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Economic Development Strategy

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					                                      CITY CLERK

Clause embodied in Report No. 9 of the Economic Development and Parks Committee, as
adopted by the Council of the City of Toronto at its meeting held on October 2, 3 and 4,
2001.




                                                 1

                         Economic Development Strategy -
                         Implementation Status (All Wards)
(City Council on October 2, 3 and 4, 2001, adopted this Clause, without amendment.)

The Economic Development and Parks Committee recommends the adoption of the report
(August 23, 2001) from the Commissioner of Economic Development, Culture and
Tourism.

The Economic Development and Parks Committee reports, for the information of Council,
having requested the Commissioner of Economic Development, Culture and Tourism to report to
the Economic Development and Parks Committee on:

(1)    special funding being established for the implementation of Economic Development
       strategies for the City in the 2002 budget; and

(2)    a tax incentive program for new industrial and commercial businesses in the City,
       including subsidies from the Federal and Provincial governments.

The Economic Development and Parks Committee submits the following report
(August 23, 2001) from the Commissioner of Economic Development, Culture and
Tourism:

Purpose:

This report is to update the Economic Development and Parks Committee and Council on
progress made and proposed future actions to implement the Economic Development Strategy
adopted by City Council in August 2000.

Financial Implications and Impact Statement:

There are no financial implications resulting from the adoption of this report.
Toronto City Council                              2              Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                         Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




Recommendations:

It is recommended that:

(1)      Council endorse the mandate for the Toronto 1st Partnership which is to advance the
         strategic directions articulated in the City’s Economic Development Strategy; mobilize
         Toronto’s issues with senior levels of government; represent Toronto businesses to
         international investment interests; act as a focus for renewing a sense of civic pride; and
         act as an advisory group to the Mayor and the Chief Administrative Officer;

(2)      the Commissioner of Economic Development, Culture and Tourism be requested to
         report back on the membership of the Toronto 1st Partnership and on further progress
         made to advance the strategic directions and key priorities identified in the Economic
         Development Strategy; and

(3)      the appropriate City officials be authorized and directed to take the necessary action to
         give effect thereto.

Background:

At its meeting of August 1, 2, 3 and 4, 2000, City Council adopted the Economic Development
Strategy for the new City of Toronto. The Economic Development Strategy is one of a series of
strategic policy documents being prepared, under the umbrella of the Corporate Strategic Plan, to
guide decision-making and achieve Council’s vision for the City. Council also adopted an
Environmental Plan in 2000, and City staff are preparing a Social Development Strategy,
Official Plan, and Cultural Plan for Council’s consideration later this year.

This report provides a summary of the ongoing efforts and proposed future actions to advance
the strategic directions of the Economic Development Strategy as adopted by City Council.

Discussion:

The Economic Development Strategy report is organized in two parts. Part I: Cities Matter,
describes the global economic forces shaping the growth of cities and the new dimensions of
competition, the increasing importance of cities and city-regions; and benchmarks the
performance of Toronto’s economy relative to other North American city-regions. Part II:
Strategic Directions and Action Areas, provides the framework to support economic growth and
an improved quality of life within the City.

The principal goal of Council’s Economic Development Strategy is to improve the livability and
quality of life in the City through economic growth that creates high quality jobs, generates
wealth and investment, and helps to ensure the City’s long-term fiscal health. The strategy
focuses on five major themes – People, Place, Prosperity, Positioning, and Partnerships – and
identifies the following eight strategic directions as critical to achieving the principal goal:
Toronto City Council                                3          Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                       Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




People Power the Knowledge Economy:

(a)      Support Knowledge and Skills Development;
(b)      Advance Design and Innovation;

Quality of Place Attracts People and Investment:

(c)      Improve Business Climate;
(d)      Stimulate Investment;

Export and Local Economic Growth is Essential for Long-Term Prosperity:

(e)      Build Competitive Export Clusters;
(f)      Establish Entrepreneurial Communities;

Tell Ourselves and the World what a Really Great City Toronto Is!:

(g)      Brand Toronto Locally and Globally;

Mobilize Resources Through Partnerships:

(h)      Create an Alignment of Strategic Intent.

The ‘Cities Matter’ discussion and Strategic Directions articulated in the Economic Development
Strategy are consistent with and support Council’s Strategic Plan. The key messages have
resonated in many jurisdictions throughout Canada. The federal government appears to have
recognized the need to ensure Canada’s major urban centres remain competitive, the Province of
Ontario is developing ‘Smart Growth’ policies, and the cities of Ottawa, Edmonton and
Winnipeg have followed Toronto’s lead in using industry cluster analysis to develop economic
strategies. The Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) and Association of Municipalities
of Ontario (AMO) have also adopted resolutions to strengthen the role of municipalities, and
increasingly the private sector and general public are acknowledging the need to invest in urban
infrastructure and services.

Ongoing activities by staff to advance each of the strategic directions adopted by Council are
summarized in Attachment No. 1. These actions seek to integrate short-term operational
imperatives (primarily financial) with longer-term strategic objectives. Although progress is
being made in a number of areas, due to the severe funding constraints facing the City and the
limitations established through the budget process, we have not - and are not - able to pursue a
number of key initiatives. This is a cause for concern.

Building and maintaining a great city requires resources. The Toronto Board of Trade in its
report, entitled “Foundations for a Strong City: Improving Toronto’s Physical Infrastructure”,
noted that the quality of life we enjoy today stems from the forward-thinking decisions and
investments made in the past. Investments in urban infrastructure (e.g., public transit, sewer,
water, airports) made jointly by all orders of government, mostly through the 1950s, 60s and 70s,
transformed Toronto from a successful Canadian city in the 1950s to one of a small number of
Toronto City Council                             4               Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                         Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




internationally recognized and globally competitive cities. Many of the investments that earned
Toronto its reputation as the ‘City that works’ and attracted public and private sector delegations
and researchers from around the world attempting to emulate the Toronto model, are now 30 to
50 years old. A new cycle of investment is urgently required in order to maintain the quality of
life in the City.

While Toronto is too often referred to as the city Canadians love to hate, the wealth generated in
Canada’s largest City has directly and indirectly improved the quality of life of Canadians from
coast to coast and helped to establish Canada’s reputation as the best place in the world to live.
The strength of Toronto’s economy has been the major catalyst for job creation, economic
growth and prosperity across the GTA and, in fact, throughout Ontario. Torontonians are proud
of this role and expect it to continue. However, as Council’s Economic Development Strategy
notes, Toronto is at its own crossroads. There is a critical need to reinvest in the City in order to
ensure sustained economic prosperity.         Enhancing Toronto’s competitive position and
establishing a vital cycle of economic growth will reap benefits throughout the GTA, Ontario
and Canada; conversely the negative impacts of a weakening competitive position for Toronto
will also be felt across the country.

The single most important message in Council’s Economic Development Strategy is the need for
the ‘alignment of strategic intent’, that is for all orders of government, business, labour,
institutions, not-for-profit and volunteer sector, and residents to find ways to work together to
build a better City. The initial Economic Development Division 2000 Budget submission
included approximately $300,000.00 to mobilize support and establish partnerships for long-term
economic growth. Key elements proposed in the initial budget submission included: identifying
international best practices, providing a dedicated staff position to focus on the Financial
Services sector, improving the quality and accessibility of economic information for public and
private decision-making, and convening a Cities Economy Summit in conjunction with the
Provincial and Federal governments and international organizations such as Organization for
Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the World Bank. These proposed
activities were not funded in the approved 2001 budget. Compared with other North American
cities we have benchmarked our services and expenditures against, Toronto is one of the lowest
per capita investors in economic development.

As a result of budget constraints, implementation of a number of priority actions has been
delayed. Recognizing the financial constraints faced by Council, Economic Development staff
have adjusted their mobilization strategy to place an emphasis on projects that can be undertaken
in partnership with other organizations to lever limited City funds and take advantage of external
expertise. The willingness of external organizations to partner with the City and commit
resources is evidence of the relevance of the strategy to stakeholders and the advantage to all
parties of coalescing around a common vision.

The key implementation priorities we believe need to be pursued more aggressively in
2001/2002: Increased Federal and Provincial Investment; Toronto 1st Partnership; Advancing
Export Clusters; Revitalization Initiatives – Quality of Place; Labour Force Readiness Plans;
Internal Alignment of Strategic Intent and Partnerships; and Marketing Toronto; are outlined
below.
Toronto City Council                             5               Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                         Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




Key Priorities 2001/2002

(i)      Increased Federal and Provincial Investment

The global economy has undergone a fundamental transformation. Global trade liberalization
and the rapid diffusion of information technology have made cities and city-regions the building
blocks of the economy. Canadian federal and provincial governments must be persuaded to
adjust their policies, actions and investment decisions to recognize the importance of major
urban centres like Toronto, Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Winnipeg, Hamilton, Ottawa and
Montreal to the economy of Canada and therefore the long-term quality of life of all Canadians.
The City’s property tax base, which accounts for only 5.7 percent of all taxes collected in
Toronto (94.3 percent of Toronto tax dollars go to the federal and provincial government),
cannot by itself support the level of investment required for economic competitiveness. The
co-operation of senior orders of government in providing additional long-term stable funding is
essential for the City to deal with the new set of realities it faces. In adopting the Economic
Development Strategy, City Council also adopted as a priority action the recommendation to
convene a Cities Economic Summit. The Summit would invite representatives from other large
Canadian and international urban centres, federal and provincial officials, and business, labour,
academic and community leaders to develop and implement an urban agenda. This proposal has
received a positive reaction from stakeholders. Although funding for this initiative was cut from
the 2001 budget, Economic Development staff are proceeding to prepare more detailed options
for consideration by City Council and other potential funding partners for implementation in
2002. Industry Canada, the Province of Ontario, Canadian Urban Institute, and the Organization
for Economic Co-operation and Development have indicated their interest in participating in
such a Summit.

(ii)     Toronto 1st Partnership

Council also adopted as a priority action the establishment of a Toronto 1st Partnership. The
Partnership would bring together senior representatives from business, labour, academia, arts and
culture, not-for-profit, government and community organizations to promote Toronto to the
world, to advocate on behalf of Canada’s largest city, and to strengthen relationships between
Toronto diverse communities. In the past three months alone we have received similar ‘Business
Leadership’ delegations from Pittsburgh, Cleveland and Washington D.C. indicating the level of
interest of the business community in working with cities to develop and implement economic
growth strategies.

The mandate of the Toronto 1st Partnership is to: advance the strategic directions articulated in
the City’s Economic Development Strategy; mobilize Toronto’s business, academic, labour and
cultural communities toward a common effort; advance Toronto’s issues with senior levels of
government; represent Toronto businesses to international investment interests; act as a focus for
renewing a sense of civic pride; and act as an advisory group to the Mayor and Chief
Administrative Officer.

Staff believe this initiative, which has received positive reaction from stakeholders, is critical to
building the partnerships required to address the complex and interrelated issues Toronto faces.
Funding should not inhibit the establishment of this important community mobilization initiative.
Toronto City Council                            6               Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                        Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




It is recommended that the Commissioner of Economic Development, Culture and Tourism
report back later this year on the list of members for the Toronto 1st Partnership following
consultation with the Mayor’s Office.

(iii)    Advancing Export Clusters

Economic Development staff are working with industry cluster groups in Biotechnology
(Toronto Biotechnology Initiative), Information Technology/Telecommunications (SMART
Toronto, Liberty Village, Spadina Bus), Film (FLIC), Financial Services and Tourism to identify
and strengthen the economic foundations critical for success. These clusters have significant
long-term growth potential and Toronto has an established competitive advantage to build upon.

Economic Development staff received Council approval on four cluster development plans for
Financial Services, Biomedical, Film and Television, and Tourism. Reports on key initiatives in
these areas will be submitted on an ongoing basis. For example, in the Biomedical Cluster, City
staff are working with the University of Toronto, Provincial and Federal governments to develop
an integrated research/business Discovery District in close proximity to the University’s
downtown campus. The purpose of a Discovery District, which would include a Biotechnology
Commercialization Centre, is to stimulate research and innovation and to accelerate the transfer
of technology and knowledge from research institutes to commercial applications.
Biotechnology is poised to be one of the fastest growing industries world-wide. This initiative,
linking the University of Toronto and associated hospitals with one of the City’s major industry
clusters, has the potential to establish Toronto as an unparalleled Centre of Excellence in this
field. Funding support from the City in the amount of $9 million has been requested to provide
the infrastructure for the Commercialization Centre.

(iv)     Employment Revitalization Initiatives – Quality of Place

The Employment Area Revitalization program has also drawn together diverse business interests
including major employers, business associations, BIAs social agencies and area residents, and
to develop strategic plans for targeted areas that support and promote local area investment. In
South Etobicoke, the local business community in conjunction with Economic Development and
staff from other City departments have used the Toronto Competes City-wide analysis as a basis
to examine the strengths, challenges and nuances of cluster development and job creation in a
local area.

The Business Improvement Association (BIA) team has supported the growth of five new BIAs
over the past two years. A BIA harmonization report will be submitted to Council later this year
to address opportunities and challenges related to the revitalization of commercial/retail areas
across the City.

Almost every major city in North America has ‘brownfield’ areas within its boundaries. As
noted in previous reports, the revitalization of employment lands and construction of new
industrial space is important to business, labour and residents of the City of Toronto, as well as
to all three orders of government for a number of reasons. Industrial and commercial properties
in productive use generate more tax revenue than vacant or under utilized lands; an adequate
supply of available industrial and commercial land and buildings is essential to retaining existing
Toronto City Council                             7                 Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                           Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




jobs and accommodating future growth; and redevelopment of properties within urban areas
makes use of existing infrastructure, mitigates against urban sprawl, improves the local
environment and revitalizes communities. City Council’s strong position in support of the
redevelopment of under utilized properties, including brownfield sites, was instrumental in the
establishment of the Provincial Brownfields Task Force and the recent announcements related to
developing Smart Growth policies. It will be important to test the efficacy of any new policies in
the context of the City’s current fiscal climate. Economic Development and Planning staff are
continuing work to identify strategic reinvestment areas within the City and incorporate
appropriate policies into the new Official Plan that would maintain stable employment areas and
stimulate investment. Economic Development prepared for investors a list of development ready
and signature sites to encourage attraction and retention of businesses.

(v)      Labour Force Readiness Plans – People Power the Knowledge Economy

Economic Development Division staff have been successful in securing funding in the amount of
$480,000.00 from the federal government, through Human Resources Development Canada, to
prepare an overview of the Toronto area labour market and develop Labour Force Readiness
Plans for the construction, information technology/telecommunications, and tourism/hospitality
industry clusters. The Action Plans will be developed through extensive consultation with
business, labour, educators, trainers, and community representatives as well as other levels of
government. Among other things, the plans will identify international best practices for
knowledge and skills development; provide a forum for improving the linkages between the
public, private and institutional stakeholders; increase awareness of education and training
opportunities; and seek to develop sustainable partnerships to clearly establish Toronto as a
centre of excellence for life-long learning. The action plans will address the needs of small and
medium business as well as large corporations, and issues relevant to institutions, youth,
immigrants, unemployed and underemployed populations. This is a groundbreaking initiative
that will influence national and provincial labour force readiness policies and programs and
provide a model approach for similar projects across Canada.

(vi)     Internal Alignment of Strategic Intent and Partnerships

While the financial participation of the federal and provincial governments is essential for
sustained economic growth, the City must also seek to increase its revenue base. Industrial and
commercial properties pay more in property tax than the cost of the municipal services they
consume, and therefore make a net positive contribution to other City funded programs and
services. For that reason, a priority action of the Economic Development Strategy is for all City
Departments, Agencies, Boards and Commissions to develop and implement an integrated
approach to retaining existing businesses and encourage industrial and commercial employment
and assessment growth. Having gone through a very difficult budget process where all City
Departments, Agencies, Boards and Commissions were challenged with making difficult
decisions about service and program cuts for short-term savings, it is appropriate that staff
address long-term strategies to increase the City’s property tax revenue base through business
retention, expansion and attraction. Economic Development and Planning Division staff are
working jointly to identify employment areas within the City and develop appropriate policies to
help ensure Toronto maintains an adequate supply of land and buildings for employment uses.
Toronto City Council                             8           Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                     Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




Additionally, Corporate Services staff are facilitating a process, led by Urban Development
Services, to re-engineer the development review process in order to reduce the time required to
process development applications without compromising City interests. Works and Emergency
Services, and Economic Development, Culture and Tourism staff are also participating in this
pilot project.

(vii)    Marketing Toronto – Telling Our Story

Working to keep Toronto ‘top-of-mind’ in the investment world, staff of the Economic
Development Division substantially updated and refocused the economic development
information available on the City’s web site, and launched our first two integrated marketing
campaigns – “Wrap it in Toronto” for promoting Toronto as a film production centre and
“Canada’s Business Address” for promoting Toronto as a general business location to both the
local and international communities.

In 2000, Economic Development established an innovative partnership with Air Canada
providing the opportunity to showcase Toronto to passengers on Canada’s largest airline. A
video highlighting Toronto’s business advantages was shown on all business class flights during
the summer.

The high quality of our marketing programs has been recognized in their receipt of professional
marketing awards from Ontario, Canadian and North American economic development
organizations. They also have been successful in building awareness about Toronto. The next
step in development is to integrate our marketing efforts with the lessons learned from the
Economic Development Strategy and directions it recommends we follow. This work was
initiated in March 2001.

Toronto was selected as the host city for the 2002 World Youth Days. His Holiness Pope John
Paul, together with 500,000 to 750,000 youths from around the world, will visit Toronto next
summer. This will be the largest conference ever held in Toronto and will attract international
media attention. A member of the Economic Development staff management team was
seconded to be the City’s Project Director for World Youth Days.

The City’s Olympic Office has been working with TO-Bid and other public and private sector
representatives to present Toronto to the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the rest of
the world as the best city to host the 2008 Olympic Games. These efforts have brought
Toronto’s diverse communities together around a common goal. The IOC’s evaluation team
visit in March of this year was recognized internationally as a critical success for Toronto.

Toronto’s Economic Development Strategy itself has attracted attention from many major North
American cities. Several Canadian cities have now adopted a cluster based approach to
economic growth and delegations from U.S. cities have requested briefings on the Toronto
strategy. In fact, the Economic Development Division has been informed that our Economic
Development Strategy has won an international award which will be announced in September.
Toronto City Council                            9               Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                        Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




Staff are currently reassessing Toronto’s competitive advantage relative to other locations and
are developing new marketing messages and an integrated delivery strategy. The strategy will
address the need to develop a “Toronto Brand” to increase our identity internationally, as well as
to build awareness of our strengths in the local market. The new marketing strategy will be
launched in September 2001.

Conclusions:
The Economic Development Strategy articulates the increasing importance of cities and urban
centres as the building blocks of the global economy. Senior orders of government in other
jurisdictions have recognized this new reality and are investing in urban infrastructure – physical
and social – to improve the competitive position of their major cities. Investments in basic
physical, social and economic foundations underpin our quality of life and help create a vital
cycle of positive growth that attracts private investment, skilled people, high quality jobs, and
generates additional tax revenues which in turn can be invested in further improvements to our
physical, social and economic foundations. Failure to rise to the challenge can lead to the
opposite phenomenon – a vicious cycle of reduced competitiveness, dis-investment, emigration
and fiscal crisis.
Given the importance of Toronto’s economy in particular, and all major urban centres in general,
to the Canadian and Provincial economies, we must work to ensure the City’s long-term fiscal
sustainability. The Economic Development Strategy was quite clear in stating that no one
agency can take on the breadth and depth of actions necessary to advance the City’s economy.
Therefore, as indicated in this report, Economic Development, Culture and Tourism staff are
focusing their attention and efforts on developing partnerships with other orders of government,
business, labour, and educators.

As a result of budget constraints we are adjusting our mobilization strategy. However, the key
priorities – Increased Federal and Provincial Investment; Toronto 1st Partnership; Dialogue with
Industry; Biotechnology Discovery District; Labour Force Readiness Plans; Brownfield
Redevelopment; and Internal Partnerships – remain. The greatest risk to our future is that due to
budget or other pressures we do nothing. Economic Development staff are working with their
colleagues within the City and with other partners to lever the limited financial and staff
resources available and advance Council’s strategic directions as identified in the Economic
Development Strategy.

Success in achieving the goal of the Economic Development Strategy, i.e., to improve the
livability and quality of life in the City through economic growth that creates high quality jobs,
generates wealth and investment, and helps to ensure the City’s long-term fiscal health, is
important to all orders of government, all businesses, and all residents. Regular reports will be
provided to the Economic Development and Parks Committee and Council on progress made to
advance the key priorities identified in this report.

Contact Name:

Ms. Brenda Librecz, Managing Director, Economic Development Division, Telephone:
416-397-4700, Fax: 416-395-0338, blibrecz@city.toronto.on.ca.
                                        _________
Toronto City Council                            10              Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                        Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




                                         Attachment No. 1

                                        City of Toronto
                                 Economic Development Strategy
                           Recommended Strategic Directions, Action Areas
                                       and Key Activities

People Power the Knowledge Economy

Strategic Directions:

(1)      Developing Knowledge and Skills

Develop, retain and attract the best and brightest labour force for all job levels by establishing
Toronto as a model for continuous learning, technical and professional development. Ensure
Toronto residents have the opportunity to acquire the knowledge and skills necessary for
personal and corporate success in a knowledge-based economy.

(2)      Advancing Design and Innovation

Advance design and innovation as foundations for global competitiveness by supporting,
celebrating and rewarding the creativity of Toronto residents, businesses, organizations and
institutions.

Action Areas:

(1)      Basic, Technical and Professional Development: Ensure access to best quality, relevant
         education and training programs by improving linkages between businesses, universities,
         colleges, private training institutes and service providers.

(2)      Small and Medium Sized Business Establishments (SME) Business Skills Development:
         Increase rate of business expansion and new start-ups by enhancing business knowledge
         and skill level of SME entrepreneurs through training programs and mentoring.

(3)      Technology/Knowledge Transfer: Accelerate transfer of technology and knowledge from
         research institutes to commercial applications by establishing dedicated tech transfer
         facilities and enhancing networks.

(4)      Lead by Example: Demonstrate commitment to innovation and design excellence.

(5)      Embrace Arts and Culture: Celebrate and support arts and culture as a key industry
         within the City and as the epicentre of creativity that inspire ideas and innovation in
         many fields and an important factor in retaining and attracting knowledge workers.

(6)      Architecture, urban design and built form: Increase attractiveness of Toronto as a place
         to live, visit and invest by improving overall quality of built form throughout the City.
Toronto City Council                              11              Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                          Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




Key Activities Underway to Achieve Strategic Goals:

-        Labour Force Readiness Plans – are being prepared to provide an overview of the
         Toronto labour force and specific actions plans for the construction, information
         technology/telecommunications, and tourism/hospitality industry clusters. This initiative
         will also identify international best practices for knowledge and skills development;
         provide a forum to enhance linkages between the public, private and institutional
         stakeholders; increase awareness of education and training opportunities; and develop
         sustainable partnerships to clearly establish Toronto as a centre of excellence for life-long
         learning. Issues relevant to small and medium size businesses as well as corporations,
         institutions, youth, immigrants, unemployed and underemployed populations will be
         considered. (Contact: Ms. Shelly Gordon, (416) 392-9487, sgordon@city.toronto.on.ca)

-        Retail Smarts Program and the Centre for Entrepreneurship - Enterprise Toronto has
         developed partnerships with Ryerson University and Centennial College to offer a
         variety of workshops and seminars for small and medium sized businesses.
         (Contact: Mr. Bill Steiss, (416) 392-7183, bsteiss@city.toronto.on.ca)

-        Export Market Development – TradeLink Toronto has also partnered with Centennial
         College to offer a series of courses for businesses seeking to establish and develop export
         markets. (Contact: Ms. Maggie Weaver, 416-263-3510, mweaver@ntc.ca)

-        Apparel Industry Training – the Fashion Industry Human Resources Adjustment
         Committee is offering training sessions to improve the quality and number of skilled
         sewing machine operators.         (Contact:    Ms. Laurie Belzak, 416-392-1296,
         lbelzak@city.toronto.on.ca)

-        District and Biotechnology Discovery Commercialization Centre – City staff are working
         with the University of Toronto, Provincial and Federal governments to support
         innovation through the development of an integrated research/business Discovery District
         in proximity to the University’s downtown campus. The Discovery District will include
         a Biotechnology Commercialization Centre. (Contact: Mr. Matt Buist, 416-392-3380,
         mbuist@city.toronto.on.ca)

-        Ontario Genome Centre – support the establishment of the Ontario centre that will funnel
         $200 million to genome research initiatives. (Contact: Mr. Matt Buist, 416-392-3380,
         mbuist@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Design Tax Credit Initiative – a design industry task force is being formed to assess the
         need and opportunity to develop a design tax credit to promote better design across key
         economic clusters and respond to competition from Quebec that has such a credit in
         place. (Contact: Ms. Alicia Bulwik, 416-392-3830, abulwik@city.toronto.on.ca)

-        Culture Plan – staff are preparing a Culture Plan to support and enhance the creative arts
         and culture community within Toronto. The Creative City report was published earlier
         this year to stimulate discussion and input.
Toronto City Council                              12              Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                          Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




-        Energy Efficiency and Toronto Sustainability Projects – working through OCETA,
         companies are able to access resource to undertake energy audits and pollution
         prevention audits that have been proven to result in process improvements, cost savings.

-        City of Toronto Tours - City Economic Development Division staff, working with
         provincial and federal agencies, have initiated a pilot project for tour operators to enhance
         their knowledge of the City and provide a positive, well-informed image of Toronto.

Quality of Place Attracts People and Investment

Strategic Directions:
(1)      Improve Business Climate.
Establish a stable, long-term cost competitive and fiscally sustainable environment in which
businesses feel welcomed, appreciated and recognized as the principal generators of employment
and wealth necessary to maintain and enhance the quality of life for City residents.

(2)      Stimulating Investment (or Reinvestment).

Stimulate private investment (renovations, renewal, new development and infrastructure) to
achieve long-term fiscal sustainability.

Action Areas:
(1)      Tax Policy: Retain and generate assessment and jobs and strengthen economic
         foundations for business by changing federal, provincial and municipal tax policies to
         stimulate private investment in Toronto.

(2)      Business Costs: Retain existing businesses, industrial/commercial tax assessment base
         and jobs by reducing cost of government services to businesses and increasing long-term
         certainty of cost structure.

(3)      Customer service and Responsiveness: Retain existing businesses/tax assessment base
         and jobs by improving services to business, reducing response time and proactively
         demonstrating commitment to customer service.

(4)      Outreach: Anchor existing businesses to the City by establishing a City to business
         relationship that is unmatched anywhere.

(5)      Tools and Incentives: Increase private sector investment by reducing development costs
         for projects that increase employment and provide net long-term positive benefits for the
         City and implementing public sector investment policies and programs that encourage
         public/private partnerships.

(6)      Infrastructure: Establish stable, adequate funding sources and long-term infrastructure
         investment (maintenance, rehabilitation, and expansion) programs to increase economic
         opportunities.
Toronto City Council                            13              Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                        Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




(7)      City Building: Expedite industrial and commercial expansion and development by
         implementing policies, plans and procedures and dedicating resources to streamline
         review and approval processes.

Key Activities Underway to Achieve Strategic Goals:
-        Economic Development Division staff make personal visits to over 1,000 local
         companies each year. This outreach activity often leads to the facilitation of relocations
         within Toronto or the expansion and renovation of existing premises. In 2000 alone, staff
         assisted local businesses in reinvesting $269 million in Toronto sites.

-        Economic Development Division staff work in partnership with the GTMA, the Ontario
         and federal governments, and international consulates to generate and service
         investor interest in Toronto from businesses in other communities. On average, over
         900 enquiries per year are addressed. Since 1999, 24 new companies have been attracted
         to Toronto. These firms are occupying 575,000 square feet of floor space, creating over
         2,000 new jobs.
-        Film productions attracted to Toronto broke previous records in both 1999 and 2000.
         Annual film production expenditures now total over $1.3 billion (2000). Foreign
         productions accounted for $526.3 million of this total, a 25 percent increase over 1999.

-        City Council approved waiving development charges on new industrial and commercial
         development in recognition of the property tax imbalance between the City and
         surrounding regions and the economic advantages of creating jobs and encouraging
         new investment within the City. (Mr. Peter Viducis, (416) 392-3396,
         pviducis@city.toronto.on.ca)

-        Some municipal service fees (e.g., planning application fees, building permit fees, etc.)
         have been waived to encourage construction of affordable housing. This approach
         should also be considered for industrial and commercial development to stimulate
         revitalization of strategic employment areas. (Mr. Randy McLean, 416-392-3397,
         rmclean@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Enterprise Toronto implemented a web-based Business Registration service in 2000.
         New business start-up clients can now receive general business management and
         financial advice, obtain a Toronto business license, and register with the Ministry of
         Consumer and Corporate Relations, at the same office.

-        Enterprise Toronto also hosts a one hour weekly radio call-in show on AM Talk
         640 Radio every Sunday afternoon, 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. (Contact: Mr. Bill Steiss,
         416-392-7183, bsteiss@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Economic Development staff produced the City’s first CD-ROM Directory of Toronto
         businesses to facilitate business-to-business contact. The Toronto Business Directory
         2000, the largest directory in Canada, lists contact information for over 85,000 Toronto
         business establishments and includes hot links to more than 7,000 web sites. (Contact:
         Mr. Sal Vivona, 416-397-5315, svivona@city.toronto.on.ca)
Toronto City Council                             14             Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                        Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




-        Following a major operational review of the film and television permitting process in
         2000, responsibility for issuing permits City-wide has been consolidated in the Toronto
         Film and Television Office. Previously clients had to go to different offices to obtain
         permits to film in each of the former municipalities, in parks, and on former Metro roads.
         (Contact: Ms. Rhonda Silverstone, (416) 392-1333, rsilvers@city.toronto.on.ca)

-        Interdepartmental Co-ordinating Committee – City of Toronto staff committee
         established in 2000 to work with the Toronto Association of Business Improvement
         Areas (TABIA) to address and resolve ongoing issues and concerns. (Contact: Mr. Bill
         Steiss, 416-392-7183, bsteiss@city.toronto.on.ca)

-        Corporate Services staff are facilitating a process, led by Urban Development Services, to
         re-engineer the development review process in order to reduce the time required to
         process development applications without compromising City interests. Works and
         Emergency Services, and Economic Development, Culture and Tourism staff are also
         participating in this pilot project. (Contact: Mr. Bruce Graham, (416) 392-3381,
         bgraham@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        City Council’s strong position in support of the redevelopment of underutilized
         properties, including brownfield site, was instrumental in the establishment of the
         Provincial Brownfields Task Force and the development of new Smart Growth policies.
         (Contact: Mr. Randy McLean, 416-392-3397, rmclean@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Economic Development and Planning staff are also working jointly to identify
         and incorporate appropriate policies into the new Official Plan that would maintain
         stable employment areas and stimulate investment in strategic reinvestment areas.
         (Contact: Ms. Christine Raissis, 416-392-3385, craissis@city.toronto.on.ca)

-        Corporate Calling – Customer Service to Existing Business – Over 1,000 companies
         proactively visited by Economic Development Division field staff – resulting in over
         100 company expansions and retention. (Contact: Mr. Bruce Graham, 416-392-3381,
         bgraham@city.toronto.on.ca)

A Vital Cycle of Economic Growth is Essential for Long-Term Prosperity

Strategic Directions:
(1)      Establish Entrepreneurial Communities

Retain, expand and improve the quality and range of employment opportunities at all skill levels
and diversity of business within the City by facilitating the start-up, growth and expansion of
local businesses and connecting them to the new economy.

(2)      Building Competitive Clusters

Advance/grow major industry clusters by strengthening the competitive position of Toronto
businesses through synergies with related businesses, labour, education, training and research
institutions and government.
Toronto City Council                            15              Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                        Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




Action Areas:

(1)      Community Economic Development: Retain existing community based businesses and
         maintain or increase community-based employment by providing decision support and
         marketing assistance to entrepreneurs and small and medium enterprises and stimulating
         investment in urban regeneration.

(2)      New Firm Formation and Financing: Create new firms/industries and expand existing
         businesses by improving access to financing and mentoring services.

(3)      Internationalization/Export Activity: Increase exports from Toronto based businesses by
         expanding capacity of companies to trade internationally.

(4)      Cluster Development: Strengthen existing clusters by enhancing synergies among lead
         firms, suppliers and economic foundations.

Key Activities Underway to Achieve Strategic Goals:

-        Youth, Women, Immigrants – Enterprise Toronto, in conjunction with provincial and
         federal colleagues, are working with community based agencies to develop programs to
         assist youth, women and immigrant entrepreneurs. (Contact: Mr. Bill Steiss,
         416-392-7183, bsteiss@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        South Etobicoke Regeneration Project – cluster capacity study and retail commercial
         market study underway to attract investment and jobs. (Contact: Mr. George Wheeler,
         416-392-1820,     gwheeler@city.toronto.on.ca;    Judy    Dunstan,    416-394-8244,
         jdunstan@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Export Assistance – Federal sponsorship of export assistance consultants based at
         TradeLink extended to September 2001. Has resulted in 400 companies exporting their
         goods and services internationally. (Contact: Ms. Maggie Weaver, 416-263-3510,
         mweaver@ntc.ca )

-        Industry Cluster Committees – Economic Development staff are working with
         industry cluster groups in Biotechnology, Information Technology/Telecommunications,
         Fashion, Film, and Tourism, to identify and strengthen the economic foundations
         critical for success. These clusters have significant long-term growth potential
         and Toronto has established competitive advantage that the City should build upon.
         (Contact: Mr. Kyle Benham, 416-397-5309, kbenham@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Staff reported to Council on action plans developed for key clusters, Financial Services,
         Biomedical, Film and Tourism.          (Contact: Mr. Kyle Benham, 416-397-5309,
         kbenham@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Tourism Investment Initiative – Economic Development staff are assessing the need and
         opportunity for creating new tourism attractions within the City. (Contact: Mr. Rob
         Berry, 416-392-3387, rberry@city.toronto.on.ca )
Toronto City Council                            16              Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                        Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




-        Accommodation Study – undertaken to assess hotel market conditions and opportunities
         for new hotel development. The results of the study will be used to assist 10+ hotel
         applications to proceed to completion (Contact: Mr, Rob Berry, 416-392-3397,
         rberry@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Toronto Technology Initiative – development of co-marketing materials with private
         sector to attract IT investment to Toronto. (Contact: Mr. Bruce Graham, 416-392-3381,
         bgraham@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        2001 Bio Finance Conference – co-sponsored by the City to bring researchers and
         investors together. (Contact: Mr. Matt Buist, 416-392-3380, mbuist@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        BioTech Directory – Toronto profiled in directory of GTA Biotechnology firms
         distributed to 10,000 companies and researchers worldwide. (Contact: Mr. Matt Buist,
         416-392-3380, mbuist@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Fashion Week – co-ordinated in partnership with private sector to highlight and market
         the design and apparel cluster. (Contact: Ms. Laurie Belzak, 416-392-1296,
         lbelzak@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Cruise Ship Initiative – on-going project to build upon the 10,000 cruise ship passengers
         expected this year. (Contact: Mr. Rob Berry, 416-392-3387, rberry@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Toronto Rochester Fast Ferry project – CATS selected as preferred ferry operator through
         an RFP process. (Contact: Mr. Rob Berry, 416-392-3387, rberry@city.toronto.on.ca )

-        Emerging Clusters Initiative – assessment and profiling of the strengths of
         13 clusters within the city.  (Contact:   Mr. Kyle Benham, 416-397-5309,
         kbenham@city.toronto.on.ca )

Tell ourselves and the world what a really great city Toronto is!

Strategic Directions:

(1)      Brand Toronto Locally and Globally

Create a cachet for the “Toronto” brand by ensuring that all the City’s unique attributes and its
reputation for excellence and innovation are recognized and promoted locally and
internationally.

Action Areas:

(1)      Global Presence and Profile: Attract investment, entrepreneurs and knowledge workers to
         Toronto by reinforcing Toronto’s image as Canada’s global business address and
         reputation as a centre of ideas and discourse for global issues.
Toronto City Council                             17              Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                         Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




(2)      Tourism and Special Events: Attract investment and tourists to Toronto by building and
         promoting the City as an exciting, event filled experience year round.

Key Activities Underway to Achieve Strategic Goals:

-        2008 Olympic Games – ongoing efforts with TO-Bid and other public and private
         partners.

-        Toronto has been selected as the host city for the 2002 World Youth Days. His Holiness
         Pope John Paul, together with 500,000 to 750,000 youths from around the world, will
         visit Toronto next summer. This will be the largest conference ever held in Toronto and
         will attract international media attention.

-        International affiliations – as participating members in the Organization for Economic
         Cooperation and Development (OECD) LEED Program, Economic Development staff
         are promoting Toronto to a broad and influential international community.

-        Economic Development Division staff, working with their provincial colleagues, have
         been successful in attracting the International Development Research Council (IDRC) to
         host its World Congress in Toronto in 2003. This event will bring over 3,000 corporate
         real estate executives and site selectors to our City and will provide a tremendous
         opportunity to showcase Toronto to key executive that influence business location
         decisions.

-        Tourism Needs Assessment – Economic Development staff have initiated a study to
         identify opportunities to secure new tourism investment to improve Toronto’s
         competitive position as an international tourist and cultural destination.

-        Launched successful marketing campaign positioning Toronto as “Canada’s Business
         Address”. Initiated the development of an integrated marketing and branding strategy to
         be implemented in 2002. Negotiated new Service Agreement with Tourism Toronto to
         promote Toronto to international tourist and convention markets.

-        Implemented an ongoing “international alliance program” to increase Toronto’s profile
         internationally, attract new businesses and investment to Toronto, and grow Toronto
         businesses. Incoming business delegations are hosted and outgoing missions organized.
         Initiated a review of the existing thirty-six “sister city” relationships Toronto.

Mobilize resources through partnerships.

Strategic Directions:
(1)      Creating an Alignment of Strategic Intent

Implement policies, programs and initiatives that will foster economic growth and improve our
quality of life by establishing a common vision and broad base of support involving all levels of
government, private sector, public and private sector institutions, volunteer (not for profit) sector
and the community at large.
Toronto City Council                            18             Economic Development and Parks Committee
October 2, 3 and 4, 2001                                                       Report No. 9, Clause No. 1




Action Areas:

(1)      Alignment of Strategic Intent: Mobilize resources of all stakeholders towards improving
         Toronto’s competitive position, creating wealth and employment and improving the
         quality of life.

Key Activities Underway to Achieve Strategic Goals:

-        Almost all actions related to implementing Council’s Economic Development Strategy
         are being undertaken in partnership to lever limited available City funds and to take
         advantage of external knowledge and expertise.

-        Toronto 1st Partnership – a broad based partnership of business and community leaders
         to promote Toronto to the world and advocate on behalf of Toronto. The mandate of the
         Partnership is to: advance the strategic directions articulated in the City’s Economic
         Development Strategy; mobilize Toronto’s business, academic, labour and cultural
         communities toward a common effort; advance Toronto’s issues with senior levels of
         government; represent Toronto businesses to international investment interests; act as a
         focus for renewing a sense of civic pride; and act as an advisory group to the Mayor and
         Chief Administrative Officer.       (Contact:     Ms. Brenda Librecz, 416-397-4700,
         blibrecz@city.toronto.on.ca)

-        Cities Economy Summit – provincial, federal and international agencies have indicated
         an interest in working with the City to convene a summit to address urban economic
         issues. Although funding was eliminated from the 2001 Budget, options are being
         developed for a Spring 2002 date. (Contact: Ms. Brenda Librecz, 416-397-4700,
         blibrecz@city.toronto.on.ca)

				
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