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					School of Visual Arts
University of Windsor




 BFA Handbook




                        Last updated: February 2007
                                                  TABLE OF CONTENTS


Mission Statement ........................................................................................................ 3

Programs of Study........................................................................................................... 3

BFA Template by year..................................................................................................... 6

Course Descriptions ....................................................................................................... 7

Faculty       ....................................................................................................................... 13

Staff         ....................................................................................................................... 19

Registration Procedures ............................................................................................... 20

SET Evaluation                 ..................................................................................................... 20

Glossary                      ...................................................................................................... 21

Visual Arts Society ...................................................................................................... 22

Local Galleries               ...................................................................................................... 23

Art Suppliers                 ...................................................................................................... 25

Student Services on Campus ....................................................................................... 26
   Aboriginal Education Centre (Turtle Island) ............................................................. 26
   Academic Writing Centre ........................................................................................ 26
   Co-operative Education and Career Services .......................................................... 27
   Educational Development Centre ........................................................................... 27
   Food and Hospitality Services ................................................................................ 27
   Human Rights Office ............................................................................................... 27
   International Student Centre .................................................................................... 27
   Medical and Health Services .................................................................................. 28
   Campus Ministry ...................................................................................................... 28
   Organization of Part-Time Students ........................................................................ 28
   Parking........................ ............................................................................................. 28
   Campus Police Services ......................................................................................... 28
   St. Denis Centre ...................................................................................................... 28
   Residence Services ................................................................................................ 28
   Special Needs Services .......................................................................................... 29
   CAW Student Centre .............................................................................................. 29
   Student Counselling Centre ..................................................................................... 30
   Student Information Resources Centre .................................................................... 30

U.W.S.A. - University of Windsor Student Alliance ....................................................... 31

Visual Arts' Careers ....................................................................................................... 32
SCHOOL OF VISUAL ARTS, UNIVERSITY OF WINDSOR

The mission of the School of Visual Arts is to provide a vibrant, interdisciplinary learning
environment committed to fostering a high level of scholarship in creative expression and
imaginative research in the areas of studio production and art history. Through responsive and
challenging teaching, in-depth studio production, internships at arts organizations and an
extensive program of lectures and workshops with visiting artists, curators and art historians,
students are provided a comprehensive understanding and intense engagement with
contemporary art practice.




PROGRAMS OF STUDY



General B.A. in Visual Arts

Total courses: thirty.

Major requirements: sixteen courses, including 27-105, 27-106, 27-107 and 27-108, and eight
other studio courses numbered 27-203 through 27-390 plus 28-150, 28-214 and 28-215 and
one other Art History course.

Option requirements: six courses including
(a) two Social Science courses;
(b) two Language courses in the same language or two Science courses;
(c) two additional courses from Arts, Languages, Social Sciences, or Science, excluding Visual
Arts.

Other requirements:
(a) two other courses from Arts, Languages, Social Sciences, or Science, excluding Visual Arts;
(b) 07-202, 07-203;
(c) four more courses from any area of study, excluding Visual Arts.




                                                                                           page 3
General B.A. in Art History

Total courses: thirty.

Major requirements: sixteen courses, including 28-150, 28-214 and 28-215, plus nine other Art
History courses chosen in consultation with a program advisor in Visual Arts, plus 27-105, 27-
106, 27-107 and 27-108.

Option requirements: six courses including
(a) two Social Science courses;
(b) two Language courses in the same language or two Science courses;
(c) two additional courses from Arts, Languages, Social Sciences, or Science, excluding Visual
Arts.

Other requirements:
(a) two other courses from Arts, Languages, Social Sciences, or Science, excluding Visual Arts;
(b) 07-202, 07-203;
(c) four more courses from any area of study, excluding Visual Arts.


B.A. in Honours Visual Arts and Communication Studies

Total courses: forty.

Major requirements-Visual Arts: seventeen courses, consisting 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108
plus ten other studio courses numbered 27-203 through 27-390 (at least four courses must be at
the 300 level) plus 28-150, 28-214 and 28-215.

Major requirements-Communication Studies: sixteen courses including 40-101, 40-200, 40-202,
40-225, 40-234, 40-257, 40-275 plus nine additional courses, at least three of which must be at
the 300 or 400 level, and at least two of those must be at the 400 level.

Other requirements: at least two Language or Science courses; plus five additional options.


B.A. in Honours Visual Arts and Art History

Total courses: forty.

Major requirements-Visual Arts: fourteen courses, consisting of 27-105, 27-106, 27-107 and 27-
108, plus ten other studio courses numbered 27-203 through 27-390 (at least four courses must
be at the 300 level).

Major requirements-Art History: fourteen courses, including 28-150, 28-214 and 28-215, plus
eleven other Art History courses numbered 28-300 through 28-456.

Other requirements:
(a) four courses in the same foreign language;
(b) four History courses chosen in consultation with an Art History advisor;
(c) four options from any area of study, excluding Visual Arts.

                                                                                             page 4
Combined B.A. Honours Degree Programs

Total courses: forty.

Major requirements-Visual Arts: seventeen courses consisting of Studio Fundamentals 27-105,
27-106, 27-107 and 27-108, 28-150, 28-214, 28-215, plus ten other studio courses numbered
27-203 through 27-390 with at least four courses at the 300-level.

Major requirements-Other Subject: as prescribed by that area of study.

Option requirements: six courses including
(a) two Social Science courses;
(b) two Language courses in the same language or two Science courses;
(c) two additional courses from Arts, Languages, Social Sciences, or Science, excluding Visual
Arts.

Other requirements: additional options (if required) to a total of forty courses, excluding Visual
Arts.


Bachelor of Fine Arts in Visual Arts

Total courses: forty.

Major requirements: Studio: twenty courses as follows: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108, 27-203;
one of 27-383 or 27-384; 27-480 (2 credits), 27-481 (2 credits), 27-490 and 27-491; plus at least
two 200-level courses in two other separate areas; five additional 300-level courses with at least
three 300-level courses in the same subject area; and one additional studio course. Art History:
eight courses as follows: 28-150, 28-214, 28-215, plus five more art history courses, one of
which has to be at the 400-level. Students must have a positive Portfolio Evaluation to proceed
to their second year of study.

Option requirements: six courses including
(a) two Social Science courses;
(b) two Language courses in the same language or two Science courses;
(c) two additional courses from Arts, Languages, Social Sciences, or Science, excluding Visual
Arts.

Other requirements: four additional options, excluding Visual Arts

Portfolio Evaluation: A successful portfolio evaluation is required. The portfolio evaluation takes
place at the end of semester 2, after the student has gained credit in 27-105, 27-106, 27-107,
27-108, 28-150.

Students who are otherwise in good standing, but whose portfolio evaluation is not successful
may:
(a) be allowed to continue in the B.F.A. program on a conditional basis, subject to re-evaluation;
(b) be allowed to transfer to the general Bachelor of Arts-Visual Arts program.

Consult a program advisor in Visual Arts for details regarding portfolio requirements and
procedures.
                                                                                              page 5
Year 1   Studio                                    Art History                         Options
         4 foundations courses over 2              2 courses over 2 semesters          4 options over 2 semesters
         semesters
                                                   Semester 1                          Semester 1
         Semester 1                                Choose 1 from the following:        2 Options
         Choose two from the following:            28-150*                             Recommended:
         27-106                                    28-214                              -Writing course
         27-107                                    28-215                              -Ways of knowing
         27-105
         27-108
                                                   Semester 2                          Semester 2
         Semester 2                                Choose 1 from the following:        2 Options
         Choose two from the following:            28-150*
         27-106                                    28-214
         27-107                                    28-215
         27-105                                                                                            10 courses
         27-108                                    *28-150 is required in first year
Year 2   6 courses in 3 separate areas over 2      2 courses over 2 semesters          2 options over 2 semesters
         semesters, 27-203 is required

         Semester 3                                Semester 3                          Semester 3
         27-203                                    Choose 1 from the following:        1 option
         27-2xx                                    28-214
         27-2xx                                    28-215

         Semester 4                                Semester 4                          Semester 4
         27-2xx or 3xx                             Choose 1 from the following         1 option
         27-3xx                                    28-3xx, etc.                                            10 courses
         27-3xx
Year 3   6 courses over 2 semesters                2 courses over 2 semesters          2 options over 2 semesters
         One of 27-383 or 27-384 is required
         and may be taken in either semester

         Semester 5                                Semester 5                          Semester 5
         1. 27-383 or 27-xxx                       28-3xx                              1 option
         2. 27-
         3. 27-
                                                   Semester 6                          Semester 6
         Semester 6                                28-4xx                              1 option
         4. 27-384 or 27-xxx
         5. 27-                                                                                            10 courses
         6. 27-
Year 4   6 courses over 2 semesters                2 courses over 2 semesters          2 options over 2 semesters

         Semester 7                                Semester 7                          Semester 7
         27-480 (dc)                               28-3xx or 28-4xx                    1 option
         27-490

         Semester 8                                Semester 8                          Semester 8
         27-481 (dc)                               28-3xx or 28-4xx                    1 option
         27-491                                                                                            10 courses

BFA - 40 courses                        Options:
o Studio courses       22               Social Science                                  2
o Art History          8                Language or science                             2
o Options              10               Arts, Social Science, Language, Science         2
                                        Other options, excluding Visual Arts            4



                                                                                                          page 6
VISUAL ARTS’ COURSES

27-105. Studio Practice & Ideas/Space
An investigation of the principles, vocabulary and concepts of space-based art, including but not
limited to sculpture and installation. Using traditional and contemporary materials, processes
and practices, students will gain knowledge and experience through the exploration of the
creative possibilities of three-dimensional space. (Lab fees may apply.)

27-106. Studio Practice & Ideas/Image
An introduction to the fundamental skills and critical concepts of visual perception and
production common to all areas of 2 dimensional image-making. Basic principles of composition
and design, light and pigment-based colour theory, as these apply to painting, photo-based
processes, and print production. Their use and application will be will be explored within the
contemporary art context. Class projects may involve inter-disciplinarity between these media.
Studio assignments are combined with related critical theory, historical practice and current
strategies.(Must be taken concurrently with 27-105 by students in Visual Arts programs.) (Lab
fees may apply.)

27-107. Studio Practice & Ideas/Drawing
An investigation of a variety of drawing processes, materials and concepts in a studio
environment that fosters exploration. (Lab fees may apply.)

27-108. Studio Practice & Ideas/Time-Based
An investigation of the principles, vocabulary and concepts of time-based arts including digital
media. Students will gain knowledge of the creative possibilities of emerging technologies and
will develop a basic understanding of methods, tools and techniques of time-based media.

27-110. Introductory Drawing (for Non-Majors)
This course introduces a variety of approaches to drawing including drawing from observation,
memory and imagination. A range of media and techniques in charcoal, graphite, pen and ink is
explored. Additional emphasis is placed on the analysis of aesthetic and expressive aspects of
two-dimensional form. (May not be taken for credit in Visual Arts and Combined Visual Arts
Programs.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-203. Introductory Drawing
Media, techniques, vocabulary, and concepts of drawing, including the human figure and other
subject matter. Development of drawing skills with exposure to more complex drawing
situations, approaches, and points of view. Emphasis on a variety of materials (traditional and
non-traditional). (Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-213. Introductory Painting
Introduction to traditional and contemporary painting concerns, problems in rendering three-
dimensional form in space and organization of the two-dimensional surface. (Prerequisites: 27-
105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-223. Introductory Printmaking-Intaglio
Introductory and intermediate techniques of contemporary printmaking practice are taught
through Intaglio. The techniques of etching, engraving and monoprints are emphasized.
(Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab fees may apply.)


                                                                                            page 7
27-224. Introductory Printmaking-Lithography
Introductory and intermediate techniques of contemporary printmaking practice are taught
through Lithography including the concept of multiples and retrievability of image through stone,
plate, transfer methods and papermaking. (Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab
fees may apply.)

27-233. Introductory Sculpture
An introduction to the various concepts and processes of contemporary sculpture practice.
Issues will be addressed through group discussion and practical application. (Prerequisites: 27-
105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-243. Introduction to Time-Based Art
An introduction to the basic concepts and techniques in production and post-production for
digital video art in the contemporary context. The relation between the idea, performance and
medium of video will be explored in an experimental and critical environment. Assignments and
screenings will stimulate students to explore issues inherent to the media in contemporary art as
well as give a background to its brief history. (Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.)
(Lab fees may apply.)

27-245. Digital Media and Images
This course introduces students to the tools used to create art in virtual space, the history and
investigation of the social, cultural and aesthetic issues pertinent to digital art making.
(Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-253. Introductory Photography
This introductory course in chemical and digital photographic processes provides an opportunity
for students to explore techniques and concepts within the medium of photography. Students
will learn the basic technical skills of operating cameras, processing film, making black and
white prints, and digital imaging through a series of concerns specific to photography.
(Prerequisites: 27-105, 27-106, 27-107, 27-108.) (Also offered as Communication Studies 40-
205.) (Students must have a 35mm adjustable camera to complete this course.) (Lab fees may
apply.)

27-303. Drawing
Advanced problems in drawing, emphasizing individual directions, concepts, and various media.
(Prerequisite: 27-203.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-313. Painting
Development of the concepts and painting skills encountered in 27-213. Exploration of the
creative potential, range, and flexibility of non-traditional techniques, forms and media.
(Prerequisites: 27-213.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-326. Printmaking
Continued development of contemporary printmaking practice. Further investigation of process-
oriented issue-based image making, with emphasis on student's chosen direction. Students are
encouraged to expand their analytical, experimental and creative skills. (May be repeated for
credit.) (Prerequisites: one 200-level printmaking course.) (Lab fees may apply.)




                                                                                             page 8
27-333. Sculpture
An in-depth study of concepts and processes as they pertain to contemporary sculpture
practice. Issues will be addressed through group discussion and practical application.
(Prerequisites: 27-233.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-343. Time-Based Art
This course explores time-based media in more complex and demanding projects than 27-243.
More advanced video projects will be undertaken. Other projects may include video installation,
audio projects and documentary, performance/video or public interventions. This studio course
encourages the thoughtful engagement of complex ideas through visual and/or audio means
within some of the issues in visual culture and contemporary art practices. (Prerequisite: 27-
243) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-345. Digital Media and Interactivity
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and tools of interactive multimedia as a
creative medium in real space. Students will experiment with interactive structures for creative
content development using digital images, sound, text, etc. for disk-based delivery
environments. The acquisition of the technical knowledge will be grounded within an exploration
of aesthetic and social issues. (May be repeated for credit.) (Prerequisite: 27-245.) (Lab fees
may apply.)

27-353. Advanced Photography
Continuation of the study of traditional and digital imaging processes in the area of camera use,
black and white, and related darkroom and digital image techniques. Discussion, critiques and
readings encourage students to expand their analytical and creative skills. Experimental
approaches to the use of the photographic image, ideas and content are emphasized.
(Prerequisite: 27-253.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Students must have a 35mm adjustable
camera to complete this course.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-365. Independent Studio
Individual work on specific projects under the guidance of an instructor. (Prerequisite: one 300-
numbered studio course in the subject desired and consent of instructor.) (May be repeated for
credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-380. Visual Arts Internship
Practical work experience in arts organizations such as art centres, galleries, artists' studios,
and visual arts related professional businesses. (Offered on a Pass/Non-Pass basis.)
(Restricted to B.F.A. Visual Arts Majors in good standing after successful completion of portfolio
review, and to Visual Arts Combined Honours with an average of 9.0 or better and with
permission of the Visual Arts Internship Coordinator.) (100 hours total.)

27-383. Inter-Media Practices - Processes
A studio/seminar course providing the basis for an interwoven art practice in an interdisciplinary
context is developed through a critical approach to materials, issues, and art-making. Required
readings/research pertinent to current issues are discussed in relation to studio production.
Studio production integrating two or more Visual Arts' disciplines is expected. (Prerequisites: 27-
203, two 200 level studios, and three 200 or 300 studios.)



                                                                                             page 9
27-384. Inter-Media Practices - Topics
A practice-oriented seminar focusing on topics central to the interdisciplinary art practice in
contemporary social and cultural contexts. Issues within areas such as history, gender, race and
technology are considered within the context of varying perspectives. Students' studio
production is challenged within a contemporary interdisciplinary environment. The students'
individual production will be expected to be situated within the larger art and social context.
(Prerequisites: 27-203, two 200 level studios, and three 200 or 300 studios.)

27-385. Green Corridor
A cross-disciplinary course that investigates and proposes various strategies for the creation
and realization of public environmentally-aware art projects. Course work contributes to the
creation of a City of Windsor/University of Windsor Green Corridor. Projects are generated in
conjunction with community-based research and involvement with special interest groups.
Students will be involved in the research and development of concepts evolving from
discussions and participation in series of lecture/seminars. Areas of investigation during the
course will include environmental study and impact, the social and political functions of public art
in contemporary culture, the public creative process, the importance of public education in the
development of community-based projects, marketing of public art and environmental
awareness. (Prerequisites: at least Semester 5 and in good standing, or graduate student.)

27-390. Studies in the Visual Arts
Special projects, topics or cross-disciplinary undertakings in the Visual Arts, organized
periodically. Specific information on course content will be available from Visual Arts
(Prerequisites: consent of instructor.) (May be repeated for credit.) (Lab fees may apply.)

27-480. Studio Practice l
The advanced student is given wide range to work in a chosen medium to synthesize
accumulated knowledge and experience with individual critique provided by the instructor.
(Prerequisites: 14 studio courses which must include 27-383 or 27-384 plus three 300-level
courses in the same or related area.) (6 credit hours.)

27-481. Studio Practice ll
The advanced student is given wide range to work in a chosen medium to synthesize
accumulated knowledge and experience with individual critique provided by the instructor.
(Prerequisite: 27-480.) (6 credit hours.)

27-490. Seminar
Investigation of professional practice and contemporary developments in the arts may include
group discussion, visits to galleries, projects, lectures, written assignments. (Restricted to
students registered in 400-level Studio Practice courses in the B.F.A. program only.) (Lab fees
may apply.)

27-491. Critical Issues
Development of an understanding of issues which have been addressed by contemporary
artists and critics contextualized in history and artistic practices with an emphasis on individual
student's concerns. (Prerequisites: 27-105 and 27-106.) (Restricted to B.F.A. Visual Arts
students only after successful completion of portfolio review.) (Lab fees may apply.)



                                                                                              page 10
ART HISTORY

28-150. Contemporary Visual Culture
A critical investigation of the visual imagery and artifacts of contemporary culture. Drawing upon
examples from TV, advertising, cinema, cyber culture, architecture, design and art, students are
introduced to such concepts as spectacle, kitsch, simulacrum, hypertext paradigm. (Lab fees
may apply.)

28-214. Survey of Art History: Ancient to Medieval
History of art from prehistoric through medieval, with an introduction to composition, the
language of the plastic arts and its relationship to culture. (Students cannot receive credit for
both 28-114 and 28-214.)

28-215. Survey of Art History: Renaissance to Modern
History of art from Italian Renaissance to the twentieth century, with emphasis on the influence
of social and philosophical ideas. (Students cannot receive credit for both 28-115 and 28-215.)

28-300. Ancient Near East Art
A comprehensive study of the art of Egyptian and Mesopotamian civilizations with emphasis
upon those periods which had distinct cultural influence upon the peripheral areas of the
Eastern Mediterranean. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-301. Northern Renaissance Art
The art of Nothern Europe during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries with particular emphais
upon the the Franco-Flemish and German painting traditions and the beginnings of Graphic Art.
(Prerequisites for Visual Art majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-307. Renaissance Art I
The Renaissance in Italy during the fifteenth century with special attention given to the
architecture, sculpture, and painting of Florence. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214
and 28-215.)

28-308. Renaissance Art II
The art of the Renaissance in Italy with a major consideration of the architecture, sculpture, and
painting produced in Rome and Venice during the sixteenth century. (Prerequisites for Visual
Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-331. Nineteenth-Century European Art
An analysis of the major movements in European painting during the nineteenth century
including Neo-Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism.
(Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-336. Early Medieval Art
An examination of the painting, sculpture, and architecture of Europe including the Early
Christian, Byzantine, Hiberno-Saxon, Carolingian, and Ottonian periods. (Prerequisites for
Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-337. Later Medieval Art
An examination of the evolution of architecture and sculpture in Europe during the Romanesque
and Gothic periods. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

                                                                                              page 11
28-338. Islamic Art
An examination of important trends in the artistic development of the Muslim era, including the
Umayyad, Tulunid, Fatamid, Seljuk, Mongol, Nasrid, Mamluk, Ottoman, Timurid, Safvid, and
Mughal dynasties. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-339. Japanese Art
The architecture, sculpture, and painting of Japan and the relationship of Japanese culture to
continental artistic developments. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-340. Art of India
A general survey of Indian architecture, sculpture, and painting with particular emphasis on the
development of the Buddha Image. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-341. Art of China
An examination on the architecture, sculpture, and painting of China from the Shang through the
Ching dynasties. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-342. The Development of American Art
A study of the art and architecture created in the United States from Colonial times to the
twentieth century. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-343. Canadian Art
A study of the development of visual art in Canada from its early beginnings to the present.
Gallery visits and primary sources in Ontario will supplement class lectures and readings.
(Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214 and 28-215.)

28-345. Art of the Twentieth Century-Post-1940
An examination of the sources, movements, and major figures contributing to twentieth century
art in Europe and North America from 1940 on. (Prerequisites for Visual Arts majors: 28-214
and 28-215.)

28-391. Contemporary Architecture
A survey of the roots of contemporary architectural theory through an examination of
representative structures since the Industrial Revolution. Students will be introduced to those
individuals who have played a central role in the development of architectural thought in North
America. (Also offered as Sociology 48-281 and Planning 50-291.) (Prerequisites for Visual Arts
majors: 28-214 and 28-215.) (3 lecture hours a week.)

28-400. Directed Individual Studies
This course involves examination of a particular problem in a specific area of interest in which a
paper will be required. May be repeated for credit with permission of Visual Arts. For specific
topics consult a program advisor in Visual Arts. (Prerequisites: 28-214, 28-215, a 300-numbered
course in the subject desired and consent of the instructor.)

28-456. Proseminar
A Proseminar course based on group encounters with particular studies in the History of Art,
which will be considered by means of readings, discussions, papers, and museum trips. May be
repeated for credit with permission. For specific topics consult a program advisor in Visual Arts.
(Prerequisites: 28-214, 28-215, and consent of the instructor.)


                                                                                             page 12
FACULTY


FRANCIS PELKEY, Brenda
Professor and Director, School of Visual Arts
Photography
bjfp@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2828
Office 101A LeBel

Brenda Francis Pelkey was born in Kingston, Ontario. She moved to Saskatchewan in 1980 and
became involved with the photographic community through venues such as Black flash and the
Photographers Gallery. Prof. Francis Pelkey has exhibited throughout Canada as well as
Scotland, Finland and England. Her works appear in numerous collections such as the
MacKenzie Art Gallery, the Mendel Art Gallery, the Art Bank, the Winnipeg Art Gallery, the
Dunlop Art Gallery and The Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography. Her most recent
photographic series Spaces of Transformation documents bars / strip clubs and hospital rooms
which she refers to as „sites of fear anxiety‟. Other solo exhibitions include; "...the great effect of
the imagination on the world," “dreams of life and death" (1992-94), Memento Mori (1994-96),
Oblivion (1997-99) and Haunts (2001).


BAGGIO, Lisa
Professor - part-time
Drawing / Painting
studio@lisabaggio.com
Ext # 4780
Office 133b LeBel

Lisa Baggio teaches drawing and has been instrumental in fundraising for the renovation of
University‟s LeBel Gallery.


BAXTER&, Iain
Professor Emeritus
Studio Fundamentals
ibaxter@uwindsor.ca
Ext #2837
Office 113 LeBel

Iain Baxter has been a teacher, mentor of the arts and a practicing artist for more than 40 years.
Through his many internationally acclaimed activities, particularly the art collective N.E. Thing
Company, Baxter forged the way for conceptual art in Canada and had remained is one of the
most influential Canadian artists of the 20th Century. Baxter‟s boundless curiosity continues
here and internationally to fascinate, dismantle, and refocus barriers between art and life. He
has had a profound influence as a thinker, pioneer artist, educator and mentor.




                                                                                                page 13
BLATHERWICK, David
Professor
Painting / Digital Media
dwb@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2847
Office 133a LeBel

David Blatherwick attended the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture (Maine) after
completion of his M.A. (Arts Plasiques) Université du Quèbec a Montréal, and B.A.A. in Design
at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute. He has exhibited throughout Quèbec, the United States and
Taiwan and his works are widely collected. He speaks English, French and Spanish.



BROWN, Brian E.
Professor
Studio Fundamentals / Painting
brown2v@uwindsor.ca
Ext #3366 (Currently Faculty Association President)

Brian E. Brown has taught at the School of Visual Arts since 1977. He has been an active
member within the larger community of the University of Windsor and he has been awarded for
his commitment to academic service with the Windsor University Faculty Association and the
Windsor and District Labour Council. He has exhibited his large abstract paintings throughout
the United States and Canada.


DINGLER, Daniel W.
Professor
Drawing / Lithography / Papermaking
Ext #2833
Office 130F LeBel

Daniel Dingler has been teaching at the School of Visual Arts since 1970. He established the
lithography area and offered the first papermaking courses in Canada. Daniel Dingler‟s prints
have been exhibited widely in the United States, Germany, Canada, and South Africa.
Highlighted major one-person exhibitions include: the Art Gallery of Windsor, the Munich Opera
House, Rodman Hall, St. Catherine‟s and the Boston Museum School. His work, based on
uncovering sexual secrets and masculinity, is included in many collections and appears in
numerous suites of prints published by various art organizations, galleries and universities.




                                                                                        page 14
DUCK, Adèle
Professor
Drawing / Painting
adeled@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2827
Office 104 LeBel

Adèle Duck is an internationally known artist who maintains a rigorous studio practice. She is
represented by galleries in Illinois, Michigan, Alberta and throughout Ontario. Her large-scale
drawings and paintings are included in numerous gallery collections as well as corporate and
private collections. Her creative work has been exhibited widely from Whitehorse in the Yukon
Territories to Germany. She has received numerous awards and grants to facilitate her creative
investigation of the figure as an abstract image.


FARRELL, Michael J.
Professor
Art History
artguise@sbcglobal.net
Ext #2835
Office 111 LeBel



GOLD/SMITH, Susan
Professor
Drawing / Painting
sgold@uwindsor.ca
Ext #2845
Office 106 LeBel

Susan Gold/Smith has exhibited throughout Europe and the United States and recently
exhibited her drawing/installation work at the Natural History Museum in London, England. She
has organized many artistic initiatives including mail art, as with, “Nobel Peace Project” and
“Notes to Kanata”, a student exchange with the University of Reykjavik in Iceland. She serves
this university as a Senate representative, a member of the Faculty Association‟s Executive
Council and many other numerous committees. Her dedication to fairness and social justice is
evident in all aspects of her professional career. Susan is an extraordinary professor, who helps
and supports students in and out of the classroom.




                                                                                           page 15
HARDING, Noel
Professor - Part-time
Green Corridor Project

Noel Harding is an international Canadian artist, recognized for his monumental scale public art
projects. As a sculptor he has worked with teams of diverse professionals within elaborate and
complex contexts. His works have been exhibited in museums throughout the world including
Moscow, Budapest, Bratislava, Amsterdam, Helsinki, Canada and the United States. His
environmental project “the Elevated Wetlands” is a prominent Toronto example of Harding‟s
ability to take a unique concept, initiate and actualize his projects. Noel Harding is currently
considered a Distinguished Visitor at the University of Windsor for his work with the Green
Corridor project.


ISAJIW, Sophia
Professor
Studio Fundamentals
sisajiw@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2846
Office 122 LeBel

Sophia Isajiw was born in New York City, received her BA, Fine Art Specialist Degree from the
University of Toronto and her MFA from the California Institute of the Arts at Valencia. She was
the director of the Print and Paper Media department at the Banff Centre for the Arts in Banff,
Alberta, where she co-founded the Velvet Antler Studio for Print Media and developed a print
publishing program, "Velvet Antler Editions." She has taught at numerous arts institutions in
Canada and the United States, most recently the California State University where she was the
Director and Curator of the University Art Gallery and a Public Arts Commissioner on the
Turlock City Arts Commission and the California Institute of the Arts.



LAW, William C.
Professor
Studio Fundamentals / Sculpture
wcl@uwindsor.ca
Ext #2838
Office 136F LeBel

Bill Law received his BFA from the Atlanta School of Art in 1968 and his MFA in 1970 from
Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. He has been teaching in the School of Visual Arts
for over 30 years and has held positions as MFA Coordinator and Director of the School. Bill is
keenly interested in a variety of new practices and has recently been investigating such elusive
mediums as light, sound and [Inter] activity. He believes that art is an outrageous adventure and
that whatever else it is … at a very simple level it is a way of making (and being).




                                                                                          page 16
MacDOWALL, Cyndra
Professor
Photography
cynmac@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2842
Office 107 LeBel

Cyndra MacDowall, formerly of Sheridan College‟s Art and Art History Program, began teaching
Photography in the School of Visual Arts in 2002. Her photographic series, Penetrating the City,
(1999-2001) was exhibited at the Gallery of Modern Art in Glasgow and recently featured in
BlackFlash magazine. These photographs make visible a lesbian couple‟s mobility through
urban spaces at night. Her most recently completed work “Shadow City” toured Toronto,
Winnipeg, Saskatoon, and Richmond B.C


MOORES, Zeke
Professor - Part-time
Sculpture
wxyzeke@yahoo.com
Ext # 2839
Office 130c LeBel


RODNEY, Lee
Professor
Art History / Visual Culture
lrodney@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 4781
Office 109 LeBel

Dr. Rodney teaches Visual Culture and courses in critical theory and contemporary art. She
obtained her Ph.D at Goldsmith‟s College, University of London (UK); previous degrees from the
Nova Scotia College of Art and Design (BFA) and York University (MA). She works as a curator
and critic, writing for C Magazine, Canadian Art, and Parachute.


SANDO, Julie
Professor - Part-time
Studio Fundamentals / Photography / Contemporary Visual Culture
jsando@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2829
Office 112 LeBel

Julie Sando has been teaching at the School of Visual Arts since 1999. She is also the School‟s
Information Officer, making her responsible for public relations and recruitment.




                                                                                         page 17
SEOANE, José
Professor - Part-time
Painting / Drawing
seoanewindsor@yahoo.com
Ext # 2836
Office 133c LeBel

José Seoane, originally from Santiago de Cuba, graduated in 1984 from the Art Institute of San
Alejandro in Havana. He is a painter and installation artist, investigating ideas around trans-
culturation and identity within the post modern condition. His work extends from the gallery into
site-specific spaces that include interactive interventions and large-scale murals. He has
organized many intercultural projects both in Cuba and in Europe and recently was an artist-in-
residence with Culture Lounge in San Francisco, California. Currently he teaches at the
University of Windsor, Visual Arts and resides in Toronto, Canada.


STRICKLAND, Rod
Professor
Fundamentals / Sculpture / Green Corridor Project
strickl@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2849
Office 133b LeBel

Rod Strickland‟s sculptural installations have been exhibited throughout Canada and the United
States. Major research themes address the relationships between nature, industrial
development and complex technologies. These themes are also explored through various
curatorial and community based projects such as “Stolen Moments, Borrowed Time”. This
exhibition brought together works created by members of the local workforce which had been
completed “on the job” with materials acquired from their employers. Strickland is currently co-
authoring a project, which highlights working examples of creative sustainable technologies in
the heavily polluted 2km long Green Corridor, Ambassador Bridge Environmental Gateway.


TORINUS, Sigi
Professor
Performance / Digital Media
torinus@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2836
Office 133c LeBel

Sigi Torinus creates hybrid, new media works with an emphasis on performance and site-
specific installation. Her research explores relations between the human experience and the
experience of technology, at times with a "technical apparatus" both as facilitator and medium of
delivery. Originally from the Virgin Islands, she studied Fine Arts in both Germany and the US
and holds an MFA from San Francisco State University. Her works have been exhibited in the
US, Europe and Canada.




                                                                                           page 18
STAFF

Cathy Georges
Secretary
george2@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2828
Office 101 LeBel
Cathy Georges has been an invaluable asset to the School of Visual Arts for over twenty years.
Cathy has many responsibilities in the office and is an integral part of the School. She also has
a very green thumb and enjoys finding the perfect place for student projects in her sprawling
garden.


Chris Blais
Digital Imaging Technician
cblais@uwindsor.ca
ext. 2832
Office 126c LeBel
Working with numerous bands led Chris Blais to become the creative head for a North American
multimedia entertainment company. Chris found himself deep into synths, computers, software,
audio/video recording & production solutions for top music acts. Today Chris‟ love for everything
“Apple” has him working with students & staff, writing music for TV, radio spots and working on
another CD release with his band No Ordinary Machine. It is clear to all of those who come in
contact with Chris, that he truly has a love for the arts and technology.


Lee Rabideau
Wood Shop Technician / Store Operator
rabide1@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2830
Office 121 LeBel
Lee Rabideau graduated with a BFA degree in 1988 and with a degree in Education in 1989.
He has been employed as a Visual Arts‟ Technician since 1989. As well as being the Safety
officer in the School, he oversees the Student Supply Store, the Wood Shop and performs
various other tasks in the department.



John Simard
Sculpture Technician
johneboy@uwindsor.ca
Ext # 2840
Office 136a LeBel
John Simard is a BFA graduate of the School and has been working in the building since 1976.
He has created a number of large scale sculptures and multi media performances and he was a
founding member of Artcite, Windsor‟s first artist-run center. John is always willing to assist
students in the Sculpture studio area with the practical “hands on” aspect of their work. He
assists students with various forms of welding, mold-making, metal casting, wood working,
fibreglass work, spray painting, hand tool operation, operating heavy duty stationary machines,
kiln operation, and general construction with a wide range of materials.
                                                                                           page 19
Registration Procedures

You may register anytime after May 1 as long as the University has received your confirmation
of our offer of admission. Normally this information is received from the Ontario Universities
Application Centre about a week after you have submitted your response form to them. Your
personal access code (PAC) along with your student identification number listed on your offer of
admission will allow you to gain access to the student self-service page (www.uwindsor.ca).

The Registration Instructions are listed under Other Information on the (Student Information
System) SIS Introductory page. If you are having any problems with the registration process,
call (519) 253-3000 ext 5332. At Head Start, you will see a counsellor and you can verify at
that time that the courses you have selected are appropriate for your program of study.

Office of the Registrar
(519) 253-3000 ext 3315
For more tips on how to make your class schedule go to www.uwindsor.ca/headstart




SET Evaluation
Student evaluations of professors are now posted on the web. This tool is designed to inform
students and faculty about student response to instructor-related and course-related questions.
Students are asked to be honest and fair as questionnaire forms are an important part of
evaluating teaching effectiveness or a course's value, but cannot be taken alone as a complete
assessment of an instructor or course. In addition, factors other than an instructor's teaching
ability or a course's value may influence ratings. These may include: required vs. elective
courses; level of course; class size; percentage of students responding; teaching methods;
gender diversity, race/ethnicity, or age of instructors and students.

This NEW tool is located on the University of Windsor‟s web site, www.uwindsor.ca. You must
enter the S.I.S. (Student Information System, and under the heading “What’s New”, click on the
heading: “SET Results” and follow the instructions.




                                                                                          page 20
Glossary


Getting used to terms at University


Bachelor’s Degree: The first undergraduate degree is usually a „Bachelor‟s degree‟ (e.g. B.A. –
Bachelor of Arts; B.Sc. – Bachelor of Science).

Cumulative Grade Average: A grade average which is based upon all courses attempted at
the University of Windsor, including failed courses.

Department: academic discipline.

Full Course Load: 4 or 5 courses per semester.

General Program: A three-year (30 semester course) program which provides a moderate
concentration (roughly 10-16 courses) in one specific subject.

Honours Program: A four-year (40 semester course) program which is designed to emphasize
a greater concentration in one discipline (roughly 20-24 courses) and demands a higher level of
achievement than the General program.

Combined Honours (or Double Major): A four-year (40 semester course) program combining
two majors (15-17 courses from each major.)

Major: A specific concentration for courses within a subject area.

Option: Courses outside the major. A number of options in specific areas (Arts, Sciences,
Social Sciences) are required in most programs.

Part Time: 3 or fewer courses.

Prerequisite: A course for which credit must have been earned prior to registration in another
course.




                                                                                          page 21
Visual Arts Society
The Visual Arts Society (VAS) supports all visual arts students in any artistic or academic
endeavour and strives to create an atmosphere that engages in critical analysis. As well, the
VAS supports and promotes visual arts within campus and the community.

All students registered in visual arts at the University of Windsor are members of the society.
The executive officers are the President, the Vice President, the Secretary and the Treasurer, all
of which are elected by the visual arts students. First and second year representatives are an
integral part of the society.

The VAS is also involved in recruitment, orientation for first-year students and various activities
and fund-raising events throughout the year.




                                                                                             page 22
LOCAL GALLERIES
Art Gallery of Windsor
401 Riverside Drive West
Windsor, N9A 7J1
Telephone: (519) 977-0013
Fax: (519) 977-0776

The Art Gallery of Windsor collects, conserves, interprets, and presents Canadian art. It is a
place to view significant works of art by local, regional, and national artists; a place to see what
Canadians have been making and thinking about for longer than Canada has been a country.
The AGW is a valuable cultural resource for the Windsor area, and provides the special service
of showcasing Canadian art in a city that has the busiest border crossing between Canada and
the United States.

ARTCITE INC.
109 University Ave W
Windsor, N9A 5P4
info@artcite.ca
Gallery Hours: Wed.-Sat.: 12-5pm, or by appointment
Phone/fax: 519.977-6564

Artcite is Windsor's non-profit, artist-run centre for the contemporary arts. Founded in 1982,
Artcite has operated as an alternative to both the commercial art galleries and to the larger,
more mainstream public art galleries. Our mandate goes beyond presenting visual art
exhibitions and extends into the programming of workshops, lectures, film and video screenings,
performance, and literary events. With the exception of special fundraising projects, these
cultural activities are offered to the community free of charge.

Another important mandate for Artcite is to promote professionalism in the arts. This means that
we support the artists we exhibit by paying professional
artist fees. Additionally, we employ, with the assistance of Employment and Immigration
Canada, contract workers who gain the valuable experience and special skills that are unique to
arts organizations.

Our programming commitment remains with the younger, or emerging artist, as well as to
showing artists that have not shown in this area before. We strive to strike a balance between
shows and events as to media, content, gender etc., and will continue to present a diverse
range of exhibitions and events that reflect the diversity of current art practices in this
community and nationally.

Common Ground
3277 Sandwich St W
Windsor, On
N9C1A9
519-252-6380
Tues-Fri 1-5pm




                                                                                              page 23
HOUSE OF TOAST (HOT)
315 Pelissier, Suite 11
Windsor N9A 4K8
Tel: 519.256.8406
info@houseoftoast.ca
Hours of Operation
Tuesday - Saturday: 12-6pm
Sunday & Monday: Closed

House of Toast is a non-profit, membership-based collective offering film & video equipment and
services for independent artists. A low annual membership fee entitles users to inexpensive
rental rates for film/video production and post-production facilities as well as discounts to
screenings, workshops and other HOT events.

LeBel Gallery, University of Windsor
Located at the corner of Huron Church Rd and College Ave
art@uwindsor.ca

The LeBel Gallery is a student-run gallery. Its mandate is to give students a professional
experience with exhibiting their work and to expose the work of the School, the University and
city communities at large. All shows are selected by the Gallery Committee consisting of BFA
and MFA students and professors in the School. Priority is given to the visual arts students at
the University of Windsor; however there may also be a limited number of shows from outside
the student body, as well as MFA, BFA and Faculty shows.

Windsor Printmaker’s Forum
420 Devonshire Ave., Lower Level
Windsor, ON N8Y 4T6
Phone: (519) 253-9493

Windsor Printmaker's Forum is an artist-run, non-profit art organization dedicated to the
preservation, promotion, appreciation, production and purpose of fine art printmaking.

The Detroit Institute of Arts
5200 Woodward Avenue
Detroit, Michigan 48202
Telephone 313.833.7900
closed: Monday and Tuesday
10 – 4 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday
10 – 9 p.m. Friday
10 – 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday

MOCAD Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit
4445 Woodward Ave
Detroit MI 48201
313 832 6622
Museum Hours: W & Su: 12-6 pm; Th - Sa: 12-8 pm; closed Monday & Tuesday

The mission of the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit is to present art at the forefront of
contemporary culture. As a non-collecting institution, MOCAD is responsive to the cultural
content of our time, fueling crucial dialogue, collaboration, and public engagement.
                                                                                             page 24
Art Suppliers

Art & Graphics
Brian and Claudette
819 Frank Ave.
Windsor, Ontario
944-0780
Fax 944-6062

Michaels
THE ARTS AND CRAFTS STORE
4339 Walker RD
Windsor, Ontario
972-5488
www.michaels.com

Windsor Art Supplies Centre LTD
965 Tecumseh Rd W
Windsor, Ontario
253-2634

Online Suppliers
Aboveground Art Supplies
Toronto, Ontario
1-800-591-2177
www.abovegroundartsupplies.com

Allart-Wyndam Art Supplies
Guelph, Ontario
1-800-560-1970
www.wyndamartsupplies.com

Curry’s
1-800-268-2969
www.curry‟s.com

Loomis Art Store
Mississauga and Oakville, Ontario
1-800-263-1456
www.LommisArtStore.com




                                       page 25
Student Services on Campus


Aboriginal Education Centre (Turtle Island)
Phone: (519) 253-3000 ext. 3481
Fax: (519) 971-3689
E-mail: turtleisland@uwindsor.ca
Internet: www.uwindsor.ca/aec

Turtle Island and its personnel provide multiple services to students of Aboriginal background.
This includes First Nations, Metis, Innu, Inuit, Status, Non-status, Traditional, and Non-
traditional Aboriginals. These services provide the support needed for students to achieve their
academic goals and successes. Turtle Island Centre itself fosters an appreciation of Native
Traditions, Spirituality and World View. Services include: Computer Lab, Faxing Services,
Academic Counselling Fund Raising Events, Indigenous Library, Phone home Access,
Information Board, Lounge, Socials, Study Rooms, Employment Board, Bridging Services.


Academic Writing Centre
Phone: (519) 253-3000 ext. 3405
Fax: (519)561-1410
Email: bbenson@uwindsor.ca

What We Offer
   Free writing assistance for University of Windsor undergraduates and graduates.
     Including those students whose first language is not English;
   Writing workshops for small groups of students;
   One-to-one conferences;
   Individualized writing programs;
   Classroom presentations on specific writing tasks;
   Coordination of course-linked writing groups.

What We Do
   Discuss your ideas and show you how to organize and develop them
   Answer questions about citing your sources
   Help you identify and correct grammar errors
   Show you how to revise and edit your papers
   Assist you in writing specific formats
   Coach you in developing a writing style that suits your discipline

What We Do Not Do
   Proofread what you have written
   Discuss multiple, or very long assignments in a single appointment
   Help you with take-home exams
   Provide assistance with writing cover letters, resumes, job applications, letters of
     admission, personal statements, letters, emails, memos
   Guarantee what grade you will receive on your paper


                                                                                           page 26
Co-operative Education & Career Services (C.E.C.S)
(519)253-3000 ext.3555
cooped@uwindsor.ca

“We are committed to working with current students and recent graduates in their quest to
develop the knowledge and skills they need to build a career plan, obtain fulfilling employment
and excel in the workplace”.



Educational Development Centre
Phone: (519) 253-3000 ext.3287
Fax: (519) –973-7091
E-mail: edc@uwindsor.ca

Staff and student volunteers within the Educational Development Centre recognize that the
experiences of university students can be challenging, exhilarating, complex and stressful. Your
university career is one that requires informed decision making, major skill development and
self-introspection about your future path in life. Our staff and students come from a variety of
backgrounds that collectively enable us to address effectively with you issues of transition
during this time of growth and development programs, career exploration and assessment,
S.T.E.P.S and the Special Needs program, we are with you every step of the way.


Food and Hospitality Services
Students an always find something to satisfy their appetite with the wide variety of food choices
available. Fresh fruits and vegetables, full meals, soup and sandwiches and grab-and-go items
are offered on a daily basis in the many food services outlets located around campus.


Human Rights Office
The University of Windsor has a policy that prohibits harassment and discrimination on the basis
of gender, race sexual orientation, disability, ancestry, place of origin, citizenship, creed, age,
marital status, receipt of public assistance and family status. To this end, the University has
created a Human Rights Office to deal with all forms of harassment, discrimination and issues of
procedural unfairness. The objective of the Human Rights Office is to create and promote an
environment in which all members of the University community interact on the basis of mutual
respect and which is harassment-free. The Human Rights Commissioner employs various
procedures, remedies and sanctions to settle disputes. Confidentiality is assured in all dealings
with the office.

The Human Rights Office is located at 310 Sunset, ext. 3400.
Appointments can be booked Monday to Thursday 9 to 4p.m. and Fridays from 9 – 12p.m.


International Student Centre
The International Student Centre and Advisor are located in Cody Hall on the first floor. The
Advisor will assist with student VISA inquiries and renewals, job information, counselling and
referrals to other agencies.

                                                                                            page 27
Medical and Health Services
second floor of the C.A.W Student Centre
Hours: 9 to 12 & 1 to 4
519.973-7002



Campus Ministry
The Campus Ministry Office composed of a variety of faith groups is located on the second floor
of the C.A.W Student Centre. It is available for counselling or conversation on an individual or
group basis.


Organization for Part Time Students (OPUS)
Phone: (519) 253-3000 ext: 3463
E-mail: specneed@uwindsor.ca

The Organization for Part Time Students (OPUS) in collaboration with the Special Needs
Advisory Committee, is offering two new awards to recognize the Special Needs population and
those advocating for them, in the University Community.


Parking
Permit parking is in effect on all residential streets surrounding the University campus. Only
those students who reside off campus have the option of purchasing a city permit.
Residence students who wish to inquire about purchasing an on campus parking permit should
contact the Parking Services at 253-3000 ext 2413.


Campus Police Services
Campus Police are responsible for keeping the peace, enforcing federal, provincial and
municipal statues, and University regulations. Campus Police Offices are on duty 24 hours a
day and are located at 320 Sunset and can be reached at 253-3000 ext.1234, EMERGENCY
ext. 4444.


St. Denis Centre
The St. Denis Centre is an athletic facility which offers a multitude of both academic and
recreational services. This includes a pool, weight room, aerobic classes, indoor track and a
variety of team and individual sports. The St. Denis Centre is located on College directly at the
south end of Sunset.

Residence Services
Living in residence places you at the heart of campus life, close to classrooms, the library,
health services, recreational and dining facilities. Residence is much more than a bed and a
desk. Our professional and student staff makes it their top priority to create living space which
supports your needs both in and out of the classroom. Residence living also provides students
with opportunities for personal growth and involvement. At the University of Windsor students
are encouraged to take an active role in their residence through participation in various activities
                                                                                             page 28
which include student government, student employment, residence oriented programs,
community and athletic events. Research indicates that students who live in residence are less
likely to drop out and are highly satisfied with their university experience.

Residence is a Community. When you choose residence life you choose to live in a community
with others who have agreed to follow the guidelines that govern residence activities. We are
committed to providing quality student housing that fosters respect for your fellow residents and
the building in which you live. To achieve these objectives, our residence halls offer a wide
range of support staff to keep the residences operating smoothly. The University operates seven
residence halls.
Phone: (519) 253-3000 ext 3279
Fax: (519) 971-3631
Email: resservices@uwindsor.ca
Other Campus Housing
www.universityrooms.com
www.rent4all.ca
www.campushousinglist.com


Special Needs Services

The University of Windsor campus is on the small side of medium…but we‟re growing! It‟s a
pleasant place with a walking/jogging/roller-blading route at the river‟s edge that runs from one
end of the city to the other. Our user-friendly campus is compact and easy to navigate with
numerous places to stop, sit, and enjoy the surrounding greenery.

There are many support services available to the students on this campus and we hope you‟ll
take advantage of them. The Special Needs Program is committed to working with all students,
faculty members, and administrative staff to effectively address accommodation and
accessibility issues so that your experience at the University of Windsor will be challenging (but
not overwhelming), enjoyable, and rewarding as you pursue your educational and vocational
goals.


C.A.W. Student Centre
(519) 973-7024

The C.A.W. Student Centre is open 24 hours a day from the first day of classes in September
until the end of final exams in April.

Services available in the Centre are:
Main Floor - Information desk, Marketplace (cafeteria Kiosk, Student Information Resource
Centre (SIRC) and the Organization of Part-time University Students (OPUS);

Second Floor- Administration Offices, Office of Hospitality Services, University of Windsor
Students‟ Alliance (U.W.S.A), Student Counselling Centre, Medical And Health Services,
Woman‟s Centre, Campus Ministry (Chaplain‟s Office), Graduate Students‟ Society, Social
Science Society, Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship, Quiet Study Lounge, Ambassador
Auditorium, Boardroom, Conference Rooms 1 and 2, Student Club Offices and Walk Safe;

                                                                                            page 29
Basement- Pharmacy, Travel Cuts, the Pub, University Cleaners, Hair Salon, Half Baked
Tanning Salon, CJAM-FM Radio, The Lance, U.W.S.A Used Book Sale, CIBC Banking
Machine, On Campus Portraits and Mr. Copies.



Student Counselling Centre
Room 293 2nd Floor CAW Student Centre
(519) 253-3000 ext. 4616
Hours: 8:30 am- 4:30 pm Monday through Friday

The Student Counselling Centre provides short-term and crisis counselling for students.
Common concerns that students have include adjusting to university, relationship problems,
depression, anxiety, family difficulties, and cultural issues. If these or other personal concerns
are affecting your life please contact us. Our counsellors can help you explore coping resources
and ways to enhance your functioning. If necessary we can also facilitate a referral to other
campus services or community agencies.

In addition, the Student Counselling Centre offers groups, workshops, and consultation services,
and conducts psychological and psycho educational assessments as required (usually upon
referral from the Special Needs office). We also co-ordinate a peer support program.


Student Information Resource Centre (SIRC)
The Student Information Resource Centre (SIRC) should be the first stop for students seeking
information or needing help. Acting as a liaison with all campus services, SIRC makes it
possible for students to receive on the sport answers to questions or problems. Complex needs
are referred to the campus location where students can receive the kind of in-depth help they
require.

Located on the main floor (room 179) of the C.A.W. Student Centre, SIRC is centrally located
and offers convenient hours of operation: Monday to Thursday 8:30am to 7:00pm and Friday
8:30 am to 4:30 pm. You can drop in any time during these hours- you don‟t need an
appointment.




                                                                                           page 30
UWSA - University of Windsor Student Alliance
The University of Windsor Student Alliance is the student union for all full-time undergraduate
students at the University of Windsor. Every full time undergraduate student pays fees to the
organization on a semester basis and is considered a member of the organization.

MISSION STATEMENT
We will be recognized as the best student led organization designed to meet students' needs.
We will strive relentlessly to enhance student life through advocacy, representation and
services.

Advocacy
The UWSA works to ensure that all qualified students are able to obtain a post-secondary
education, regardless of their financial situation. At this time, there is a serious threat that the
provincial government will de-regulate all undergraduate tuition fees which means that each
institution will have the ability to increase fees without restrictions. Ontario Universities face
serious funding short falls in the face of expected increases in enrolment. The UWSA will work
to defend students interests by demanding that the University remain accountable to the
students and that the Provincial government adequately fund universities and colleges so that
qualified students can obtain a post-secondary education.

Representation
The UWSA represents all full-time undergraduate students on all major bodies and committees
of the University to put forward students concerns, desires and needs. The UWSA also provides
students with an element of campus life outside of the classroom. Not only are events organized
on and off campus, but students can also get involved themselves through clubs, committees
and all aspects of the local and Canadian community.

Services
The UWSA provides services for students such as the Used Bookstore and the Student Health
and Dental plan to assist students in dealing with the high costs of education. The UWSA
always seeks to provide new services to students that contribute to their educational
experience, build a sense of community on campus and ensure a positive experience on
campus.




                                                                                               page 31
160 Careers Related to the Visual Arts
Artist/ Photo Stylist/ Wedding Photographer / Leatherworker/ Teacher/ Props Manager/
Caricaturist/ Metal Smith/Architect /Special Effects Technician/Editorial Art Director/
Silversmith /Architectural Critic/ Publications Designer /Cartoonist / Art Historian/
Computer Graphics Artist/ Product Designer/ Medical Illustrator/ Art Librarian/
Architectural Graphic Artist/ Furniture Designer/Technical Illustrator/
Private Art Instructor/ Environmental Designer/ Communications Designer/
Bookbinder/ Ceramist Papermaker /Art Educator/ Automobile Designer/Art Restorer/
Art Insurance Agent/ Web Site Designer/ Industrial Designer/ Botanical Designer/
Art Appraiser/ Colour analyst/ Cartographer / Children‟s Book Illustrator/ Jewellery/
Designer/ Landscape Designer/ Lighting Designer/ Multimedia Artist/ Art Therapist/
Model Builder/ Product Photographer/ Forensic Photographer/Packaging Designer/
Marine Architect/ Promotion Designer/ Researcher/ Web Designer/ Playground Designer
Photographer/ Gallery Exhibition Coordinator/ Web Animator/ Dyer Illustrator/
Photofinishing Specialist/ Museum Preparatory/ Theme Park Designer/ Poster Artist/
Photographic Sales/ Gallery Program Coordinator/ Interior Designer/ Lithographer/
Stock Photographer/ Carpenter/ Environmental Planner/ Exhibit and Display Designer/
Video Artist/ Font Designer/ Antique Specialist/ Retail Art Director/Ergonomic Designer
Welder/ Design Consultant/ Silk Screen Artist/Art Consultant/ Creative Director/
Floral Designer/ Sketch Artist/ Art Specialty Lawyer/ Theorist/ Advertising Art Director/
Typographer/ Gallery Administrator/ Specialty Cake Designer/ Fashion Art Director/
Cinematographer/ Art Critic/ Landscape Architect/ Windsor Display Designer/
Costume Designer/ Artist‟s Assistant/ Painter / CD Designer/ Billboard Designer/
Stage Design/ Sculptor/ Video Editor/ Airbrush Artist/ Film Editor/ Printmaker/
Advertising Executive/ Television Art Director/ Makeup Artist/ Kinetic Artist/
Travel Photographer/ Glass Blower/ Storyboard Illustrator/ Appraiser/ Publications/
Designer/Bank Note Designer/ Title Designer/ Art Dealer/ Performance Artist/
Manuscript Illuminator/ Film Lab Technician/ Artist‟ Agent/ Muralist/
Block Engraver/ Legal Photographer/ Gallery Director/ Toymaker/
Film Scene Painter/ Photo Journalist/ Craftsperson/ Sound Technician/
Book Jacket Designer/ Fashion Illustrator/ Environmental Artist/ Tattoo Artist/
Graphic Arts Technician/ Fashion Designer/ Foundry Worker/ Art Retailer/
Stencil Maker/ Fabric Designer/ Framer/ Commissioned Artist/
Set Designer/ Patternmaker/Master Printer/ Portraitist/ Greeting Card Designer/
Film Animator / Mold Maker/ Animation Artist/ Museum Curator/ Special Effects Artist/
Enamellist/ Antique Dealer/ Calligrapher/ Camera Operator/ Gem Cutter/Photo Stylist/
Fine Art Photographer/Goldsmith




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posted:10/9/2011
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