example one of the missions was 
retrieving magical Urim tablets (old tablet computers in custom­built casings to be used in 
techno­occult rituals) and the players had to call certain phone numbers, realize that their 
information was flawed, then search the internet for clues, find a contact person by shouting 
publicly on one of the most trafficked public squares in Stockholm, find the right nurse (an 
actor) in the biggest hospital in the city and so forth.


                                                             16 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




                    Image 3: The NPC Adam lectures the players on how nodes work. 

The players were taught how to conduct rituals, what kind of symbolic actions would help in 
the rituals, how to use the equipment at the headquarters, when they would have to flee the 
HQ (if there was an alarm about a “radioactive ghost” – which enabled the game masters to 
descend into the HQ and see what has happened and possibly repair surveillance equipment) 
and so forth. 

2.4  Second Scenario: Saving 93 
Saving 93 is the part of Momentum that determines the victory or the loss of the players. It’s 
the great war against The Grey, where all elemental factions (the players were divided at the 
beginning of the game to four groups: fire, water, air and earth) receive a mission that is a 
part of the big attack against the enemy. Many of the missions that the players were sent 
during the game had specific structures (task A must be completed in order to start working 
on task B or that tasks C and D had to be completed at the same time). This was clearest in 
Saving 93, where the air, fire and water tasks had to be completed in sequence. Also, if three 
or four factions succeed in time, the protagonists win the war (and the rest of the game is 
about who gets to rule after rebellion), otherwise they lose the war (and the rest of the game 
determines who survives the failed rebellion). 

Goal: To provide meaningful playing for the participant and determine whether to go for the 
positive (rebellion succeeds) or negative (rebellion fails) end scenario. 

What happened: The players succeeded in completing all four missions even if the last two 
happened quite late. More detailed descriptions follow: 

2.4.1  Air 
The mission of the air group in Saving 93 is to act as counterintelligence against the Gray. As 
air is a symbol of intellect and wits, their tasks required puzzle­solving and cunning. Their 
tasks were the following: 
     ­  Acquire a stack of secret documents 
     ­  Determine an area where secret message is hidden by solving a puzzle by triangulating 
         data they get from (fictitious) listening stations 
     ­  Go to the area, search and find the secret message


                                                             17 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

     ­  Meet the Kerberos antagonists, negotiate a trade: Kerberos wants the Electronic Voice 
        Phenomena (EVP) logs made by players during the game, the players want a magical 
        name of a spy tracking them. 

Success criteria for completing the task: Players acquire the magical name and use it in a 
ritual, without giving the real logbook to Kerberos (i.e. by falsifying the logs). 

What happened: The players falsified the logs and succeeded. They spent some extra hours 
searching in wrong areas, due to making mistakes in the triangulation puzzle. 

2.4.2  Earth 
Mission of the earth faction was to conduct a protective ritual. The ritual had been designed in 
advance by a non­player character Johannes, living in Katrinaholm, two hours away from 
Stockholm. 
   ­  Go to Katrinaholm and find Johannes’s cabin 
   ­  Rummage through his notes and other clues to find out how to conduct the ritual 
   ­  Obtain ritual components from a park, abandoned mine, stone age ruins etc. 
   ­  Meet Y, a mysterious stranger for an afternoon tea, to get background information 
   ­  Build a bonfire and conduct a ritual on a specific place 

Success criteria for completing the task: Players perform Johannes’s ritual correctly and 
successfully. 

What happened: The players successfully performed the ritual, in a spectacular fashion. The 
ritual was the high point of the game for many earth faction players. 

2.4.3  Fire 
Fire is the passionate, destructive faction. The mission of fire is to attack and destroy the Gray 
physically, by finding and destroying jamming stations used by the Gray to protect their main 
antenna. 
    ­  Get the clues on how to find three antenna props in different locations in Stockholm 
    ­  Destroy the antennas simultaneously and report to headquarters 
    ­  Get the information on the main antenna and find it 
    ­  Avoid the Kerberos guards when sneaking to the antenna, and destroy it 

Success criteria for completing the task: Jamming stations destroyed simultaneously and 
reported, to find the main antenna. Destroying the main antenna before a deadline.




                                                             18 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




                    Image 4: The antenna the fire faction found and later destroyed. 

What happened: The players destroyed the jamming stations, but failed to report that. That 
failure had some repercussions in the war on the Other Side, but ultimately the players 
succeeded – even though one of them was also captured by Kerberos guards in the process. 

2.4.4  Water 
The spiritual and contemplative water is the group going for offensive against the Gray by 
conducting an astral journey to the lands of the dead. In order to do so, they need to acquire a 
map of the astral plane first. 
   ­  Get the clue on the gallery where the map is displayed 
   ­  Obtain the map from the gallery by purchase or negotiation (with non­players) 
   ­  Meet Ingela, the medium doing the astral journey 
   ­  Perform the astral journey successfully (a tabletop role­playing session in disguise, 
       with the medium essentially playing the part of the game master) 
   ­  Sacrifice Ingela against her will during the journey, making her an unwilling suicide 
       bomber 

Success criteria for completing the task: Ingela sacrificed in a right way during the astral 
journey as a “suicide bomber”. 

What happened: The players got the painting after several hazards and long discussions. 
They performed the astral journey and but the game masters decided not to introduce the 
character of Ingela. Instead, the astral journey and sacrifice was made by a different character. 

2.5  The Node Game 
During the low intensity game time for the duration of the game the player were supposed to 
locate, correctly identify, and ritualistically cleanse or strengthen magical nodes around 
Stockholm. Most of the “node game” took place during the last two weeks, though the first 
node was already taken during Across Lethe.



                                                             19 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

Goal: The node game was designed to create interesting missions and game experiences for 
the players with limited effort on part of the game masters. The tasks, though individually 
themed, were quite repetitive. A node was claimed by a faction if it had been located, the 
meaning of it correctly interpreted and then taken with a ritual. The factions competed for the 
biggest number of nodes taken. 




                    Image  5:  One  of  the  positive  nodes  was  at  the  house  that  the 
                    anarchists of Stockholm had been building for some time. 

What happened: The players received information from the other side which they decrypted 
to mean certain location around Stockholm (basically GPS coordinates). All of these locations 
had some sort of historical significance, but it was not always apparent what the significance 
was. Some of the nodes where gray nodes that had to be cleansed and some were positive 
nodes that had to be strengthen. There were also a few portals to the other side. The idea was 
that these were fissures, fractures in reality and it was possible to send energy to the other side 
through them. 

The gray nodes included places like the place where Prime Minister Olof Palme was 
murdered, the headquarters of Clear Channel, the popular meeting place at the heart of most 
affluent part of town and the American embassy. Positive nodes included places like the 
monument for the memory of the Swedes who left to fight for the republic in the Spanish civil 
war and the location of 13 trees that the early environmentalist were able to save in the centre 
of Stockholm. One of the portals was a subway station that was never finished through which, 
urban rumours have it, a ghost train passes to transport the souls of the ones who die in 
Stockholm to the afterlife. 

After finding out the locations the player had to go the actual place and listen to sounds from 
the other side on the Omax system (prototype technology, a cell phone that played sound files 
in the correct location). Then the players were supposed to decrypt why the location was 
important, carry out the Enochian ritual and support it with symbolic actions. The symbolic 
action had to be the right kind, meaning that for example at Clear Channel headquarters the 
people had to understand that this is the company that own most of the public advertising 
space in Sweden and used that to pollute our minds. 

In order to carry out the ritual the players still had to find the exact location of the fracture. 
This was done with the Thumin glove (prototype technology, basically a glove with a passive


                                                             20 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

RFID reader and a vibrator inside). Once a ritual was carried out successfully, the node was 
taken, energy flowed to the other side, and one of the factions (fire, earth, air or water) could 
claim the place as their own. 

2.6  Third Scenario: Radical Saints 
The last scenario determined the aftermath of the revolution. If the players would have lost 
Saving 93, Radical Saints would have determined which faction survives the failed 
revolution. As Saving 93 succeeded, the question was about which faction would rule the 
future world. 

Goal: Radical Saints took the gameplay public. The tutorial mode of Across Lethe was over, 
and the challenges of Saving 93 had been conquered. The point of Radical Saints was about 
players creating their own game and taking it out to the public, with outsiders as spectators. 

The two core events of Radical Saints were the parade of the dead and the homegoing party. 
The game concluded with a de­possession ritual ending the possession, after which there was 
a short debrief session. 

2.6.1  Parade of the Dead 
In order to gather magical power, the rebels had to march through Stockholm in a 
demonstration on the night of All Hallow’s Eve. Hiding behind the façade of non­player 
characters, the game masters provided them with a demonstration permit which also outlined 
the route of the demonstration. As they have informed the officials about the demonstration as 
well, the police knew to expect the parade. 

The tasks that the players were to carry out during the third scenario did not have specific 
success criteria. The players were instructed to stage a parade, with self created signs and 
props. The players were also encouraged to attract outsiders to participate in the 
demonstration. 




                    Image 6: A player at the parade/demonstration carrying a home made 
                    torch. 

What happened:  The players paraded through downtown carrying home made torches and 
banderols, escorted by several police vehicles. They demanded that the many dead

                                                             21 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

revolutionaries, martyrs of various causes, should be remembered. Not many outsiders joined 
the demo (probably due to the unclear message of the demonstration), but there were plenty of 
spectators. 

2.6.2  Homegoing Party 
The homegoing party was supposed to be the final contest between the elemental factions. 
Along with the node game, it was supposed to have decisive power on which faction won 
Radical Saints. 

The game masters contacted a Stockholm area party organizer, establishing a contact between 
him and the players. The players were expected to throw a party in a venue booked by the 
game masters, in order to say goodbye to the radical spirits and to collect more magical power 
for going back to the Other Side. The players were also encouraged to bring their friends to 
the party. 

Organizing the party was a necessary for successful return journey. The different elemental 
factions were competing on who would get the most magical energy from the party. In order 
to accomplish this, different factions took turns at playing music and raising the energy in the 
party, attracting outsiders and each other to dance. 




                    Image 7: Players and unaware participants partying at the homegoing 
                    party. 

What happened: The game got sidetracked in this point due to players’ creative problem 
solving. They gave up the conflict of the factions, and managed to end the post­revolution 
conflict with their EVP­based NPC interactions. Players did stage a party, attracting perhaps 
20­30 non­players, but the element of competition was not present. 

2.7  Aftermath 
The game ended in an exorcism (de­possession) ritual that concluded Radical Saints. Right 
after the ritual, there was a quick middle­of­the­night debrief. The real debrief was held the 
next day in two phases: The main phase was attended by an evaluation team, which was 
followed by a Q&A session with the game masters.




                                                             22 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

2.7.1  Interviews 
During the following week 11 of the players were interviews one on one at SICS. These semi­ 
structured thematic interviews were used to collect information on what had happened in the 
game and how the players had experienced it. Already before the ending the players who had 
left the game (when their characters had died) had been interviewed as had two people at the 
art gallery that the players visited during scenario 2. In total 15 face­to­face interviews were 
carried out. The rest of the players had the chance to answer the same base questions via 
email. The questions can be found from Appendix B.




                                                             23 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




3  Gameplay Evaluation 
Many of the ideas of Momentum were originally tested in Prosopopeia Bardo 1: Där vi föll, 
including indexical propping, possession model, runtime game mastering, seamless merger of 
life and game et cetera. (see Montola & Jonsson 2006). 

Momentum was an ambitious attempt of scaling the game up in terms of duration and number 
of players, having 30 players play for 36 days continuously. Momentum also addressed issues 
of pacing and viability. In Där vi föll, the players played quite continuously for the whole 52 
hours. In Momentum that was not possible as the players had to be able to live their ordinary 
lives as well. 

Constructing a game where participants could drop in and out at any time and still experience 
a coherent whole was demanding. The game masters who had stayed awake for most of Där 
vi föll couldn’t do the same in Momentum. It was important to create orchestration tools to 
facilitate the communication of the large game master group, in order to maintain the illusion 
of continuity among the players. 

The Momentum possession model was changed from the one used in Där vi föll a bit in order 
to make it easier for players and more sustainable over very long durations. In Där vi föll, the 
players themselves were possessed by spirits. Many players saw this as problematic – it was a 
gigantic leap of faith. In Momentum the two­tier model of “host” and “spirit” was expanded to 
a three­tier model. In the revised model, the player can alternate between host and spirit, but 
he can also go completely outside the game and be just himself by using the safe word 
“prosopopeia”. 

In Där vi föll the border between the game and the ordinary had been hidden by giving the 
players as little off­game information as possible and in every way denying that the game was


                                                             24 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

a game. This proved to be at best confusing to the players and removed the common ground 
and common agreement that has showed to be so important for improvisation in the Swedish 
larp scene (Fatland 2005a, Koljonen 2007). The problem was that there was no agreement on 
how to play and what to play, which caused problems. 

Momentum was clearly marked it as game with a regular information site, a participation 
contract and a player seminar before the game. But when the game started the players where 
supposed to go into seamless mode where they played a carbon copy of themselves in a 
magical world. During the game the ludic nature was denied and the game was treated as 
reality. 

3.1  Challenges of long duration larping 
Typical Nordic larps last from a few hours to a week. These games are continuous, consuming 
                                                                7 
all waking hours of the player. Continuous character immersion  is common, as are high 
production values of involved props. The emphasis is more on intrigue and emotion on the 
expense of quests and physical combat. For a description of the larp tradition that Momentum 
stems from see Koljonen (2007). 

A week is usually a long time for an adult to take a break from the everyday life. In order to 
create longer continuous and immersive game experiences, a number of design challenges 
must be overcome. The central design challenges concern pacing, life/game merger and 
gamemastering viability. 

Pacing a game is challenging, as the game must be kept moving, but players have to be 
prevented from consuming the content too fast. In a five­week game, it’s also practical to 
ensure that most or all players are participating in the game during the most important periods 
of gameplay. 

Life/game merger requires that the participant must be able to continue with his ordinary life, 
work, school and social life. The game must be constructed in such a fashion, that its 
coherence is not lost even if a participant is not engaged with the game all the time. 
Interruptability is a central part of the merger, as the participants must be able to move easily 
between ordinary life and game without either one suffering from the switch. 

Gamemastering viability is a practical requirement. In larps, anticipating all player action is 
impossible, and as the effects of unanticipated behaviour escalate over time, continuous run­ 
time gamemastering is needed in order to create a working game experience. Continuous run­ 
time game mastering consumes lots of work hours, which is both an issue of resources and 
knowledge management. A single mistake can compromise the coherence of the game world. 

3.1.1  Pacing and scenario structure 
Problems regarding pacing were solved by structuring the game in high and low intensity 
periods. The players were given an advance warning on when the game would go to high 
intensity. These periods were three high intensity weekends during the game (Across Lethe, 
Saving 93 and Radical Saints, see above), and at these times the players were supplied with 
lots of prepared game content.

7 Immersion is central to Nordic larp both as a design principle and a role-playing philosophy. On character
immersion, see Pohjola (2004) and on physical immersion Koljonen (2007) and Murray (1997). Fine (1983) uses
engrossment to describe a similar phenomenon.


                                                             25 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


If one person played only the mandatory weekends and another person played continuously, 
they could still play the same game. The different levels of activity and information created a 
tension which the player negotiated by information exchange through meetings and a web 
community that they initiated and managed on their own. 

The theme of the game was revolution. In the beginning the four factions of radicals were 
united against a common enemy. They had to complete interdependent tasks in order for the 
rebellion to succeed. The unity was then lost regardless of the outcome. An internal struggle 
followed over the spoils of the struggle (victory) or over survival against an invincible 
oppressor (defeat). 

Throughout the duration of the game the players role­played their characters, carried out 
missions (e.g. performing a purification ritual outside the headquarters of the largest 
advertising space seller in Sweden) and communicated with “the other side”. During the last 
weekend, there were two major public events. One was a public demonstration parading 
through downtown to honour the dead (see Image 8); the second was a homecoming party 
where the vessels bid the spirits goodbye and celebrated their victory before going home. 




                    Image  8:  “The  Dead  Live”  proclaimed  the  banderols  at  the 
                    demonstration. 

3.1.2  Possession model 
Momentum was on all the time, and the players were supposed to live theirs lives in it. To be 
viable, the game had to be interruptable. Due to the seamless merger of life and game, the 
interruptions had to make diegetic sense. The players had to be able to take care of their 
ordinary lives while staying in game. 

As a solution, the game was based on a ghost story, using a role­taking model based on the 
idea of possession as a form of self­hypnosis. The players role­played characters that were 
treated as possessing spirits in the game. 

In the possession model every player is supposed to role­play a copy of oneself that hosts a 
possessing spirit. Thus, every player had three identities; two within the diegesis and (since 
the players do not actually believe they are possessed) one player identity outside it.



                                                             26 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

When playing the game a participant would act in the role of the ghost, but as the need arose, 
she could always move the possessing spirit to the back of her mind and act as the host 
instead. The host would then be able to take care of the mundane tasks relating to operating in 
the ordinary world as he was mostly identical with the player. 

As a safety measure it was also possible for the participant to step outside the game and be the 
player. This was done by using the safe word “prosopopeia”. 

3.1.3  Seamless Life/Game Merger 
The core instruction to the players was to play the game as if it was real. In order for the 
ordinary world to become a game world, all the people, props, places, actions and information 
the players encountered had to have a believable place, role and history in the game. Through 
the ‘play as if it was real’ proposal, this was automatically achieved: everything was just what 
it is in reality – but this reality could also affect the afterlife world. 

In order for the game and life to merge seamlessly, the world however cannot function 
entirely as usual: it has to always respond to player actions in an in­game manner. This is a 
huge requirement for the people who create and run the game, as they need to stay up­to­date 
on what all the players are doing, what has happened before, and then ensure that the correct 
reaction occurs. 

Basically this life/game merger means taking This­Is­Not­A­Game –aesthetic used in ARGs 
to its logical extreme (McGonigal 2003, Szulborski 2005). From the point of view of the 
participant, it is only the knowledge that the game is a game that differentiates it from reality. 
The participant simply needs to pretend is that he has forgotten that he is participating in a 
game. 

The seamless merge of ordinary life and game reality enables the participants to avoid treating 
the game as a game: more specifically, they would never have a meta­discussion about the 
game as such. Anything in the surroundings can be a part of the game so the players will see 
and interpret things in the everyday environment that they might not have noticed before. The 
world is changed by altering the way the players see and experience it. 

3.1.4  Fabrication and reality hacking 
On top of the solid foundation of reality, a layer of fabricated content was added. 
As an illustrative example, if the players went to a hospital during those five weeks, the 
nurses of the hospital (in physical world) represented themselves within the game world. But 
when the game masters needed a nurse to deliver a message to the players, reality hacking 
could be used: The game masters could either ask a nurse to deliver the message (while being 
oblivious to the game), or they could guide the players to visit a hospital where they had an 
informed acquaintance working as a nurse. The key trick is to keep the players oblivious to 
the range and extent of fabrication until they believe that any nurse could potentially play a 
part in the game. 

Reality was a sourcebook for Momentum. The fiction of the game world was built on real 
world history, enabling the players to research them as much as they wanted. For example the 
Enochian magical system used in the game was lifted from actual occult literature and all the 
possessing characters were actual historical persons. But in addition to the real world 
resources about historic events and occultism, the creators of the game fabricated parts of this



                                                             27 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

information by creating fake websites and fictional transcripts of email correspondence 
between characters. 

When a new game element was needed in the game, the game organizers searched history 
books until something was found that fulfilled the need of the game. As written history is 
always biased and filled with holes, the game masters were able to use these as places to add 
their own interpretations. The ludic mythos was woven from threads of reality to fit together 
to create a new, consistent whole (much like real­world conspiracy theories are). The players 
could actively research it, guided by the many subtle clues entered into the game, and tapping 
into real­world resources (often found on the web). 


3.1.5  Content generation 
A traditional problem in the persistent world industry has been creating sufficient story 
content for prolonged playing. World of Warcraft has solved this problem by including a 
massive number of quests, and the scenario structure served Momentum in a similar way. Pre­ 
designed and gamemastered content was mostly added on high intensity weekends, with 
occasional pieces sent to sustain the interest during the low intensity periods. 




                    Image  9:  Connection  with  the  land  of  the  dead  was  established 
                    aurally using a techno­occult device. 

The good thing with Momentum was that the surrounding environment produced an infinite 
amount of building­blocks for player created content: the players’ task was to find out which 
parts of the ordinary world were meaningful for the game. 

The experience of the existence of the land of the dead was mostly achieved through aural 
communication. Creating voices from beyond the grave allowed easy, fast and cheap 
improvised authoring. 

3.1.6  Life/game merger as an expression 
In addition to testing out interesting game mechanics, the decision to use seamless merging of 
life and game as an expression was motivated by the artistic ambitions of the production. 
Momentum was conceived as an attack on consensus reality, that which is seen as the 
objective everyday world. The message was that ‘reality’ is a social construct, and that a 
gameplayed on the streets can question all assumptions on what is real or acceptable.


                                                             28 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


Politically, the game was supposed to raise awareness regarding a number of (mostly left­ 
leaning) political agendas. The possessing spirits were revolutionaries, freedom fighters, even 
terrorists. In order for these issues to have gravity, the game designers felt that the game 
needed to be framed as reality (even if its ludic nature was fairly apparent to the players). 

However, the fact that Momentum was a game was openly advertised before and after the 
game. Player signed up for it with full knowledge that they would be playing. It was only 
during the game that its ludic nature was denied. In order for the seamlessness of the game to 
work, it started in a way that made it possible for the gameness to be ignored: At the start of 
the seamless period, the players where called to a meeting where the game­masters explained 
that everything was real, and that Momentum was not a game but a real phenomenon masked 
as a game to hide it from the rest of the world. This method for switching from seamful to 
seamless mode has been used previously in ARGs, e.g. in Majestic (Szulborski 2005). 

Denying the ludic nature of a game is a standard practice of ARGs. The difference to most 
ARGs, however, was that Momentum was played mostly in the physical world (as opposed to 
on the web) and that the participants were expected to role­play. Correspondingly, the major 
difference to ordinary larps was that there was no “off­game”; the players were expected not 
to step outside of the magic circle during the game. 

3.1.7  Runtime gamemastering in the context of seamlessness 
Runtime game mastering is the process of influencing the flow of a game in real time. The 
game masters of Momentum were responsible for creating a believable world. Whatever the 
players did, the game world had to produce a believable response. As the game and life were 
merged, most of the time the ordinary world reacted to player activities, but the job of the 
game masters was to uphold the fabricated parts of the environment. 

The most important part in that was making sure that the story unfolded in a proper way: 
Actors, organizations, internet entities and other game elements had to react in the correct 
way, at the correct time in the correct manner. 




                    Image  10:  Using  surveillance  tech  helped  runtime  gamemastering, 
                    but  without  controllers  it  would  have  been  hard  to  understand  the 
                    social interaction.




                                                             29 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

In Där vi föll the game masters had worked full time around the clock, but that couldn’t be 
done in much longer Momentum. It was important to create orchestration tools to facilitate the 
communication of the large game master group, in order to maintain the illusion of continuity 
among the players. 

A web­based orchestration tool was used to gather information on players and characters, 
notes were kept on the individual plots, sound files that the players had sent and received were 
stored and the diegetic reports from the spirits were kept in order. This tool made it possible 
for one game master to initiate a plot on his shift and another to pick it up later. 

Där vi föll game mastering had depended on direct game master observations, NPC reports 
and technical surveillance, which consumed a lot of manpower. 

Though theoretically the game masters could follow the players out on the town and observe 
their actions from a distance, in practice this was often impossible. Use of controllers was the 
most important way in making long­term game mastering more efficient and less taxing in 
Momentum. Four players observed the game while playing, informed game masters and 
sometimes secretly guided the players. As the players did not know about these controllers, 
they could not do anything overtly suspicious in order to not be spotted by the players. One of 
the controllers was also the researcher working as a participatory observer. 

The main point of controllers is that it’s very difficult to understand a role­playing situation 
through sensory equipment, but an on­site person can analyze it much better. The controllers 
could easily provide the game masters with information on player plans, preferences, moods, 
emotions, intentions et cetera. 

As Momentum included several puzzles, one potential problem was players being stuck with a 
puzzle with no way to go. The controllers could subtly tune the difficulty level, by providing 
players with ideas when absolutely needed. 




                    Image 11: Puzzles were solved using all available resources. 

The controllers were also used as the backup solution in case of technology failures: The 
designers started with three plans using different amounts of technology. Planning for failures 
saved the game – some central pieces of equipment were critically delayed and never made it 
to the game. As a solution, the role of the controllers was increased, and the game content was 
changed from gamist exploration of magical landscape more towards personal drama.



                                                             30 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

The last source of information was the players themselves. In the headquarters there were a 
number of communication channels to the various entities in the story­world (e.g. The Order 
of Metatron could be contacted through Skype chat). In discussions with these game master 
entities, players would tell what had been happening as part of the dialogue. Finally, the 
players were tasked to write diegetic reports. 

3.2  Evaluation of seamless merging of life and game 
Setting up a game that denies its ludic nature leads automatically to problems in running the 
game. Data was gathered through surveys before and after the game, and some players also 
filled them during the game.  Half of the players participated in thematic interviews after the 
game, in addition to the group debrief for all players. All players also filled diegetic diaries 
during the game, in order to inform their otherworldly allies on their doings. Data was 
gathered directly through participatory observation and technical surveillance and logfiles. 
Some of this data was also used in run­time gamemastering. 

3.2.1  Problems 
Communicating the rules of the game, instruction on how to use the game equipment and 
relaying missions was perceived as inefficient by a number of players. The diegetic way this 
information was disseminated did help build a more believable, coherent and complete story­ 
world, but it also raised the risk of misunderstanding. In many ways it was also extremely 
inefficient. The main points of Across Lethe included a diegetic possession ritual and a non­ 
player mentor character introducing the players to the mythos of Prosopopeia. Due to the 
extensively detailed and complex background story, the signal­to­noise ratio was low, even if 
the “noise” was important for establishing the mood of the game. Communicating some of 
this information outside the game (and in written form) would have helped the players to 
internalize the information better, with the expense of some seamlessness. 

In the very beginning of the game seamlessness worked well, but the introduction of game 
mechanics changed this. When possession or game devices are encountered for the first time, 
many players need a “correct interpretation” to understand the nature of these elements within 
the diegesis. As the players learned the ropes these problems of ambivalence were forgotten. 
When the ludic elements were handled by game masters, and the players didn’t need to act as 
game engines, then the seamlessness worked. 

One practical problem was that the gamemasters had to hide from the players as they had 
written themselves out of the story: They had to avoid places where there was a risk of 
running into players. 

3.2.2  Coherent interactive game world 
The game masters managed to create the impression of a logical game world reacting to 
player actions coherently. Having accurate information on what was happening and when, in 
particular from the controllers and diegetic diaries, was instrumental. Combined with the fact 
that the players remained unaware on how they were followed, and were regularly surprised 
by the accuracy of information game masters had, substantially contributed to the immersive 
experience. 

The rich and detailed story­world helped in runtime game mastering. Though the intricate 
otherworldly mythos might seem inconsequential, a rich living world enabled the game 
masters to react quickly to emerging situations.



                                                             31 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

The successful run­time game mastering of a game this long was one of the biggest 
achievements of Momentum. Aside from a handful of minor peaks behind the magician’s 
curtain (such as accidental spotting of a gamemaster on a street where he shouldn’t be) the 
seamlessness was upheld successfully. 

3.2.3  Trapped in the magic circle 
Easy interruptability was a design requirement for Momentum, which was addressed with the 
possession model: the players could step out of the game when they needed to attend to their 
everyday life. However, they were only allowed to switch between the host and the spirit, 
stepping completely out of the game in a meaningful way into the player persona was only 
acceptable as a safety measure. These rules were taken seriously by the players and there was 
considerable social pressure to stay within the game fiction. 

This was supposed to be circumvented by the fact that the host and the player were almost 
identical However, when the game is framed as reality the everyday persona becomes just 
another character. Though in the beginning of the game this character and everyday self are 
almost identical (with the difference of believing in ghosts), the game will provide a number 
of life­altering experiences (being possessed, experiencing magical world) that the two selves 
frame differently, until eventually these two identities are very different. For a long­lasting 
game directly addressing and challenging players’ identities, this distinction is instrumental. 
The game­as­reality approach influenced the genre of the game. The realistic aesthetic of the 
game forced players to down­play their reactions: taking the necessary leaps of faith in regard 
to magic is much easier in a context of a game. In reality most people are much more 
skeptical – even if the carbon copy persona is defined as more prone to believing in the 
supernatural. 

Most players adhered to total seamlessness strongly; some of them claimed having almost no 
off­game experiences during the period. Total seamlessness, however, resulted in a number of 
problems: Talking and reflecting about the game was impossible, even though many players 
were longing to do that, and many indeed did. The insistence on the game being reality started 
to draw increasing attention to the fact that Momentum was a game. People thought about it 
but were unable to properly address it. 

When the players broke the rules and discussed the game anyway, they violated the explicit 
rules of conduct, and thus drawing attention to the gameness of Momentum. Though most 
players did not break the illusion of Momentum as reality in public, many later reported that 
they had stepped outside of the game and discussed it as a game with other participants, game 
organizers, friends or family. 

As is typical to Nordic high­end larping (Koljonen 2007) the social rule of not stepping 
outside the fiction was very strong. In post­game interviews most players denied that they had 
broken the rule, but more accurate questions revealed that they actually had discussed the 
game as a game. The social pressure led some players to deny that they had broken rules. 
Practically all players played intensely during the high intensity weekend. Half a dozen 
played daily for hours, and most players did at least some game related activities every second 
day. 

Some players reported that they longed for some space outside the fiction where they could go 
if necessary, now they felt trapped in the magic circle of play. Others were adamant that the 
strong game experience required flawlessly seamless merge of life and game.


                                                             32 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


The length of the game was a central problem. Firstly, there was no way to address the 
problems in the game or problematic players while the game was being run. Secondly, many 
players wanted to distance themselves from the game at some point during the game. 

3.2.4  Mixed signals 
Breaking the player expectations is a powerful tool in strengthening the life/game merger. 
One example is breaking something physically; a trick that is used for the audio­visual effect 
gives the players the feeling of freedom regarding their environment. However, these border­ 
breaking approaches are also problematic: If the characters can, with good diegetic reason, 
break down one door in a game, why can’t they do the same to all scenography if diegetically 
necessary? 

This particular problem occurred in a mission where the players needed to destroy a couple of 
antennas made out of black boxes with red LEDs and stickers of a diegetic security company. 
While this technique probably increased the perceived seamlessness, allowing the players to 
exert violence on objects risks breaking these borders too well: If players are allowed to break 
certain antennas of The Grey, why can’t they wreck all other game props as well? 




                     Image  12:  Some  props  could  easily  be  identified  as  game  related, 
                     some  couldn’t.  Pictured:  Thumin  glove,  Omax  phone,  steele  and 
                     related support equipment. 

The issue with mixed signals was aggravated by the fact that the mission contradicted 
Momentum player agreement: 

          You are not allowed to change anything permanently (like painting, destroying furniture or props etc.), or open any 
          apparently  sealed  or  closed  off  area  within  the  game locations,  i.e.  you  will be held liable  for  every  irreversible 
          change to the locations. 
          Every player will be assigned expensive electronic equipment during the game period and are required to handle 
          the equipment with care. You are liable for the equipment during the full duration of the game. You will be held 
          responsible for lost or destroyed equipment. 

Of course, even the existence of a player agreement form challenges seamlessness. 
Similarly, there were locations that in the ordinary life are off­limits to normal people (such as 
the retired nuclear reactor hall) that were rented for game purposes. Differentiating game 
locations from non­game locations was challenging and also incompatible with the design 
philosophy (as everything was supposed to be equally “real”).



                                                                   33 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

The gamemasters tried to sidestep this issue by marking locations and props as clearly game 
related. Places marked with Enochian symbols or stickers of the diegetic security firm 
Kerberos were clearly part of the game. Unfortunately these markings could be moved or the 
things in their vicinity could change. 

In the end the players needed a double consciousness: The game was not ordinary life and 
ordinary life was not a game world. 

3.2.5  Player exhaustion 
Practically all players played intensely during the high intensity weekend. Half a dozen player 
played actively the game daily for hours, and most players did at least some game related 
activities every second day. 

Somewhat unforeseen problem with the long and intense gameplay was player exhaustion. 
Due to design solutions incorporating reality as the source material and emergent content, 
there was literally an infinite amount of things to discover during the game. The players could 
never reach a content state where they could be secure about having completed all the tasks 
and puzzles available. 

Even though this issue was somewhat addressed by the intensity variation in scenario 
structure, over 90% of players stated that they felt guilty about not playing enough. 

3.2.6  Seamlessness as a tool 
The motivation of creating Momentum was to create an extremely pervasive in order to 
inform design of more economically viable games. Falk and Davenport (2004) describe the 
“holy grail” of interactive entertainment as pervasive, tangible and sensory­intense digital 
interface design. Momentum went a long way in terms of pervasivity, tangibility and sensory 
intensity; the thing to be done is adding replayability and portability to Momentum, and 
further automating the game mastering to replace the need of game mastering manpower with 
better digital game mastering systems. 

Regardless of the problems discussed above, seamlessness worked very well in many ways. 
Players regarded it as a fun and intensive thing that heightened the feeling of a complete 
story­world. The incentives to stay in the game were strong and this resulted in a deeper 
immersion into the game. All but one player claimed that they would like to participate in a 
similar game next year. 

One central pleasure in the game arose from ambiguity and emergence. Many memorable 
moments were created from unpredicted interaction of players and outsiders. Similar finding 
have been reported by Montola & Jonsson (2006), Szulborski (2005) and McGonigal (2003).




                                                             34 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




                    Image  13:  Using  the  aesthetics  of  urban  exploration  helped  create 
                    ambiguity  that  was  perceived  as  fun.  Picture  from  one  of  the  gray 
                    nodes. 

When the game is undistinguishable from everyday life, everything becomes related to the 
game. This alters the way world is perceived, and the players start to see game where there is 
none. 

Runtime game mastering turned out to be an absolute necessity; times when players surprised 
the game masters are too numerous to list. Clues and methods that seemed obvious to the 
designers were often missed, players spent a lot more time procrastinating over alternative 
paths of action – and then might suddenly burst into action. As players would come up with 
unexpected plans the game masters needed to stay alert all the time. 

The advantages of seamlessness are some of the most important attractors of pervasive 
gaming, but completely hiding the game creates a completely new set of issues. Even though 
seamlessness was toned down from Där vi föll, Momentum was still too seamless, mostly due 
to the increased duration. As a design principle, seamlessness needs to be seen as an aesthetic 
and metaphor, not as a rigid rule or a concrete target. As Harvey (2006) points out, ethical 
considerations are essential; we have discussed them in e.g. Montola & al. (2006); but work 
on that field is still far from finished. 

3.3  Social Play Modes 
Together the seamless merging of life and game, the possession model, the extremely long 
duration and the Prosopopeia protocol created a basis for a number of interesting modes of 
interaction. Here the interaction modes are divided into four groups. The findings presented 
here are based on ethnography (participant observation the players were not aware of) as well 
as numerous email and face­to­face interviews conducted during and after the game.



                                                             35 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

3.3.1  Playing with Other Players 
The most common way of interacting in a larp is with other players. This character­to­ 
character interaction within the diegetic game world is the core of a role­playing game. In 
Momentum the game world was the everyday world with the addition of certain magical and 
occult ingredients, but basically the game world was built on real world history. 

The character­to­character interaction was complicated by the fact that all players played two 
characters, a carbon copy of themselves in a magical world (the host) and the dead 
revolutionary  possessing them (the spirit). In the beginning the host was almost identical to 
the everyday self of the participant (the player). The only real difference was that the player 
was playing a game and that the host believed in, or at least was receptive to the existence of, 
supernatural phenomena. Yet, as the game progressed and the hosts had strong supernatural 
experiences the difference between the host and the player grew. 

Thus the character­to­character interactions could be further divided to host­to­host, host­to­ 
spirit, spirit­to­host and spirit­to­spirit interactions. All of these are characters, of course, but 
they felt different. Especially those players who had a background in larp sometimes felt that 
playing the host was almost like stepping out of the game, off­gaming, and thus interpreted 
                                                  8 
the spirit­to­host interaction as non­diegetic.  This was mostly due to the lack of clear 
instructions on how the possessing spirit was supposed to be played. In Momentum the game 
organizers had left that up to the participants and some of them aimed at playing the spirit as 
much as they could, some played the two characters equally and some constructed an 
amalgam of the two characters. 

          As the Momentum guidelines suggested: Always assume that people are possessed, so this I do, or at least I assume 
          they are playing their vessels [aka hosts]. So I approach players with the name of the guest […] and with their own 
          name, if I know that they are their vessels right now. If I need to talk to their guest [aka spirit] I just ask if they can 
          try to call for their guest, and it has worked out just fine. I speak some English and try to change my body language 
          and behaviour when being [possessed], to make it easier for others players to see whom they are talking to. (player 
          post­game interview, email) 

Most players followed the Prosopopeia protocol completely and did not talk about the game 
as a game. Some used the opportunity offered by the possession model to talk about the 
events of the game as the hosts, thus discussing the game on a meta­level even if they never 
explicitly articulated the ludic nature of the game. 

          The word “prosopopeia” did not exist in the gameworld. Instead it was the safe word that could be used to step out 
          of the­reality­that­is­the game into the everyday world. The word was used a few times during the game, mostly to 
          check that the players who were playing very intensively were not hurt when their characters were, and to convey 
          meta­information. These occurrences were very rare and many players played the whole five weeks without ever 
          hearing the safe word. 

Some players talked about the game as a game with other participants, but only with people 
they knew in advance, people they knew wouldn’t mind the off­game discussion and people 
that they trusted. Also, some people talked with the controllers and game masters. 

          Yes, I broke the proposal two times during the five weeks, once to check if [another player] really was okay and 
          wasn’t being mind­raped by [her spirit] and once to have an open conversation with my  girlfriend. (player post­ 
          game interview, email)




8Multi-level character immersion models have been tried out before Prosopopeia series at least in two Finnish games.
Pitkä Perjantai (eng. The Long Good Friday, 1997,by Arkham Paradox) used the method to create a horror game and
Wunderbar 2: Kuumempaa kuin helvetissä (eng. Wunderbar 2: Hotter than Hell, 1996, by Panu Alku and Tuomas Lähdeoja)
played it for laughs. In both games players portrayed larpers who were larping.


                                                                36 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

          I was called once by [a game master] and I called [him] once to discuss [game events]. It was OK, but I felt uneasy. 
          It really broke the illusion and it took a day or two to get it back. (player post­game interview, email) 

The players had a special kind on relationship to one NPC that was played by one of the game 
masters. This NPC showed up during the first week to instruct the players. He was basically 
there to disseminate information. Many players saw this character for what he really was, a 
game mechanic. Some even compared him the mentors encountered in digital games. This 
was a strategy consciously chosen by the game masters (jokingly called the tutorial mode). 
Most players regarded this NPC as a guide who could and indeed should be milked for 
information. Very seldom was any of the information given by him questioned, mostly 
because he was played by a game master and because he filled the stereotypical mentor role. 
          Adam talked a lot, and we asked a lot, and I don’t believe  we understood half of  what he said, and I 
          don’t think we remembered more than 25 % of what he said, but still, it was okay. He talked a lot, yes. 
          He could’ve been more efficient at this, but still, it’s not as (­) a seminar, there’s no need to be efficient. 
          If Adam is a character that is inefficient, he inefficient, it’s not a problem. Okay, you can get irritated at 
          him, so what, it’s in­game. (player post­game interview) 

3.3.2  Playing Alone 
One of the most interesting elements of gameplay in Momentum was the emergent for of 
playing alone we call selfplay. Many participants reported that they had gone through a 
number of meaningful “interactions” with themselves. As the host and the spirit occupied the 
same physical body for a long while, after the game had been running for some time the 
differences between these two personas started to demand addressing. This inner conflict lead 
to a number of cases where the host and the spirit carried a conversation or even fought 
outright. 

One player reported that the spirit carried out a ritual to rob the host of all willpower. Another 
told that the two personas were only able to communicate through writing and thus she wrote 
long discussions were the handwriting would change as a different persona took over. A third 
player engaged in a shouting match with himself alone in his apartment after the vegetarian 
spirit protested the use of eggs in pancakes and so forth. 

          And one of the funniest things I think during this whole thing was, because I was vegetarian for one month, and 
          one evening I came home very late, and wanted to do some pancakes, and I used some eggs, and my [spirit] didn’t 
          like that, so I was actually screaming at myself in my apartment. I knew that nobody would have really seen it or 
          listened, but I was screaming at myself and arguing with myself and even throwing the egg shells on the floor and 
          stuff like that, and it was. Of course it was part of the game, and afterwards I know that it didn’t much [matter] for 
          anybody else, but for myself to keep the feeling that I really was two persons, and it helped me. (player post­game 
          interview) 

Again, the possession model that could be interpreted in a number of ways, created the stage 
for these “interactions”. Basically this meant, that suddenly it only “took one to tango”, 
showing that some forms of role­playing alone are possible and make sense to the players. 

Role­playing alone has been a widely debated question on the email lists and conventions of 
Nordic role­players for years. Helsinki FTZ (by Panu Alku), an early street larp played in 
Finland in 1997, created debate about the possibility of playing alone while out on the town. 
Helsinki FTZ was a spatially (and thus socially) expanded larp before the term was invented, 
and in this context playing alone meant playing with non­players. If a character goes shopping 
for clothes for two hours, is he playing or not? Is the player role­playing alone when 
interacting with the clerk? Now, ten years later, interaction with non­players is not seen as 
playing alone.




                                                              37 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

In the discussion that followed the publication of The Manifesto of the Turku School (Pohjola 
2000) the proponents of immersionist play declared that it was possible to role­play alone in a 
closet even if there was no interaction with the rest of the game world.  Many recent 
definitions and descriptions of role­playing are based on a process involving at least two 
participants (Fatland and Wingård 2003, Mackay 2003, Hakkarainen & Stenros 2003, 
Montola 2007), and thus playing alone (without even a potential co­player or a gamemaster) 
has been branded as not being role­playing. 

The problem has been how to distinguish between daydreaming and role­playing. 

          I spent the first night, around 10 hours, meditating together with my spirit to get to know her, and for her to get to 
          know me. I knew quite well how she would like me to act and she knew my preferences. We weren't always acting 
          accordingly.  (player post­game interview, email) 

It is impossible to draw that line based on Momentum, but it is evident that selfplay is 
something that does happen, something that the participants interpret as part of the game and 
something that can be supported with the right game design decisions. However, in order for 
the selfplay to be “meaningful”, the context that the game provides is needed. That is, self­ 
play is daydreaming that becomes meaningful in, and because of, and adds to the meaning of, 
the game context of which it is part. The game is what enables the interpretation and assigning 
of meaning in selfplay. Even though the players were alone at the time, the collectively 
constructed game world was present for them. Also, the players knew that they would later 
interact with other players and the events that took place during selfplay could be relevant. 

Similarly it is not clear how the player interpreted the time that they spent researching the 
mythos while playing their characters. The activity would mean negotiating and forging new 
meanings. However, the post game interviews did not cover this area sufficiently. 

3.3.3  Playing with Friends and Relatives 
The third mode of interactions happened when participants interacted with people who were 
not part of the game but who already had a personal relationship with the participant. Roughly 
this meant playing with friends, relatives and workmates. 

The most common way of interacting with friends was to use the Prosopopeia proposal and 
talk about the game as if it was real. What separates the friends of the participants from 
strangers is that most of these people knew that the players were going to participate in a 
game as it had been discussed in advance. Thus they could have a winking relationship to the 
game, pretending along with the players that the game was real. They pretended to take it 
seriously while the game was running as they knew it would end at some point. However, 
some people really disliked the way the game affected the players. For example a girlfriend 
of a player threatened to end the relationship if the player continued to refuse to acknowledge 
her. 

Avoidance of the people not related with the game or avoidance of the subject of the game 
was another strategy that was often adopted. Some players effectively cut down their 
interaction with friends and relatives during the game. They said that they are involved in a 
project that they couldn’t really talk about and that they were willing to talk about it 
afterwards. Others simply refused to discuss the subject of the game. They said that did not 
feel comfortable talking about it “in these terms” (as a game) yet and that after the game they 
would talk about it. Some also referred to the game as a game as that was an excuse that the




                                                              38 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

players were instructed to use when talking with outsiders. The game was real to the players 
but they could pretend that it was a game. 

          I tried to keep my family and friends out of the game. But this proved difficult, since they started to worry, and ask 
          questions about what I was doing, and why I never was at home. After a while I came up with the perfect lie: Its all 
          just  a  game.  Although  my  game­self  didn't  believe  it,  it  was  a  very  good,  and  seamless,  way  to  relieve  others. 
          (player post­game interview, email) 

A few players also decided to break the Prosopopeia protocol with certain people. Mothers, 
best friends and people distant enough from Stockholm larping scene were mentioned as 
example of people that players talked with outside the game context. Some felt that they 
wanted to get away from the game and do so with people they cared about, others said that 
they felt that it would be dishonest and disrespectful toward people they cared about to 
pretend that the game was real. In all cases the players insist that the people they decided to 
break the Prosopopeia proposal with were carefully selected. 

          I only broke [the proposal] while discussing with people that either were part of the game master team or 
          with non­participating friends wanting to discuss the game as a game. (player post­game interview, email) 

          I felt a need to talk about it and my feelings and such involving the game. So I talked to my boyfriend. And 
          felt that it was necessary to do that. Otherwise I wouldn’t have been able to play normally for such a long 
          time. (player post­game interview, email) 

3.3.4  Playing with Strangers 
As the larp was played in Stockholm, the players would frequently encounter people who did 
not belong to either the player group or the game masters. On some occasions, the game 
masters had staged such meetings; for example, one of the player groups was instructed to 
meet up with a nurse at a hospital. On this occasion, the woman they met was a specially 
instructed player who did not actually work as a nurse in the hospital. On another occasion, 
the players met up with a gallery owner, who was supposed to hand out a painting to them. By 
contrast, this gallery owner was authentic and, although given a specific task, had no 
information about the ongoing game. Finally, the players would frequently need to interact 
with complete outsiders, e.g. to buy food, ask for directions, etc. 

The reason why the game design included all these modes of interaction was to implement a 
tight integration between the real world and the game world. The Prosopopeia proposal 
provides an adequate framework to interact with all outsiders in a consistent manner. Rather 
than deciding if an outsider is part of the game or not, a player decides how much of the 
‘truth’ that an outsider needs to know and he can be told. However, in practice many players 
tried to second­guess the status of the people encountered during the game. Were they 
complete outsiders, or specially instructed by the game masters? Many players showed a 
willingness to act out much more with the people that they assumed to be plants deployed by 
game masters. They would also be quite quick in assuming that the plants already knew much 
of the story context and uncritically relate it to them. The most critical side­effect was that the 
players treated assumed plants with different morals compared to outsiders – as an example, a 
character might be willing to steal from a plant (as a part of the game), but not from an 
outsider. 

This is perhaps the most obvious way in which seamlessness failed to manifest in the game, 
and against what the game masters had intended. It is important to note that the players did 
not always guess right; they probably were able to spot almost all fully informed plants, but 
sometimes bystanders were thought to be NPC:s.



                                                                   39 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

From the outsider point of view, there are three rough levels of game engagement. In unaware 
state the game around the outsider goes unnoticed or is interpreted as ordinary everyday 
events. In the ambiguous state the outsider suspects that something is going on, but what is 
happening is uncertain. Finally the outsiders can enter the conscious state, where the game 
context is entirely accessible. (See Montola & Waern 2006.) 

Momentum was a game that invited the outsiders to participate in unconscious and ambiguous 
fashions. Unconscious interaction happens for example when players go shopping during the 
game – the clerk hardly realises that someone is shopping as a part of the game; the player 
appears as just another customer, even if for the player the interaction might be very 
meaningful. 

          I was dressed as [my spirit, who is] a transvestite – maked up and wearing a wig. The time was after 01.00 
          Friday night and I was looking for a cab. When I jumped in the driver gave me the girl­rate (it is a lower rate 
          for girls during night time). It took maybe 5 minutes before he recognized that I was a transvestite. It was 
          difficult for him to handle in the very first – but in the end he opened his heart and started telling me some 
          personal problems. A reality moment. (player post­game interview, email) 

Creating ambiguous interactions was one of the aims of Momentum, and that happened a lot 
during the game. At numerous times the players did things in the public sphere that was 
difficult to understand in the context of everyday life. It is difficult to evaluate how these 
events influenced or were interpreted by the bystanders, because most of the time they cannot 
be tracked down after the scene has ended. 

At one point the game took the players to an art gallery. The game masters had planted a 
painting in the exhibition without telling that the proprietors that the picture would be a prop 
in a role­playing game. The gallery had only been instructed to “give out the painting to 
someone who really wanted it”. The next day a number of players showed up to look at and 
ask about the painting. When introducing themselves they gave the names of their characters. 
After awhile the people at the gallery started suspecting that something odd was happening 
and they started not only writing down the names of the people interested in the painting, but 
to also googling them – effectively starting to play a game of their own. 

          I tried to look up Ingela [the person credited for creating the painting], and I couldn’t find anything except she was 
          mentioned in like a blog. They were [also] talking about a journalist that was killed, […] they mentioned her name 
          there. And it seemed to be like about all these conspiracy theories and all of these UFO’s and all that, so I was like, 
          it was intriguing that these were the people that they were doing. […] It was definitely something to do that day, 
          yeah.  (gallery worker in a pair interview) 

When they were interviewed a few days later and the ludic nature of the events was disclosed, 
they reported that the ambiguity of not knowing what was happening had been fun and that 
the experience had been a positive one. When asked if they would like to continue to 
participating in the game after they had been informed that it was a game, they declined: 

          I  don’t  know  if  that  would  work,  because  it’s  funnier  when  you  don’t  know.  Cos  if  you  know,  then…  That 
          wouldn’t be fun. (gallery worker in a pair interview) 

This was exactly the kind of social expansion the game masters had wished to create. Yet it is 
probable that the fact that the people had background in arts made them more receptive to 
weird artistic events. Still, the occurrence shows that the kind of positive social expansion 
often sought after in pervasive games is possible to achieve. 

          1: Yeah, it wasn’t upsetting enough to feel like an invasion. Looking back, it doesn’t, it didn’t matter at all really. If 
          they had played a different prank with someone more, something more serious, but maybe that would’ve been. But 
          now, I still don’t think that was [an invasion].



                                                                40 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

          2: They could’ve taken it even farther I think, like it ended kind alike oop, okay, I guess it’s just over now. Like 
          they’re not gonna come back, like no­one’s come in angry like where is the thing! 
          1: Yeah, once we started to feel it was a game, we kinda, we were waiting for like.. 
          2: We were ready. 
          1:  Maybe  like  a  big  polar  bear  walking  in!  You  know,  like  something.  [laughs]    (gallery  workers  in  a  pair 
          interview) 

Whether Momentum invited any outsiders to participate on the conscious level, interacting 
with the game as if it was a game, remains up to debate. No outsider was really provided the 
entire ludic context (except some friends and relatives), but many players lied (inside 
Prosopopeia protocol) to outsiders that their actions were parts of some game. The point of 
this lying (which was a lie in the game, but truth in the ordinary world) was more to get rid of 
the outsiders rather than to invite them further into the game: Telling that something was just 
a part of a game erased the curiosity­inspiring ambiguity drawing some outsiders towards the 
game. 

In Momentum the ambiguity of division between game and ordinary life was a major source 
of enjoyment. Of course, most of the participants were avid players and identified as larpers – 
and the non­participants worked in the context of the art world. Still, this finding is echoed in 
a number of other writings. The ambiguity seems to be a major source of enjoyment in many 
other pervasive games as well (see for example McGonigal 2003, Szulborski 2005 and 
Pettersson 2006), and bears repeating as one of the central attractive properties of the form. 

3.3.5  Playing in Public 
Even though playing in public is technically playing with strangers, it’s differentiated here 
because it’s a very specific way of playing with others. With public play we mean the scenes 
of Momentum where players entered the public space and their performative gaming attracted 
audiences. The rituals staged by players were a central form of performative gaming, but 
during the game the players were also expected to stage a demonstration through downtown 
to honour the dead, and to run a party where they could invite their friends. (See for example 
Benford et al. 2006). 

The game served as an empowering mechanism for redefining the rules for the environment; 
the players could use the game as an excuse to act against social expectations and 
conventions. One player reported the following. 

          When  acting  among  bystanders  I  realized  how  assimilated  I  had  become  to  the  alternate  reality  of  Momentum. 
          When I performed the ritual at Olof Palmes gata, I just thought that the bystanders were weird, because they didn't 
          understand the importance of my work. It didn't really occur to me that I was the strange one. (player post­game 
          interview, email) 

In some ways the climax of the game was the demonstration for the dead, staged by the 
players on the last Saturday. The game masters only provided the players with the information 
that police had been notified of the demo, but the details were left for the players to sort out. 
In the end they paraded through the downtown with torches, escorted by the police. 

Observed from a distance, the parade and the subsequent player ceremony displayed the 
typical signs of slightly embarrassing outdoors performance; as an observer commented, “you 
could almost see the magic circle” due to players being in a round, introvert formation facing 
in the middle. This reinforced the observation from the first Prosopopeia game where the 
players tended to move in groups, in order to establish a zone for role­playing in order to both




                                                                41 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

reinforce the illusion of role­playing and to cope with the social pressure of engaging in 
performative play in public. 

The demonstration was escorted by several police vehicles. On the one hand this helped to 
integrate the game into everyday life. On the other hand it strengthened the magic circle by 
creating a boundary for the ritualistic space where (carnivalistic) demonstrations are held. 
Still, the players did actively interact with the passers­by, at least when they wandered within 
the zone of play, clearly approaching the demonstration or the ceremonial circle. 

Pohjola (2004) applies Hakim Bey’s concept of temporary autonomous zone to larp, claiming 
that the fictitious realities created in role­playing serve as a structure that has the potential to 
empower and enable the players to “comment on real­life societies and even change them”. 

At other times by­passers were stopped by player activities and were wondering them aloud. 
Some rituals were conducted in central places during party nights. People who were going 
home from a bar stopped to look at and something talk with the players who were “cleansing 
the place of mammon” or “commemorating the triumph of green activists”. 

Occasionally the actions of the players were also interpreted as dangerous. One of the ritual 
demonstrations staged by the players took place in the front of the US embassy. The techno­ 
magical equipment used by the players caught the attention of the police, who showed up with 
               9 
a riot vehicle.  The players explained that they were performing a perfectly legal ritual of 
symbolic resistance as part of a game, and the police could do nothing about it. 

          [The police] came with, you know, a whole strike force, you know, these buses, it was a full bus, but only the two 
          people in the front came out, because the other, they were suddenly in there prepared with submachine guns and 
          everything, in the car. […] And, and they came out with you know their hands on the guns and walked up to us […] 
          [T]hey  were  really  jumpy,  and  they  started  to  explain  that  this  is  a  game,  and  of  course  that  was  the  easiest 
          explanation.  It,  we  didn’t  break  the  Prosopopeia  proposal,  but  we  explained  it  to  the  cops  that  this  is  a  game, 
          because it’s an easy thing to say. (player post­game interview) 

This incident serves as an interesting example on how ambiguous playing is culture­ 
dependent: McGonigal (2006) reports an incident from Ravenna, Ohio, where Super Mario – 
style yellow blocks were distributed in urban areas as a part of an art project in spring 2006. 
According to McGonigal the 17 yellow Mario­themed box installations lead into bomb squads 
being called and subsequently into criminal investigation. “Five teenage girls from Portage 
County face potential criminal charges after attempting to play a real­life version of Super 
Mario Brothers”, McGonigal quotes the local news. Obviously, what is doable and acceptable 
in Stockholm and Ravenna is very different. The police in Stockholm was also aware of this: 

          So I started to explain [to the police] our equipment [which had piqued the guards’ interest]. And they 
          were like, you can be shot for having one of these things. In Israel you would’ve been dead by now. 
          Yeah, sure, I think you have watched too many movies, that was the thought in my head at least. (player 
          post­game interview)




9 This is an example of the problem with professional involvement: the guards at the embassy must be wary on
anything strange going on outside it. So even if they suspected a game or a prank, they can’t turn away from it but
must call the police. And the policemen are still annoyed because they have been called out unnecessarily. For
professionals, an ‘invitation to refuse’ participation is not available. We have earlier discussed ethics of pervasive
gaming in Montola & al (2006).


                                                                   42 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

3.3.6  The Prosopopeia Proposal and Seamlessness 
As discussed above, the players were not primarily guided by the Prosopopeia proposal , ‘play 
as if it was real’, in their interaction with outsiders. Similar behaviour occurred with their play 
in the environment. 

There are a couple of reasons why this happened. One reason was that there were some very 
obvious plants in the game that were exposed very early. A couple of players ‘died’ during the 
first weekend, and one traitor was discovered within the player group. One group of plants, 
the ‘Kerberos guards’ followed the players throughout the game, imposing a threat to capture 
them and dispel their spirits. Thus, the players were well aware of the existence of plants. 

The interaction with the real world was influenced by similar design choices. Not only were 
the headquarters of the game a pure game arena, complete with extensive propping, but 
several of the tasks set out in the real world required the players to interact with specially 
propped diegetic artefacts. On one occasion, the players had to seek out and destroy a set of 
magical antennas. To avoid the risk of players destroying real antennas, the objects to destroy 
were clearly marked as ‘game props’. On one occasion, the players entered a church to 
retrieve water from the baptismal font. Again, the fact that the church was open and that there 
was small glass bottle made them conclude that the scene had been prepared for them (in 
collaboration with the local staff). 

One player reported on a specific interaction with the game master, which made him select a 
‘reality as a backdrop’ approach to the whole game. During the first weekend, his subgroup 
formed a plan to enter a subway train and rob it of all advertisement. Since one of the game 
masters were participating during this weekend, he informed the game master about the plans 
and got feedback that made him interpret this as unsuitable within the game. 

          [W]hen [a game master played NPC] came in and said we shall not use reality in this game, we shall have reality in 
          the background, playing as [backdrop], scenery. And that was.. I, I’m not disappointed, but I’m sad that happened, 
          because I think I would’ve had a better experience had I not ceased my ambitions to make direct actions and to 
          really try to get political. (player post­game interview) 

These examples illustrate well a central problem for games that blur the borderline between 
the game and reality: games become games precisely because they offer the opportunity to go 
outside of what is acceptable in the ordinary world. Prior to the game, several players also 
stated this as their main expectation of the game: 

          I expect to be forced by something that isn’t me to do subversive things, and by that force non­players to question 
          their reality. (player pre­game interview, written on paper) 
          How  far  will  people  push  their  boundaries  for  a  game,  however  imerged  and  pervasive?  (player  pre­game 
          interview, written on paper) 
          The  game  feels  really  exciting,  and  I  hope  that  it  will  drive  me  towards  exciting  happenings  that  I  would  not 
          normally do. (player pre­game interview, written on paper) 

These expectations cannot be met unless the game offers activity that is not commonly 
accepted (or even legal) in real life. Unless these activities are identifiable for the players, 
they might not dare to engage in them. In Där vi föll, players were more dependent on game 
master interventions to progress in the game. Although this behaviour had several 
contributing reasons, we believe that one of them was an uncertainty of what they were 
intended to consider being part of the game. If the borderline is too fuzzy in this respect, the 
play may become conservative no matter how engaging the setting is.




                                                                  43 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

A problem that adds to this is that the game organizers have responsibility towards players, 
authorities, financers and outsiders to ensure the safety and legality of the game. As an 
attempt to solve the issues of responsibility, the Momentum player agreement stated that the 
players were responsible for all of their activities just as they would be in normal life. Thus, 
when a game master was asked about the appropriateness of a particular activity (the 
aforementioned subway action), he was forced to discourage it: by asking the players 
transferred responsibility for the action from themselves to the game master. 

To sum up, the Prosopopeia proposal did not provide a sufficient context to create real­world 
gameplay, and Momentum used a lot of cues that separated gameplay from reality. The effect 
of this was that for some players the ordinary world became a backdrop rather than a game 
board. 

Yet even with that in mind, many game masters and players longed for a real possibility to 
step outside of the game. In Momentum the only way to enter full off game mode was to 
invoke the safe word, but few people were willing to do that. The lack of an off­game in a 
game this long made game mastering very challenging as all information and instructions had 
to be communicated in a diegetic fashion. Some players also wished for a way to reflect on 
the game with other players while it was running. This kind of non­diegetic interaction should 
not be forced on the players, but a possibility for that should be provided in future games. 

          [I don’t like] that you can't discuss the game with any one who's in the game. An off game area where you can have 
          reality checks would be great. (controller­player post­game interview, email) 

Thus it seems that in some ways game and life were not merged enough in Momentum, and in 
other ways it was too seamless. The magic circle was visible between the game world and the 
ordinary world as some of the game mechanics were visible. At the same time the players 
were hesitant to step outside of the game and break seamlessness. In practise this meant that 
the players could encounter the seams of the game and even be confused by them (or their 
implications), but they had no way of addressing or discussing these on a meta­level. 

3.3.7  Interaction Model for Pervasive Larp 
Above we have divided the modes of interactions into four rough groups based on situation 
and level of involvement. This can be used to construct an interaction model on how players 
interacted with each other and to fine tune the interaction modes. In Figure 2 it is possible to 
see the different modes that a person could choose between based on what state they were in 
and the state they presume the person they are interacting with is in. It is important to note, 
that the decision on what mode to use was very often based on a hunch as participation in the 
game, or choice between spirit and host was not visibly communicated. 

Eirik Fatland (2006) discusses this challenge in the context or live­action role­playing by 
introducing the concepts of interaction codes and improvisational patterns: 

          Whenever two players facing a similar situation in a similar context will tend to make similar decisions, we can talk 
          of  an  improvisation  pattern.  “Context”,  here,  will  need  to  be  understood  broadly  and  flexibly:  the  character 
          portrayed, the larp it is portrayed at, which other characters are present, the social situation, etc. In some cases, a 
          “similar context” will mean the same character at different runs of the same larp. In others, it is enough that the 
          characters belong to roughly equivalent cultures at larps in somewhat related genres. 
          We can take for granted that such patterns exist—if not, then we should see peasants using pacifist tactics against 
          invading  orcs  as  often  as  they  brandish  swords  and  pitchforks,  or  often  experience  role­played  businessmen 
          converting to Zen Buddhism in the middle of a management meeting. (Fatland 2006)




                                                                44 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

These improvisational patterns can be expanded to apply to pervasive larps as participants and 
non­participants struggle to find a meaningful context. Momentum did not offer a ready­made 
package of interaction codes, so the interaction model presented here is a coping strategy 
where the participants look for correct state for themselves and the correct interaction mode. 

                     Spirit             Host                 Player              Aware                Ambiguous            Unaware 

                                                             Ambiguous/ 
 Spirit              Diegetic           Diegetic             Conflicting  Diegetic                    Diegetic             Diegetic 
                                                             Ambiguous/ 
 Host                Diegetic           Diegetic             Conflicting  Diegetic                    Diegetic             Diegetic 

                     Ambiguous  Ambiguous/  Non­                                 Non­                               Non­ 
 Player              /Conflicting  Conflicting  diegetic                         diegetic             Non­diegetic  diegetic 
                                                                                 Ordinary             Ordinary             Ordinary 
                                                Ordinary                         life/                life/                life/ 
                     Diegetic/     Diegetic/    life/                            Ambiguous/           Ambiguous/           Ambiguous/ 
                     Ambiguous  Ambiguous/  Ambiguous/                           Diegetic/            Diegetic/            Diegetic/ 
 Aware               /Conflicting  Conflicting  Conflicting                      Conflicting          Conflicting          Conflicting 
                                                             Ambiguous/  Ambiguous/         Ambiguous/ 
                                                                                                      Ambiguous/ 
                                                             Ordinary    Ordinary           Ordinary  Ordinary 
 Ambiguous           Ambiguous  Ambiguous                    Life        Life               Life      Life 
                     Ordinary                                                               Ordinary 
 Unaware             life       Ordinary life  Ordinary life  Ordinary life  Ordinary life  life 
                    Figure 2: Interaction  model for  Momentum (On the  vertical axis  we 
                    have  player  A  whose  perspective  is  used  and  on  horizontal  axis  is 
                    player B). 

The interaction modes for the spirit and the host are the same. In Momentum all the interaction 
that they participated in was diegetic, as long as they were not addressing a player outside the 
game. Officially the only way to do this was by invoking the safe word, but at times there 
were situations where it was uncertain if the person a spirit or a host is addressing is actually 
the player. This lead to ambiguousness that had to be negotiated. If it turned out that a host or 
a spirit was addressing a player, then a conflict emerged, which had to be resolved. 

Some participants also reported that at times it felt that players who were playing their hosts 
were “off­gaming”. Though these interactions were diegetic, the players did not experience 
them as such. These are examples of situations where the participant misread the state of 
person they were interacting with and saw a conflict. It is noteworthy again, that the other 
person in the interaction may not have noticed this conflict if his interpretation of his own 
state was different. 

According to the rules the player­level interactions were only allowed in a case of emergency. 
Still, many players reported that they did discuss the game with outsiders as a game. 
Depending on the case, that might be diegetic (diegetic lying about the diegetic reality) or 
non­diegetic interaction. In most games the division of non­diegetic interaction to game 
related and non­game related would not be relevant. In Momentum almost any comment could 
be interpreted as diegetic and thus there is no real distinction between non­diegetic, non­game 
related interaction and diegetic interaction.




                                                             45 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

The non­players who were aware of the ludic nature of the event had the widest selection of 
modes available. They could basically decide if they played along with the diegetic world or 
if they just pretended to be oblivious to it. Still, whatever choice they made was conscious. In 
many ways they were able to either act as players or as (unpossessed) hosts. 

Only conscious role­players participating in the game construct imaginary worlds. Thus 
diegetic interaction was not possible for non­participants in an unaware and ambiguous state 
form their point of view, as they are not aware of the existence of a game. Unaware 
participants spent the entirety of their game­influenced life in the “ordinary” world, outside 
magic circle of gameplay. Still, ambiguous participants could start to construct some kind of 
“proto­diegesis”. 

There were two types of ambiguous interaction in Momentum. For an aware non­participant 
and player participants the ambiguousness emerged when they did not know who they were 
interacting with. For the unaware non­participants the ambiguousness came from 
encountering the game and starting to suspect that something out of the ordinary was taking 
place. The clearest example of this was the art gallery example, where the people working at 
the gallery started playing a game of their own (even if it wasn’t a role­playing game). They 
did not engage in diegetic interaction, but were questioning the applicability of everyday life 
rules to the interaction with the players. 

For the non­participants, who came in touch with the game and did not suspect that something 
ludic was taking place, the interactions carried no meaning beyond that of everyday life. Thus 
applying the concept of diegetic or non­diegetic has no relevance to those interactions. Still, 
from a third party point of view these interactions could still be interpreted as diegetic, if the 
observer was in a host or spirit state. 

                               Player/               Player/ 
                               aware                 aware not 
                               playing               playing              Ambiguous             Unaware 
           Player/ 
           aware                                     Ambiguous/ 
           playing             Diegetic              Conflicting  Diegetic                      Diegetic 
           Player/ 
           aware not    Ambiguous/  Non­                  Non­            Non­ 
           playing      Conflicting  diegetic             diegetic        diegetic 
                                         Ambiguous/  Ambiguous/  Ambiguous/ 
                                         Ordinary         Ordinary        Ordinary 
           Ambiguous  Ambiguous  Life                     Life            Life 
                        Ordinary         Ordinary         Ordinary        Ordinary 
           Unaware      life             life             life            life 
               Figure 3: General interaction model for socially expanded pervasive 
               larps 

Theoretically it would have been possible for non­participants in an informed state to start 
playing spirits as well, construct back­stories for themselves and claim that they have been 
possessed as well. This did not happen, but as a thought experiment it is interesting. Had this 
happened, according to both the invisible rules of role­playing (Montola 2007) and the 
Meilahti definition of role­playing (Hakkarainen & Stenros 2003) thought they could have


                                                             46 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

played, they still wouldn’t have role­played in the same game as the other players. In order 
for that to happen they would have to recognize the power structure within the game 
(according to Montola) or to submit this character addition to the game mastering function 
(according to Meilahti). 

Based on Momentum, it is possible to categorize the interaction modes of pervasive larp in 
general. In Figure 3 the number of states is reduced from six to four. As an aware non­player 
can actually act in a similar manner to a player, these two categories are combined. Also, host 
and spirit are combined as a more general character state, which is here called the playing 
state. For non­pervasive larps, only the upper left corner is relevant. The way the size of the 
table swells when non­participants and multiple levels of character immersion are added 
illustrates how pervasive expansions complicate things that are quite simple in non­pervasive 
larps. 

Momentum is a great example how complicated the interactions can become when a live­ 
action role­playing game is expanded socially. The two levels of character immersion also 
contribute to making the situation a bit hazy. Thus, as the seamlessness was not complete and 
players played differently with participants and non­participants, there was a lot of the 
guessing going on regarding the state of the person they were interacting with. In games as 
complex as Momentum, in the future it would make sense to develop ready made interaction 
codes for the players. 

3.4  Expanding the magic circle 
A salient feature of pervasive games is that they break the boundary between the game and 
the ordinary world in different ways (Montola 2005), blurring the ritualistic sphere of the 
magic circle of playing (Huizinga 1938, Salen & Zimmerman 2004). 

Momentum used all three ways in which pervasive games break the boundaries of traditional 
games. Spatial expansion meant that the game was played all around Stockholm in everyday 
environment – streets, cafés, workplaces and back yards. Temporal expansion meant that the 
game was interlaced with everyday life, that it could draw the player in at any time of the day, 
in any situation – and that all of the player’s life might be part of the game. 

Yet the emphasis was on Social expansion, meaning that non­players were pulled into the 
game as spectators and participants (Montola & Waern 2006). Blurring the line between 
participant and non­participant ensured that the game bled into the ordinary world. The 
provocative goal was to use real people as an interesting feedback system. The game could 
have an effect on the world of ordinary life and change it for real as influencing the game 
world also lead to influencing the real world. 

The temporal expansion has been described in the contexts of seamlessness, long duration 
larping and social play modes above. In regards to spatial expansion, Momentum did not 
break new ground – though it did combine a number of methods that have not been used 
previously. 

Though social expansion has been discussed above in relation play modes, a few cases shall 
be analysed more thoroughly: the art gallery and Gullmarsplan.




                                                             47 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

3.4.1  Case: The Art Gallery 
On the Friday of the second scenario one of the game masters went to a hip art gallery with a 
                                                          10 
painting that had been created specifically for the game  . He told that the painting had been 
made by his mother and that she would like someone to have it, someone who really 
appreciated it. The people at the gallery agreed to take the painting and the game master told 
then to sell or give it to someone who really wanted it. He had introduced himself with a 
phony name and but gave a phone number that he could be reached from (and said that his 
number should not be given out to anyone under any circumstances). 

Later that night the gallery owner got a phone call on his private number. A woman said that 
the painting was hers and that she wanted it back. Apparently the players had gone to the 
gallery (they needed to get the painting as it was a map for an astral journey they were about 
to embark on) and gotten his contact information. The gallery owner was a little worried 
about the legal implication of all this, but reassured the woman that the painting was at the 
gallery. 

The next day a number of players went to the gallery, looked at the painting and tried to get it. 
The players (who thought that the gallery people were actors or NPCs) went in one at a time 
and pretended to not know each other though they were hanging together on the street. 

This is when the gallery people realized that something fishy was going on. They did not 
know if it was a prank or a game or what, but they started playing a game of their own. They 
wrote down the names of all the people who expressed interest in the painting and started 
googling them. They realized that these were fake names and even after a week they 
remembered many of the names and could describe the people. 




                    Image 14: The painting that worked as a map for the astral journey. 

The biggest clue that something odd was happening when the people at the gallery called the 
person that had left the painting, as for them the easiest and least questionable way of getting

10The description here is based on an interview with two people who work at the art gallery as well as player and
game master interviews. The interview with the gallery people was conducted less than a week after the events and
until that time they did not know that they had been a part of Momentum.


                                                             48 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

out of the situation would be to give the painting back to the person who brought it in. The 
game master said that he was not in Stockholm (the people at the gallery could hear that the 
game master was on the metro and that he was just coming to a station in Stockholm) and that 
he could not come and pick it up. He also reiterated that the gallery should give the painting to 
whoever really wanted it. He also added that “time is ticking”, that it should be done fast. 
Finally they gave the painting to one of the players. 

A week later when they were interviewed by an evaluator, they were exited that the event had 
been a game, just as they had suspected. They did not feel that the game had been invasive or 
exploitative; on the contrary, they had enjoyed being a part of it. Apparently the biggest 
challenge for them was deciding what to do with the painting: can they just give it away to 
someone who not only doesn’t have any kind of identity card, but clearly uses a false name. 
Overall they thought that the experience had been a positive one. 

3.4.1.1  Ambivalence as fun 
The ambivalence of not knowing what was going on was a major part of what made the 
interaction interesting. When asked if they wanted to further participate in the game, they 
declined: it wouldn’t be fun anymore now that they knew that it was a game. 

As the location chosen was an establishment that was firmly interested and invested in arts 
and – as its hip status shows – interested in pushing the envelope, this instance cannot in 
anyway be generalized. However, the fact that the gallery people reacted as positively as they 
did shows that the ambiguity of unknown participation does indeed have the possibility be an 
extremely positive and fun experience. Choosing the locations where radical social expansion 
takes place is a big design challenge – and an ethical quagmire. 

3.4.1.2  Enabling radical social expansion 
Based on the description and interviews a speculative list of some of the elements that worked 
to the make the situation work can be put together. These items are extrapolations, educated 
guessed and gut­feelings – not findings but basis for a further research. 

Home domain 
The interactions took place in a location where the gallery workers felt at home (even if was 
semi­public). Even though an unknown element invaded it, they were still in control at all 
times and had the experience been unpleasant they could have asked the players to leave. 

Difficult, yet accessible backdoor 
The game master had left his phone number at the gallery. He was reluctant to talk on the 
phone, so the gallery people avoided phoning him with every possible question, but in the 
end, when they needed some else to carry the responsibility of passing on the painting, they 
could get his blessing. 

Time to participate 
The art gallery, though quite a popular one, was never overflowing with patrons. This means 
that the gallery people had time to invest in the players and game was not stopping them from 
doing something more important that they were supposed to do at the same time. 

Affinity with weird




                                                             49 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

The hip gallery people were not unaccustomed to people with weird, fake­sounding names 
and quirky attire, on the contrary. Also, the painting – as well as the players – were perceived 
as cool; they fit the “cultural niche” of the art gallery. 

In summary, the gallery people did not feel threatened, they had a safety net, time to kill and 
the whole endeavor seemed like a cool thing to do. 

3.4.2  Case: Gullmarsplan 
On the first Saturday of the game (during the first high intense gaming weekend) the players 
were presented with a challenge to recover “an Enochian magical tablet”. They were 
supposed to do this by following clues that would lead them to a public square where they 
would find a NPC dressed up as a hobo who would then turn the tablets over to them. 
However, the players misunderstood the time incorrectly (they thought that the correct time 
would be midnight) and arrived at the scene after the actor playing the hobo had already went 
home. The actor had been wearing clothes covered in Enochian symbols and had drawn a 
number of “protective circles” and Enochian symbols around the place where he had been 
sitting. He left these markings behind when he left the scene. 
                                                        11 
Anders, one of the players present, describes the events  : 

          [Five other players] and I decide that we want to do the Gullmarsplan mission. Being bored, we go away already at 
          nine  o’clock  so  that  we  can  have  a  couple  of  beers  at  Carmen  before  its  time.  We  arrive  at  Gullmarsplan  some 
          twenty minutes before midnight. Karl has three com­radios so we split up in three groups of two persons each and 
          place ourselves at the three entrances to the square. For the next 40 minutes we see several suspicious persons, we 
          follow some of them using the com­radios but none of them seems to be our person. We start to discuss aborting 
          this  mission  on  the  radio.  We  all  seem  to  be  feeling  that  this  is  a  failed  mission,  that  somehow  we  missed 
          something or failed to get the contact we needed to contact. 
          At twenty minutes past midnight we all meet at the park benches at the far end of the square, next to the kebab 
          joint. We are having a discussion about what to do next, there is a discussion about maybe not looking for a “he”. 
          Suddenly a man in his forties approaches us and asks [if] we sell weed. We state that we’re looking for weed as 
          well and he starts to converse us. For a moment we respond, just in case it is the person we are looking for. There is 
          a woman on the bench as well, she is drunk as hell, almost sleeping, she must have sat herself on the bench around 
          midnight but none of us really believes that she is the one we’re looking for. 
          Then  I  notice  that  the  passed  out  woman  is  sitting  in a  chalked  circle.  I  silently  point  out this  fact to  Karl.  The 
          moment he sees this he reacts. We now have to get rid of the man, who is very talkative, so that we can confront 
          this woman. Two of us (I can’t remember who) distracts the man by walking with him to the subway until the goes 
          away. They are gone for some time. 
          At a quarter to one, Björn, two others and me try to make contact with the woman. We’re rather shy at first, trying 
          stuff like “that looks cold” and the like but she is passed out. She is sitting upright, moving like a pendulum from 
          side to side since her body cannot find anything to rest on. There is some spit on her shirt that she [is spitting] up 
          continuously.  Through  phone,  we  get into  contact  with Brigitte, she instructs that someone  in  Pantarei  [a player 
          group] should conduct [the Enochian ritual called] Lesser Banishing on the woman. A number of our numbers are 
          now on their way to Gullmarsplan, as it is the only current lead at the moment. At that time, I do a discrete, half­ 
          hearted version of the Lesser Banishing by myself, mumbling the words, but nothing happens with the state of the 
          woman. 
          Time passes. Around one, we try a more whole­hearted version of the Lesser Banishing. We are four persons, one 
          from  each  element,  we  stand  in  a  circle  around  the  woman  and  our  voices  are  louder  but  we  try  not  to  arouse 
          suspicion at the nearby kebab joint. Again nothing happens. For a moment Björn and me are alone with the woman. 
          The woman has been carrying a bag and it has remained untouched but now we are seriously contemplating that 
          she has some sort of clues. The bag itself is too small and too light to actually carry the artefact we are looking for, 
          but we imagine that it carries some sort of note or that kind of clue. Both me and Björn feel that the situation is



11 The player, Anders, was first asked to write a description of what happened at Gullmarsplan. Later he answered
specific questions via email. This happened while the game was in progress. Names, and in the case of some players
also sexes, have been changed. In this case study a lot of space is allotted to the player’s recounting of the events to
provide. This is done to give a fuller picture of the events.


                                                                     50 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

            awkward but we realize that it’s something we have to do. We find, amongst junk, a patient card with the name 
            Kina Ingvarsson on it. People are now looking in our direction; we are approximately 20 meters from the busses. 
            Again we try to make contact with the woman, now naming her by name. “How are you doing, Kina?”. We try to 
            look like concerned social workers. At half past one Mr. Lindroos and another person arrives. Now that we have 
            our main ritual magician at the location, we decide to perform an exorcism on the spirit possessing Kina. We move 
            one of the benches so that we can build a major circle of people around the woman and her circle of protection. Mr. 
            Lindroos needs one person from each element apart from herself, so me, Karl and a third person are placed at the 
            busses as guards, in case one of the approximately 15 guards guarding the subway station decide to walk out into 
            the square witnessing the ritual. 
            Mr.  Lindroos  performs  a  major  version  of  the  Lesser  Banishing, complete  with  loud  voices  and  the  [Enochian] 
            ritualistic cross [which consists of drawing a five point star in the air with one’s hand] which from a distance looks 
            like  a  nazi­heil.  Drunken  people  on  the  bus  station  are  watching  but  no  one  interferes.  After  30­45  minutes the 
            ritual is finished. The time is now after two. There is a message from Brigitte, [who] is still at the reactor, that there 
            is an active signal at Kvarnholmen (my mobile phone clocks this message to 02.10). People are very tired. Some of 
            us have been at Gullmarsplan for more than two and a half hour. There are more attempts to make contact with the 
            woman  that is  now  awake  but  she  can’t  say  anything  intelligible.  At  some  moment she  tries to  walk but  cannot 
            move,  she  falls  forward  falling  on  her knees but  we lift  her  up  again, putting  her  back  on  the bench  (I  have  no 
            recollection of the timing of her falling). The contact with the woman borders on the rude, “do you have something 
            for  us,  Kina?”  Sometime  between  half  past  two  and  three,  we  break  up  from  Gullmarsplan.  There  is  a  crew 
            returning to the reactor to prepare for a late night move to Kvarnholmen. I decide to go home. There are two people 
            left with the woman. I later hear that things do not go so smooth trying to help her. Had I known this would happen 
            I  would  have  stayed,  but  I  was  tired  to  the  bone,  which  helped me  decide that  the  two  persons  staying  had  the 
            capacity to solve the situation. 
            This is what Stefan recalled when I spoke with him the evening after: "There were two of us left. Suddenly the 
            woman takes up a smaller bottle [of] vodka (hidden in her clothing) and drinks half of it like it was water. She then 
            tries  to  move  away  from  the  bench,  getting  half­way  before  falling  pretty  badly  (but  presumably  not  damaging 
            anything) at the parking lot. The woman cannot get up and she is far too heavy for [us] to lift. I get to one of the 
            female guards at the subway station saying that there is a woman in dire need of help. The guard move away in the 
            direction of the woman. Then we run, because we don’t want to have to explain the scenario to the guards.” 


Björn, the one who with the previous informant went through the homeless person’s personal 
                            12 
effects describes the events  : 

            We  were  looking  out  for  a  homeless  person  on  Gullmarsplan who  was  meant  to  give  us  some  information  or 
            whatever it was. We found a woman sitting on a bench near us and we thought that this must be the person we were 
            supposed to find. I, as my ghost Rottweiler, who has some strange morals, went through her bag of stuff, found that 
            she wasn´t carrying any information for us. And she was in very bad shape, drawling and passing out from time to 
            time, unreachable and rather repulsive. Rottweiler went through her bag once more, and took some of her money 
            [four Swedish crowns, approximately 0,5 euros] just because he felt he needed it. After that we performed some 
            kind of ritual around here and chanted for a while, but she never woke up to talk to us. 


In addition to being rude the players broke the law (went through the personal belonging of a 
person without her permission and stole money from her). What makes the incident even 
more unfortunate is that the victim was a drunk, homeless person, someone who is essentially 
helpless in this situation. The fact that the theme of Momentum was supposed to raise 
awareness and sympathy towards those who have fallen through the cracks of society brings a 
bitter irony to the events. 

However, though on the surface quite clear cut, the Gullmarsplan incident is actually 
extremely problematic one. It underlines the problems with the seamlessness. The players 
present at Gullmarsplan had arrived there due to game instructions. The stipulated time was 
perceived as game instructions. The person they contacted was surrounded by game related 
symbols. And finally, the person they contacted seemed to fit the theme of the game. Indeed, 
the players were in the right place, contacted the person surrounded by the right symbols and


12   Björn’s interview was conducted via two weeks after the incident via email. The game was still in progress.


                                                                    51 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

the person did look like a person involved in the game would look like. This was exactly the 
place and thematically attired person they were supposed to contact. 

Unfortunately the time was wrong. The actor, who had created the symbols that later led to 
the wrong interpretation, had been there dressed up as a bum. If the players had arrived hour 
earlier the exact same scene had been within the diegesis of the game, a cool event nicely 
contained within the magic circle. 

The players were very much aware that they were responsible for all their actions even while 
the game was in progress. This was spelled out in the Player Agreement Form (see Appendix 
A). However, the players were also aware that they were participating in a game. The 
standard rules of social conduct, or even laws, do not always apply inside the magic circle. 
Contestants are allowed to hit each other in a boxing match and violence that takes place 
during an ice hockey match will be settled within the game. Even if a player breaks the rules, 
this will be handled within the magic circle – a player can, for example, se sent in the penalty 
box. 

The two laws that the player broke were unlawful searching of another persons belongings 
and stealing of money. In addition to this the players were rude, but that is something people 
are allowed to be in a public place even if it is not encouraged. Thus this report will 
concentrate on the two unlawful actions. 

In live­action role­playing games there is a history of stealing. A character may steal the 
possessions of another player. In most games the player is expected to return the stolen goods 
when the game ends, but this does not always happen (e.g. Wanderer 3). The game organisers 
had also contemplated equipping the players with a plastic bag full of money that they could 
use as they saw fit in equipping the headquarters. This plan was dropped as it would have 
been impossible to get the receipts that accounting for such money would have been 
necessary. Still, money was seen as a game element even by the game organizers. 

Going through another person’s personal affects is quite common in live­action role­playing 
games. If the players had found the right person (the actor), then it is entire possible that they 
would have had to do exactly this in order to complete their task. This would have been 
completely acceptable within the game. 

Thus the presence of a clear symbol indicating that the person the players found was part of 
the game (the Enochian markings, the ritual circle) led the players to believe that they were 
playing a game and all the participants were players. They carried out actions, that are 
questionable inside a game, but that can still be seen as acceptable game actions. 

One central element was also social pressure. Anders describes his feeling after it had turned 
out that the woman had not been a player: 

          The situation was absurd. First, before we "discovered" the woman (she had been sitting at the bench since about 
          midnight but I think we all felt that it was too far­fetched) I was frustrated because the game didn't move forward. 
          Then, when we discovered the circle I wasn’t really sure so  I wanted my actions to be the right things to do no 
          matter what the truth would be. I felt that a ritual could be performed with this almost passed out woman as long as 
          she  was  treated  well  and  we  cared  for  her.  I  did  try  to  come  in  contact  with  her  and  my  intentions  were  not 
          primarily to ask her were the artifact was but how she was doing and if we could help her (a person that later did 
          manage to speak with her said that she said that she had lost her teeth). 
          There was social pressure in the way that if the woman was a part of the game the person who would blow the 
          whistle would be forever ridiculed as a "not hard­core enough for the game"­larper.



                                                                   52 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

          It  could have been a part of the game, even though  I think we all had doubts. The actor would have been really 
          good,  and  very  hard­core  indeed,  considering  the  saliva­vomit, but  we just  couldn't  get  any  confirmation  of  this 
          person being non­game so we just had to continue. 
          By the time that we got reinforcements the thought of this not being the right person had vanished. It was as if we 
          all could confirm each other that it must be the right track. If we did the exorcism so the lady would be able to 
          speak to us or found the clue in the bag, the game would be propelled forward. 
          We were all afraid of missing the clue. No one wanted to fail. That is how I perceive the others and my self. That is 
          the only other explanation I could give for this group thinking. 
          As for the searching of the bag, both I and Björn were in some state of shame while we were searching in it but we 
          had no other way of acting. If the clue was in the bag we would have been bad players indeed not searching there. 
          Everyone wants to be the hero of the day, I guess. 

Anders had not noticed that Björn stole some money from the victim. When asked if he had 
felt like he was crossing some sort of a border he replied: 

          Yes. In three parts. One for myself and Björn, when we searched the bag. One, for Mr. Lindroos, when we stopped 
          being discreet and did a wholesale ceremony, one for the rest of the gang, when the communication between us and 
          the lady went from "how are you doing?" to "do you have something for us?" 


Still, even after he had found out that the person involved was not a player, Anders thought 
that the scene had been a cool one. The feeling of danger (15 security guard standing 50 
meters away), the thrill of being found out (the bus faring people nearby) and the rush of 
being able to act out the ritual, a ceremony, in a public space. He is sad that the victim was 
drawn in (he describes her as “totally defenceless”), but points out that she was not hurt. In 
fact, according to Anders she was completely invisible to the other people passing through the 
area as she was homeless and alcoholic. And at least the players did alert the security guards 
to her condition when they realized how confused her state was. 

Björn was shocked when he found out that the woman had not been part of the game: 

          Oh my god, I really thought it was a part of the game, since she was sitting in front of the circle which we thought 
          she wrote. 

The reaction to the incident was twofold. The involved parties (players, game organizers, 
evaluators) who knew that the woman had been an outsider, were surprised, shocked and 
worried. The ones that thought she was part of the game considered the event an encaging, 
atmospheric and successful scene in the game. This supports the position, that within the 
diegetic frame these actions would have been acceptable regardless of what is stated in the 
Player Agreement Form (PAF). 

Due to the close working relationship between the evaluators and the game organizers, a 
dialogue was initiated as to how to deal with the situation. In the end it was decided, that the 
players needed to be reminded about contents of the PAF, that it really something that the 
game masters take seriously and is not just a worthless disclaimer. The problem is, of course, 
that the PAF is constructed in the everyday world and no matter what it says, it is not 
perceived with as much gravitas within the magic circle. 

In the future, in order to avoid problems such as this, two design principled need to be 
followed: 1) symbols that communicate participation in the game should not be widely 
available and should not be left lying around, and 2) there needs to be a diegetic system of 
punishment that supports the extra­diegetic one.




                                                                 53 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

3.4.2.1  Careful use of symbols 
In a spatially expanded game that is played on the streets the game reality and everyday life 
exist on top of each other. Certain locations are marked as game locations through the use of 
diegetic symbols. In Momentum these were Enochian markings and stickers that stated that a 
certain location is guarded by the fictitious security company Kerberos. 

In Prosopopeia Bardo 1: Där vi föll, a building was marked with Kerberos stickers. The 
players understood that even though breaking into a building is illegal, breaking into this 
building is acceptable – even mandatory for the flow of the game. In Momentum the same 
method was used. For example during the second scenario the Fire group had to dismantle 
certain antennas that were distributed on the town. These antennas were marked with 
Kerberos stickers. 




                    Image  15:  Enochian  symbols  were  used  in  the  game  extensively, 
                    written on streets, walls, doors, on computers, in diaries etc… 

The same goes for the Enochian texts and circles. During the first scenario these markings 
were found next to the entrance to R1, the former nuclear reactor that later acted as the 
headquarters for the players. The next day the actor the players were supposed to contact had 
surrounded himself with these symbols on Gullmarsplan. When he left the site he did not 
erase the symbols. Later the players were confused when they found a woman surrounded by 
these symbols. 

In practice these symbols give permission for the players to treat people and objects found in 
everyday realm as game artifacts. Even though this was not explicitly communicated to the 
players they understand it implicitly. If there is a clear indication of the presence of the game, 
then clearly it is acceptable, even encouraged to play the game. 

Thus in a pervasive game that is potentially intrusive such symbols must be used with care. 
Leaving them around will potentially lead to problematic situations, as happened in the case 
of Momentum. 

The problem with this suggestion is that if a game is designed to question or challenge 
consensus reality, then the players and game masters may wish to leave as big a mark in 
public space as possible. If the game tidies after itself and removes all traces of its presence, 
then the whole point of the game is lost. This is exactly what happened in Momentum. If the 
political or artistic message of the game absolutely requires that symbols can be freely


                                                             54 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

distributed then there are three alternatives: 1) the town must be saturated with the symbols so 
that their relevance as “game takes place here” indicators wears off, 2) there needs to be more 
then one level in the symbols (for example the town might be littered with cryptographic text, 
some of which translates to “this is a game location” and the rest is just gibberish), and finally 
3) the symbols are distributed freely with full knowledge of the fact that misreading may lead 
to problematic situations. Though the first two options are on a more sound ethical ground, in 
some cases artistic merit or political relevance may redeem the third option (see below). 

3.4.2.2  A diegetic system of sanctions 
In Momentum, the norms governing acceptable behavior were markedly different from the 
norms in everyday life. Certain actions that would be framed as crimes in everyday life were 
acceptable within the diegetic frame (for example vandalism, breaking and entering, 
eavesdropping). This is similar to many other games – especially sports. In sports, a player 
may take actions that would be completely unacceptable in an everyday setting (such as 
hitting in boxing). Also actions that are not acceptable in the sport are punished with in the 
magic circle – as long as the violation is not too extreme. The penalty box in ice hockey is a 
good example of this. 

Momentum had no internal system of sanctions. The only thing that the game masters could 
have done if a player stepped over the line was to kick the player out of the game and report 
him to the police. This is not a diegetic sanction, but the exact opposite. Such an action would 
violate the whole game, and affect the fellow players of the person being punished. In 
addition to kicking out players, the game masters could bill the players who had broken 
equipment (as stated in the PAF). This actually happened in at least one case: a player had 
damaged a Kerberos vehicle when escaping from their clutches. 

If the game had contained a clear system of punishment for minor diegetic offences, then the 
players might have had more incentive to be careful when taking such actions. Building a 
system that punishes players for taking liberties with non­players should be easy enough to 
implement. Such a system could also have been invoked by players who felt that the social 
pressure was pushing them to cross boundaries they were hesitant to cross. 

A fine example of how such a system can be implemented can be found from the commercial 
live­action role­playing game Masquerade by White Wolf. In this game the players are 
vampires who have their own shadow society that operates in our world. However, the 
vampires must keep their existence hidden from the major population and thus are forbidden 
from revealing their true nature in public, they are in fact barred from doing anything that 
could lead to the discovery. This sacred rule of “Masquerade” is a diegetic one and it violating 
it is punishable by death. Thematically it is so important that the actual game is named after it. 
Of course, Masquerade deliberately tries to hide from non­participants, unlike Momentum. 
Yet the idea of diegetic sanctions is valid. 

3.5  Momentum in the contexts of game genres 
Momentum built on a number of game traditions and genres. In addition to being a pervasive 
game, which can be seen as a top category that overlaps with a number of other game genres, 
Momentum can be seen from quite a large number of points of view. On the most visible level 
Momentum was a live­action role­playing game. Yet it also drew from the work done in the 
tradition of crossmedia games, MMORPGs and ARGs.




                                                             55 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

3.5.1  Momentum as a live­action role­playing game 
As the name of the showcase, eLARP, suggests, Momentum was very much a live­action role­ 
playing game. On a general level it can be identified first as a role­playing game and secondly 
as a larp by the invisible rules of role as described by Montola (2007). 

          1) Role­playing is an interactive process of defining and re­defining the state, properties and contents of an 
          imaginary game world. 
          2) The power to define the game world is allocated to participants of the game. The participants recognize the 
          existence of this power hierarchy. 
          3) Player­participants define game world through personified character constructs, conforming to the state, 
          properties and contents of the game world. 
          […] 
          l1) In larp the game is superimposed on physical world, which is used as a foundation in defining the game world. 


More specifically it was a larp in the Nordic tradition as showcased in the 
Knutpunkt/Solmukohta conventions. It had strong characters that the participant played and 
immersion into these characters was encouraged, the game world was a coherent one and 
slipping between the diegetic world and the diegetic world was discouraged, propping aimed 
at being indexical, the game was an original one not based on published material, it had an 
artistic/political aim and the game masters are auteurs. 

In the Nordic larp tradition (at least in Finland) there is also a long tradition of so called city 
games (or city larps), game that are not limited to a certain location, but are played around the 
town. These games (such as Helsinki FTZ, Isle of Saints, some games of the game series 
Helsingin Kronikka, Pimeyden maailma) were pervasive already before the term was 
invented. The Prosopopeia series continues this tradition. 

Another connection to the Nordic tradition is the people behind the project. Many of the game 
masters already had a reputation in the field. Finally, the game was marketed to larpers as a 
larp. 

3.5.2  Momentum as a crossmedia game 
The biggest difference between Momentum and other Nordic larps with high production 
values is the amount of technology involved and the fact that a lot of the tech was in prototype 
state. Technology in and of itself is common in larps, but the sheer amount in Momentum was 
uncommon. Thus it makes sense to approach Momentum also as a crossmedia game and 
compare it to the other IPeRG crossmedia game, Epidemic Menace. 

Both Momentum and Epidemic Menace are games that have a strong story element. In 
Momentum the preservation of a coherent fictive world was extremely important. In Epidemic 
Menace the story is more just a setting where the action takes place. Both games tell their 
story using a number of devices. In Momentum the Thumin glove, the Omax phones, the Urim 
tablet computers, the EVP rig, the different chats and so forth (in addition to the way all the 
props are created and location chosen etc.) all work towards to holistic experience of a 
coherent game world. In Epidemic Menace, which is a crossmedia game where two teams of 
combat virtual viruses spreading in the real world and try to solve a crime, the players use cell 
phones, AR goggles and different kinds of visual and textual data feeds to carry out their 
mission. Both games use fiction as glue: in both games the output from various dissimilar 
devices is given relevance by the fictitious context.



                                                              56 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

In a sense gestalt was an important aesthetic pattern. The idea of the gestalt is that even when 
singular game actions might be trivial, stupid or boring, the totality created by different 
gaming activities is much more than the sum of its parts. Similarly the plethora of different 
media that were used in Momentum and Epidemic Menace would make very little sense as 
stand­alone data streams, but together they create something more. 

Looking into the air mission at Saving 93 provides an excellent example. While solving a 
triangulation puzzle (delivered using one media) might be a boring mathematical task as such, 
and while searching a neighbourhood for a clue might be even more boring menial task, the 
interplay of these two might provide considerable added value to the both. The search gives 
the meaning to the triangulation (if we fail we’ll be searching a wrong area with no chance to 
succeed), while the triangulation gives meaning to the search (when something is found, it’s 
found not by searching a neighbourhood, but searching the whole city). Solving of the case 
also, in the end, lead up to receiving a message in another medium – and the information was 
relevant for another mission and so forth… 




                    Image 16: Players triangulating on a map of Stockholm. 

In Momentum, the gestalt design seems to be an all­encompassing (yet implicit) guideline. 
Using fiction as glue when integrating crossmedia content was thus a natural design choice. 

Another interesting aspect of the way media was used in Momentum was the fact that the 
virtual world (the world of the dead) was successfully created with text and sound. The aural 
messages received through the EVP rig, the sounds that haunted the different nodes, the 
textual messages in the chat and the print­out from the matrix printer all told the story of an 
unseen world. The players only visited this virtual world once, during the astral journey, and 
even that time the place was mostly created through joint verbal storytelling. The only visual 
representation of the world of the dead was a single picture – the “map” that the players 
obtained from the art gallery. 

This was a compelling and encaging way of creating an alternative world, but it was also 
cheap and relatively easy to do. The game masters were able to create audio messages quite 
fast when the need arose and thus they could continue to fine tune the virtual world to keep it 
in step with player actions.


                                                             57 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

3.5.3  Momentum as a MMORPG 
Momentum also borrowed some trick of trade from massively multi­player online role­ 
playing games such as World of Warcraft. Though these games are played in a different way 
through a different media they have some similarities. As one of the biggest challenges of 
Momentum was to create meaningful game content for 30 players for 36 consecutive days, 
some ideas were borrowed from the way MMORPGs create content for their players. 

Thus the structure of the game, and especially the structuring of the missions that players 
would carry out, was influenced by MMOPRGs. The gamist goal oriented missions took 
foreground from the immersive character play especially during the high intensity weekends. 

A good example of this is also the node game. There were numerous nodes that the players 
were supposed to capture and they were also competing over which faction would reign over 
the largest number of nodes. Yet from a game design perspective the nodes were all the same 
and the players would have to carry out exactly the same tasks at each location. However, as 
all the nodes were themed differently, they were placed in different but intriguing urban 
settings and as the symbolic action carried out were so varied, the node game was quite 
meaningful. From the point of view of game mechanics it was grinding (i.e. carrying out 
repetitive and monotonous menial labour), but as it was successfully themed it did not feel 
that way. 

3.5.4  Momentum as an ARG 
The aesthetics of Momentum drew a lot from Alternate Reality Games (ARG). ARGs are one 
genre of pervasive games that has not been covered in IPeRG as that type of game is already 
quite established both as a commercial venture (The Lost Experience, I Love Bees, The A.I. 
Game) as well as academic subject (see for example McGonigal 2006, Szulborski 2005). But 
as Momentum positioned its game­play as taking place in the everyday world, it made a lot of 
sense to use tested methods from the ARG genre. 

The methods borrowed include generally the whole denial of the ludic nature of the game and 
specifically the statement of “the game has been cancelled, we are now doing this for real” 
(lifted quite directly from Majestic). The way that the web was used to disseminate 
information through bogus websites is also an ARG tactic. 

In many ways Momentum took these methods and used them as a starting point, it just took 
them further. ARGs, for example, are usually run and to a large extent played, on the web. In 
a way Momentum was closer to Reality Games (such as Vem Gråter?), with the difference 
that the people involved owned up to the game afterwards (and the game was marketed as 
game). 

There was also an actual ARG organised mainly by Daniel Sundström (who was also one of 
the game designers of Momentum) that tied into the game. This ARG started before 
Momentum and is still running at the time of writing. The game is called A Silent Revolution, 
and it is a separate game from Momentum, though the players of both games did run into each 
others. The design document of A Silent Revolution states: 

          The ARG’s in­game function is to serve as a way of introducing new information to the players. This can be done 
          very naturally due to the nature and structure of the game. The game is entertaining to play because it plays up the 
          players ability and will to investigate the mythos further, to investigate the city further and to find its mysteries. It 
          also provides means to get in contact with the other players, and further their experience and relations with each 
          other before [Prosopopeia] Bardo 2[: Momentum] commences.



                                                               58 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


The players of Momentum did encounter A Silent Revolution in a number of ways. For 
example one of the NPC groups in the game, “de andra”, had ties to A Silent Revolution, 
players ended up spreading stickers that had the text “Slå från skuggorna” (Strike from the 
Shadows) and contained the web address for one of the rabbit holes (http://www.under­ 
jorden.nu/). The players of Momentum did ask about events tied to A Silent Revolution in the 
post­game debriefing, but as that was a separate ARG the game masters of Momentum denied 
all knowledge about the game. This evaluation report does not cover A Silent Revolution. 

3.6  Discussion 
3.6.1  Magician’s Curtain 
The idea of magician’s curtain means that the game masters try to create a perfect illusion for 
the players, before showing the strings and wires that keep the game flowing. Upholding 
magician’s curtain is a necessity for a game that attempts to merge game and life seamlessly; 
the seams are shown exactly where magician’s curtain fails. 

In Där vi föll, the magician’s curtain established before the game. It was only lifted on the 
signup website, where players entered their personal information and acquired the times and 
dates of the main game event. After that, all contact between players and game masters was 
banned and minimized. 

In Momentum this structure was slightly tweaked; the game masters were available until the 
seamless mode started, and in the second seminar and afterwards the game was no longer 
considered a game. 

In Momentum the price of upholding the magician’s curtain was very steep just like it was in 
Där vi föll: Denying the gameness of the game entirely during the game time causes 
complications in solving technology failures, instructing the players and evaluating the game. 
It is also very expensive design principle in terms of money. 

Though the game masters had gone to great lengths to minimize any extra­diegetic signals, in 
practice, much of the game mastering was done diegetically, by the mystical Order of 
Metatron. The aim had been to mask the curtain so well that the players wouldn’t run into it 
by accident and that it would be difficult to do it on purpose. Still, some players did peek 
behind the curtain, either by accident or on purpose. Accidentally this happened for example 
when players spotted a game master somewhere on the street where he clearly shouldn’t have 
been (which is easy to ignore) and when the players found out that the car that the guards 
form the fabricated security company Kerberos were driving is actually registered to P 
Productions, the company that staged the game. 

According to the player feedback, there was one surprising problem with the strongly 
established magician’s curtain: The game masters had to subtly guide the game through 
several side characters (Order of Metatron and others), and occasionally this was perceivable 
to the players. The problem was that when players noticed game master influence, they had to 
carry it back to the game and fiction. If the game masters influenced the game in an extra­ 
diegetic manner (e.g. by providing direct instructions on how to play), the players could have 
just forgotten about the intervention, moving on instead of mulling over Metatron’s weird 
motivations.



                                                             59 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

3.6.2  Auteur Theory 
The Prosopopeia games are set in world that is very, very detailed. The mythos developed for 
the game is complex, rich – and ambitious. This is one of the strong points of the Prosopopeia 
games. However, in some cases it is also a hindrance. During the three days that the NPC 
character Adam spent with the players he delivered a dozen long monologues that tried to 
explained the world that the players found themselves inhabiting. However, it was not 
enough. Adam could spend an hour talking about the metaphysics of radioactive ghosts. This 
was interesting and important for setting the mood and style of the game, but only up to a 
point. 

At some point players simply started to lose interest. One reason for this was clearly that the 
players were not so much playing, but listening to a lecture. But another may be that they 
were unable to decipher which parts of Adam’s message were relevant. 

The ability to be able to differentiate between the message and the filler is something that is 
genre specific – and auteur specific. A person who has watched a lot of horror films knows 
what to look for. Similarly a person who has seen four films by Alfred Hitchcock is able to 
see more when he watches a fifth one than a person who is just discovering he works of 
Hitchcock. 

Often this kind of metainformation can be interpreted as knowledge about a certain genre. 
However, in the case of Momentum, the genre of the game was very difficult to articulate. The 
game was a reality bending political occult treasure hunt with strong immersive power. 
Another way to characterise the genre would be to call it a Nordic live­action role­playing 
game in the spirit of the Knutpunkt tradition (Moira, Mellan himmel och hav, Hamlet) with 
elements of ARGs and MMORPGs thrown in. Yet the only game that resembled Momentum 
was the first game in the Prosopopeia mythos, Där vi föll. Only three players participated in 
both games – and one had a prewritten part in Momentum. 

Thus genre can not really be seen as an explaining or knowledge­ordering concept in 
Momentum. What would have, and indeed did, help players to understand what was relevant 
information and what was just thematic filling, was knowledge about previous games by the 
same game masters. The people most responsible for the thematic content of the game were 
Martin Ericsson and Emil Boss. Most of the players had not attended any games that these 
two had created and thus they were unfamiliar with their “shorthand”. However, the ones that 
were familiar with their body of work (especially the works of Ericsson) were more prone to 
understand what information was important and what was not. 

This means that auteur­ship is something that should be taken into consideration in game 
design. The fact that some players are not able to understand subtle clues in the beginning of 
the game does not mean that the game is not suited for them, but maybe they simply are not 
yet comfortable in a certain mythos or style of game mastering. If a game is to include people 
who are new to the genre and the oeuvre of the game masters, then the learning curve inside 
of the game needs to take this into account. Basically the expected learning curve for these 
players needs to be shallower.




                                                             60 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




4  Game Mastering Evaluation 
Game mastering has proven invaluable in Pervasive Games, even when these are 
implemented with computer technology. The real world is a fickle stage for games: its 
conditions are infinitely variable and rich, and provides an unlimited resource for participant 
improvisations. 

In order to succeed in game mastering, four components need to be in place. The game 
requires a sensory system providing information for decision making, and the decisions need 
to be actuated to steer the game. Finally, a communication structure is needed. In a tabletop 
role­playing game the live GM present can fill all the four functions, but in larp and pervasive 
games this is different. Technology mediation will take on several of the functions and since 
full technology mediation is not possible, pervasive games will typically not be fully game 
mastered. Instead, they can both be partially automated and partially socially constructed by 
the participants on their own. 

In Momentum, game mastering also included active authoring of content to fit the activities of 
the participants. This has precedence e.g. in the cell phone role­playing game Day of the 
Figurines 13  (Benford et al 2005), where the game masters could at any time add new content, 
e.g. to answer particular requests from participants. Momentum relied on a hidden game 
master role, inspired by the ‘puppet master’ role in alternate reality games (McGonigal 2006). 
In an ARG, the puppet masters are typically also the game designers, as a large part of the 
content authoring takes place while the game is running. Due to the seamless merging of 
reality and fiction that ARG rely on, the puppet masters stay hidden throughout the game; a 
game that is “not a game” (Mcgonigal 2003, Szulborski 2005) cannot have a visible game 
master. This seamlessness requirement of ARG pose large difficulties for game mastering, as 
the ARG puppet master has very little information about what the participants are actually 
doing.

13This discussion refers primarily to the first trial version of Day of the Figurines. In its final version, the game play is
automated to a much larger extent and content is typically edited only between game trials.


                                                             61 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


Similar approaches have previously been used in larp game mastering, e.g. in Carolus Rex 
(Koljonen 2007), which was played out in a strictly confined area and where game mastering 
was achieved through surveillance equipment and an in­game communication channel. The 
game setting was a space ship travelling through space; its physical setting was inside an old 
submarine. The ship and all of its equipment was controlled by an artificial intelligence 
played by the game masters. Only through accessing the AI, the participants could get a 
picture of the world outside the ship and obtain crucial information about the story line and 
the other characters. The technology to implement this system was a chat system with the 
game masters, serving both as a sensing (when participants were typing) and actuating system 
(as the messages from the AI directly influenced the gameplay), and the communication 
structure. 

Although this approach was successful, it severely restricts the freedom of participants to 
move around and puts game masters under extreme working conditions. In Carolus Rex, the 
game masters were on duty for 56 hours straight, with little opportunity to share the activity 
between game masters. 

A similar but mobile setup was used in Prosopopeia Bardo 1: Där vi föll (Jonsson et. Al 
2006, Montola & Jonsson 2006), the first production in the Prosopopeia series. In this 
production, a tape recorder from the seventies was used to implement a communication 
channel with ‘ghosts’ played by the game masters. Technically, the setup was implemented 
through a mobile phone built into the tape recorder. This setup allowed participants to be 
mobile (though the tape recorder was fairly large), and the game was effectively played all 
over Stockholm. 

4.1  Game Master Techniques in Momentum 
Where Där vi föll had been limited to a small number (twelve) of participants and required 
intense game mastering over the entire duration, Momentum aimed for both a higher number 
of participants (30) and a much longer duration (36 days). This meant that a great emphasis 
was placed on creating well­functioning support for the game master role. To enable game 
mastering in Momentum, a vast variety of techniques were used. 

4.1.1  Technology for Surveillance and Communication 
In the Prosopopeia series, communication between the lands of the dead and the living is 
central. The ghosts stay in contact with their homeland through techno­magical artefacts built 
to resemble mythical EVP equipment for ghost communication 

The Där vi föll EVP machine had been a movable reel­ to reel tape recorder. It was 
completely redesigned for Momentum, where it instead was implemented as a fixed 
installation in the participants’ headquarters. Furthermore, it was redesigned to replay pre­ 
recorded messages rather than direct communication with the game masters. To locate a 
recording, the participants had to scan a virtual ‘frequency band’. This turned the EVP 
machine from a pure communication channel into a puzzle. This way, the game masters could 
set up information for the participants in advance and not need to be on constant standby. 

More direct communication was also used, in particular through a ‘ghost chat’ which 
implemented a distorted text link to the world beyond – all messages received this way were 
garbled and often in foreign languages. A very old matrix printer complemented the setup and 
was used to relay particularly important messages for saving.


                                                             62 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


Surveillance technology was also rigged in the participants' headquarters ­ staged in an 
abandoned nuclear reactor below Stockholm. 




                    Image  17.  One  of  the  mobile  devices  was  a  glove  with  a  built­in 
                    RFID reader. This device was used to make contact with the magical 
                    spots in the landscape. 

4.1.2  The Node Game 
Momentum included a semi­automatic subgame (the node game) that ran without continuous 
game master involvement. The game masters had selected a set of locations around 
Stockholm with an interesting history (such as a slaughterhouse, the murder scene of a prime 
minister, the U.S. embassy). These were tracked down by GPS and marked by hidden RFID 
tags. Through various clues and using special equipment the participants could locate these 
places, learn their historical significance (illustrated by soundtrack played when the 
participant came in the vicinity), and then locate the exact spot (RFID tag) that needed to be 
’cleansed’ by magical means. Towards the end of the period, the participants were split up 
into four teams that would compete in finding and cleansing as many as possible of these 
places. 

To clean a magic spot the participants had to design and perform a magic ritual designed to fit 
the place’s history. Although the search for nodes was automated, the rituals were not. The 
technology was able to detect that a ritual was performed but not how well it was performed. 
They were improvised by the participants and reported back to the game masters by 
controllers (see below). Based on aesthetic evaluation, the game masters would have the final 
say on whether a group managed to cleanse a magical spot. 

Both the EVP machine and the node game thus lowered the need for continuous game 
mastering. At the same time, none of the installations was completely automatic. The 
messages in the EVP machine were entered manually by the game masters depending on the 
game’s overall progression, and rituals were manually refereed by the game masters. This 
approach provides room for participant engagement and creativity, while leaving the final 
control of the game developments to the game masters.



                                                             63 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

4.1.3  Controllers and Participant Reports 
Experience from Där vi föll had shown that the complexity of a social role­playing situation is 
very hard to capture through surveillance technology. The ambient mood, inner emotional 
drama and outspoken future plans are not really possible to perceive through technological 
mediation. When you are not there, it is very hard to understand and conceptualize what is 
happening. To tackle this problem we applied two techniques. 

The first of this was the introduction of a set of specially instructed controllers. Four 
participants, one in each of the participant factions, had been specially instructed to provide 
information about the game progress. Their most important role was to send in a report on the 
quality of a performed ritual, but they would also regularly communicate with the game 
masters on the progress of the game from the participant perspective. In addition, they were 
forewarned about particularly important game events so that they could secretly help the 
participants to be in the right places at the right times. 

The second technique was to require all participants to write a daily online diary about their 
game experiences and thoughts from a in­game perspective. 

4.1.4  Everyday Technology 
Experience from the ARG scene (McGonigal 2003, Szulborski 2005) argues that it is efficient 
to use the participant’s personal communication channels for game information. This 
immediately introduces a life­game merger and creates a light paranoia: at any time your 
phone rings, it might be a message from the game. Momentum adhered to this approach, by 
introducing NPC characters that only where contactable through everyday technology: Skype, 
phone, SMS, email and regular snail mail were used as communication channels. 

4.1.5  The Game Mastering System 
The game mastering (GM) system for Momentum was designed and developed closely 
together with the game­design. Focus was placed upon building a system that supported the 
process of decision making by live game masters. The GM system was a browser based 
application, providing integrated access to the most important information and 
communication channels between the participants and the game masters. The most important 
information kept in the GM system was
    ·  Static  information  about  the  participants,  including  contact  details,  a  picture,  and 
       information such as special skills, medical information, driver license, etc.,
     ·  A  log of all  messages that the participants had  sent and received through the various 
        communication systems,
     ·  Access to the in­game diaries,
     ·  Logs of participant activities around and at the nodes in the node game,
     ·  Notes about potential and active subplots. 

The system enabled the game masters to
   ·  Upload new sounds and make them available through the EVP machine
     ·  Communicate with the participants through the ‘ghost chat’ system
     ·  Add nodes and node sounds to the node game
     ·  Modify the state of a node (e.g. mark it as captured by one of the fractions),


                                                             64 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

     ·  Send  SMS  to  a  participant’s  private  phone  (for  both  in­game  use  and  for  off­game 
        emergencies). 




                    Image 18: Screenshot  from the GM system. Name of the player has 
                    been removed. 

The most important design goal for the GM system was to make information about the game 
and its state continuously available for the game­masters, wherever they where located. A 
collection of screen views were used, each providing an overview of a particular aspect of the 
system content. These were central especially when the game masters changed shifts and 
needed to communicate the state of the game comprehensively. In detail the screens were:
    ·  player screen,
     ·  character screen,
     ·  location and node screen,
     ·  sounds screen,
     ·  participant reports screen,
     ·  chat screen. 
In addition to the integrated GM system, the game masters used separate (proprietary) 
interfaces that plotted the participants’ GPS positions on a map (when they were using Steele 
and the Omax phone, explained later), and operated the video surveillance equipment. 

4.2  Experiences from Game Mastering Momentum 
A game that denies its ludic nature automatically leads to problems for game mastering. As 
the event cannot be discussed, presented or viewed as a game by the participants, all game 
mechanics need to be rationalized away and explained within the game context. This problem 
is one that Momentum shared with its predecessors Carolus Rex and Där vi föll, but it was 
accentuated by the long duration of Momentum. As the game masters had written themselves 
out of the story, they effectively had to hide from the participants for the five week period the 
game lasted – a difficult task since their main game master locale was placed in close vicinity 
of the participant’s high quarters.




                                                             65
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

In effect, the successful run­time game mastering of a game this long is one of the major 
achievements of Momentum. Aside from a handful of minor peeks behind the magician’s 
curtain (such as accidental spotting of a game master on a street where he shouldn’t be) the 
seamlessness was upheld successfully, and the game master interventions into reality were 
successful in generating a consistent illusion of a magically enhanced real world. 

          Q: Did you wonder how the game masters found out about everything? 
          A: I did wonder about it, but I was thinking that they were reading reports, maybe. And I was considering that there 
          might be microphones at the actual sites. … it never figured to me that they could actually have spies … or that 
          they were part of our team. (player, post­game interview) 

4.2.1  Video Surveillance 
The lesson learned from Där vi föll video surveillance was that cameras providing overall 
views are almost useless; they require constant monitoring and provide little information on 
social situations. In Momentum every camera was given one single question to answer, such 
as “Is there action in the war room?” The most effective installation was a pan tilt camera 
mounted above the reactor core. This camera was mounted so that the game masters could see 
the facial expressions of the person using the EVP machine. The functionality of this camera 
was so good that the game masters could assess the mood of the participants and how they 
reacted to messages. This gave ample opportunities for a dramatic, interesting interaction. 

4.2.2  Experiences on Node Game 
The split of actuation and decision making in automated (the node search) and manual 
(rituals) categories worked out well. The automatic feedback provided by sounds and 
vibrations allowed the players to play the game on their own as they were out on the streets 
doing their rituals. Only after the ritual, game masters and controllers needed to judge the 
success of the ritual. This way the pressure on the game masters was eased, while the 
participants would still get the instant feedback they needed on the streets. 

Node capturing was however less appreciated by the participants than the play created by the 
communication channels in the HQ, and the story­driven quests placed in the city. The 
competitive aspect made participants focus on finding and capturing nodes with the expense 
of creating believable rituals. The node game became detached from the storyline of the 
game. The design intention was that the participants themselves would create stories built on 
their activities, but this did not happen. 

          I think one of the bad moments was after we saved 93 … we’re sort of told that we should go on doing these nodes, 
          but no­one knows why. (player, post­game interview) 

4.2.3  The Game Master System 
Almost all of the information in the game master system was used in game mastering. For 
example, the personal photo and description on the player screen proved very valuable as they 
enabled game­masters to pick out and identify participants in a crowd, and data on special 
skills provided understanding on how difficult a certain challenge would be to a participant. 

About one week into the game, the game masters were able to draw upon the combined 
information to deduce the play style and preferred play times for the participants. Free­form 
notes were used as a means to communicate between game masters which individual plots 
that had been set in motion for that character.




                                                             66 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

The sound screen and the chat screen were the primary means for documenting plotlines. 
When a game master started the day, checking the activity log in these windows gave a 
general idea of who has been playing recently and what had been happening. Still, the overall 
assessment from game masters was that the interface lacked an adequate overview of the 
current game state. 

The challenge of constant attention eased up as the game went on. The game masters adapted 
their schedule to player activities, discovering that practically nobody played after four in the 
                                          14 
morning and before the next afternoon.  The game masters still had to work in shifts and the 
web­based GM interface was instrumental in making this possible. Although the game master 
central was rigged close to the participant’s HQ, game mastering could be done from any 
location with an Internet connection. Hungry, frozen and bored game masters would 
sometimes move out of their central and work from home or from a café. When called upon in 
the middle of the night to author some additional content, they could go back to sleep 
afterwards. 

4.2.4  In­game Diary 
The diary proved to be a valuable sensory technique in the game, both from the participant 
and the game master perspective. It provided the participant a way for the participant to 
conceptualizing and storing their experiences, thereby supporting their contemplation and 
narration of their experience. 

          Things About the Twenty First Centaury of Which I Willingly to Approve: 
                         15 
          ­ "Varma Koppen  " ­ it's not quite food, but it's warm and it's there. 
          ­ E­Mail ­ an interesting concept, but now that I grasp the basic underlying magic of it I wholeheartedly 
          approve. 
          ­ The Electronic Water heater ­ does nothing a stove cannot do, but it brings me my tea and soup that 
          much quicker. 
          ­ The "Lava Lamp" ­ I can watch this thing go for hours. (Diary excerpt, Woman participant) 


At several occasions, the diary was also used as an implicit communication channel; while 
kept in the story context of the game there were several entries that were thinly disguised 
comments and requests directed towards the game masters. The diary provided an inside 
perspective of the unfolding of the game narrative for the game masters, allowing successful 
decisions regarding what information to inject in the game and selecting the participant 
receiving it. Without diaries it would have been impossible to know what information was 
internalized, how it was interpreted, whether it was communicated to other participants. By 
using the diary information, we could build upon interpretations. 

The central risk of the diaries was that since they were kept in­game by the characters, the 
participants had no obligations to be honest or open in the diaries. In fact, they did even have 
good reasons to lie and mislead in the diaries. Fortunately these risks were not realized during 
Momentum.


14 After the game some participants reported being exhausted by the game, especially since there was game content
late in the night. Game masters reported the same exhaustion. Apparently the game masters stayed on post because
participants were playing late and needed content to play with, and the participants had to stay up in order to react to
the content GM:s fed into the game.
15 A Swedish brand of instant soup.




                                                             67 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

4.2.5  Controllers 
The introduction of the controllers was perhaps an even more important feature. The diaries 
only collected slow­paced and uni­directed information about the participant experience. The 
controllers could be contacted instantly and provide answers to specific questions. Can You 
See Me Now resulted in similar findings (Crabtree 2004). 

A problem with the controller solution was that the controllers could not be everywhere and 
play all the time. Since the majority of the participants did not know about the controller role, 
they frequently started activities without one present. 

To circumvent this restriction, the game masters told the controllers what was planned to 
happen at certain points in the story. This enabled them to be on the spot for the most 
important activities. Guided by information from game masters, the controllers could 
sometimes propose actions to the rest of the group without actively enforcing them. If the 
participants then chose to do something else than planned, the controller could inform the 
game masters and these could re­plan their actions for the new situation. 

This created a feedback loop in the game between the participants’ interpretations and the 
game­masters intentions, where the controllers where moderators and acted as an informed 
but to the participants unknown filter between these actors. 

The experience from Där vi föll showed that it is easy to overestimate the capability of the 
participants in solving puzzles. This problem was overcome by the introduction of controllers. 
The controllers knew enough about the puzzles and intellectual challenges of the game to 
provide hints to the other participants when they really needed them. This kept the challenge 
in the game while still preventing large parts of the usual frustration caused by too difficult 
puzzles. 

A side note is that the controllers enjoyed their role, even if it hampered their immersion. 

          [Momentum]  wasn’t  very  seamless  for  me,  since  I  was  a  controller,  but  also  I  thought  it  was  fun 
          playing as a controller. (player, post­game interview) 

4.3  Analysis 
4.3.1  The Distancing Problem 
Eirik Fatland (2005b) has discussed the core problem of larp game mastering as one of 
distance. Before a larp starts, the participants and the game masters / designers share more or 
less the same conceptual image of the game (at least if the larp designers have been successful 
in communicating their vision). But as soon as the game starts, the actual game experience is 
created and experienced only by the participants. Through observing the participants, the 
game masters can make an intelligent guess about their experience, but the larger a larp is and 
the longer it lasts, this becomes increasingly more difficult. 

The diaries and controllers were the major means to overcome this problem in Momentum. 
The diaries provided a good impression of the first­hand experience, and the introduction of 
the controllers provided a way to actually engage in dialogue as well as subtly guide the 
game.




                                                             68 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

In Momentum, one of the game masters participated in the game in person during the first 
weekend. This was less successful than use of the controllers, as it’s difficult to participate in 
a game and simultaneously make game mastering decisions. It’s especially hard to 
communicate with rest of the game orchestration team while staying with the participants. In 
Momentum the tutorial part run by a GM was judged as too lengthy and boring by several 
participants. 

A similar problem occurred already in Där vi föll, where game masters were communicating 
with the participants through the tape recorder EVP machine. This setup required them to 
role­play their characters, forcing them into a mental state where there was little room for 
reflection and strategic thinking. This was one of the main reasons why the EVP machine 
used in Momentum was designed to transfer only pre­recorded messages. 

4.3.2  Pacing 
Designing the pacing for a larp is very hard even in traditional larp settings. In Momentum, 
much of the game mastering tools were put in place to help the game masters to judge and 
affect the pace of the game. 

The pace was largely set by the participants, or more precisely, by a core team of highly 
active participants. This group emerged only after a few days of gameplay; a group of 
participants that spent much more time in the HQ than the other participants. The game 
masters responded to this by introducing content into the game whenever these participants 
requested it. 

This could potentially have alienated the larger group of more passive participants, but 
fortunately the participants were divided into four subgroups with their own motives and 
goals. These factions stuck together, taking care of transferring information and ensuring that 
the less active participants were kept up to date with the game. This way, the more active 
participants upheld critical mass in the game and ended up creating content for the less active 
participants. As one of the participants, who had been ill for a large part of the duration, stated 
it in the post­game interviews 

                if  we  hadn’t  had  these  elemental  groupings  …  I  probably  would’ve  felt  much  more  detached 
                during the end, now as you know I had this smaller group and I could connect to them and get up 
                to date. (player, post­game interview) 


Furthermore the game masters, who were aware of activity levels, could set up quests with a 
specific demand that certain participants had to be present. This caused the more active 
participants to lure the others back into the game 

During the post­game interviews, both the active and the passive participants felt engaged in 
the game and none were alienated. At the same time, all participants including the most active 
ones felt guilty that they had played too little. This comment should be seen in light of the fact 
that these participants would spend several hours each evening in the HQ. The game was 
perhaps a bit too effective in creating a highly engaging experience. 

4.3.3  The Risk of Railroading and Passivity 
Game mastering will sometimes be extremely frustrating to the participants. Two main risks 
with game mastering are that it may create a railroaded experience, and that it might render 
the participants passive.


                                                             69 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


‘Railroaded’ is a derogatory term for role­play scenarios which are experienced as a pre­ 
determined sequence of events over which the participants have little or no control. The 
problem is that whenever a larp is staged, the participants will pass through only one of a set 
of possible paths. Even the richest scenario can thus be perceived by the participants as 
railroaded. Heavy game mastering may lead the participants to believe that the experienced 
story line was the only possible story line. 

The second and more serious risk is that game mastering may hamper the participant’s sense 
of autonomy, creating a passive play style where the participants wait for the game masters to 
tell them what to do. If this play style emerges, the game is almost certain to be experienced 
as railroaded, since the game masters will be forced to steer the game in order to make 
anything happen at all. 

Momentum was designed to open up during the game, starting with fairly railroaded 
experience but forcing the participants to get more active during the weeks. For example, the 
first weekend ended with an in­game disaster forcing the mentor character out of the game, 
leaving the participants on their own. This weekend was followed by a game period of very 
little game­mastered activities, to encourage the participants to take control. A similar 
structure was implemented after the mid­game high intensity event. The two last weeks of the 
game were devoted to the node game, in which the participants again were pacing the game. 

From the participant interviews we can conclude that very few participants experienced 
Momentum as being railroaded after the first high intensity weekend. The passages from game 
master driven game to participant­driven game worked, but they were not frictionless. After 
the introduction weekend, the participants felt very unsure of what to do. To spur some 
activity in the participant group, the game masters added more quests and puzzles. This 
triggered a higher degree of self­driven activity in the participant group. Similarly, the 
participants were also slow in picking up on the node game during the last two weeks. 

4.3.4  Dynamic difficulty level 
The fact that Momentum was game­mastered enabled the implementation of a dynamic 
difficulty level, realised as a combination of determinism and competence­based puzzle play. 
A major example of this was that the central scene; the Saving 93, did not have a 
predetermined outcome; success or failure (and a whole range of in­between options) was 
based on the elemental factions’ success in their tasks. However, the difficulty of those tasks 
was tuned; the game masters provided additional hints and the informed controllers nudged 
the players on. 

Failure was, still, a tangible possibility. During the air scenario of Saving 93 the players 
miscalculated the triangulation puzzle provided by the game masters, and ended up – for 
hours – wandering in a wrong neighbourhood, searching for a dead drop (aka looking for a 
package that has been left by another agent in a specific location) that was in a different area. 
This could well have lead to a failure to complete this particular task. Overall failure in Saving 
93 was also possible; in fact the game masters discussed for hours whether they would pass 
the players or not. The most of the game organizers seemed to prefer the failure scenario, 
believing that a struggle for survival would produce more intense drama than a struggle for 
dominance.




                                                             70 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

In Där vi föll the solutions of dynamic difficulty level had caused problems. We identified 
several patterns of behaviour emerging from the dialogue of players and game master 
characters. Milking for clues was a problem, meaning that when then players did not know 
what to do next they would start talking about the problem through all interfaces that they had 
to the game masters (non­player characters, EVP, phone numbers, etc.). 

This problem did not surface in Momentum, probably because the various communication 
channels that the game masters had with the players were not perceived as such by the 
players. In the post game interviews most players stated that they had not though that the EVP 
chat, the Skype chat and printer were all controlled from the same game mastering room. 
Thus the fiction of the game held more strongly and hence the players did not break character 
immersion and start solving the problem with meta information. Though the players knew that 
the game masters had the answer they did not perceive the various communication channels 
as interfaces to the game masters.




                                                             71 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




5  User Technology Evaluation 
When information technology is used in larp settings, it typically manifests itself as artefacts 
that are used in some, but not all, in­game activities. The alternatives are that technology stays 
entirely hidden, is an integral part of the environment, or is used to augment the player’s own 
body (Söderberg et al. 2004). In IPerG, we have primarily designed and implemented in­game 
artefacts, complemented with hidden technology. 

The primary activity in a larp is almost always the face­to­face role­play interaction between 
the participants, so we should be careful to always discuss larp as a computer­supported 
activity rather than a computer mediated activity. This means that when designing an artefact 
for use in­game, we must not only consider how to interact with the artefact itself but also 
how the artefact and its interaction shape and inspire the surrounding activities that are not 
technology­supported in themselves. 

In Momentum, the players used a plethora of technology­based artefacts with different roles in 
the game. In this report, we will limit ourselves to a discussion of the artefacts designed for 
the game, and some examples of complementing technologies. 

5.1  Design factors 
To facilitate the discussion, we start by mapping out a design space for in­game technology. 
This design space can be roughly characterized by the form an artefact takes, and its function 
within the game design. This is however not a clear­cut division: the form an artefact takes is 
often a strong factor in how it shapes surrounding activities. 

5.1.1  In­game design or Indexical Propping 
A first design choice for the form of an artefact is whether the technology should be disguised 
as an in­game object built to fit the theme and setting of the larp, or whether it can appear as it 
is: as a mobile phone, a computer, a printer etc.. The latter model has been called indexical 
propping (Montola & Jonsson 2006). It should be noted that indexical propping is largely an 
ideal in traditional historic larp (at least in the Nordic countries): clothes, environments and


                                                             72 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

equipment will typically be in every detail designed manufactured according to the time 
period of the larp. 

When applied to technology, indexical propping is really only possible with contemporary or 
near­contemporary themes – computer technology is a fairly recent phenomenon. A large 
advantage of indexical propping is that the technology continues to adhere to its well­known 
interaction model; players do not need to learn how to use it. This usage model is typically 
also very rich, offering a much wider range of functionalities and interaction means than what 
special­built technology typically will do. Due to the ARG aesthetics of Momentum, many of 
the in­game technology installations were indexical props, including as computers, printers, 
and some computer programs. 

In settings that are not contemporary and when the technology used has no well­established 
usage model, the technology must be designed and propped as an in­game artefact. The 
biggest advantage of in­game design is that it enables full integration between the game theme 
and setting, and the technology. This might, in turn, limit the reusability of the technology. A 
design that is too specific for a particular production runs a risk of becoming a one­off, which 
                                                                                            16 
in turn affects the amount of resources that can be put into its design and implementation  . 
                                  17 
5.1.2  Seamfulness or Seamlessness 
The seamless integration of technology in everyday life has been a ‘golden nugget’ for mobile 
technology development for a long time. Partly inspired by Weiser’s original vision the 
pervasive technology vision has been described as 

           […]to create a system that is pervasively and unobtrusively embedded in the environment, completely 
                                                                                18 
          connected, intuitive, effortlessly portable, and constantly available. 
Given the design ideal of complete immersion, the obvious design choice for technology in 
larp settings would be the same. As quoted from (Söderberg et al 2004), 

          This  application  area  is  a  highly  demanding  design  space  where  any  technological  affordances  of  a 
          device must be totally hidden or disguised. To have the players accept an artifact, it has to completely 
          blend in with the setting or it will be rejected. 
As discussed by Chalmers (Chalmers et al 2005), there is however another design 
alternative, that of creating a seamful design which instead makes the inherent properties of 
the technology visible, as an asset to play with within the game setting. 

It should be noted that seamful design is not the same as indexical propping, and neither is 
it implied by it. We illustrate this by two examples.



16 A potential solution to this is to design and implement traditional folk magic artifacts: a wand, a crystal ball, a
dragon, etc. Due to their firm footing in folk lore, participants should find it easy to grasp their role in the game and
their usage model, and the folk lore functionality is sufficiently well spread to make them reusable in a very large
range of settings. Using folk magic as a design metaphor for Ubiquitous Computing has been suggested in the CHI
community (Binsted 2000, Cho et al 2004, Ciger et al 2003). The approach is however problematic as can be
observed in parallel larp projects outside of IPerG (such as www.dragonbane.org which featured a mechanical
dragon).
17 Note that in this chapter seamlessness refers to implementation of technology, not seamless merging of life and

game.
18 Quoted from SearchNetworking.com definitions,

http://searchnetworking.techtarget.com/sDefinition/0,,sid7_gci759337,00.html (Referenced March 2007).


                                                             73 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




                    Image 19: The EVP tape recorder used in Där vi föll. 

The Electronic Voice Phenomenon (EVP) (Image 19) machine constructed for the first 
Prosopopeia production was constructed from a tape recorder from the seventies. Inside 
the recorder, a mobile phone was rigged so that it picked up sounds from the EVP 
microphone and communicated it to the game masters. These could in turn construct 
responses that were recorded on the machine’s tape. The tape recorder was used exactly as 
a tape recorder from the seventies. Its hidden recording functionality implemented an 
interaction model that is well documented in pseudo­scientific studies of the electronic 
voice phenomenon from the sixties. In all, the EVP machine was an example of indexical 
propping, but at the same time the remote communication functionality inside it was done 
in a seamless manner. For example the players were not aware of when the phone was on 
or off. The phone was also transmitting sounds from the general environment of the 
machine and not just from the microphone. 




                    Image 20: The Thumin glove 

The Thumin Glove (Image 20) is a custom­built artefact designed for Momentum. The glove 
contains an RFID reader, a Bluetooth communication circuit, a vibrator and a LED light. The 
vibrator and LED light are both designed to provide local feedback about the functionality


                                                             74 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

and status of the device. In particular, the lead light is used to provide information about the 
status of the Bluetooth connection. When the glove is first switched on, this light blinks 
rapidly, indicating that the device is on but not yet connected to the wearer’s phone. Once 
connected, the LED signal changes to a slower, steady blink rate. In addition, the vibrator 
(which vibrated when the RFID reader was placed over an RFID tag), would only work when 
both the phone and the glove were on and connected to each other. 

This design is seamful in that it reflects the inner status of the device and its current 
connection status to the player. At the same time, it is an in­game design; the look and feel of 
the Thumin glove was made to fit both into the game aesthetics and diegesis. 

5.1.3  Magic or meta­game functionality 
A central choice in designing information technology for larp is if the actual functionality of 
the artefact will communicate in­game or meta­game information or communication to the 
players. 




                    Images  21  and  22:  The  Kejsartemplet  bracelet,  a  look  from  the 
                    outside and the inside.


                                                             75 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

An example of in­game technology that communicated meta­game information was the 
bracelets used in Kejsartemplet (Images 21 and 22), a traditional fantasy larp where IPerG 
contributed by supplying a set of in­game artefacts. The bracelets were worn by the wizards 
of the game and played an important role in the game diegesis; they were used to signal 
whether magic currently was or was not working. This was signalled by a vibrator mounted 
on the inside of the bracelet, which would vibrate in different patterns depending on whether 
magic just stopped working, and when it started to work again. This information was picked 
up by the person playing the wizard, who then would act in­game on this very discrete 
information channel. 

A contrasting example is the EVP machines used in Momentum. These were designed to relay 
information between game masters and players in a way that was completely integrated into 
the game diegesis. The EVP messages were recorded and replayed, printed, read aloud, and 
discussed as part of the game. 

The two examples illustrate that in­game information is much easier to use and re­use in the 
game. Since the bracelets communicated meta­information about the game, they relied on a 
hidden and private information channel that was available only to the player who was wearing 
the bracelet. This person was also forced to interpret and act on the information, bringing in 
an ‘off­game’ experience for this player. By contrast, the EVP machine provided ample 
opportunity for role­play based on its interaction model (“why aren’t the spirits talking to me 
today?”) and the communicated content. 

There is however a real advantage to meta­game information as well. As the players are 
experiencing the game first hand, they are better able to judge the state of the game and adapt 
their play to the situation than the game masters are. This is even more important when 
automatic functionality is introduced (as was done with the Kejsartemplet bracelets, since the 
current state of magic was determined by the status of another in­game artefact). Through 
providing some of the players with meta­game information, we are in effect introducing a 
limited in­game game master role. 

In Momentum, the ARG aesthetics made in­game communication a much more desirable 
choice. All of the in­game artefacts supplied in­game functionality (although the in­game and 
meta­game aspects were deliberately blurred in installations such as the online diary). Meta­ 
game communication was made available primarily for controllers, but also for all the players 
through a ‘hot line’ number to the game masters. In all cases, the players’ private phones were 
used. Since the game was using a reality­based aesthetics and players were able to mix 
everyday life activities with in­game activities, they were able to carry personal phones. The 
actual meta­game communication had to be kept hidden for the other players – by speaking on 
the phone when alone, or speaking in code. 

5.1.4  Functionality for Technology 
Technology should of course be introduced in a larp only when it achieves something that is 
difficult or impossible to achieve by any other means. If for no other reason, technology is 
expensive and unreliable, and requires additional resources to install and run during a game. 
As discussed previously, the main role for technology in Momentum was to support game 
mastering through enabling game master surveillance and communication. There are however 
a host of functionalities where information technology can be used.




                                                             76 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

Special effects. When the role of technology is discussed with non­technicians, most 
suggestions that are brought forward can be classified into this category. Doors that open 
automatically when some books are moved, chairs that scream, flying dragons etc. all belong 
to this category. Seen in isolation, special effects are not that interesting to support by any 
advanced technology, as they often can be realised by simpler means. Most automatic effects 
can be implemented by a simple circuit and a trigger; and more advanced effects can be 
solved by instructing a player who needs to be present, to trigger the effect in the right 
situation. 

Special effects have another function though. The first is to provide local feedback on remote 
effects. As in all interaction design, it is important for the user to recognise that they managed, 
or failed, to do something in the interface. In larp settings, this local feedback needs to be 
aesthetically pleasing and consistent with the game diegesis. In this context, ‘special effects’ 
are often precisely what we are looking for. The vibrator used in the Thumin glove is an 
example of such a special effect. The glove would vibrate whenever the RFID reader was 
placed over an RFID tag. This is a ‘special effect’ in the sense that vibrating gloves are 
perceived as magic; and it provided local feedback that this was an in­game event. The 
significance of the event was communicated by other means. 

Remote communication. The primary use of information technology in Momentum, and 
indeed in all larp productions that IPerG has been involved in, has been to support remote 
communication. In this setting, communication should be read as human­human 
communication transferring information­rich and vague media such as language, speech, 
images, sound, etc. Such communication can be synchronous (enabling fast dialogue) or 
asynchronous (which enables asynchronous participation). Both were used extensively in 
Momentum. It can also be both intended (as when players were using the EVP machine) or 
unintended (as when players were monitored by surveillance equipment). 

In Momentum, the in­game technology supported communication between players and game 
masters, but the players themselves also set up a web site to support information sharing and 
internal communication. 

Event communication. By contrast, event communication provides in­game information in 
an abstract way. The communication can again be synchronous or asynchronous, intended or 
unintended. The difference between remote communication and events is that events enable 
the information system to manage the information rather than just transferring it. One 
example (the Steele) was that when players came close to a specific node, this was signalled 
by a unique node sound in their earphones. 

Traces. If the information system is able to recognise events, this also enables traces to be 
stored. These can be made available to players or game masters in aggregated form. In 
Momentum, the log of GPS positions of the Steele provided a trace which was made available 
to game masters. Automatic scoring is a variant of traces. 

Information and quest propping. A particularly interesting usage of events is when they are 
used to tie game information or functionality into a particular place or a particular activity. 
Information and quest propping means that the players must first make the system aware that 
a particular event has occurred, before they get access to a particular piece of information or 
get their next assignment. The best example of quest propping in Momentum was the EVP 
machine discussed below, which only would release its hidden message if the players found


                                                             77 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

the right position of the dials on the machine. Information and quest propping is used 
extensively in on­line games to sequence and pace the player experience. 

5.2  Example artefacts in Momentum 
Momentum used a host of technological installations. In this section, we will describe, analyse 
and evaluate the most interesting examples and then briefly list other similar installations. 

5.2.1  The Player Diary 
As part of the pre­game introduction, the players were provided access to an in­game 
reporting system and asked to keep a daily diary using this tool. The diary was implemented 
as a very simple, remote terminal window that accepted input; they could not re­read previous 
diary entries. The simple layout and ‘write­only’ style of the diary system was intended to 
offer a sense of privacy; as if meditating or praying. 

The diary system was thus
   ·  indexically propped, as it appeared as, and was, a terminal window towards a server,
   ·  seamlessly designed, providing no clues as to whether it was working or not,
   ·  provided an intermediate between in­game and meta­game functionality.
   ·  implementing asynchronous communication (one­way, from the players to the game 
       masters) 

Of the twenty­seven players that participated throughout the entire game, seven players did 
not write anything at all, and two players wrote only one entry each (seemingly to test the 
system). Although it was not expected that the players would keep up a daily routine, the fact 
that a large number of players did not use the system at all was a bit discouraging. One reason 
might have been usability issues. The ‘write­only’ aspect of the system, as well as the fact that 
it disconnected if the entry was not saved in twenty minutes, caused some such problems. 
Similarily, the use of a terminal window is nowadays quite unusual and caused some 
problems. 

          [name removed] would like to report that your machinery ate the report he had spent so much of his rare 
          and precious time on writing and that he now is too wexed to start over. (diary entry) 
          [name removed] has never used ’Putty’ before but got some help from her boyfriend :) (diary entry) 
None of the players actually wrote daily journal entries. The reporting system went online one 
week into the game and was available over a total period of 24 days (while the game was 
ongoing). The player who wrote most journal entries wrote seventeen entries in all over this 
period. The average number of entries was 6.6 per player, and the female players wrote much 
more in the diary (13 entries on average) than the male players (5.5 on average). There seems 
to be a tendency for writing less frequently towards the end of the game, although most active 
players have made at lease one entry during the very last days. 

One of the most interesting aspects of the diary system was that it was sometimes used to 
communicate meta­game information to the game masters. Although all players were writing 
to the system as an in­game artefact, they were mostly aware that the system was being 
monitored by the game masters and used it also as a communication channel. Some players 
wrote more or less direct messages to Metatron into their diaries: 

           Shit, this might be the last thing I post ­ for all I know, you are in on it too.. I dont know.. This shit has 
          just got 23 written all over it. Illuminati will not get hold of me. I am considering cutting the wires to 
          the cameras.. Show me proof of your intentions. (diary entry)


                                                             78 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


The players took different stances towards the diary: some would write it entirely in 
characters, whereas others would switch between the two characters, or sometimes write 
solely in the role as themselves. 

          Hello. [player name]/[character name] reporting. ... This must be our diary, right? Are we supposed to 
          write from the perspective of the ghost or the vessel? We will probably write from both perspectives.” 
          (diary entry) 
          [My Character] will not likely write a word here but I know he writes notes in a notebook. […] he will 
          never learn to use this thing. I know he bought a hypermodern typewriter in the first decade of the last 
          century but it was only used by others to type his notes before they were sent to the publishers.” (diary 
          entry) 
For the players that wrote most actively in the diary, it very clearly became a means to reflect 
on their personal game experience, perhaps in particular on the relation between the ‘vessel’ 
and the ‘ghost’ character. 

          Yesterday when I came home late from work, I felt like making pancakes. So I cracked two eggs open 
          [...] and all hell broke loose. Fernando threw the egg shells on the floor and started to yell at me. I won’t 
          go into exactly how the quarrel continued, but we carried on discussing abortion when I understood that 
          he is much more radical than I. (diary entry) 
Other players used the system more as a report system, reporting semi­objectively on in­game 
events. 
          I have been mighty busy trying to patch up the leak, which has been leaking information about our 
          actions to the Grey and Kerberos. It started out with a document drop from Metatron. It contained some 
          radio­correspondence between different fractions considering an unknown radio transmission. 
          With the few bits of information given, we singled out a place which we believed to be the point to 
          where a grey entity had been sent to take a vessel of kerberos. It contained mail correspondence from 
          within kerberos and an EVP­sending with sensitive information about Zeitstrom. We called up Patric 
          Leijon, head of Kerberos security, and offered him a trade ­ the angelic name of the entity for the EVP­ 
          log. He ate the deal whole. 
          We extracted the ANGELIC name out of the patch using the OMAX­system which allowed people 
          back at HQ to do the fun part; they got the name and conducted a ceremony to get rid of the grey entity. 
          It was a tough day, and the cup at the end of the race was stolen from us. I am quite pissed. (diary entry) 
The in­game diary proved to be a useful tool for the game masters even though several 
players did not use it. For example, the game masters used the frequency and intensity of 
game entries as an indicator of how engaging the game experience was, and adapted their 
flow of new game content to this. The fact that usage of the diary system was strongly 
encouraged but not enforced was probably a key factor to its success. The number of players 
that were interested in writing diaries (or reports) was high enough to provide the game 
masters with the information they needed, while at the same time the players who did not 
want to use the system were not forced to do so. 

5.2.2  Redesigned EVP Device 
The EVP device used in Momentum was an entirely novel design with very little in common 
with the EVP device used in Där vi föll apart from the background EVP myth. The EVP 
machine in Momentum was a fixed installation in the reactor hall, special designed for this 
production (see Image 22 and 23).




                                                             79 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




                    Image  23: The EVP device, a  complex  system, used  in Momentum, 
                    was mounted in the old reactor pit. 

Furthermore, it no longer implemented direct communication; instead it supported players to 
search for hidden messages through twisting four knobs mounted on the device. The default 
mode of output was through very loud loudspeakers, making it impossible for anyone in the 
reactor to escape EVP output, although it was also possible to listen to the messages in 
earphones. 

In all, the EVP device used in Momentum was
    ·  an in­game artefact,
    ·  seamlessly designed (e.g. it was not possible for the players to know if the machine 
         was online or not),
    ·  providing in­game information,
    ·  using a combination of information propping (as the information was made accessible 
         only when the knobs were in the correct positions) and asynchronous communication 
         (as it would then play messages that had been uploaded by the game masters in 
         advance) 

The chosen design was based on a number of observations from Där vi föll. The use of 
loudspeakers rather than earphones was dictated by a need to make the device more multi­ 
user; although it was manoeuvred by one player at a time the Momentum design let everyone 
take part of the results. The choice of using an information propping approach rather than 
direct synchronous communication relieved the game masters from being constantly on 
watch. Finally, one experience from Där vi föll was that the immersive experience of 
communicating with the other side is better used in situations where players are not under 
time pressure or in noisy environments. Through mounting the EVP machine in the reactor 
hall rather than making it mobile, it was seldom used for instrumental reasons (such as 
solving a quest task under time pressure) but more for long­term, immersive interactions.




                                                             80 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




                    Image 24: Control mechanisms for the EVP. 

Apart from some technology problems, this EVP design worked well. Some players used the 
EVP machine for hours; this despite the fact that to use it you had to be strapped down on an 
                19 
asylum steel bed  . An additional advantage of the information propping approach was that 
the game masters were able to distance themselves from the characters that they were 
communicating information from. 

There is a difference however in the player response to the EVP rig in Momentum and that of 
Där vi föll. In the post­game interviews after Där vi föll, the players would always explicitly 
discuss the EVP as a wondrous piece of technology and have a strong attitude (for or against) 
it. In Momentum, the EVP rig, despite its spectacular design, is seldom commented upon as 
such, but only as one item in the full technology setup in the reactor. One reason might have 
been that the alternative communication channels were so much more effective that it became 
less important in the game. 
           A problem was that when something really cool was happening, the person who was supposed to 
           control the machine sitting in this bed didn’t really do anything, because the chat was more effective 
           than the mike in, and the chat was more effective than the sound out, and you didn’t really see, couldn’t 
           type of see the screens when you’re sitting there. So when, it worked good where when you were like 
           two persons and nothing really happening… (post­game interview) 

5.2.3  The Ghost Chat and the Matrix Printer 
The installations in the reactor locale included several other communication channels apart 
from the EVP machine. Of these, the ghost chat and the matrix printer deserves special 
mentioning.




19   They brought a blanket and a pillow.


                                                             81 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




                    Image 25: The ghost chat mounted in the reactor pit next to the EVP 
                    rig. 

The ghost chat was a custom­designed chat channel which implemented a text variant of 
EVP. The players would communicate their questions and comments through plan text, 
receiving responses as garbled and chopped up messages, often in foreign languages, from 
various ghost characters. It was used extensively to complement the EVP communication. 
One advantage of the ghost chat was that it was relatively easy for the players to copy the 
responses and decode them off­line. Although the ghost chat looked and felt much like an 
ordinary chat it had some hidden functionality that made it feel more ‘magic’ than a normal 
chat. The ghost chat relayed everything the players wrote on­screen to the game masters, even 
sentences and questions that were deleted before pressing ‘return’. This would sometimes 
provide the game masters with extra information that they could use in later ghost 
communications. This functionality was uncovered by some of the most active players. The 
ghost chat was thus an in­game design that for the players came very close to being indexical; 
still some of its functionality was hidden (from most players) and for that reason more 
‘magic’ to the players. It implemented remote synchronous communication to and from the 
game masters. 

The matrix printer was an ordinary printer from the eighties, which was used to relay 
particularly important ghost messages. It is the best example from Momentum of an 
indexically propped artefact that was used in a completely seamful way: its interaction model 
and functionality was exactly that which it seemed to be. It implemented remote 
synchronous/asynchronous communication, one way from the game masters to the players. 

The matrix printer was by far the most successful piece of in­game technology in Momentum. 
To start with, its incorporation in the game diegesis created a strong dramaturgic effect. 

          The printer was amazing. Because they only sent really important stuff, so when the printer started to 
          sound, you know something were going down, something’s going to happen now, so I loved the printer. 
          (post­game interview) 
Even more importantly, the fact that the printer was indexically propped and completely 
seamful in displaying its inner workings made the players able to handle it and fix problems 
with it without ever breaking out of the game diegesis. 

          I worked with the printer, and that was unexpected, and I guess that was also kind of humiliating to tell 
          you, I guess you have been working a lot with this tech, but the teleprinter was great. You see what’s



                                                             82 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

          happening, it was this cool stuff turning out, and when it jammed, and it did, I could fix it myself. I 
          could tear it out and work, ooh, the paper is jammed, how do we do this? […] Call to someone, hurry 
          up, hurry up! Please, (­) is calling us […]we can like really work with the technology. (post­game 
          interview) 




                    Image 26: The Matrix printer 

In all, the collection of technology installations in the reactor was appreciated. Especially the 
richness of the installation created a very strong sense of immersion. 

          Q: How did that feel, the technology, did it feel like a prop, or did it feel like a part of the game? 
          A: It felt like part of the game, and it felt like a part of the reality. And I actually was talking with Emil 
          about it, and one of the main reasons it felt real was that the amount of props was much, much greater 
          than it had to be. There were loads of things on desks that weren’t supposed to be used, but it looked 
          like it could be used. So I think if there were only the terminal, and only the straps and stuff like that, it 
          would feel like everything that you see has to be used.  (post­game interview) 
          I had some of my greatest moments playing, playing towards a computer screen.. [laughs] That’s 
          something very interesting. You were playing with a computer, you were playing towards nothing, you 
          know..  (post­game interview) 
It was however considered a bit difficult to handle. About half of the players reported in the 
in­game interviews that they did not use the reactor technology much, feeling a bit inadequate 
for the task. 

5.2.4  Camera Surveillance 
During the Där vi föll production, the game masters were not able to retrieve much useful 
information from surveillance equipment. In Momentum, cameras were still used, but this 
time in a more limited way and for specific purposes. As an example, one camera was 
mounted right above the EVP rig in the reactor. Due to the careful selection of the surveyed 
spots, camera surveillance was much more effective in Momentum. In particular, cameras 
enabled the game masters to stay alert when people were getting ready to use the in­game 
communication devices and judge how large audience a transmission would have. As the 
cameras were directed towards the places where people would sit during communication 
sessions, they were also able to watch facial expressions to pick up emotional reactions to the 
transmissions. The camera sound channel was for the most not used at all.




                                                             83 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

5.2.5  Omax phone, Thumin Gloves and the Steele 
The mobile equipment in Momentum consisted of three items: the Thumin glove, the Steele, 
and the Omax phone. 

The Thumin glove was briefly presented above. In the in­game narrative, the Thumin glove 
was a modern adaptation of an ancient magic device that enabled the wearer to open a 
connection to the ‘other side’ at a spot where the wall between the worlds was unusually 
weak. The Thumin glove was a custom­built device constructed around an RFID reader that 
communicated over Bluetooth to the Omax phone. 




                    Image 27: The Steele. 

The Steele was simply a GPS reader, mounted inside a small pyramid. It came together with a 
tripod so that it could be placed in a steady position at a particular location. Again, the name 
‘steele’ is based on an ancient mythical construct – a kind of altar in the shape of a small 
pillar. The Steele would also connect over Bluetooth to the Omax phone. 

The Omax phone was used only for in­game communication between the game server and the 
mobile devices. In the original game design, each player was assumed to wear an Omax 
phone and it had some functionality on its own; in the actual game only the players equipped 
with a Thumin glove or a Steele had a reason to use one. The phone had a special (Java) 
program installed that when started would look for game devices in its proximity and connect 
to them. Its role was to relay in­game events from the Thumin and the Steele to the game 
server, and send back sounds that were played in the additional speakers or earphones of the 
phone. 

The players used the mobile equipment to seek for magical nodes in the landscape, nodes that 
when found could be cleaned from negative influences to create an energy node for the world 
beyond. The players would seek for nodes through carrying the Steele and listening to the 
speakers for sounds that indicated that they were close to a magic node. When such a place 
was found, they would continue by looking for the precise spot, represented by a hidden RFID 
tag that could be found by placing the Thumin glove on top of it. When such a node was 
found, the glove vibrated and the same node sound was played in the earphones, this time at a 
higher volume. It was at this spot the cleansing ritual should take place. 

To summarise, the Thumin glove and the Steele were in­game designed artefacts whereas the 
Omax phone was indexically propped. The Thumin glove was seamfully designed, with a 
number of design features that helped the wearer to understand the current status of the


                                                             84 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

device. As the Omax phone was indexically propped and the game application had to be 
explicitly started by the player, it is possible to say that the Omax phone also was using 
seamful design. However, the application itself was however very obscure and hid all of its 
functionality from the players. The mobile equipment implemented information and quest 
propping; the node sounds illustrated the type of node encountered and the RFID tag enabled 
cleaning rituals. 




                    Image  28:  Three  Urim  tablets,  each  individually  design  to  fit  the 
                    elemental group (and a black plastic box that contain a Thumin glove 
                    with Steele on top of it). 

In addition to these three mobile devices, the players were also introduced to a tablet PC 
which was intended to be used in rituals, called the Urim tablet. The tablet PC implemented a 
simplified version of a traditional magic system (Enochian magic); and were as all real magic 
systems extremely complicated to use. Due to technical difficulties, the tablet PCs were never 
functional in the game, and were removed from the game after one week of game play. 
Although this made it necessary to rely more on the controllers reporting each ritual, it 
probably improved the game experience for the players. 

          The tablets especially were, they removed them thankfully. Thank them very much for that. If we had 
          been supposed to use those, I would not have performed or taken part in one single ritual. Because they 
          were such a hassle, for one thing, and the other is, it was too much of an intrusion […] We’re supposed 
          to use magic thinking. And it just seemed like an elaborate toy that had no other purpose than looking 
          cool. (post­game interview) 
The largest problem experienced with the equipment was that the mobile equipment was put 
in place too late in the game, and that its functionality was brittle even when implemented. 
Several of the players commented on this fact, and it was particularly annoying for players 
who themselves were competent technicians. 

Design­wise, the technology was appreciated. With the exception of one player who was very 
negative towards all of the technology, the players answered that the in­game technology felt


                                                             85 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

like an integral part of the in­game world and that, despite the technology problems, this 
experience was appreciated. 

          Q: So, did it, did they [the tech] feel props or communication devices or tools? 
          A: A little bit of both. Yeah, I realized that a big part of it was tracking the players and what they were 
          doing, but as they gave, as they wasn’t just passive, they gave us feedback too, so like, yeah, they were 
          great. I guess they could’ve worked a little bit better, but I think they were a great part of the game. 
          Without them, the game wouldn’t have been near as good…(post­game interview) 
The seamful design aspects of the Thumin glove inspired the players to invent an interaction 
model for the device. The Thumin glove would vibrate only if it was connected to the phone 
and the application was running at the phone. During the initiation ritual, all players had been 
equipped with a little personal pouch containing, among other things, a crystal and a magical 
‘dog tag’, which actually was an RFID tag. The players carried this bag around their neck. By 
placing the glove on top of the crystal, the Thumin glove would vibrate only if it was on and 
properly connected. The players did not really know why the glove vibrated on the crystal, but 
it seemed like a good way to check that the equipment was working. 

Apart from implementing a technology check, this gesture worked well in­game. The gesture 
was actually designed from start; it was one of the reasons why the personal RFID tag had 
been put in the pouch to start with. But due to late modifications to the technology 
specification it had no in­game functionality and the players had not been instructed to use it. 
Still, the players were able to find this gesture and make use of it in a way that was both 
seamful and still fit elegantly into the game aesthetics. 

5.3  Analysis 
5.3.1  Technology breaks and real world intervenes 
The most important conclusion to draw from Momentum is that designing problem­free 
technology for larp settings is a fever dream and will remain so. This means that every 
introduction of technology into a larp must include not only a design the game experience of 
the technology when it is working, but also the game experience around non­working 
technology. Although some of the technology used in Momentum was extremely brittle, the 
game is not unique in this respect and similar problems should be anticipated in every 
technology­enhanced production. 

There are two main reasons for this. The first is that technology in itself is a brittle design 
material: technology always breaks. In our everyday life, technology is always provided with 
backup solutions; be it reset buttons, alternative solutions, or support staff to call in. In 
Momentum, all in­game technology broke at least once; this included some serious fall­outs of 
the internet connectivity in the reactor (on which all surveillance equipment and EVP 
communication relied). The situation is even worse when technology is custom­built for a 
specific production; for example a custom­built EVP machine is unlikely to live up to the 
stability of a Skype chat. 

The second reason is that the world is a very fickle stage for games. Some of the technology 
breakdowns in Momentum were extremely hard to foresee. Through connecting a pre­amp the 
wrong way, the players managed to break not one but two such devices during the first 
weekend. The reactor core turned out to be full of a kind of very fine­grained concrete dust




                                                             86 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

                                                                    20 
that broke a computer installation during the first day of the game  . On several occasions, the 
players unplugged a critical power cable in the reactor to put in an electric water heater, and 
so on. 

Momentum employed two main strategies to deal with technology breakdowns. One was an 
alarm signal installed in the reactor core. When this alarm went off, the players were 
instructed to leave the area and not go back within two hours. This emergency solution was 
used on some occasions, especially in during the first critical days, to fix acute problems in 
the reactor. The second strategy was the Metatron order itself: through contacting Metatron 
the players could get help from the game organisers with fixing technology without breaking 
out of the game diegesis. Although the alarm worked diegetically, it was not well appreciated: 
it broke the game flow in the reactor and forced the players to climb the long stair out of the 
reactor. The Metatron order worked less well. In intense game­play situations, the fact that 
you can call Metatron and that they might be able to fix your technology tomorrow is not 
acceptable to players. 

           We have no contact whatsoever with Metatron. The equipment in the rig has started to fall apart; 
           yesterday it started smoking from some kind of pulse meter. The devil take Adam and his Strike Team 
           with technicians who were going to appear when things started to fuck up, sediamo delle anitre, stiamo 
           bastardi, you damned incompetent fools. THINGS ARE SERIOUSLY FUCKING UP, WHERE ARE 
           YOU? (diary entry) 

5.3.2  Seamful Design and Indexical Propping 
Rather than relying on game masters fixing problems, the in­game technology worked best 
when it provided sufficient information about its inner workings to the players, so that they 
could fix it themselves. The ARG aesthetics and the revolutionary theme of Momentum both 
also encouraged players to take control over the technology. When players are able to take 
control over the technology and fix the problems themselves, this empowers them and makes 
them feel more at home in the game experience. 

It is not enough however if players are able to expose the inner workings of the technology 
and by that fix problems. As is illustrated by the following quote from a technology­savoury 
player, it is important that this exposure does not break out of the game diegesis. For this 
player, the lack of instructions caused him (and some of the other players) to start taking the 
technology apart, which in turn lead them to discover what technology worked and what had 
only been added as decoration. 

           […] c’mon, with a simple like instruction about how the machine worked, so we could plug in shit by 
           ourselves.[…] Because the fail and error technique that we had to use, kind of quick we realized that 
           these antennas doesn’t do shit. This […]  sound system, the best way to get a clear transmission is to 
           turn it off. This login system doesn’t really do anything. This electropulse doesn’t really do anything, 
           they doesn’t really even give you power […]. (post­game interview) 
This observation is a very strong argument in favour of seamful rather than seamless design of 
all in­game technology. Since hidden functionalities are so extremely successful in creating a 
magic experience, they create a very dangerous temptation for the designers of larp 
technology. The magic experience will break when the technology breaks. (As a side point, 
this is also a strong argument against implementing traditional folk­lore magic; although the 
core functionality just might be possible to implement, the traditional break­down interaction 
models are nothing you would want to implement with modern technology.)


20   This problem was eventually solved by pulling a nylon stocking over the replacement computer.


                                                             87 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


Independent of whether the technology is designed as in­game or indexically propped 
artefacts, as much as possible of the inner workings of the technology should be exposed and 
accessible to the players. As seen with the matrix printer, seamful design is easiest to achieve 
with indexical artefacts that contain no hidden functionality whatsoever. But the simple 
seamful design of the Thumin glove came quite close in creating a useful dramatic experience 
around its usage, including the setup and debugging of its functionality. The crucial difference 
was that the Thumin glove only could display that it was not working; the players were not 
able to fix it. 

Indexical propping does not imply seamful design and indexical propping alone does not 
ensure that players can handle technology breakdowns in game. The EVP machine from Där 
vi föll is an example of this. This machine looked and worked like, and was, a reel to reel tape 
recorder from the seventies. But it also contained hidden functionality that implemented the 
EVP ghost communication. This hidden functionality was seamlessly integrated and thus 
extremely hard for the players to survey or fix. 

5.3.3  The Importance of Aesthetics 
Through a very careful design of the aesthetics of all technology, including custom­built 
software, the technology installations in Momentum contributed substantially to the immersive 
environment of the game. As discussed previously, the ‘look and feel’ of all player 
technology was designed to adhere to the game diegesis and the overall game aesthetics. As 
discussed above, most of the players also saw it as an integral part of the game world. For the 
Momentum designers, it was of outmost importance that all player activities, including the 
interaction with the technology, should contribute to drawing them into the game rather than 
distancing themselves from it. 

One advantage of this approach was that the technology actually could have a role in the 
game even when it was not working. During the first weekend, the tablets were used in­game 
as a ‘special effect’ game prop without server connection (and thereby without any remote 
effect on the state of the game). 

5.3.4  The Importance of Usability 
To some extent, this focus on aesthetics caused a de­emphasis on usability. As can be seen 
above, usability was a fairly consistent problem for many of the in­game artefacts. The online 
diary was confusing in its write­only mode (and hard to get working), in intense situations the 
EVP rig provided a poor experience for the person who actually was in the rig, the reactor 
technology would have benefited from an in­game instruction, and by and large the messages 
communicated through EVP (as well as the sounds communicated by the Steele and the 
Thumin glove) were considered hard to hear and even harder to interpret. From the pure 
usability perspective, the Thumin glove was the most successful design (although its overall 
usability was hampered by the phone interaction design) and the tablet was perhaps the least 
usable artefact. 

It should be noted that it is far from obvious what a “good” interaction design would be in a 
larp like this. Simple and straightforward usability is typically not desirable; the technology is 
intended to contribute to the in­game challenge and a slow and complex interaction model can 
support immersion. Many of the devices had interaction models that were made deliberately 
complicated to support a strong immersive experience. One such example was the EVP rig in 
the reactor core, which worked well when the game pace was low, but would have benefited


                                                             88 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

from more feedback (especially access to the on­screen chat messages) when the game pace 
was high. In general, the varying pacing of a larp seems to require that the same equipment 
can offer several different interaction models for different situations. 

Nevertheless, some of the interaction problems could have been alleviated prior to the game 
with just a little bit more testing. Some things were just too hard to use; this would have been 
spotted easily by handing the equipment out to a couple of people prior to the game. One of 
the reasons that this did not happen was that the technology development was late. But there 
was also a real conflict between the desire to keep the aesthetics of the game consistent and 
the goal making interaction feasible; a conflict that no doubt will surface again in other 
technology enhanced larp projects.




                                                             89 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




                     21 
6  Ethical Evaluation 
According to the IPerG deliverable D5.5 Ethics of Pervasive Gaming (Montola & al. 2006), in 
pervasive games the designers need to weight what is acceptable in game, but also what is 
acceptable in ordinary life. The report states that the two most important aspects are 
fabrication and surveillance. Both aspects had to be addressed in Momentum. 

6.1  Surveillance and privacy 
Surveillance and thus privacy were issues regarding players who were filmed when they were 
at the headquarters. Bystanders were not subjected to surveillance. The players had been 
informed in the player agreement, that they would be subjected to surveillance. However, the 
player agreement (see Appendix A) was effectively a carte blanche – the players did not 
know when or how they would be observed. 

          Prosopopeia  Bardo  2:  Momentum  is  both  a  technologically  orchestrated  Larp  and  an  EU­funded  research 
          prototype.  In  order to  run  the  game and  conduct  our research  on  pervasive  gaming,  we  will need  to  subject  our 
          players to surveillance and observation for the duration of the game. 
          By  agreeing  to  this  form  you  allow  Momentum  organizers  to  collect  technical  surveillance  data  about  your 
          gameplay during of the game and store it as long as it is needed it for the purposes of game orchestration, research 
          and  documentation.  The  data  will  be  treated  as  privacy­protected personal  data  and  not  redistributed  outside the 
          research group. 
          Our surveillance equipment includes many sorts of sensors including cameras and microphones; some you will be 
          carrying  around  while  others  are  mounted  in  prepared  locations.  You  should  understand  that  the  game  will  be 
          running  24  hours  a  day,  and  it  will  not  be  restricted  to  any  physical  areas.  However,  the  technology  enhanced 
          wearables you might wear or encounter during the game do not include active microphones or cameras. 


Most players thought that the headquarters was littered with cameras even if there were only 
few (and even those were quite visible). On the other hand the players did not know that there


21Even though we use the IPerG deliverable D5.5 Ethics of Pervasive Gaming (Montola & al. 2006) in the ethical
evaluation, it should be made clear from the start that when Momentum was designed, D5.5 was not available for use.
Thus, the function of this chapter is not to measure the designer success in comparison to D5.5.


                                                                  90 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

were controllers, player characters that conveyed information to the game masters. Also, the 
participant observation was something that the players did not know about. 

Carte blanche player agreement was clearly a questionable choice as the players were not 
aware what rights they were signing away to the game masters. It can be questioned if a 
person is actually signing away his rights if he does not know what he is signing away. In 
effect the players were placing their trust in the game masters, hoping that that trust would not 
be misused. This applied to quite a few things, not just privacy. For example the players were 
given pills that supposedly contained a drug. Most, but not all, players decided that whatever 
the pills actually contained wouldn’t be harmful and would not actually be a drug. The pills 
contained sugar – something that a diabetic player would probably want to be informed about 
(none of the players were diabetic). 

D5.5 quotes Allen’s (1996) division regarding the concept of privacy:

     ·  physical privacy, meaning that people have the right to private physical space from 
        where other people may be excluded (e.g. private toilets),
     ·  informational privacy, meaning that a person has the right to control access to 
        information about oneself (e.g. privacy of information on one's health), and
     ·  decisional privacy, meaning that people have the right to exclude other people from 
        the decisions concerning oneself (e.g. the decision to make an abortion). 

Physical privacy was seldom invaded in Momentum. There were no cameras in the toilets, 
nothing was planted in the homes of the players and the game did not contain violence. 
However, when a player was caught by the diegetic security firm, the guards did go though 
the personal belongings of the player. Also, at one point in the game a player went through the 
bag of a non­player when he thought that person was an NPC. 

These transgressions are not really problematic per se as the personal effects of the 
participants are seen as props in the game. What a character carries around is seen as fair 
game. This freezing of the physical privacy does not, of course, cover non­participants. 
However, in the situation when this happened, the player had ample reason to believe that he 
was dealing with a participant. Thus the problem is not with violating physical privacy, but 
with identifying participants. 

Informational privacy is a clear example of a situation where the players signed away their 
privacy in the player agreement. The players did not know what information was being 
collected and who had access to it. It is clear that in order to game master a game this long 
with this many intertwined plots a lot of player­specific information needs to written down. 
Still, the player agreement was unnecessarily vague. 

Decisional privacy is a more complex issue. On a practical level the players were aware that 
the other players and the game masters were able to influence their choices (participating on 
certain missions, for example). The players (as well as the characters) were also able to step 
out of the game or not just show up for a certain part of the game. 

On a more philosophical level the player had not been aware about the political leanings of 
the game. Basically the players were ‘tricked’ into taking part in quite leftist political actions 
(demonstrations, symbolic actions) as well as subjected to strong communal experiences and 
encouraged to interpret them as magical and spiritual (rituals). These were a surprise to some


                                                             91 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

players and this was not something that the players could opt out of without abandoning the 
whole game. 

Though slightly suspect, this is not an ethical problem. The game was clearly framed as 
political and with certain artistic ambitions. This means that the game masters could be 
expected to have some sort of a message. Still, the difference in comparison to for example 
political art in a gallery is that in Momentum the players had to participate in action – which 
took place in the ordinary world – in order to be able to see the work of the auteurs. 

6.2  Fabrication 
Fabrication, as opposed to surveillance, was something that affected both participants and 
non­participants. As the players were aware that the game was indeed a fiction, the ethics of 
fabrication are most relevant regarding bystanders. 

For five weeks the players were instructed to treat the game as if it were real. This meant that 
they had to lie to friends, family members, acquaintances and strangers. Most of the time the 
lying was passive, only done when prompted about the events of the game. In the context of 
Momentum lying to friends and relatives is not really an ethical issue, as many of these people 
had been informed about the ludic nature of the event beforehand and the players were most 
of the time willing to explain the events of the game afterwards. 

          First of all [I] told [my boyfriend] before the game that it was a game and what it was about, the things I knew then, 
          which wasn’t very much. And that I wouldn’t be able to talk about it at all with him for a month, and I promised to 
          tell him anything, everything afterwards. And he has asked like one time, and then I have said that we’ll discuss it 
          in two weeks. (post­gameplayer interview). 
          My mother asked me so how was the game, then I was more like well, yeah, it’s going great, I really don’t wanna 
          talk about it, but yeah, you might wanna call it a game, you can  call it a game if you want to. (post­gameplayer 
          interview). 
          When my family contacted and said oh, how’s the larp going, I was like it isn’t a larp. It’s a lot bigger, I can’t talk 
          about it. It’s really strange, I will contact you in a month, don’t worry. Don’t worry, I’m not feeling so good, I have 
          to hang up now. (post­gameplayer interview) 

The fabrication is much more questionable when it is aimed at non­participants that the 
players will not have any contact after disseminating the lie. It is impossible to say how much 
of fabrication took place during Momentum, but the game masters had tried to minimize it 
with the convenient lie that the event was a game. So if the players did something odd out on 
the town and someone asked them about it they could say that they were “just playing a 
game”. It is not known how much this excuse was used, but at least at the American embassy 
the police was told about the game­ness of the events. 

          [The police] came out with you know their hands on the guns and walked up to us, because some of us (­) down, 
          and they were really jumpy, and they started to explain that this is a game, and of course that was the easiest 
          explanation. It, we didn’t break the Prosopopeia proposal, but we explained it to the cops that this is a game, 
          because it’s an easy thing to say. (post­game player interview). 

Usually when non­participants came into contact with the game it was apparent that 
something weird was going on. One of the design principles had been to create ambiguous 
interactions for the participants and so the rituals, the demonstration, the party and other such 
endeavours were pretty easy to mentally write off as just something weird that happens on the 
town. 

An exception to this is the art gallery where the staff was directly lied to when they were 
drawn into the game. But, as already discussed, they enjoyed the interaction.



                                                              92 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

Another exception is the online material created for the game that is in no way marked as 
fiction. Of course, the Internet is hardly known for its trustworthiness, and it is acceptable that 
anyone post pretty much anything they like online. However, the game masters did place a 
page long description on the diegetic group “de andra” in the Swedish language Wikipedia. As 
that site is an encyclopaedia, deliberately putting in fictive information is quite questionable. 
The page was removed by the administrators of the site the following day and it is quite 
improbable that anyone not associated with the game read it or believed it. The page was 
more of a nuisance to the administrators (see next subchapter) than a lie. 

6.3  Accountability 
In pervasive games the players’ perception of the game rules may clash with what is 
considered legal or appropriate behaviour within the real world social context, and as the 
magic circle is blurred in many fashions, this becomes a very relevant concern. Speeding on 
the highway to catch up with another player is just as unlawful as speeding for any other 
reason (and, as games are voluntary and needless, may be considered even less morally 
acceptable). In the ethics deliverable D5.5 it was speculated that a player may consider the 
accountability to lie with the game designer or game organiser, as they developed a rule set 
that rewarded speeding. (Montola et al 2006). 

In Momentum, it was pointed out to the players time and time again before the game that they 
would be responsible for their actions. For example the player agreement stated: 

          By signing this agreement you expressly acknowledge and agree that you are playing this game at your own sole 
          risk. Every part of Momentum is voluntary and you are personally responsible for any acts you perform during the 
          game. The game is provided "as is" and without any warranty of any kind. If you brake any part of this agreement 
          you will be suspended from the game and your game­fee will not be repaid. 
          […] 
          Momentum is played in the real world and not in a pre­staged environment. The locations used and rented for the 
          game are provided ‘as is’ and not guaranteed to be safe. Remember that speeding, trespassing and similar acts are 
          just as illegal within the game as in ordinary life. 


The problems regarding accountability that arose during play were not related to question of 
who carries the responsibility. The players had internalised that quite well. However, there 
were problems with the blurring of the magic circle. As described above, the incident at 
Gullmarsplan took place because players played differently with participants and non­ 
participants. After the incident, as the game masters had heard about it but did not yet have a 
clear picture as to what had happened and why, the players were sent an email that reiterated 
the player agreement: 

          A bit surprisingly, we feel the need to remind all the participants of Prosopopeia Bardo 2: Momentum about the 
          following, hopefully quite obvious thing: Please, do not break the Swedish law while, or as a part of your 
          gameplay. Not even if your character would. In the worst case scenario, the police involvement would force us to 
          shut down the whole game. 

          The game masters can't take the responsibility of anything you might do during the game. If you ever are in doubt 
          whether something you plan to do as part of the game is safe or legal calm down and think twice. 


This infuriated at least one player precisely because now the game masters were saying that 
the players weren’t allowed to do anything illegal, which is quite different from saying that 
the players would carry the responsibility for their actions. 

          And the other thing was, do not break the law, even if your character would. No, that was not the agreement from 
          the  beginning.  The  agreement  was  you  do  things  on  your  responsibility.  So,  do  not  break  the  law  even  if  your


                                                                 93 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

          character would. So, do not break the law even if you would, what about that?  I would break the law in certain 
          circumstances, and gladly so, with political intent. (post­gameplayer interview) 


Some players were quite willing to bend or break the law within the context of the game and 
carry the responsibility for these actions. In fact some players had joined the game with this 
expectation and this was exactly what they were looking for in the game. The way that the 
players were recruited probably is a major influence behind this finding as many players’ had 
a background in political activism or in urban exploration (which endorses trespassing as long 
as the trespasser “takes nothing but photos, leaves nothing but footprints”). 

One central problem in this is that different players had different expectations. While many 
players were willing to for example trespass, all of the players were not. This creates 
problems with social pressure. As Anders was already quoted above in the context of the 
Gullmarsplan case: 

          There was social pressure in the way that if the woman was a part of the game the person who would blow the 
          whistle would be forever ridiculed as a "not hard­core enough for the game"­larper. 

This brings into question the players’ abilities to take personal responsibility for actions 
carried out during the game. Players did not report that they were coerced into doing things 
that they did not want to do, on the contrary, they denied that such things happened. It is of 
course possible that the players did not want to admit to such a thing in the post game 
interviews. In any case social pressuring remains a possibility in intensive pervasive games. 

Still, in the post­game interviews it turned out that players had not broken the law during the 
game more than they would have during a similar 5 week period – but that many did not 
consider trespassing a crime. In addition to trespassing (in the spirit of urban exploration), the 
players reported very few instances of breaking the law, and all of those were very minor. For 
examples, as part of a symbolic action, some players had defaced advertisements. 

One way to look at accountability is with the concepts of harm, offence and risk. Harms 
include lasting setbacks to one’s assets, including physical and psychological setbacks. 
Offences include harms, but also minor, ‘harmless’ nuisances such as bad manners and 
indecency. 

Momentum contained a lot of minor nuisances towards non­participants. In fact, this was 
encouraged, and to a certain extent the whole point of the game from the point of view of 
performance. For example, some of the rituals that were carried out in public did “disturb the 
peace”. 

The incident at the art gallery is theoretically a nuisance or indeed even a harm (of losing 
time) to the people working there. Yet, as shown in the interview conducted with the 
personnel, it was not perceived as such. The problem is, of course, that it is impossible to 
guess what the ambiguity of playing that non­participants feel is experienced as fun – and 
when it is just a nuisance (see also Montola & Waern 2006). 

Risk regarding non­players was nonexistent, and toward player fairly small. The aesthetics of 
the game did encourage trespassing, which breaks the law and thus is a risk to the player – 
and in some cases the trespassing might actually put the player at risk. However, the game 
mechanics or game material did not encourage breaking the law in this way. In fact, the game




                                                             94 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

master characters discouraged players from even minor infractions – which displeased some 
of the players who wanted more confrontation with the ordinary world. 

          In some ways [the game], it failed massively [to meet my expectations]. […] The political actions that 
          did not happen, after this first fanning, and then [game master played NPC] coming in saying this is not 
          the  thing  that  matters.  The  thing  that  matters  is  these  mumbojumbo  words  and  standing  around 
          chanting, which was not what [the game master] was trying say.  Basically  what he said to me in that 
          situation, because we had planned a real cool direct action, and he came in this character and said well, 
          we’re gonna do this cool stuff with these tablets (­) that’s what matters. (post­game player interview). 


Momentum caused actual harm in some minor ways. In the incident at Gullmarsplan, a few 
coins (worth less than one Euro) were stolen from the homeless person. In case of a homeless 
person, this is a clear setback to one’s assets. The causes and ways to avoid these kind of 
situations have already been discussed. 

Another situation where the game can be constructed as harmful, is the ritual al the American 
embassy and the demonstration, both of which consumed resources of the society in the form 
of police involvement. This is a much hazier situation. Both of these instances were 
completely legal. For an individual police officer these incidents may have been nuisances 
(the officers at the embassy seemed agitated, the ones at the demonstration seemed bored), but 
for the police force or, if you will, for the society these might be conceived as harmful. 

The demonstration was organized following the protocol established by Swedish government: 
the police was informed of the time, date and route of the demonstration. There is a clear 
process on how this is done and the based on available resources and perceived danger, the 
police decides whether there is a need to send officers to direct traffic and guard the 
demonstration. It can be argued, that the police was used in exactly the way that they are 
supposed to be used in this situation and thus no harm was done. In an open democratic 
society such as Sweden demonstrations have a long­standing tradition as part of the public 
discourse. They are one way to engage in a discussion. 

The nuisance that the demonstration caused the bystanders that might have been late due to 
the disrupted traffic should be expected to be able to handle the situation as they live in a 
large city that has demonstrations so often that there is a clear process on how they are staged. 

In case of the ritual at the American embassy, the actions of the players did attract the 
attention of the police. This was to be expected even if the player were not breaking any law. 
Though it can be argued that the players shouldn’t waste police resources on their leisure 
activities (the game), it can just as well be argued that that the citizens of a democratic society 
need not choose their actions based on what may be interpreted as suspect. 

Basically in both instances the police was doing what it is paid to do and the players were 
acting within their rights as citizen. But were the completely legal actions of the players right 
or wrong? The motivation of the players can be questioned, but that is a completely different 
issue. 

6.4  Momentum as Art and as Political Action 
Momentum crossed boundaries, both legal and ethical, that a game is traditionally allowed to 
cross. Disregarding norms is usual inside the carnival space of the magic circle, but as the 
players were playing in the real world – al least from the point of view of the non­participants, 
even if not from the point of view of the players – the transgression happened in the real


                                                             95 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

world. These transgressions, if done in the name of pleasure, are frowned upon and not 
tolerated. However, events and actions that happen in the context of art or are conceived of as 
political actions are tolerated even when they cross boundaries. 

6.4.1  Game master intention 
The characters of Momentum were dead radicals from recent history, people that have given 
their life to a cause and that not even death could stop. Strong characters were used to give the 
players courage and incentive for taking their play out in the streets and also underline the 
seriousness of the thematic and story. By taking a role of someone who had made a great 
change, the hope was to help the players to understand that they have the power to change the 
world as well. 

The story was about change, articulating how something is not right on both our world and on 
the other side. The old metaphysical idea, “As above, so below”, was used as the guiding 
principle in negotiating the relationship between this world and the next. The problems of the 
world of the dead migrate on our plane and vice versa. “The Gray”, agents of conformism, 
were the main opponent in the story. 

The game was designed to intertwine with the ordinary life of the players. Yet it was 
implemented in such a fashion that players were able to control how much to play over 
extended time. The idea was to create internal dilemmas: “Should I go to the movies or let 
Ken Saro­Wiwa out?” 

The historical characters were chosen with several criteria. They were relatively recent in 
order to understand world of today with things such as internet and electricity, as that is not 
very interesting to play and would have diverted attention from the central theme. The chosen 
rebels were people who were fighting for one single thing, people like Chico Mendez, who 
was shot by the logging companies for speaking up against the exploitation of Brazilian 
forests. This was used to underline an anti­conformist attitude and prompt questions. You are 
able to change your own world and your own life. What is really important? What do I really 
want to do? 

To create collaboration, context and to illustrate the different approaches and methods of 
change the characters were divided into four groups represented by the four elements, which 
also provided a supportive context where experienced and active players could support less 
active and experienced players. When the players chose a character they also unknowingly 
chose a side in the revolutionary struggle. 

Water represented revolution by individual enlightenment; dreamers, poets and hippies 
fighting for a world with brighter colours and is a more open to individual interpretation. A 
typical character here would be Ron Thelin, one of the founders of the hippie movement. Air 
wanted a revolution of the mind, liberating information, encouraging research and distributing 
insights and ideas to everyone. A typical air character would be Tron, a member of the Chaos 
Computer Club and creator of the cryptophone. 

The rebels of fire wanted a revolution through direct confrontation, to respond to injustice and 
oppression with force. George Jackson, a member of the Black Panthers, who died in prison 
stood proud in their ranks. The earth faction was grounded in the concrete; they knew that 
whatever humanity is going to do it has to be sustainable and well thought through in the long



                                                             96 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

run as well. Judi Bari, environmentalist and fighter for the redwood forests knew that without 
earth we are nothing. 

The elemental groups provided social and ideological context for characters and social 
frameworks for the players. All the groups had basically the same goal but very different 
methods of getting there. Also, after the success or failure of the revolution the strife between 
different factions was the source of drama. 

The Prosopopeia game series experiments with extremely pervasive methods of role­playing. 
The intent is to create game experiences, where it’s impossible to differentiate the game 
content from ordinary reality outside the game. Successful execution of this kind of game 
both brings the excitement of the game to the players’ ordinary life, and the thrill of non­safe 
reality to the game experience. 

Momentum was an attempt to take the framework of role­playing and use it to bring together 
the post­modern politics of identity, the aesthetics of urban exploration and the tactics of 
activism, and take the action to the streets. The game was constructed to show that if we want 
to we can enchant our lives by making them a game and make that game matter. Seamlessness 
was a requirement as in order to make a game about social construction of reality, the game 
had to be framed as reality. By showing the players that they can confront the consensus 
reality, conformity and boredom with magic in a game­that­is­real, they would see that the 
same methods would work in ordinary life. 

Momentum was also a game about change; by doing symbolic resistance it allowed you to 
step outside the boundaries of the usual ‘real’. The game masters felt that role­players have 
been sitting long enough on pillows talking about things that never existed – Momentum 
wanted action, relevance, and responsibility. 

6.4.2  Political action 
Momentum had a clear political agenda. In a nutshell it was a leftist performance raising 
awareness that also sough out to teach the players methods of direct action. 

The game tried to raise awareness regarding the shrinking of the public space as well as give 
the players the opportunity unlearn to respect the boundary between public and private space. 
The example on how this should be done was borrowed from the underground movement 
urban exploration, and specifically the motto of Sierra Club (an American environmentalist 
organisation) of take nothing but pictures, leave nothing but footprints. This was achieved 
mostly though aesthetics (city as playground, game locations), but it was also stated out loud 
by the game masters. The game did not force anyone to trespass, but it was occasionally 
necessary for success. In the post game interviews most players expressed a lack of respect 
towards restrictions forbidding people to enter spaces that could be accessed without breaking 
the way in. As the question was not posed before the game it is impossible to say if the game 
influenced the opinions of the players, or if this possible influence carries on to the post­game 
life of the players. 

Momentum also wanted to raise awareness of people who fall though the cracks of modern 
society, such as homeless and mentally ill people. This was done by the themes of the game as 
well as locations and missions that the players were asked to carry out. The whole endeavour 
had a leftist bent, and it is clear that the game tried to teach the players that a society that 
mistreats its weakest members is not a fair society.


                                                             97 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


The leftist bent was clearest in the choice of the characters, the dead revolutionaries, who 
were mostly environmentalists, leftist activists, pacifists, homosexuals, labour union related 
people, communists and such. Also, the nodes that players were supposed to cleanse or 
empower were quite political and the correct symbolic action at these locations was always 
leftist (honour the voluntaries who fought alongside the republicans in the Spanish civil war, 
strike against that advertise agency who has control over the public billboards, remember the 
workers who died working in the harbour, acknowledge the death of the Swedish welfare 
society at the location where Prime Minister Olof Palme was murdered and so forth). 

Momentum also wanted to teach the players to be aware and to be able to use activist 
methods, such as putting together a demonstration and different methods of preparing for it, 
how to deface advertisement, how an anarchist non­hierarchical organisation works, and so 
forth. This was done through missions and literature that was given to the players. 




                    Image 29: Players constructed torches for the demonstration based on 
                    instructions they read from the Anarchist Cookbook. 

Finally, the game was also an attack on consensus reality. On the on hand this was an occult 
endeavour (which was one of the building block of the feel of the game), where the players 
were though to see the world as a magical place where supernatural, or at least improbable 
things can happen, where personal choices and actions have a direct influence on the way the 
world works. On the other hand this was a post­modern project, teaching the players that 
reality is a construct; and that much more than what we think is actually based on common 
assumptions. The idea was that players would be equipped to question the hegemonic reality, 
to build their own world, and to be able to carry that knowledge with them to the ordinary 
world. These two alternatives offered basically the same idea in two different packages, one 
that was magical and the other which was practical. In the thematic of the game, thus magic 
and activism tied together into a neat whole. 

Thus Momentum had a clear political agenda. In D5.5 the issue is discussed and it is stated 
that as long as bodily harm is not caused (as it wasn’t) according to Vandeveer (1979), it’s in 
the interests of the third parties to have both sides of the conflict brought to public – and 
offensive provocation is often the only or the best way to do so. Quoting Standard of 
Permissiveness toward Conscientious Offence:




                                                             98 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

                Individuals engaged in conscientiously motivated dissent aimed at securing what dissenters judge 
                to be more desirable social arrangements have a claim to restraint from coercive interference even 
                if their dissent is seriously offensive. 


Applied to pervasive gaming, Vandeveer’s argument is that if a pervasive game is aimed at 
improving the social system, it should be tolerated even if it might offend someone, as long as 
it’s motivated by the organizers’ conscience. In the spirit of free speech, the benefit of the 
society demands tolerance for such expressions. 

In the case of Momentum, the transgression were clearly motivated by trying to build a better 
world, to improve the social system. It can be debated whether or not the public was engaged 
in the discussion as the ludic nature of the events was not disclosed. On the other hand the fact 
that the events were not framed as a game means that they had to taken at face value. Still, the 
fact that the game did not – at least thus far – stimulate a public discussion, can not be used as 
a success criteria, as that is an after the fact test. 

6.4.3  Art and transgression 
The ethics of art are not really discussed in D5.5. Discussing ethics of art implies that there 
are boundaries that can be crossed and thus the discourse of transgressions is used here. 
Mostly this report draws from the book Transgression. The Offences in Art (Julius 2003). 

This report does not ponder the question what is art. As Momentum is an expression that stirs 
emotions, is created with artistic intent agenda, used novel forms of expression that blur the 
boundary between artist and audience, and did partly take place in the context of an art 
gallery, the most commonly used criteria for art are met. Thus this report works from the 
assumption that Momentum is indeed art and the question becomes if that changes anything 
regarding the ethics of the game. Does that fact that Momentum is art change the rightness of 
certain actions? The two opposites in this debate are crystallised by Julius (2003): 

          This leads, from the perspective of the artists, to a certain disrespect of the law, a qualified antinomianism: law has 
          no place in art, there should be no constraints on the imagination. It is the sheer clumsiness of legal investigations 
          in the art world that most exasperate art’s champions. From the perspective of moralists, by contrast, artist deserves 
          no greater licence than any other citizen. Art – or rather, artistic status – excuses nothing. Moralist need not be 
          Platonists. They do not mistrust art; they merely hold that it should not have any special privileges. (Julius 2003, 8­ 
          9) 

If artistic status excuses nothing, then the debate ends here. If, on the other hand, art and 
artists have a slightly more room to breath, then it needs to be established how much more. 
Art that breaks laws or offends sensibilities, as Momentum did, is transgressive. Julius (2003) 
sees four ways to transgress: 

          the denying of doctrinal truths; rule­breaking, including the violating of principles, conventions, pieties or taboos; 
          the giving of serious offence; and the exceeding, erasing or disordering of physical or conceptual boundaries. 
          (Julius 2003, 19) 

He also lists five different defence strategies for transgressive art. The first two are: 1) 
Aesthetic Alibi, meaning that even if there may be some forms of expression that can be 
legislated and circumscribed (defaming, inciting, blasphemy), these restrictions do not apply 
to art; and 2) Art Speech, which is the constitutional defence argumenting that artistic 
expression is on par with political and commercial speech and thus for example government 
funding must be allocated to all kinds of artist or else the state is not living up to 
constitutional requirements. These two defences are easy to counter as Julius shows: “artists 
deserve no greater licence than any other citizen, and art excuses nothing.” This brings the 
discussion back to square one. (Ibid, 25­30).

                                                               99 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


The three further defences that Julius puts forward are much more sophisticated and complex: 
3) The Estrangement Defence postulates that art teaches the audience something about 
themselves, the world or art itself. Thus shocking the viewer is necessary to shatter illusions, 
to astonish, to disturb, to seduce, to shake things up. 4) The Formalist Defence insists that it is 
the job of art to explore form and the spectator should learn to keep his cool distance and 
contemplate. The subject is not relevant, only the presentation. Finally 5) The Canonical 
Defence looks for continuity in the canon of art. It finds similar works that are respected, 
points at them and shows that, logically, if the new work is dismissed, there goes the canon as 
well. In a way it is the opposite of estrangement defence which relies on shock; canonical 
defence puts forward the idea that any shock is fleeting and that many canonical works were 
seen as shocking when they were first exhibited. (Julius 2003, 32­47). 

Aesthetic alibi and art speech are defences that are simply based on the assumption that all art 
is free and if something is indeed art, then it cannot be constrained. The other defences are 
more complex and they build on (art) history. Looking at Momentum in the context of these 
three defences is interesting. 

The estrangement defence is the easiest to use with Momentum as it had a clear political 
message that was communicated through the art of experience, role­play. A case can be made 
that the game was meant to make the players realize that “reality” is a social construct and to 
teach the players to do reality hacking. Momentum was supposed to show the players, to make 
them experience first hand that by changing the way the view the world they change the 
world. Of course, the non­participants were also part of the audience of the work. By being 
random encounters with weird people, i.e. the players, non­participants might also question 
societal norms and be confronted with question regarding for example public space. 

The formalist defence is perhaps the weakest in respect to Momentum, due to the fact that the 
form of live­action role­playing is not established enough. Thus Momentum would be looked 
at as action on the street, stripping away the context of art and the holistic appreciation of the 
work as a whole. This would basically mean that the party where players and unaware 
participants mingled would be viewed as a party, the demonstration reminding people to 
remember the dead revolutionaries would be seen as just another demonstration and so forth. 
This defence strips the game­as­a­work­of­art of its meaning just as the formalist defence 
often does (for example Serrano’s Piss Christ is suddenly just a “pretty picture”). 

The canonical defence is an easy one. Though live­action role­playing has not been 
established as a form of art, it is very easy to find similar events that are branded as art. Larp 
itself is preceded by commedia dell’arte, theatre games and improve (see for example Morton 
2007), but also more confrontational pervasive larp has predecessors: both theatre and 
performance art have left the stage, deliberately blurred the line between participant and non 
participant, the stage and the audience. The history of art is also filled with examples of works 
that do not advertise their status as works of art, such as invisible theatre, performance art and 
some forms of street art. 

6.4.4  Breaking the law 
None of this directly addresses the problem of how far art can go. However, unless the actual 
form of pervasive larp is seen as problematic – and considering the three defences listed 
above making that case is difficult – then the cases need to be handled one by one. Thus it is 
important that game organisers who plan to stage disruptive, transgressive pervasive larps are


                                                            100 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

aware of the transgressions, are willing to bear the possible consequences and also ensure that 
the participants are knowledgeable of the possible risks. 

In Momentum this was done. The Player Agreement Form clearly stated in the first paragraph 
that “Every part of Momentum is voluntary and you are personally responsible for any acts 
you perform during the game.” When, after the Gullmarsplan incident, all the players 
received a reminder of the PAF that was worded in a way that stated that the rules of the 
games were that the players shouldn’t break any laws, one player got angry as that was not 
PAF he had signed. He felt that the game masters were trying to take away his freedom of 
choice. 

Other players were quite sensitive to the issue as well. When asked if the game encouraged 
breaking the law in the post game interview, most participants did not feel that it did. It is 
quite representative that one of the most critical voices was actually almost apologetic 
towards the game masters: 

                [A]t first I felt that the game encouraged [breaking the law], during the first preparation weekend, 
                that like the organisers said, you can, it’s your personal choice to break the law and stuff, but it 
                felt something like that you need, you should break the law or something. We expect you to do it, 
                more or less, but then I didn’t, I felt like later in the game they tried to stop us more or less, and 
                not, to discourage us more than encourage us to break the law. (post­game player interview)




                                                            101 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




7  Meta­Evaluation 
In Där vi föll game master evaluation was done through activity research, with an evaluator 
following the game master work, constantly asking questions on what was done, why it was 
done the way it was done, and what were the various contingencies in case players chose 
unexpected approaches to problems. In Momentum participant observation was used. 

7.1  Participant Observation 
According to Arja Kuula (2006), people who are being observed for the benefit of a study in a 
non­public space should not only be informed about the study, but actually their permission 
should be asked. In Momentum the players did not know that one of the players was a 
participant observer. According to Kuula, this kind of observation is acceptable only if the 
researcher is a researcher only secondarily, that he should be a natural part of the group that 
he studies. In Momentum participant observation was carried out by a person who has a long 
history of larping in the Nordic countries. He probably wouldn’t have participated in this 
particular game if he had not been researching it, but he is a familiar face in the subculture 
that Momentum drew from. Thus the participant observation, though not explicated to the 
players beforehand, is considered as non­problematic. 

Participant observation itself is quite important for the evaluation of role­playing games and 
live­action role­playing games are no exception. The works produced on this field are not 
geared towards pleasing and audience since there is no audience but the participants (who can 
be considered to be “first person audience, see Sandberg 2004 for details). Observing and 
understanding the experience without participating is very difficult. It can be done with 
technology – at least up to a point – but it does disrupt the game. The difficulty is evident in 
Där vi föll, where the only non­diegetic piece of propping, the only thing that purposefully 
broke the illusion, was the movements of the surveillance cameras in one of the central 
gaming areas.



                                                            102 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

In Momentum the participant observation was mainly used to contextualise information and to 
learn what happened in the game, what was relevant and feel what it was like to play the 
game. It was absolute essential in understanding what questions to ask in the post­game 
interviews, which form the core of the data corpus that this study is based upon. 

In the post­game debrief the players were told that that there had been a participant observer 
and they were given the chance to decline participation in the study. None declined. A central 
question is whether or not knowing about the presence of an observer and the identity of that 
observer would taint the results. Based on Momentum this question cannot be answered. What 
can be said is that the data that we were able to gather in the post­game interviews would have 
been significantly poorer. 

7.2  Unaware participation 
One of the research goals of Momentum was to gather information on unaware participation. 
This was supposed to be done by carrying out interviews with people who had come into 
contact with the players. The four controllers each had a stack of “info cards”, small 
laminated cards that had the following text: 

                Wondering  what  just  happened?  We  would  like  to  thank  you  for  your  time;  you  have  just 
                participated in Prosopopeia, thus contributing to ongoing game research. 
                Your feedback is invaluable to us, so for a full explanations please contact [the contact info of two 
                researches]. 
                Please do NOT ask the person who gave you this card for more information. 
Unfortunately, none of the cards was ever used. The only unaware participants that we were 
able to interview were the two workers at the art gallery. Thus the evaluation of unaware 
participation mostly failed again, though not as badly as in Där vi föll. 

7.3  Player demographics 
It is important to note that the players were a representative sample of hard core players, but 
they weren’t in any way representative of the whole population. Momentum was staged to 
chart the outer edges of the most hard core players, to see what can be done. Its intention was 
not to construct a prototype that would have a huge target audience. We feel that this research 
will benefit building those kinds of games as well, even if it was not one itself. 

Thus the player were mostly in their twenties (the game had an age limit set at eighteen) 
living in urban areas (mostly in Stockholm). Most, though not all, had a background in role­ 
playing, live­action role­playing, theatre or urban exploration, but there were no clear 
differences noted that would correspond to the backgrounds. Politically more than half of the 
players seemed to be leaning to the left, though there were some who had affinity to right as 
well. Political stand did influence how the participants interpreted the game. The gender 
balance was almost equal, approximately 60% of the participants were men and 40% were 
women.




                                                            103 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 




8  Conclusion 
Looking at the success criteria presented originally (see first chapter), Momentum can be 
deemed quite successful in terms of game design. The three success criteria that was set was 
met for the most part. The biggest success was the third one: “The majority of players are 
enjoying the game both during low­intensity gametime and high­intensity weekends.” Most of 
the players enjoyed the game immensely and would be interested in playing a similar 5 week 
game the next year. 

The second one was also a clear success: “The game content emerging from the interaction 
with non­players provides sufficient and interesting game content.” There was not quite as 
much interaction with non­players as was expected, but when there were interactions, those 
worked very well and indeed a lot of content emerged. 

The first success criterion: “No significant practical or ethical problems emerge” was met as 
well. No significant practical problems emerged, even though some of the technology failed 
to arrive in time. Due to very good planning in game design this was not a problem. Also, no 
unforeseen or new ethical problems emerged. The unfortunate incident at Gullmarsplan was a 
product of a number of coincidences. The design of the game had tried to steer away from 
these kinds of incidents, but a number of unfortunate coincidences enabled that it did take 
place.




                                                            104 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

Of the many research goals that we had for this project, almost all were met. In the regards to 
game mastering, long­duration larping, social modes of playing and life/game merger we feel 
that we have surpassed both our goals and our expectations. Only in gaining deeper 
understanding regarding the influence of the game on outsiders we feel that we failed to 
achieve our goals and even in that area we did gain relevant new understanding. 

8.1  Future research issues 
Based on this research new questions emerge. In order to further expand our understanding of 
pervasive larps, we need to continue the research and look at the following questions: 

Unaware participation is still not understood as much as is necessary to start running 
pervasive games in a widespread manner. Non­participants can and do enjoy encountering 
pervasive larps, but not unconditionally. They like to play but not be played with. 

Commercial viability and alternative business models also need to be developed further. 
At the moment larping is very much a hobby where the game organisers work for no fee. 
However, this rich and imaginative subculture has not been able to produce commercially 
viable larps that would have preserved the attraction and sophistication of non­commercial 
larps. Momentum was a clear step forward (in comparison to Där vi föll) in bettering the 
viability of runtime game mastering, but it is still not quite ready for mass deployment. 

Alternatives to carte blanche player agreement forms must be developed in order to ensure 
player safety. The problem is that the less the player knows what is in store the more they 
enjoy a game and a document that lists for example all the methods of game master 
surveillance does spoil the surprise. 

Developing interaction codes for seamless merger of life and game is also a clear goal. 
The merging of life and larp if fun, but ensuring a flawless flow of the game, participant and 
non­participant safety and possibility to meaningfully interrupt the game need to be further 
developed. Also, some of the methods used in Momentum are specific for the genre or theme 
of the game; for example the possession model of role­taking can only be used as is in games 
that have an occult theme. 

‘Pervasivity’ in culture is also something that should be looked at. The merging of ordinary 
life and fiction, the erosion of clear signification of fact should be explored further. The 
presence of a game is not necessary for this blurring. Playful activities such as scambating, 
fake blogs and reality television blur the dividing line ever further. 

8.2  Acknowledgements 
We want to thank all the players of Momentum who spent an unprecedented amount of time 
playing the prototype game and also answering our many, many questions. The game couldn’t 
have been pulled off without the many volunteer that helped make it happen. Also, the players 
who participated in Där vi föll helped us better define our questions and our understanding. 

We would also like to thank the people at Hypermedialab at the University of Tampere, SICS 
and Interactive Institute for their comments and support. Of the many people providing good 
feedback to this report, we want to especially thank Emil Boss, Jussi Holopainen, Eirik 
Fatland and Eetu Paloheimo for comments.




                                                            105 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 



9  References 
Allen, A. (1996): Constitutional Law and Privacy. In A Companion to Philosophy of Law 
and Legal Theory, ed. Patterson, D. Oxford, Blackwell. 

Benford, Steve, Crabtree, Andy, Reeves, Stuart, Flitham, Msrtin, Drozd, Adam, 
Sheridan, Jennifer & Dix, Alan (2006): The Frame of the Game: Blurring Boundary 
between Fiction and Reality in Mobile Experinences. CHI 2006 Proceedings, April 22­27, 
2006. Montreal, Quebec, Canada. 

Benford, Steve, Capra, M., Flintham, M., Drozd, A., Crabtree, Räsänen, A., Tallyn, E., 
Tandavanitj, N., Adams, M., Row Farr, J., Opperman, L., Kanjo, E. and Fischer, J. 
(2006): City as Theatre Deliverable D12.4: Evaluation of the first City as Theatre Public 
Performance. IPerG deliverable, February 2006. Available at www.pervasive­gaming.org 
(Referenced March 2007). 

Binsted, Kim (2000): Sufficiently Advanced Technology: Using Magic to Control the World. 
Plenary at CHI 2000. 

Chalmers, M., Bell, M., Brown, B., Hall, M., Sherwood, S., Tennent, P. (2005): Gaming 
on the Edge: Using Seams in Ubicomp Games. In: Proc. ACM Advances in Computer 
Entertainment (ACE05), pp 306­309, ACM Press. 

Cho, Sung­Jung, Jong Koo Oh, Won­Chul Bang, Wook Chang, Eunseok Choi, Yang 
Jing, Joonkee Cho, Dong Yoon Kim (2004): Magic wand: a hand­drawn gesture input 
device in 3­D space with inertial sensors. Ninth International Workshop on Frontiers in 
Handwriting Recognition, 2004. IWFHR­9 2004. 106­ 111. 

Ciger, Jan, Mario Gutierrez, Frederic Vexo and Daniel Thalmann (2003): The magic 
wand. Proceedings of the 19th spring conference on Computer graphics (Budmerice, 
Slovakia). 119 – 124. 

Crabtree, Andy, Benford S., Rodden, T., Greenhalgh, C. Flintham, M., Anastasi R., 
Drozd. A., Adams M., Row­Farr, J., Tandavanitj, N., and Steed. A. (2004): Orchestrating 
a mixed reality game 'on the ground'. Proceedings of CHI 2004, Vol. 1, pp. 391­398. 

Falk, Jennica & Davenport, Glorianna (2004): Live role­playing games: Implications for 
pervasive gaming. In Rautenberg, M. (ed) ICEC 2004, pp. 127­138. 

Fatland, Eirik & Wingård, Lars (2003): The Dogma 99 Manifesto.  In Gade, Morten, 
Thorup, Line & Sander, Mikkel (ed) (2003): As Larp Grows Up. Theory and Methods in 
Larp. http://www.laivforum.dk/kp03_book/ 

Fatland, Eirik (2005a): Knutepunkt and Nordic Live Role­playing: A crash course. In 
Bøckman, Petter & Hutchison, Ragnhild (Eds.) (2005): Dissecting Larp. Knutepunkt, Oslo. 

Fatland, Eirik (2005b): Incentives as Tools of Larp Dramaturgy. In Bøckman, P. and 
Hutchison, R. (eds) Dissecting Larp. Collected papers for Knutepunkt 2005.



                                                            106 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

Fatland, Eirik (2006): Interaction codes. In Frizon, Thorbiörn & Wrigstad, Tobias (eds.) 
(2006): Role, Play, Art. Collected Experiences of Role­Playing 85­99. Stockholm, Föreningen 
Knutpunkt. http://jeepen.org/kpbook/ 

Fine, Gary Alan (1983): Shared Fantasy. Role­Playing Games as Social Worlds. Chicago, 
University of Chicago press. 

Hakkarainen, Henri & Stenros, Jaakko (2003): Thoughts on Role­Playing. In Gade, 
Morten, Thorup, Line & Sander, Mikkel (ed) (2003): As Larp Grows Up. Theory and 
Methods in Larp. http://www.laivforum.dk/kp03_book/ 

Harvey, Allison (2006): The Liminal Magic Circle: Boundaries, Frames, and Participation 
in Pervasive Mobile Games. In Wi: Journal of the Mobile Digital Commons Network vol.1. 

Huizinga, Johan (1938/1955): Homo Ludens ­ A Study of Play Element in Culture. Boston, 
Beacon Press, 

Jonsson, S., Montola, M., Waern, A. & Ericsson, M. (2006): Prosopopeia: Experiences 
from a Pervasive Larp. Proceedings DVD of ACM SIGCHI ACE 2006 conference, June 14.­ 
16. West Hollywood, ACM. 

Julius, Anthony (2002/2003): Transgressions. The Offences in Art. The University of 
Chicago Press, Italy. 

Koljonen, Johanna (2007): Eye­Witness to the Illusion: An Essay on the Impossibility of 
360° Role­Playing. In Donnis, Jesper, Thorup, Line & Gade, Morten (eds.) Lifelike. 
Copenhagen, Projektgruppen KP07, 2007. www.liveforum.dk/kp07book 

Kuula, Arja (2006): Tutkimusetiikka. Tampere, Vastapaino 

Loponen, Mika & Montola, Markus (2004): A Semiotic View on Diegesis Construction. In 
Montola, Markus & Stenros, Jaakko (eds.) (2004): Beyond Role and Play. Tools, Toys and 
Theory for Harnessing the Imagination. Vantaa, Ropecon. 39­51. 

Mackay, Daniel (2003): The Fantasy Role­Playing Game. A New Performing Art. Jefferson, 
North Caroline and London, McFarland. 

McGonigal, Jane (2003): ‘This Is Not A Game’: Immersive Aesthetics and Collective Play. 
DAC 2003 conference, Melbourne. 

McGonigal, Jane (2006): This Might Be a Game. Ubiquitous Play and Performance at the 
Turn of the Twenty­First Century. Doctoral Dissertation at Univerity of California, Berkeley. 
www.avantgame.com/dissertation.htm 

Montola, Markus & Jonsson, Staffan (2006): Prosopopeia. Playing on the Edge of Reality. 
In Frizon, Thorbiörn & Wrigstad, Tobias (eds.) (2006): Role, Play, Art. Collected 
Experiences of Role­Playing 85­99. Stockholm, Föreningen Knutpunkt. 
http://jeepen.org/kpbook/




                                                            107 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

Montola, Markus & Waern, Annika (2006): Participant Roles in Socially Expanded 
Games. In Strang, Thomas, Cahill, Vinny & Quigley, Aaron (eds.) (2006): Pervasive 2006 
Workshop Proceedings 165­173. PerGames 2006, May 7.­10. University College Dublin. 
www.ipsi.fraunhofer.de/ambiente/pergames2006/final/PG_Montola_Roles.pdf 

Montola, M., Waern, A., Kuittinen, J. & Stenros, J. (2006): Ethics of Pervasive Gaming. 
IPerG Deliverable D5.5. In www.pervasive­gaming.org/Deliverables/D5.5%20ethics.pdf 

Montola, Markus (2005): Exploring the Edge of the Magic Circle. Defining Pervasive 
Games. DAC 2005 conference, December 1.­3. IT University of Copenhagen. 

Montola, Markus (2007): Breaking the Invisible Rules. Borderline Role­Playing. In Donnis, 
Jesper, Thorup, Line & Gade, Morten (eds.) Lifelike. Copenhagen, Projektgruppen KP07, 
2007. www.liveforum.dk/kp07book 

Montola, Markus (forthcoming): The Invisible Rules of Role­Playing. 

Morton, Brian (2007): Larps and Their Cousins Through the Ages. In Donnis, Jesper, 
Thorup, Line & Gade, Morten (eds.) Lifelike. Copenhagen, Projektgruppen KP07, 2007. 
www.liveforum.dk/kp07book 

Murray, Janet H. (1997): Hamlet on the Holodeck. The Future of Narrative in Cyberspace. 
Cambridge, Massachusetts; MIT Press. 

Pettersson, Juhana (2006): Art of Experience. In Frizon, Thorbiörn & Wrigstad, Tobias 
(eds.) (2006): Role, Play, Art. Collected Experiences of Role­Playing 85­99. Stockholm, 
Föreningen Knutpunkt. http://jeepen.org/kpbook/ 

Pohjola, Mike (2000): The Manifesto of the Turku School. Selfpublished leaflet by the 
author, reprinted in Gade, Morten, Thorup, Line & Sander, Mikkel (ed) (2003): As Larp 
Grows Up. Theory and Methods in Larp. http://www.laivforum.dk/kp03_book/ 

Pohjola, Mike (2004): Autonomous Identities. In Montola, Markus and Stenros, Jaakko (eds.) 
Beyond Role and Play. Tools, Toys and Theory for Harnessing the Imagination (2004), 
Solmukohta, Vantaa, Ropecon. http://www.ropecon.fi/brap/. 

Sandberg, Christopher (2004): Genesi. Larp Art, Basic Theories. In Montola, Markus and 
Stenros, Jaakko (eds.) Beyond Role and Play. Tools, Toys and Theory for Harnessing the 
Imagination (2004), Solmukohta, Vantaa, Ropecon. http://www.ropecon.fi/brap/. 

Salen, Katie & Zimmerman, Eric (2003): Rules of Play. Game Design Fundamentals. The 
MIT Press, Cambridge & London. 

Szulborski, Dave (2005): This Is Not A Game. A Guide to Alternate Reality Gaming. Digital 
edition. Exe Active Media Group. 

Vandeveer, D. (1979): Coercive Restraint of Offensive Actions. In Philosophy and Public 
Affairs, Vol 8, No 2.




                                                            108 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 



10 Appendix A: Momentum Player agreement form 

MOMENTUM: PLAYER AGREEMENT FORM 
PLAYER RESPONSIBILITY AND CONDUCT 
By signing this agreement you expressly acknowledge and agree that you are playing this 
game at your own sole risk. Every part of Momentum is voluntary and you are personally 
responsible for any acts you perform during the game. The game is provided "as is" and 
without any warranty of any kind. If you brake any part of this agreement you will be 
suspended from the game and your game­fee will not be repaid. 

WITHIN MAIN GAME LOCATION 

By agreeing to this form you are agreeing to not consume any kind of drugs within the 
main game location, except for medical purposes. This includes alcohol stronger than 
3.5%. Smoking is only allowed in designated areas, which might change or be withdrawn at 
any time during or before the game. 

You are not allowed to change anything permanently (like painting, destroying furniture or 
props etc.), or open any apparently sealed or closed off area within the game locations, i.e. 
you will be held liable for every irreversible change to the locations. 

The location can be hazardous and you are advised to be careful and not take any 
unnecessary risks while in the premisses. 

EQUIPMENT 

Every player will be assigned expensive electronic equipment during the game period and 
are required to handle the equipment with care. You are liable for the equipment during 
the full duration of the game. You will be hold responsible for lost or destroyed equipment. 
Technical hazards 

The technology­enhanced wearables contain Lithium batteries. If these batteries are 
damaged or exposed to water they will heat up very rapidly and might explode. HANDLE 
ALL WEARABLES WITH CARE. KEEP AWAY FROM WATER. Do not shower or 
bath with them, for example. Keep them out of rain. Do not try to open or alter the 
wearables. 

Some technical equipment will issue electroshocks as a part of their interaction. This is off 
the shelf equipment and are under normal circumstances not harmful in any way. If you 
have heart problems, a pace make or other medical problems these might be harmful. 
Please notify the game­master if you suspect that electroshocks might cause a problem for 
you. 

PLAYING IN REAL WORLD AREAS 

Environmental hazards 

Momentum is played in the real world and not in a pre­staged environment. The locations 
used and rented for the game are provided ‘as is’ and not guaranteed to be safe. Remember 
that speeding, trespassing and similar acts are just as illegal within the game as in ordinary 
life. 

RESEARCH AND DATA COLLECTION 

Prosopopeia Bardo 2: Momentum is both a technologically orchestrated Larp and an EU­funded 
research prototype. In order to run the game and conduct our research on 
pervasive gaming, we will need to subject our players to surveillance and observation for 
the duration of the game.



                                                            109 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


By agreeing to this form you allow Momentum organizers to collect technical surveillance 
data about your gameplay during of the game and store it as long as it is needed it for the 
purposes of game orchestration, research and documentation. The data will be treated as 
privacy­protected personal data and not redistributed outside the research group. 

Our surveillance equipment includes many sorts of sensors including cameras and 
microphones; some you will be carrying around while others are mounted in prepared 
locations. You should understand that the game will be running 24 hours a day, and it will 
not be restricted to any physical areas. However, the technology enhanced wearables you 
might wear or encounter during the game do not include active microphones or cameras. 

After, or even during the game, we will provide you with a debrief questionnaire and 
possibly also want to interview you to discuss your game experiences. Expect to spend a 
couple of hours in providing feedback after the game. Your feedback is critically valuable 
for our research AND THIS IS YOUR OPPORTUNITY TO INFLUENCE FUTURE LARP 

DESIGNS AND FUTURE GAME DESIGNS OVERALL. 

As for technically collected data, all player feedback, interview comments and discussions 
will be treated as privacy­protected personal data. It will not be redistributed outside the 
project. When cited in public papers and reports, it will be anonymized. Under the 
circumstances that we want to publish video and photographs from the game we will ask 
the persons appearing in the video or picture. 

We recognize that participating a pervasive game such as Momentum requires giving up 
some privacy for the duration of the game. This is, in effect, one of the research issues 
studied in this prototype game. 

Practicalities: 

If you for unforeseen reasons have to leave the game early, you must contact Staffan 
Jonsson: 070­7427476 

Whether you accept or reject this agreement, you are more than welcome to 
provide us feedback by emailing Markus Montola. 

More information on the game: 
Staffan Jonsson, +46 707 427 476, staffanj@sics.se 

More information on research done in Momentum: 
Markus Montola, +358 44 544 2445, markus.montola@uta.fi 

By signing this agreement you confirm that you are 18 years old or older at the 5’th of 
October 2006. 


Date: 


­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ 


Signature: 


­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­




                                                            110 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 

11 Appendix B: Post Game Questionnaire 
1. Describe your best moment(s) in the game. Why do you think these were the best ones? 

2. Describe your worst experiences in the game. 

3. Did the game meet your expectations? What did you expect the game to be like? 

4. How much time did you spend playing the game during weekdays? How much did you 
play during the weekends? 

5. Construct a timeline of your play. What happened during the first week, second week, and 
so forth? 

6. Were there been times when you were reluctant to play but had to, or, have you pressured 
others to play when they were out of game? Describe the event and your feelings. 

7. Did you experience moments where you were unsure whether you were playing or not? 
Please describe these situations. 

8. Did you take the pills during the game? How did they work for you? Discuss your feelings 
towards them. 

9. How easy has it been for you to switch between the spirit and vessel when the need has 
arisen? How do you see the connection  between the host and the guest? 

10. Do you think having bystanders around influences your game? Have you communicated 
with bystanders while in character? Describe the situation. 

11. What do you think about the seamlessness? How has the game influenced you everyday 
normal life? Have you communicated with outsiders, other players or game masters out of 
character? Have your friends or family been pulled into the game? 

12. Did you break the Prosopopeia Protocol during the five weeks ­­ i.e. discuss the game as a 
game. How was it? 

13. What technology did you use in the game (EVP, tablets, steele etc.)? What other tech have 
you used? 

14. Did it feel like all the gadgets were telling the same story, that all of them were part of the 
same game? Was it primarily propping, communication devices, or tools to enable the 
gameplay  (e.g. the node capture)? 

15. How were tech breakdowns handled in­game and/or off­game? 

16. Often in the game there have been chained tasks (task A has to succeed or task B will fail) 
and coordinated tasks (A and B has to be made simultaneously). Did you notice that? Did it 
work as a design solution? Describe your experiences? 

17. Did you get any insights (for example political, ethical or philosophical) during the game? 
If you did, please describe them.


                                                            111 
IPerG                                                                                              D 11.8C Momentum Evaluation 
Report 


18. How did you like the amount of GM control? Were you aware on how game masters kept 
on top of what's happening in the game? 

19. Do you think you were generally aware of where the game started and ended? 

20. Would you like to play another similar­scale Prosopopeia game, say, next year? Was the 
game too long or short? 

21. Did you break the law during the game? Describe the situation. Did you break the law 
more often than you would have during another, non­game related 5 week period? Did you 
feel that the game encouraged  breaking the law? Or conversely, did you think that the 
player agreement restricted them from activism that they were fully prepared to take 
responsibility for? 

22. When did you seriously start to work on capturing nodes? How did that change the game 
experience? Was that good or bad? 

23. Did you get stressed by the game or feel that low intensity periods were boring? Did you 
feel guilty over not playing enough, or irritated because others played too little? Do you have 
any suggestions on pacing? 

24. Other feedback on the game or our research? Something you want to put emphasis on? 

25. The IPerG business researchers would also really appreciate if you quickly filled out the 
following web form: http://fit­bscw.fit.fraunhofer.de/pub/bscw.cgi/36989096




                                                            112 

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:30
posted:10/9/2011
language:English
pages:112