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Notebook Assignment Antigone Scenes

VIEWS: 4 PAGES: 31

									Terms to know: Hamartia
• The tragic flaw that causes the
  downfall of a tragic hero.
              Catharsis
• Emotional relief or purification that an
  audience was supposed to experience
  upon watching a Greek tragedy.
   Notebook Assignment,
   Antigone, Scenes 3-5
How does King Creon try to give
Antigone a chance to avoid her fate
in the first part of the play?
A: Creon asks Antigone, “Have you
heard the decree?” This gives her
the opportunity to say, “No,” but
since she is not interested in saving
herself, she does not.
                Pg. 829
1. What does Haimon’s response to
   Creon tell us about the expected role
   of a son to a father?
A: A son’s job is to be a dutiful son; full
   obedience is required.

2. Give a quote that illustrates this
  expected role, either from Haimon or
  Creon.
A: “I am your son, father. You are my
  guide. You make things clear for me,
  and I obey you” (lines 7-10)
           Pg. 830,831,832
1. Describe the position Creon believes he is
   in.
A: He is afraid if he waivers on his decree,
   he will look weak. Also, he is afraid if he
   cannot control his own family, people will
   believe he is a terrible leader, so they will
   not follow his laws.
2. Creon’s way of ruling will ensure
  obedience, won’t it? Why or why not?
A: The attitude, “My way or no way” turns
  people off. Rulers who are willing to listen
3. What is Haimon’s advice to his father?
  What examples does he give his father
  to make his points?
A: He tells his father to be reasonable
  and to listen to other’s opinions. He
  pleads, “I beg you. Do not be
  unchangeable:/ Do not believe that you
  alone can be right./ The man who
  thinks that, /The man who maintains
  that only he has the power/ To reason
  correctly , the gift to speak, the soul-/
  A man like that, when you know him,
  turns out empty./ It is not reason never
4. What is Haimon’s point that he makes
  about age, and advice?
A: He says that age should not matter: “It
  is not right[to listen to me] /If I am
  wrong. But if I am young, and right, /What
  does my age matter?”
5. In line 119, what is Haimon’s hidden
  threat?
A: Haimon says, “Her[ Antigone] death will
  cause another.” Creon sees this as a
  death threat, but really Haimon is telling
  his father that he intends to kill himself.
6. What is Antigone’s fate?
A: She is to be locked in a cave with some
  food and water and left to suffocate.
               Pg. 834

1. What is Antigone’s request that she
   makes to the gods?
A: “May Creon’s judgment be equal to
   mine.”
                Pg. 835-8
1. What news does Teiresias give King Creon?
A: King Creon has angered the gods and they
   will not accept any sacrifices from men.
2. According to Teiresias, what is the only
  crime?
A: The only crime is pride.
3. What crime does Creon accuse Teiresias of?
A: He accuses him of loving gold too much.
4. What warning does Teiresias give to King
  Creon?
A: Teiresias warns Creon that he will pay dearly
  for his foolish pride: “The time is not far of
  when you shall pay back/ Corpse for corpse,
  flesh of your own flesh. . .”
5. What does King Creon finally decide to do?
A: To release Antigone and give Polyneices a
           Pg. 839-842
1. What news does the messenger bring
   concerning Haimon?
A: Haimon has killed himself.
2. How does Antigone die?
A: She hangs herself.
3. When Creon sees Haimon, what does
  Haimon attempt to do?
A: He tries to stab his father—he
  “lunged at him and spat in his face.”
4. What additional bad news does King
  Creon receive?
A: His wife has killed herself.
5. What does Eurydice utter with her last
  breath?
A: She curses her husband.
6. What ultimately does Creon learn?
A: His own foolish pride and stubbornness
  caused the ultimate tragedy. Now his son,
  wife, nieces and nephews are dead and
  he is alone: “ I have been rash and
  foolish./ I have killed my son and my
  wife. I look for comfort; My comfort lies
  here dead.”
Checking Comprehension
1. Why do Creon and Haimon argue?
A: Haimon thinks his father’s judgment is too
   rash.
2. According toTeiresias, what terrible
   punishment awaits Creon?
A: Teiresias predicts that Creon’s house will
   be full of tears and that his own flesh
   (Haimon) shall payback “corpse for
   corpse.”
3. What action does Creon take after
   Teiresia’s prophecy?
A: Creon sets out to bury Polyneices and free
4. What does the Messenger tell Eurydice
   before she leaves the stage during the
   Exodus?
A: The Messenger tells Eurydice that
   Creon was too late to save Antigone, and
   that her son, Haimon, is dead.
5. What finally happens to Antigone?
   Haimon? Eurydice?
A: Antigone hangs herself. In his raging
   grief, Haimon tries to kill his father,
   misses, but then mortally wounds
   himself, dying next to Antigone. Cursing
   her husband, Eurydice kills herself.
          Critical Thinking
1. Explain the conflicts that drive Haimon to
   take extreme measures. Does he seem more
   concerned with divine law, to which
   Antigone turns for her justification, or with
   human law? Support your answer
A: Haimon is more concerned with the divine
   law. He listens to the people and overhears
   their sympathy for Antigone-that what she
   did for her brother was no crime, but as
   decent act. He begs his father to listen to
   reason, “ God’s crowning gift to man,” and
   exclaims that Creon has “no right to trample
   on God’s right.”
2. Why does Creon say “I have neither life nor
   substance” in the Exodus?
3. How great a role do you think fate plays in
   dictating the outcome of the story?
A: The choices people make dictate the course of
   their own lives, not fate- fate changes as
   choice changes; the main characters didn’t
   change, thus they were stuck with their fate.
OR
Some may say that fate is fixed from birth, the
   sum total of innate patterns of behavior and
   destiny, which we are unable to alter.
4. Both Antigone and Creon are unwilling to
   appear weak. How could this trait influence a
   person’s outlook on life?
A: The people that were afraid were appearing to
   be weak, indeed are; they resort to trying to
   control others and usually end up out of
                Literary Focus
1.(a) In you opinion, who is brought down most completely at
   the conclusion of the action?
A: (a) Creon: He lost everything that matters in life: his wife, his
   son, and the respect of his people.
2. (a) What is this character’s tragic flaw?
A: (a) Creon has intense pride, will not listen to reason, and is
   inflexible.
    (b) How does this flaw lead to the character’s downfall?
A: (b) By not using reason, he sets up a no-win situation;
   everyone loses.
HW: Write a one page essay answering
      the following question.
Antigone: Explain how the following theme is
developed in the play. Make sure to use CD
and CM in your response. Use at least 2
specific quotes to support your ideas.

Theme: Pride and stubbornness give rise to
tyranny and are character flaws that cause
suffering and, inevitably, tragedy.
              Possible CD’s
• Choragos, directed at Antigone: “Like father,
  like daughter: both headstrong, deaf to
  reason! She has never learned to yield” (
  823).

• Creon, directed at Antigone: “She has much
  to learn. / The inflexible heart breaks first, the
  toughest iron/ Cracks first, and the wildest
  horses bend their necks” (823).
Creon, directed at Antigone: “This girl is guilty of a
  double insolence, / Breaking the given laws and
  boasting of it. Who is the man here, /She or I, if
  this crime goes unpunished?” (823).

Creon to his son Haimon: “Of all the people in this
  city, only she /Has had contempt for my law and
  broken it./ Do you want me to show myself weak
  before the people? / Or to break my sworn word?
  No, and I will not” (829).
• Creon to Haimon: “If I permit my own family
  to rebel/ How shall I earn the world’s
  obedience? Show me the man who keeps his
  house in hand,/ He’s fit for public authority. I’ll
  have no dealings/ With lawbreakers, critics of
  the government: /Whoever is chosen to
  govern should be obeyed-/Must be obeyed,
  in all things, great and small,/Just and
  unjust!” (830).
• Haimon to his father: “Reason is God’s crowning
  gift to man, . . .yet there are other men/ who can
  reason, too: and their opinions might be helpful”
  (830).
• Haimon to his father: “Forget you are angry! Let
  yourself be moved! I know I am young; but please
  let me say this:/ The ideal condition /Would be I
  admit, that men should be right by instinct; / But
  since we are all to likely to go astray, / the
  reasonable thing is to learn from those who can
  teach” (831).
• Haimon to Creon: “I beg you. Do not
  be unchangeable:/ Do not believe that
  you alone can be right./ The man who
  thinks that, /The man who maintains
  that only he has the power/ To reason
  correctly , the gift to speak, the soul-/
  A man like that, when you know him,
  turns out empty./ It is not reason never
  to yield to reason!” (830).
• Teiresias to Creon: “Think: all men make
  mistakes, / But a good man yields when he
  knows his course is wrong,/ And repairs the
  evil. The only crime is pride” (836).
• Teiresias to Creon: “The time is not far off
  when you shall pay back/ Corpse for corpse,
  flesh of your won flesh. . .Not many days, /
  And your house will be full of men and
  women weeping. . .” (837).
• Creon to Choragos and himself: “Oh, it is
  hard to give in! but it is worse/ To risk
  everything for stubborn pride” (838).
• Creon to Choragos: “Nothing you can say
  can touch me any more./ My own blind heart
  has brought me / From darkness to final
  darkness. Here you see/ The father
  murdering, the murdered son-And all my civic
  wisdom!/ Haimon, my son, so young, so
  young to die, I was the fool, not you; and you
  died for me” (840).
• Creon to himself: “I alone am guilty. / I
  know it, and I say it. Lead me in. . .I have
  neither life nor substance” (841).

• Creon: “Lead me away, I have been rash
  and foolish. /I have killed my son and my
  wife. I look for comfort; my comfort lies
  here dead” (842).
Review
Who is the
tragic
hero/heroine
in this
 play:
Antigone or
Creon?
       Relate how each of the following
       themes is developed in this play:
•
    a. Because humans are faced with a basic conflict in
    loyalties, suffering is inevitable.
    b. Any excess, even an excessive devotion to state
    or religion, is a fault and leads to misfortune.
    c. Pride and stubbornness give rise to tyranny and
    are character flaws that cause suffering and,
    inevitably, tragedy.
    d. In a conflict between God’s law and man-made
    laws, the divine laws take precedence.
    e. There is a personal responsibility for suffering,
    but from suffering comes wisdom.

								
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