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					                                  William Paterson University
                                  Division of Academic Affairs

                          Assessment of Academic Support Services

Introduction:
 
The overall goal of academic support is to improve student retention and graduation and reduce
attrition by providing programs and services to help students persist. Most academic services
support the instructional areas and assist students with their individual and collective learning
experiences and goals. In collaboration with the instructional and student development areas,
programs work to provide quality academic learning assistance; help to provide a supportive
campus environment; help to ensure a quality educational experience.

The University Student Success Plan (2005) provides the context for each program’s mission
related goals and objectives. Specifically, programs and offices in the division of academic
affairs develop strategies and initiatives that have both direct and indirect impact on Student
Achievement (Goal 1); Campus Climate (Goal 3); and Community Outreach and External
Relations (Goal 5) for the purpose of student retention and success.

Assessments cover a wide range of both qualitative and quantitative methodologies. Primary
among the assessment strategies are yearly cohort studies that track student progress
longitudinally. Other strategies include informal and formal feedback forms; satisfaction
surveys; and standardized formative program evaluations used by external professional
associations, such as the Council on Academic Standards, peer review by external professional
standards organizations, and internal audits. Generally, a program assessment will include some
aspects of all of the above. Assessments are tailored to the nature and characteristics of specific
program purposes in order to provide appropriate data and information for improvement.

Overall, effectiveness is determined over time and by several general and broad direct and
indirect indicators, alone or in combination and include:
            One year retention rate
            Completion of basic skills coursework after 2 and 3 semesters
            Continuous enrollment: enrollment after 2, 4, 6, and 8 semesters
            Time to declaration of major (2 semesters; 4 semesters)
            Time to degree completion: Five and six year graduation rate;
            GPA: Semester/cumulative grade point index
            Use of support services and level and quality of student participation
            Student satisfaction with services

These indicators and assessment cycles vary and include time frames from 1 to 3 years.

Each year and or planning cycle, based on the Student Success plan, programs develop
major goals and objectives within the context of broader institutional goals; denote
specific expected outcomes; the means of assessing these outcomes; and plans to address
the actual outcomes, whether expected or unexpected. The framework follows the
Student Success plan:

                                                                                                 1 
           Institutional Goal
           Department Goal
           Department objective
           Expected outcome(s)
           Actual outcome(s)
           Method of Assessment
           Outcome of Assessment
           Plan to address the outcome(s); make changes and improvements based on the
           outcomes.

In addition, Annual Reports, narratives typically outlining accomplishments and highlights of the
preceding year, substantiate assessment activities.

Academic Support Programs:
         Office of the First Year Experience
         Academic Development Programs
            ♦ Basic Skills and Placement
            ♦ Academic Support and Tutoring
                        Early Alert
                        Sponsored Student Program
            ♦ Education Enrichment Center
         Educational Opportunity Fund Program
         Office of Scholarships
         Office of International Students and Scholars




                                                                                               2 
   Office of the First-Year Experience
2007 – 2008 / Assessment Report
Submitted – September 2, 2008

The follow assessment report reflects the department’s programmatic response to the
institution’s goals and objectives. In addition, the report clearly states the department’s
commitment to increase retention for the first-year student population.

Institutional Goal:
Goal # 1 – Student Success – William Paterson University will make the academic and
professional success of students its defining characteristic with programs and strategies that
reflect best practices.
Objectives S3, S4, S8 & S10
        S3 – Help students make a successful transition into the academic community
        S4 – Offer programs and curricula that reflect best practices and that prepare students for
        productive lives in contemporary society and for life long intellectual growth.
        S8 – Offer co-curricular experiences that complement academic programs in helping
        students achieve high levels of personal and intellectual growth.
        S10 – Integrate systematic assessment into all programs and services that contribute to
        student success.

Department Goals:
First-Year Experience works closely with students to:
       Acclimate them to William Paterson University’s campus
       Educate them in the area of critical thinking, academic integrity, study skills strategies,
       information technology and other topics that provide a foundation for student success
       Identify and workout solutions for roadblocks to student success in the first year
       Integrate co-curricular activities with academic programs
       Promote a smooth transition from high school to college
       Stress the importance and implement an academic support plan for first-year students
       Support students through their first year at the university

Department Objective #1:
Help new students become acclimated to the university so that they understand the university’s
policies and procedures and so that they know were to go for help in various areas.

Expected Outcomes:
      1. Students will know the various academic and social policies of the university, as well
      as be able to identify the various academic support departments on campus and
      understand the services provided in each area.

       During the fall 2007 FY Seminar class, students were given an assignment to review and
       study the policies and procedures in the Student Handbook. In addition, students
       participated in a “scavenger hunt” to locate and research the various academic support
       units on campus. Students were tested on the assignments above.




                                                                                                 3 
Assessment Methods & Actual Outcomes:
   1. At the completion of the FY Seminar, students completed a FYS survey and 95% stated
      that FY Seminar helped them understand the university’s policies and procedures and that
      they were able to locate the academic support services on campus. This assessment is
      used to assess several components of the course, student learning outcomes and
      departmental activities. For the remainder of this report this assessment will be referred
      to as the “FYS Assessment.”

       In addition, during the spring semester, we conduct a syllabus analysis to determine how
       many sections of the FY Seminar actually assign the policy and scavenger hunt
       assignments listed above. The analysis indicated that approximately 70% of the sections
       assigned the aforementioned assignments. The syllabus analysis is used to assess several
       components of the course and departmental activities. For the remainder of this report,
       we will refer to this assessment as the “Syllabus analysis.”

       During the 2008-2009 academic year, the department will work on increasing the number
       of sections so that more students will participate in the policies and academic support
       assignment. Our goal is to increase the sections by at least 5%. During the faculty
       training in May and August, we will stress the importance of these exercises on the
       acclimation process of first-year students.

Department Objective #2:
Through the department and the first-year seminar, enhance first-year students’ personal and
academic development and provide opportunities and support involvement in campus activities
during their first year at William Paterson University.

Expected Outcomes:
      1. First-year students will gain an understanding of information literacy and blackboard.
      2. Students will share a common reader experience and will have an opportunity for
      discussions and activities around the common reader
      3. Students will participate in a Campus Pride Project
      4. Students will participate in campus life activates
      5. Students who are in liked and cluster courses will do better academically with a higher
      overall GPA and a higher grade in their FY seminar, than those who are not in cluster or
      linked courses
      6. Students will work with upper class peers and gain “academic survival knowledge”
      from their upper class peers

Assessment Methods & Actual Outcomes:
   1. On the FYS Assessment, students are asked various questions regarding their
      understanding and knowledge of blackboard and information literacy. 78% stated that
      they were introduced to and had gain knowledge of information literacy and the
      technology used at William Paterson University.

       In addition, over ½ of the sections of FY seminar conduct an online assignment with the
       use of Blackboard as well as hold at least one course session in the library with the use of
       information literacy. This information is collected through the syllabus analysis.

                                                                                                 4 
   During the 2008 – 2009 academic year, we will attempt to increase the number of
   sections that use Board and the library component, by at least 5%. In addition, we will
   attempt to increase the number of students who stated that they gained knowledge in the
   above areas by at least 5%. This will provide an opportunity for more sections to take
   advantage of Blackboard training and the library resources.

2. According to the syllabus analysis over 50% of the FY seminar sections gave an
   assignment or quiz on the common reader book selection. In addition, all sections stated
   that they required the students to read the book and held a class discussion on the book.

3. In October, FY seminar faculty and students come together for a campus pride program.
   Students and faculty worked together to beautiful the campus and Raubinger hall. A little
   over 10% of the sections participate with approximately 140 students. Our 2008-2009
   goal is to increase the number of faculty and student participation by at least 5%.

4. Although the syllabus analysis indicated that FY seminar sections give credit by requiring
   or strongly suggesting participation in campus activities, the FYS assessment stated that
   very few students took part in campus activities. Our goal for the 2008 – 2009 academic
   year is to continue to stress the importance of getting involved on campus and to provide
   more department opportunities for student engagement.

5. In the fall of 2007, we scheduled a few linked and special population sections as well as
   included FYS in two clusters.
   a. FYS was linked with ENG 110 and students lived together in a HME Pod
   b. FYS was linked with POL 120 and students lived together in a HME Pod
   c. FYS was linked with Basic Skills Reading
   d. FYS was linked with Basic Skills Reading and Writing
   e. We ran seven special population sections: one for nursing students, one for Part-
       Time students and five for honor students.

   In the linked and special population sections, students reported high satisfaction with
   their experience in the course and their first semester grades were, on average, higher
   than those of the larger FYS population. The average FYS grade for students in the
   sections above was a 3.0 and their average overall GPA at the end of the fall semester
   was a 2.53. Furthermore, faculty who taught the courses stated that it was an ideal
   situation for the FYS and requested a linked or special population in the fall of 08. In
   addition to an increased number of linked and special population sections scheduled for
   the fall of 2008, all instructors who taught in the above sections are returning to teach
   FYS in the fall of 2008.

   As listed in “a” and “b” above, we scheduled two residence hall FYS links. Students
   took classes together as well as lived together in High Mountain East. First-Year
   Seminar faculty and students expressed high satisfaction with this model. Students
   enjoyed the opportunity to conduct academic activities in there living environments. The
   FY seminar assessment as well as student verbal feedback was used to assess the
   satisfaction level of this initiative.

                                                                                           5 
       2008 – 2009 anticipated increases: Due to the success of this program, we will run three
       FYS residence links in the fall of 2008, as well as several linked and special population
       sections. Our goal is to increase the success of the program by higher GPAs overall as
       well as to provide this learning environment to more first-year students. We are looking
       for at least a 5% increase in the above numbers and levels of satisfaction.

   6. During the 2007 – 2008 academic year, 29 of the 73 sections of FY seminar utilized a
      Peer Leader in the course. The FYS assessment indicated that students who had an
      opportunity to work with a peer leader were very satisfied with the experience. 98% of
      those who worked with a peer, would recommend the use of peers in the FY seminar.
      Our 2008 – 2009 goal is to increase the use of peers so that more students can have an
      opportunity to work with a trained upper class student. Due to budget constraints, we
      may not be able to increase the number of sections that utilize a peer leader. However,
      we will initiate various programs for all FY students that incorporate the use of peers.
      This will give more students an opportunity to work with peers during their first year.

Department Objective #3:
First-Year Experience will help identify and workout solutions for roadblocks to student success.

Expected Outcomes:
      1. Undeclared students will have an academic advisor for their first year at the
      university, whom they will see on a weekly basis in the classroom and outside of the
      classroom when necessary. The office will assist the school academic advisors as a
      liaison between first-year students and the academic departments. Students will be able
      to report any concerns or problems to their advisors as soon as issues arise.

       2. The department will receive reports on student success and other student information,
       (holds, withdrawals, registration, etc.) and send such information to various academic
       and special programs on behalf of the students. Students will continue to receive
       correspondence from First-Year Experience in an attempt to help students facilitate
       problems prior to certain deadlines.

Assessment Methods & Actual Outcomes:
      1. The FYS assessment asks first-year students questions regarding the availability and
         helpfulness of the Academic Advisor in their FY seminar. At the end of the fall 2007
         semester, students who received advisement from their FYS instructor reported high
         satisfaction with their advisors. When asked if their FYS advisor was helpful, on a
         scale from 1 – 5, with 5 being “Very Helpful,” the average score was a 4.4. When
         asked about the quality of advisement assistance from the staff in the First-Year
         Experience department, with 5 being the highest score, the average score was a 4.8.

           For those students whose advisor was someone other than their FYS instructor, they
           also had an opportunity to evaluate the advisement session received in their FYS
           course. All students gave an above average rating for questions such as:
               1. My FYS course helped me connect with my major advisor



                                                                                                6 
              2. My FYS course helped me prepare a course schedule and understand the
                 registration process
              3. My FYS course prepared me for my advisement session with my advisor in
                 my major department
              4. I received an Academic Advisement Guide that helped me through the
                 advisement process

       Our 2008 – 2009 goal for academic advisement is to continue working closely with the
       undeclared first-year student population. In addition, we plan to work collaboratively
       with the academic departments on increasing advisement satisfaction for all FY students
       in their majors.

       2. During the past year, First-Year Experience received various reports on FY student
       data, such as: Grade Reports, Financial Hold Reports, Part Time and other student
       demographic reports. The information was used to alert students to certain barriers that
       may stop them from registering or other processes at the university. In addition, the
       information was distributed to special programs, as well as used in the advisement
       process with students. On the FYS assessment, students reported high levels of
       satisfaction regarding communication with the office on issues with “holds, withdrawals,
       registration, etc.

       Our 2008 – 2009 goal is to increase the use of such information and continue sharing
       with students and various departments on campus.

Cohort data and Assessment:
  Throughout the 2007 – 2008 academic year, First-Year Experience has initiated, sponsored
  and successfully coordinated programs to contribute to the success and retention of first-year
  students at William Paterson University. In the fall of 2007, we had 1,345 first-year students
  in our “new student cohort.” Approximately 469 were undeclared. After the fall semester,
  170 students earned a GPA of 1.99 or less. Those students were placed on academic
  probation status.

   Of the 170:
              -   122 were undeclared and 48 were in majors
              -   99 of the 122 undeclared registered for the spring semester
              -   30 of the 122 reported regularly for probation meetings and support
              -   21 of the 30 registered for the fall of ’08 /11 were those who reported
                  regularly for individual meetings with office staff
              -   13 of the 21 are over 2.0 and all participated in the academic support plan, 7
                  are still under 2.0
              -   Of the 8 Students who did not register for the fall of ’07, only one is over a 2.0
                  and he also participated in the academic support plan

   The probation student population is very difficult to work with. The program is not
   mandatory and students understand that they have additional semesters to remain at the
   university.



                                                                                                  7 
In addition to the Probation Students’ Program, First-Year Experience coordinates the
following programs in attempted to increase retention of the first-year population.

          1. Convocation – an academic kickoff used to introduce students to higher
             education.
          2. First-Year Seminar – an acclimation to university life and specifically William
             Paterson University.
          3. Faculty Mentors – trained instructors with a desire to work with first-year
             students.
          4. Peer Leader Program – upper class students trained and paid to work with and
             help first-year students.
          5. Academic Advisement – undeclared students see their academic advisor on a
             weekly basis. They know them as instructors and mentors early in their first
             semester.
          6. Campus Pride Project, Movie Nights on Campus, Pizza with the President and
             other activities sponsored by the department. These activities are designed to
             keep students on campus, and help them get involved in university life, for the
             purpose of their satisfaction, success and retention at William Paterson
             University.




                                                                                          8 
Office of the First-Year Experience (FYE)
2008 – 2009 - Assessment Report

The follow assessment report reflects the department’s programmatic response to the
institution’s goals and objectives as well as the major goals and objectives for the Office of the
First-Year Experience (FYE). The report clearly states the department’s commitment to increase
retention for the first-year student population and its attempt to achieve the board’s “Dashboard
Indictors” on first year retention.

Institutional Goal:
Goal # 1 – Student Success – William Paterson University will make the academic and
professional success of students its defining characteristic with programs and strategies that
reflect best practices.
Objectives S3, S4, S8 & S10
        S3 – Help students make a successful transition into the academic community
        S4 – Offer programs and curricula that reflect best practices and that prepare students for
        productive lives in contemporary society and for life long intellectual growth.
        S8 – Offer co-curricular experiences that complement academic programs in helping
        students achieve high levels of personal and intellectual growth.
        S10 – Integrate systematic assessment into all programs and services that contribute to
        student success.

Department Goals:
First-Year Experience works closely with students to:
       Acclimate them to William Paterson University’s campus
       Educate them in the area of critical thinking, academic integrity, study skills strategies,
       information technology and other topics that provide a foundation for student success
       Identify and workout solutions for roadblocks to student success in the first year
       Integrate co-curricular activities with academic programs
       Promote a smooth transition from high school to college
       Stress the importance and implement an academic support plan for first-year students
       Support students through their first year at the university

Department Objective #1:
Help new students become acclimated to the university so that they understand the university’s
policies and procedures and so that they know were to go for help in various areas.

Expected Outcomes:
      1. Students will know the various academic and social policies of the university, as well
      as be able to identify the various academic support departments on campus and
      understand the services provided in each area.

       During the fall 08 First-Year Seminar (FYS) class, students were given an assignment to
       review and study the policies and procedures in the Student Handbook. In addition,
       students participated in a “scavenger hunt” to locate and research the various academic
       support units on campus. Students were tested on the assignments above.



                                                                                                 9 
Assessment Methods & Actual Outcomes:
   2. At the completion of fall semester, students completed a FYS survey and 95% stated that
      FYS helped them understand the university’s policies and procedures and that they were
      able to locate the academic support services on campus. This assessment is used to
      assess several components of the course, student learning outcomes and some of FYE’s
      department activities. For the remainder of this report this assessment will be referred to
      as the “FYS Assessment.” (See Appendix C for the complete FYS assessment tool and
      report)

   3. In addition, during the spring semester, we conduct a syllabus analysis to determine how
      many sections of the FYS actually assign the policy and scavenger hunt assignments
      listed above. The analysis indicated that approximately 78% of the sections assigned the
      aforementioned assignments. The syllabus analysis is also used to assess several
      components of the course and department activities. (See Appendix A for the complete
      Syllabus Analysis Report)

       Our goal for the 08-09 academic year was to increase the number of sections who
       assigned the policies and academic support assignment by at least 5%. We actually
       increased the number of sections by over 5%, in that we went from 70% participation to a
       78% participation level. In an attempt to reach 100% participation, our goal for the 09/10
       year is to experience another increase of at least 5% by the end of the fall semester. We
       can achieve this goal by sending additional notices to the faculty as well as increasing the
       use of Peer Leaders in more sections of FYS.

Department Objective #2:
Through the department and the first-year seminar, enhance first-year students’ personal and
academic development and provide opportunities and support involvement in campus activities
during their first year at William Paterson University.

Expected Outcomes:
      1. First-year students will gain an understanding of information literacy and blackboard.
      2. Students will share a common reader experience and will have an opportunity for
         discussions and activities around the common reader
      3. Students will participate in a Campus Pride Project
      4. Students will participate in “out of the classroom” and/or campus life activates
      5. Students who participate in linked and cluster courses will do better academically,
         with higher overall GPAs as well as higher grades in their FYS, than those who
         are not in cluster or linked courses
      6. Students will work with upper class peers and gain “academic survival knowledge”
         from their upper class peers

Assessment Methods & Actual Outcomes:

   7. First-year students will gain an understanding of information literacy and
      blackboard: During the 08/09 academic year, the syllabus analysis showed that 81% of
      the FYS sections engaged the students in the library instruction class during the fall
      semester. During that lesson students gain knowledge on information literacy and

                                                                                                10 
   competencies. During that class, students expressed an understanding of and respect for
   information literacy.

   In addition, over half (58%) of the sections of FYS conducted an online assignment with
   the use of Blackboard and/or hold at least one course session to introduce Blackboard to
   the first-year students.

   Our 08/09 goal was to increase the number of sections that incorporate the library lesson
   and Blackboard assessment by at least 5%. However, we did not accomplish our goal for
   the library lesson. The 07/08 numbers showed that 85% of the FYS sections participated
   in the library lesson, where the 08/09 numbers actually decreased to 81% participation.
   During the 09/10 year, FYE will research the decline in the library use and if feasible,
   work to bring the library participation percentage back to at least 85%.

   On the other hand, we did reach our 5% goal for the use of Blackboard in the FYS
   sections. Our 07/08 numbers were slightly under half of the sections at 43%. Last year’s
   number showed 58% which indicates a more then 5% increase. We did and will continue
   to spend time supporting and training faculty in Blackboard. Our 09/10 goal is to
   increase the use of sections that utilize Blackboard assignments by another 5%. We plan
   to achieve this goal by incorporating a move comprehensive Blackboard component to
   the FYS Faculty Training sessions. In addition, we will include a workshop on
   Blackboard in the Peer Leader Training sessions so that the upper class students are more
   equipped to support faculty as well as the first year students with the use of Blackboard.

   In addition, during the 09/10 year, we will attempt to increase the number of students
   who stated that they gained knowledge in the above areas (information literacy and
   Blackboard) by at least 5%. On the 08/09 student survey, 85% agreed that their FYS
   course assisted them in “finding and evaluating” information. In addition, during the
   freshman class meetings, students reported a high satisfaction with information literacy,
   and a low satisfaction with their knowledge of Blackboard. For the next academic year,
   we plan to assess the students following the library presentation, as well as on their
   knowledge of blackboard at the end of first semester.

8. Students will share a common reader experience and will have an opportunity for
   discussions and activities around the common reader: In 07/08, according to the
   syllabus analysis over 50% of the FY seminar sections gave an assignment or quiz on the
   common reader book selection. It seems that our numbers have remained the same for
   the 08/09 year, in that approximately 54% of the sections gave an assignment or quiz on
   the book. However, the common reader remained a required reading on all syllabi for the
   08/09 year. During the 09/10 year, FYE will re-examine the use of the common reader in
   the FYS sections. If all sections require it, but ½ of the sections use an assessment to
   evaluate its use, we need to look at what the other ½ of the sections are doing to insure a
   common reader experience. We plan to do this by addressing this question during a fall
   faculty training session.

9. Students will participate in a Campus Pride Project: In October, FYS faculty and
   students come together for two campus pride programs. Students and faculty worked

                                                                                           11 
   together to beautiful the bulletin boards in Raubinger hall, as well as to work on the
   “Halloween Open House Pumpkin Project.” Our 08/09 goal was to increase the number
   of faculty/FYS sections who participated in the campus pride project by at least 5%.
   However, we did not reach our goal. In 07/08, we had a little over 10% of the sections
   participate with approximately 140 students and about 7 instructors. During the last
   academic year, our numbers dropped drastically. We had approximately 30 student
   participants, and two instructors. FYE is fully aware of the cause in the drop in numbers
   over the past academic year and has already made the necessary changes to increase
   participation for the 09/10 academic year. Our goal is to increase participation by at least
   5% of the 07/08 numbers. Our plan is to recruit faculty and FYS sections early in the
   semester, as well as provide incentives for student participants.

10. Students will participate in “out of the classroom” and/or campus life activates:
    The 08/09 syllabus analysis indicated that a little over half (58%) of the FY seminar
    sections give credit for or strongly suggested participation in campus activities, and/or
    out of the classroom activities. However, discussions at the freshmen class meetings and
    focus groups indicated that very few students took part in such activities. Our goal for
    the 09/10 academic year is to continue to stress the importance of getting involved on
    campus, participating in “out of the classroom” activities and to continue to provide more
    department opportunities for student engagement. Our plan to achieve this goal is to
    increase promotion of such events, as well as to encourage the faculty to provide credit
    for such events. FYE will also increase involvement in such activities through additional
    programming in the evening.

11. Student participants in linked and cluster courses: In the fall of 08, we ran various
    linked and special population sections of the FYS, as well as residence and clusters.
    f. FYS / linked with one section of ENG 110
    g. FYS / linked with two sections of PSY 110
    h. FYS / linked with BIO 130
    i. FYS / linked with one section of POL 120 and those students lived on the same floor
        in the Towers
    j. FYS / linked with CMHL 120 and those students lived on the same floor in the
        Towers
    k. FYS was apart of three cluster cohorts / two in the fall and one in the spring
    l. We ran several special population sections: five for EOF students, five for honor
        students and one section for undeclared students only.
    Our 08/09 goal was to run three FYS residence links in the fall of 08, as well as to
    increase our number of linked and special population sections. Although we were not
    successful with increasing the number of residence links in the fall of ’08, we did meet
    our goal of increasing the number of linked sections. In the fall of 07 we ran four linked
    sections of FYS and we increased that number to six in the fall of 08. In addition, the
    overall grades received in the FYS sections that were apart of a link or cluster, were
    higher than those not linked or clustered.

   As in the 07/08 year, during the 08/09 year, students in the linked and special population
   sections, continued to reported higher satisfaction with their experience in the course and
   are more likely to recommend the course to other students. Our goal for the 09/10

                                                                                            12 
academic year is to continue to increase the number of linked and special population
sections, as well as to include at least one new GE course in the linked sections. We plan
to accomplish this by contacting academic department chairs and requesting at least one
FYS link with a GE in their department. We plan to achieve this goal by the end of the
spring semester.

During the 08/09 year, FYE supported 74 sections of the first-year seminar course (65 in
the fall and 9 in the spring). The course continues to meet for 75 minutes once a week for
14 weeks. This course is mandatory for all first time, first-year students as well as
transfer students with 11 credits or less. This course is a foundation course designed to
introduce students to university life. In an attempt to increase retention of first-year
students, FYE set a goal to increase the overall passing grades of the FYS course. As
indicated in the chart below, the overall passing grades of the FYS did increase slightly
from the 07/08 year. In 07/08, we had 72% of the students passing FYS with a grade of
“C” or above. That percentage increased to 75% during the 08/09 year. Our goal for the
09/10 year is to continue to increase the number of students in the FYS who receive a
grade of “C” or above. We plan to achieve this goal through the use of academic support
and the Peer Leader Program. We will evaluate the grades in the FYS sections following
the fall and spring semesters.




                                                                                       13 
   Fall 07 (1346 Students enrolled)             Fall 08 (1269 students enrolled)
   452               A          34%                 448         A                35%
   152               A-         11%                 146         A-               12%
   132               B          10%                 105         B                8%
72% of                                                                                              75% of 
   63                B-         5%                  93          B-               7%
the                                                                                                 the 
   122
students             B+         9%                  114         B+               9%                 students 
   47
received a           C          3%                  57          C                4%                 received a 
   28
grade of             C-         2%                  38          C-               3%                 grade of 
“C” or 
   72                C+         5%                  38          C+               3%                 “C” or 
above 
   39                D          3%                  47          D                4%                 above 
   12                D-         9%                  0           D-               0%
   109               F          8%                  94          F                7%
   11                INC        1%                  0           Inc              0%
   36                WD         3%                  8           WD               1%
   10                Misn 1%                        0           Missing          0%



  Spring 08, (128                         Spring 09 (141
  enrolled)                               enrolled)
  27              A                   21%          27    A                           19%
  5               A-                  4%           11    A-                          8%
54% of 
  11              B                   9%           B+    9                           6%             55% of 
the 
                                                                                     10%            the 
  9
students          B-                  7%           B     14
                                                                                                    students 
received a 
  11              B+                  9%           B-    6                           4%             received a 
grade of 
  5               C                   4%           C+    4                           3%             grade of 
“C” or 
  3               C-                  2%           C     7                           5%             “C” or 
above 
  3               C+                  2%           C-    4                           3%             above 

  3               D                   2%           D+    2                           1%
  1               D-                  1%           D     9                           6%
  2               D+                  2%           F     44                          31%
  35              F                   27%          WD    4                           3%
  9               WD                  6%


        12. Students will work with Peer Leaders: Our 08/09 goal was to increase the number of
            FYS sections that utilize Peer Leaders so that more students can have an opportunity to
            work with a trained upper class student. We did accomplish this goal as our number
            increased from 29 sections in 07/08 to 31 sections in 08/09. In addition, the FYS
            assessment indicated that students who had an opportunity to work with a peer leader
            were very satisfied with the experience. First-year students expressed their satisfaction
            with the Peer Leader Program during the freshmen class meetings and on the FYS


                                                                                                  14 
       assessment. FYE was also able to increase the number of first-year students’ ability to
       work with Peer Leaders through the FY Chat Room. The Chat Room showed an increase
       of use from the prior year. More students visited the Chat Room; thus more students had
       an opportunity to interact with a Peer Leader.

       Our 09/10 goal is to continue to increase the use of peers in the FYS courses. However,
       due to budget constraints, we may not be able to increase the number of sections that
       utilize a peer leader as we did in the 08/09 year. However, we will continue to provide
       programs for all FY students that incorporate the use of peers. This will give more
       students an opportunity to work with peers during their first year.

Department Objective #3:
First-Year Experience will help identify and workout solutions for roadblocks to student success.

Expected Outcomes:
      1. Undeclared students will have an academic advisor for their first year at the
      university, whom they will see on a weekly basis in the classroom and outside of the
      classroom when necessary. The office will assist the college’s academic advisors as a
      liaison between first-year students and the academic departments. Students will be able
      to report any concerns or problems to their advisors as soon as issues arise.

       2. The department will receive reports on student success and other student information,
       (holds, withdrawals, registration, etc.) and send such information to various academic and
       special programs on behalf of the students. Students will continue to receive
       correspondence from FYE in an attempt to help students facilitate problems prior to
       certain deadlines.

Assessment Methods & Actual Outcomes:
      1. The FYS assessment asks first-year students questions regarding the availability and
      helpfulness of the Academic Advisor in their FYS. At the end of the fall 08 semester,
      students who received advisement from their FYS instructor reported high satisfaction
      with their advisors. When asked if their FYS advisor was helpful, on a scale from 1 – 5,
      with 5 being “Very Helpful,” the average score was a 4.4. This mean did not change
      from the 07/08 year. Therefore, there was no increase in the level of satisfaction.
      However, there was an increase in the number of students who completed the form, as
      well as an increase in the number of students whose FYS instructor was their official
      academic advisor.

       Our goal for the 09/10 year is to increase student satisfaction on the advisement process
       in the first year, as well as to increase student knowledge on the advisement process. In
       addition, we plan to help students become better prepare for advisement with their major
       advisors. To measure this goal we will use the FYS assessment, as well as discussions
       with non-FYS faculty advisors.

       2. During the 08/09 year, First-Year Experience received various reports on FY student
       data, such as: Grade Reports, Financial Hold Reports, Part Time and Resident Students
       Reports, as well as student demographic and other reports. The information was used to

                                                                                               15 
       alert students to certain barriers that may stop them from registering or cause other
       roadblocks to student success. Our 08/09 goal was to increase the use of such
       information and continue sharing with students and various departments on campus.
       Over the past year, FYE worked closely with various support units to assist with the
       success of the first-year population.

       Our 09/10 goal is to continue to receive the above reports and to use such data to keep the
       students informed of issues that concern their success as well as to track retention data as
       it relates to the university’s retention goals.

Cohort data and Assessment:
  During the 08/09 academic year, FYE initiated, sponsored and successfully coordinated
  programs to contribute to the success and retention of first-year students at William Paterson
  University. In the fall of 08, we had 1,311 first-year students in our “new student cohort.”
  Our new student cohort consists of all students registered for a FYS course. New students
  and transfer students with 11 credits or less. Our 08/09 number was slightly less than the
  07/08 cohort of 1,345. Out of the 1,311 new students, approximately 499 were undeclared.
  This number shows an increase from the 07/08 undeclared population of 469. Upon
  completion of the fall 08 semester, 237 earned a GPA of 1.99 or less. Those students were
  placed on academic probation status.
  Of the 237:
             - 103 failed FYS
             - Of the 103 who failed FYS, only 75 returned for the spring semester
             - 50 of the 75 reported regular for a special section of FYS and 19 of the
                 remaining 25 who repeated FYS, participated in the Probation Students’
                 Program in the spring
             - 17 of the 69 earned a GPA of 2.0 or higher for their spring semester GPA
             - 10 of the 69 earned an overall GPA of 2.0 or above
             - 27 did increase their GPA but did not reach a 2.0 for the term or the semester
             - The remaining 15 students continue unsuccessfully during the spring semester

   The probation student population is very difficult to work with. The program is not
   mandatory and students understand that they have additional semesters to remain at the
   university.

   However, the department has set a 09/10 goal to decrease the number of first year students on
   probation status after their first-year at the university. We will accomplish this by increasing
   support for those students in the spring semester, as well as implement a program for
   returning first year students under a 2.0 in the fall.

   In addition to the Probation Students’ Program, FYE coordinates various activities to support
   the retention initiatives of the university. FYE is very much aware of the “Board of Trustee’s
   Dashboard Indicators” which includes a goal of 80% FY student retention by 2011. The
   2006 FY retention was 75.8%, with a first semester rate of 89.8%. The 2007 FY retention
   was 76.8% (slightly under the Board’s target of 77%) with a first semester rate of 90.6%.
   The 2008 FY retention rate will be available in mid-October. In an attempt to meet the 2011
   university retention goal, FYE will continue to sponsor activities to support increasing the

                                                                                                16 
first-year retention rate over the next two years. (FY retention statistics are posted in the
IR&A Fact Books – see charts attached)




                                                                                          17 
Office of Basic Skills
Linda Refsland, Director
2008-2009 Annual Report

Division: Academic Development
Unit: Office of Basic Skills
Strategic Direction: The Basic Skills Program of William Paterson University is committed to
promoting a successful student transition to college-level academics through developmental
coursework and student-centered support services. Foundational academic skills will be
developed through effective student assessment and placement, student-centered instruction and
service provision and appropriate interventions.

I Institutional and Office of Basic Skills Objectives and Initial Outcomes

Four institutional objectives inform the practice and goals of the Office of Basic Skills. These
objectives incorporate:
        • Improving college readiness and effective transitions for students (IO S3)
        • Providing effective support services for at risk students (IO S6)
        • Improving retention and time-to-degree rates (IO S1)
        • Integrating program and outcomes assessment to inform data-driven decision making
            practice (IO S10)

As this report describes a limited period of action, objectives and outcomes are framed into
short- term goals with initial outcome data and longer term future plans and recommendations.

Institutional Objective S3: Help students make a successful transition into the academic
community.

   A. Increase proactive communication to reduce numbers of students with outstanding
   basic skills coursework

   Proactive Process
   In prior years, students with outstanding basic skills needs had a hold is placed on their
   registration with no notification; if students contact the Office of Basic Skills to register, a
   course was scheduled, otherwise their schedule was altered without their involvement.
   Beginning in Spring 2008 a more proactive communication process was used to reduce
   student confusion and dissatisfaction, increase positive interactions with students and speed
   their registration process. Throughout the Fall 2008-Spring 2009 year, this process was
   refined and used to place students quickly, with a decrease in late schedule changes and
   student dissatisfaction.

   Fall 2008
   Through data obtained from the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment and the
   Office of Admissions two cohorts of students were created. A group of 197 pre-existing
   students with basic skills needs and a group of 558 first time freshmen, readmit, and transfer
   students with basic skills needs was generated. As in the previous semester, all students with
   outstanding needs were sent an initial formal letter to their primary address informing them

                                                                                                18 
of the needed coursework or, in the case of transfer students, their options for presenting
documentation or taking placement testing. Following this all students had holds placed on
their registration.
All students were then emailed a reminder two weeks prior to priority registration. Students
were notified of the reason for the hold, how to rectify the situation, and several
communication options (telephone, in person, or email). Throughout the registration cycle
remaining students were emailed a reminder every two weeks that included their current
status. Students who contacted the Office were consulted as to their scheduling restrictions
and registered for the needed coursework. Students who were repeating a course were also
asked about needed academic supports. Any interested students were tracked for referral in
the fall or summer semester to the Academic Support Center. Based on student feedback
from the prior semester an additional component was added to email communications with
students. The director reviewed all students for other registration holds prior to emailing.
Reminder emails included a listing of all holds and recommendations for steps to resolve
financial, Alcohol Edu and part time status holds.

Spring 2009
As the midyear Admissions process is truncated when compared to the traditional cycle, a
different process for quickly identifying students with outstanding basic skills needs was
developed for the Spring. To account for re-admitted students and those returning from
withdrawals or leaves of absence, a list of all students with outstanding basic skills needs
who had an active schedule for the Spring 2008 semester, or were active within the past year
was developed through collaboration with Institutional Research. This listing was used to
identify 306 students with outstanding basic skills needs, including new admits, transfer,
continuing or returning students. As in the Fall, students were notified prior to priority
registration by mail and sent reminders as the registration cycle progressed.

Outcomes

Fall 2008
Following a proactive communication process, of the 755 students with outstanding needs
(197 existing, 558 new freshmen) 88% (655) were registered for a basic skills class for the
Spring 09 semester. The remaining 12% (100) included students who were transferring,
withdrawing or taking a leave of absence, were not able to register due to lack of space or
evening course availability, or did not communicate with the office.

Spring 2009
Of the 306 students with outstanding needs, 285 or 93% communicated with the Director
during the process; of that group 70% were placed (200), 10% were cleared of requirements
(29), 3% were transferring or not active for the Fall 09 (8); and 17% had remaining holds or
conditions delaying registration (48).

Through this process only 69 current students remained without placement at the end of the
Spring 09 semester, a significant improvement over prior years. In addition, students
responded with overwhelmingly positive feedback, noting that having the steps necessary to
solve registration holds assisted them greatly. Given this feedback, information surrounding
these issues will be included in initial email communication.

                                                                                         19 
   Future goals include modifying initial placement procedures to ensure all students with
   English or Reading needs are placed in courses their semester of entry, ideally resulting in no
   student taking these courses past their first year. In addition, adjustment to the placement
   process in mathematics will need to be considered. Currently many students who need to
   repeat MATH 106 from the Spring semester are unable to be placed in the course for the fall
   due to the large number of freshmen placed before final grades are completed. Options such
   as additional repeat only sections or holding spaces across sections for repeat students will
   need to be considered.

   B. Increase collaboration to facilitate basic skills registration of incoming first time
   freshmen

   Following a successful collaboration between Academic Development cohort managers and
   the registrar, students in special programs were pre-packaged with the assistance of cohort
   managers. As this process was seen as contributing to student success, particularly during
   their first semester, this relationship was expanded to include the Director of Basic Skills.
   Through discussion with the Registrar’s Office several decision rules and procedures were
   developed to adapt the pre-packaging process.

   First, a decision rule was placed that all students with Reading and/or English basic skills
   requirements were to be placed in that course(s) their first semester. It was agreed that if
   additional sections became necessary, the appropriate Coordinator would be informed and
   lobby for additional sections. Second, the Registrar agreed that the Director of Basic Skills
   could request schedules for any student with basic skills needs. Particularly those students
   not in a specialty cohort, who required all three basic skills, would be pre-packaged with
   special consideration. As much as possible, these students were placed in a linked section of
   BRI 109 and ENG 108, along with courses without overwhelming reading/writing
   requirements. Finally, students with very weak math scores were placed in MATH 106
   sections first (as available) and with professors familiar with developmental student needs.

   Future goals include evaluating outcomes of students placed in cluster sections and success
   of students in selected MATH 106 courses. Also, development of procedures to facilitate
   registration of the large numbers of at risk students each incoming Fall semester will need to
   be addressed.

C. Increase level and clarity of communication with transfer students to facilitate basic
   skills placement and completion
   Transfer students receive an initial communication from the Office of Testing informing
   them of any outstanding basic skills requirements. Frequently incoming transfer students are
   unfamiliar with basic skills requirements or the methods of completing the placement
   process. To facilitate testing and placement of incoming transfer students, frequent review
   of transcripts, collaboration with the Orientation committee and proactive communication
   with students was used. The Director of Basic Skills participated in all transfer orientations
   for the 2008-2009 academic year; review of student transcripts was performed immediately
   before each session to reflect recent changes in transcripts. All student holds are temporarily
   removed prior to orientation sessions, and advisors are provided a listing of all students and

                                                                                               20 
    their placement needs. Through this process there has been a reduction in the number of
    students needing Basic Skills guidance during the orientation, and resulted in positive
    feedback from Orientation managers and students.

    During the academic year, transfer students are tracked similar to first time freshmen and
    continuing students. Notifications and informational emails are customized for their needs
    and include information about placement testing, options for exemption and invitations to
    speak directly with the Director to resolve holds or placement concerns. Key areas of
    difficulty for many students are delays in credit evaluations, unfamiliarity with William
    Paterson registration procedures and lack of basic skills course availability during transfer
    orientations.

    Future goals include improving initial contact with transfer students to facilitate process,
    increase advisor awareness of transfer student options for basic skills completion and
    developing support materials for advisors and students during orientations.

Institutional Objective S6: Provide effective academic support services to help students
with diverse needs achieve academic success

A. Establish baseline rates of remediation and course repetition for future program
   development

Course Enrollment and Remediation rates
Of the incoming Fall 2008 class 463 or 21% of all new students required remediation in reading,
through the BRI 109 course. One hundred and ninety seven or 9% required remediation in
writing through the ENG 108 course and 1055 or 48% required remediation in mathematics
through the MATH 106 course.

Due to the limited number of sections offered not all students requiring a basic skills class were
placed in the requisite course their first semester. Of 1055 students placing in MATH 106 only
565 or 54% were enrolled in a section of MATH 106 in their entering semester (Fall 2008). Of
197 new students placing into ENG 108 from the entering Fall 2008 cohort 169 or 86% were
enrolled in a section of ENG 108 or an equivalent ESL course in their entering semester (Fall
2008). Of 463 new students placing into BRI 109 from the entering Fall 2007 cohort 434 or 94%
were placed in BRI 109 or an equivalent ESL course their entering semester.

During the Spring 2009 semester 655 students were placed in basic skills courses; with the vast
majority being MATH 106 students (577); of all basic skills students, 111 were new Spring
admits, with the remaining student consisting of repeaters and continuing students taking a basic
skills course for the first time. Because of the large number of students repeating MATH 106
and requiring it from initial admission to the University, 739 students needed MATH 106
placements in the Spring 09 to ensure all Fall 2008 cohort students attempted MATH 106 their
freshman year. Although this figure does not account for students leaving the University it is
still reasonable to assume a large number of students will not complete their MATH 106
requirement before the end of their freshman year.




                                                                                               21 
Future goals for this area focus on developing options for sequencing students more
successfully into MATH 106, given the limited number of sections available. Options include:
       • Focus advisement on guiding students with larger Math needs (business and research
           based majors) to complete their math 106 requirements early, even if it requires some
           alteration of their schedule. As there is not room for all students who need to
           complete math 106, students who have the least math intensive curriculum and part
           time students are the best options for those who have to wait to take the course.
       • Guide students with very weak math placement scores to begin their MATH 106
           course as early as possible to allow for a repeat of the course.

B. Increase success rates of students in basic skills coursework

Success Rates for Basic Skills Coursework by Skill Area
The table below describes the success rates for each Basic Skills area for the Fall 2008 and
Spring 2009 semesters. The range of success rates and average rates for each department are
presented; with Reading having the most consistent and strongest success rates and Math with
both the lowest pass rates and the greatest variability in pass rates.

Table 1 Success Rates Across Basic Skills Fall 08 and Spring 09
Course Fall      P     N WD Range Avg               Course Sprin           P    N     W    Range     Avg
          08                                Rate              g 09                    D              Rate
BRI 109 381      34 32 5          75     - 92%      BRI 109 42             38   4     0    81-       90%
                 4                100%                                                     100%
ENG       144    12 14 3          70-       90%     ENG       28           21   7     0    69-83%    75%
108              7                100%              108
MATH      696    38 30 9          26-       56%     MATH 562               32   21    25   30-89%    57%
106              3     4          83%               106                    0    7

English courses experienced an increase in success rate as compared to the prior academic year
for both semesters. Efforts were made to collaborate with faculty to encourage early
identification of students in jeopardy through early Alert and individual consultation. In
addition, meetings with the Coordinator for English, recommended interventions for students
with intensive remediation needs were made. All English faculty are encouraged to provide
frequent and individualized feedback to students regarding performance and areas for
improvement; this in addition to early intervention provides early opportunities for students to
improve. Given the increase in student success outcomes, direct collaboration with faculty and
the Coordinator will be continued.

The Reading program continues to demonstrate consistently strong student performance across
both Fall and Spring semesters. Several factors are seen as contributing to this trend. First, the
Coordinator for Reading continues to provide professional development and supervision of
faculty through semester meetings and training sessions. Also the Coordinator has identified a
core group of reading faculty with extensive experience and a professional background in
Literacy and Reading instruction. Second, faculty are strongly encouraged to work with both the
Coordinator and Director of Basic Skills to identify students having difficulty so appropriate
tutoring, mentoring and other services can be provided. Finally, course curriculum and materials

                                                                                               22 
are assessed and monitored for utility; changes are made to link the reading curriculum to later
college level demands as much as possible.

Math course outcomes were impacted by two changes in grading policy; for the first time Web
Assign (a computer-based instruction module) assignment grades were included in students’
final grade. During the Fall semester Web Assign contributed 10% towards a student’s final
grade, reducing the weight of the final exam to 50% and in the Spring Web Assign contributed
15% of the students’ final grade, reducing the weight of the final exam to 45%. It was
anticipated that by including homework assignment grades, overall success rates would increase.
During the Fall 08 semester, success rates remained the same, even with the change, indicating
students were either performing equally poorly on Web Assign as exams, or WebAssign grades
were not sufficient to improve overall performance. During the Spring 09 semester WebAssign
weights were increased, and the pass rate cut-off score was piloted at 60% instead of 66%.
Again, pass rates remained fairly constant despite the changes. The results of these two
semesters’ piloting of WebAssign suggest Web Assign may not improve a student’s performance
on in class time-constrained exams that require memorization of procedures. Student feedback
regarding WebAssign has been mixed, with many students requiring assistance to begin the
program and expressing a desire to practice their math skills with a one to one tutorial
relationship.

Future goals in this area include:
      Math: Collaborating with the Coordinator for Mathematics to discuss options for
      incorporating WebAssign or other technology in MATH 106.
      Reading: Collaborating with the Coordinator for Reading to include diagnostic and
      formative reading assessments in all BRI 109 classes, adapting syllabi to clarify how
      attendance, participation and homework all contribute to final grades and continuing a
      pilot of an alternate final exam.
      English: Collaboration with the English Coordinator will focus on increasing utilization
      of Early Alert so students with specialized writing needs are identified earlier.

C. Reduce repetition of basic skills courses through assessment of repeat student sections
   and alternate curriculum

Outcomes for Mathematics:
The Math department offered a single repeat student section for the Fall semester. This section
is different from other math sections by having a large enrollment (56 and 64 respectively) and
co-teachers or attached supplemental instruction, ideally allowing for more student interaction
and correction. The Supplemental Instruction leader (through the Academic Support Center)
also participated in the class and provided voluntary review sessions to all students. Given the
poor success rate in the Fall, 43%, and again in the Spring (34% without altered grading policy)
serious consideration as to the model of this course should be addressed. As the curriculum,
exams and structure of the course are the same as all other sections, it’s unclear if a single
additional instructor can provide the assistance needed for this population of students.

Outcomes for Reading:
The Reading department also offered a repeat student only section in the Spring 2009 semester.
This course utilizes a very experienced professor with training in developmental literacy

                                                                                             23 
 education, a different text and in class pedagogy focusing on targeting students’ specific reading
 weaknesses. This methodology has largely met with success with an 88% pass rate. Additional
 options being considered for this course are utilization of formative assessment, mandated one to
 one tutoring or lab component and increased use of early diagnostic reading assessments.

 Future goals:
 Mathematics: Addressing poor student performance in Math 106 repeat student sections
 through collaboration with Math Coordinator, Supplemental Instruction and effective use of
 Early Alert resources.
 Reading: Piloting a diagnostic reading assessment in all reading courses and making necessary
 changes to finalize an exit exam and process.
 English: Work with English Coordinator to develop repeat section curriculum and strategies for
 English students.

 D. Reduce number of students repeating basic skills coursework through Early Alert and
    collaboration with Basic Skills Coordinators and faculty.

The Early Alert system went “live” for all faculty during the Fall 2008 semester. Faculty were
trained in the program and strongly encouraged to use it to identify at risk or failing students early
in the semester for targeted intervention. Basic Skills instructors utilized the system and it resulted
in 251 students being placed on early alert for basic skills needs in the Fall 2008 semester and 270
students in the Spring 2009 semester. The Math department placed the most students on early
alert, as the testing methodology in the course lends itself to identifying students based on single
test scores. Both the Reading and English departments required more frequent coaching on the
part of the Director to place students on early alert; many faculty felt that students would improve
through faculty intervention and were sometimes loathe to “label” a student as at risk.

A standard intervention was used for all Basic Skills students placed on early alert; an initial email
was sent, informing the student of the reason for the early alert and a strong recommendation that
they contact me on how to improve their performance. Students were given a week to respond,
after which an additional email was sent. For all students who responded, either an in person or
email dialogue was started discussing what was going on in class and what their plan was for
improvement. Students needing tutoring were given a referral to a specific tutor or review session
and a time to go, to make it more likely they would follow through on the plan. Students who felt
a test or quiz was an anomaly were given a plan, but were monitored to see if their performance
improved. Students who developed a connection with an advisor or the Early Alert Coordinator
were no longer emailed; any additional information was sent to that individual, to take advantage
of an existing affective relationship.

Anecdotally, students who responded and followed through on interventions were most successful
and did pass their course. Several repeat students in Math finally passed the course following
intervention and commitment by the student. Later analysis of Early Alert data will be used to
evaluate how best to proceed and utilize the program. Initial difficulties revolve around the
volume of students; although phone calls or more personal methods of outreach are preferable,
managing 250 -300 students makes this all but impossible. Although additional data management
tools and automated emails to students were added to the Early Alert system in the Spring



                                                                                                    24 
semester, the student load prevented more personal methods of intervention such as phone calls or
personalized email.


Future goals in this area include increasing personalized intervention with repeat or at risk
students. It is anticipated that more personal intervention may be possible if time intensive
methods are used with the most at risk students first. In addition, increasing initial contact with at
risk and repeat students before classes begin to develop rapport and encourage later contact should
problems develop.

II Outcomes of Long Term Goals

 A. Reorganization of the Office of Testing

 Annual Goals in the Office of Testing focused on re-organizing the testing cycle to more closely
 match the Admissions cycle, shorten time to placement, and increase the capacity of the Office
 of Testing without using outside facilities. Through collaboration a new testing schedule for
 basic skills was developed and piloted during the Spring semester. Testing was conducted
 during the academic year using facilities in the Office of Academic Support and the Atrium;
 testing was begun at the end of February and was conducted at least twice per week. Students
 were usually scheduled for testing within two weeks of their deposit week and English readings
 were conducted beginning in March. Outcomes of this initial pilot have yielded positive
 feedback from several constituent offices including Admissions, Registrar and special programs.
 As of this report almost 70 percent of incoming students have been tested and/or cleared of
 requirements. Unlike previous years Admissions and Registrar have completed invitations and
 registration for the first orientation session over one month in advance and have enough placed
 students for the second orientation session as well. The revised schedule placed students for
 programs with summer components with enough time to allow for class placement, and did not
 require special testing sessions.

 Review of Current Placement Testing Instruments and Norms

 Reviews of instruments focused on two areas during the 2008-2009 year, a revision of the
 Reading exit exam and a revision of materials sent to students prior to initial placement testing.
 A revision of the Reading exit exam was performed ahead of other reviews because one single
 instrument, a paper and pencil version of the Accuplacer placement test, was being used,
 resulting in students who repeated the course taking the exact same instrument multiple times.
 Also the Coordinator for Reading and the Director of Basic Skills agreed that a placement exam
 is not methodologically sound as an exit exam. Thus, an instrument was piloted with a small
 group of reading students in the Spring semester. The piloted instrument was developed by the
 Reading faculty and designed to provide more authentic assessment of literacy outcomes needed
 for successful college level reading. Initial data and student feedback suggest the piloted test
 was perceived as easier than the Accuplacer, however there was variability in performance that
 paralleled Accuplacer findings. Additional item analysis will be performed and revisions are
 scheduled for a large scale pilot in the Fall 2009 semester.




                                                                                                   25 
A review of mailings and materials sent to students prior to placement exams was conducted
ahead of other assessment goals. Again, feedback from cohort managers, students and families
suggested past mailings were unclear and did not explicitly identify subjects being assessed. A
general review of all materials yielded changes to increase clarity and an addition of a review
packet for all exams. Anecdotal outcomes suggest additional changes may be required for
transfer student materials. It is unclear if review packets have improved performance; however
their inclusion has reduced complaints from families and students suggesting they should have
been better prepared for the exam.

Fall 2007 – Spring 2008 Long Term Goals Currently in Process
Two long term goals from the prior year, policy development and review and an agenda of items
for the Basic Skills Council were delayed to increase focus on more critical areas effecting
enrollment and student retention. Additional reviews of policy documents have taken place and
have reinforced the need for a unified policy and procedure document which includes ESL policy
components and course pre-requisites. Although an agenda of items for review by the Basic
Skills Council was developed, the committee was not convened during the 2008-2009 academic
year. A similar agenda of items will be prepared for the upcoming academic year to encourage
review of critical FERPA and curricular concerns.

III Goals for 2009-2010 Academic Year

Process Goals

   1. Increase early intervention with at risk students through use of Early Alert system,
      proactive contact with repeat and at risk students and personalized contact
   2. Increase mentoring of students in academic jeopardy through Early Alert system, email,
      face-to-face meetings and referrals to appropriate resources on campus.
   3. Reduce number of students repeating basic skills coursework through early intervention
      and collaboration with Basic Skills Coordinators and faculty.
   4. Reduce number of students with outstanding Basic Skills coursework through more
      effective registration and tracking of students.
   5. Expand tutoring and diagnostic reading services available for at risk reading students
      (students in BRI 109).
   6. Increase collaboration between Basic Skills Coordinators, faculty and Director to
      promote student success
   7. Streamline placement process for transfer students to reduce upper level students with
      outstanding Basic Skills coursework.
   8. Increase longitudinal tracking of students and use of entry data to facilitate program
      development, collaboration with cohort managers across Academic Development and
      increase student success.

Long Term Project Goals
   1. Policy and procedure review for the Office of Testing and Basic Skills Department with
      an outcome of a unified policy document
   2. Convene the Basic Skills Council to begin discussion on relevant Basic Skills policies
      and procedures


                                                                                            26 
   3. Revise the Web pages and content for the Basic Skills department and Office of Testing
      to include more expansive testing schedule information, informational material for
      students, and areas for Basic Skills Coordinators
   4. Produce training materials for Basic Skills to distribute to advisors and departments to
      increase faculty comfort with basic skills policy
   5. Complete pilot of new Reading exit exam and define policy around new exam


The Basic Skills Department within the Division of Academic Development provides
developmental coursework in three areas, Reading, Writing and Mathematics. The purpose of
Basic Skills coursework is to develop key academic skill areas so students can effectively
complete college level coursework. All students are evaluated based on SAT scores, prior
coursework and placement testing to determine appropriate beginning coursework.

Students are monitored in their progress by faculty, the Director of Basic Skills, Academic
Support staff through the Early Alert system, student self-report, intrusive email and faculty
collaboration. Services for these students include mentoring, advisement, supplemental
instruction, skills workshops and individual and small group tutoring sessions. The Director of
Basic Skills collaborates with cohort managers, athletics and other programs to identify students
with needs and to monitor student progress.

Entering Profile
Based on the Fall 2007 entering cohort of First Time Full Time (FTFT) freshmen, 44% had one
basic skills placement, 25% had two placements and 4% had three placements. Rates of
placement vary by subject area, with the majority of students placing into basic math (67%), then
reading (34%) and finally for writing (8%). The large number of students requiring
developmental math work is consistent with national findings for higher education.

Students placing into basic skills coursework were found to enter the University with a weaker
profile of standardized testing. Overall, students placed into at least one basic skills course
achieved an average combined SAT (verbal and math) of 940; students with no placements
achieved a combined SAT of 1110. Similar differences were found for high school Academic
Index scores; students placed into at least one basic skills course achieved a mean academic
index of 140 and students with no placements achieved a mean index of 163.

Effects of Early Intervention
Findings show students with basic skills placements benefit from early placement in
developmental coursework. Students with one placement who completed it during the summer
or their first semester earned a cumulative GPA of 2.6 as compared to a 2.47 for those who did
not. Students with 2 placements who completed both courses their first semester earned a
cumulative GPA of 2.5 as compared to a 1.6 for those placed in no basic skills their first
semester. Those with three placements earned a 2.4 cumulative GPA when completing two basic
skills courses their first semester as compared to a cumulative GPA of 1.55.

Outcomes for 100 Level Coursework



                                                                                              27 
A comparison of outcomes shows that students completing basic skills coursework move on to
successfully complete later 100 level classes. Type of course and type of basic skill placement
both effect outcomes, although all means were found to be within requirements for good
academic standing. Results support that students improve in skills taught in basic skills courses
as they proceed through college level classes and utilize those skills. For example, students
successfully completing basic reading performed comparably (2.99 GPA) to those not requiring
the course (3.05 GPA) in ENG 110. They also performed comparably in SOC 102 (2.89 vs.
2.94), and HIST 102 (2.80 vs. 2.98), all courses requiring reading strategies and typically taken
in the sophomore year. Students placing into basic writing (2.68 GPA) demonstrated weaker
outcomes than those not placing (3.0 GPA) into Basic English in ENG 110. However, they
performed comparably in other 100 level coursework where writing skills may be a component
of class work, for example SOC 101 (2.46 vs. 2.65) and POL 110 (2.3 vs. 2.62).

Retention Across Groups
Retention of students with and without basic skills placements was robust; students placing in
basic skills had comparative or better retention rates across their first two years. Using data from
the Fall 2007 entering cohort of FTFT freshmen, the two year retention rate (students registered
for the Spring 2009 semester) for students with no basic skills placements was 74%; students
with one placement, 69%, students with two placements, 73% and students with four placements,
81%. The strong retention rates of students with two and three placements indicate support
services are reaching this population and in all likelihood contributing to students’ connection to
and retention at William Paterson University.




                                                                                                 28 
Office of Testing
Rachel Anzaldo, Coordinator
2008-2009 Annual Report

Division:                    Academic Development
Unit:                        Office of Testing
Mission Statement:           To provide tests and testing services to William Paterson
                             University in order to meet the growing demands of our
                             community.

Objective S3: Help students make a successful transition into the community.

BASIC SKILLS PROGRAM:
Assessment
Freshmen
One thousand four hundred thirty-seven (1437) fall 2008 semester students were
assessed for basic skills proficiency. Of this number, 939 were regular admits, 48 non-
traditional, 113 EOF, 184 Sponsored, and 75 Alchemy. Seventy-eight (78) students were exempt
from the University’s required placement test.

Seventy-one (71) students were assessed for the spring 2009 semester. Seventy (70) students
were regular admits, and 1 student was EOF. The spring 2009 cohort did not have students
which met the exemption criteria.

Students tested by Admission Type
CATEGORY                FALL 2008                  Spring 2009             TOTAL
Regular Admit           939                        70                      1009
Non-Traditional         48                         0                       48
EOF Program             113                        1                       114
Sponsored Program       184                        0                       184
Alchemy Program         75                         0                       75
Exempt from Testing     78                         0                       78
TOTAL                   1437                       71                      1508

One thousand two hundred and four (1204) first-time full-time freshmen enrolled for the
fall 2008. Four hundred and two (402) had no basic skills requirement, 509 one requirement,
224 two requirements, and 69 three requirements.

Ten students, of the spring 2009 cohort, had no basic skills requirement, 27 one requirement, 13
had two requirements, and 21 had three requirements.

Student requirements (None, one, two and three)
         CATEGORY                 FALL 2008                  SPRING 2009
         No Requirements          402 (34%)                  10 (14%)
         One Requirement          509 (42%)                  27 (38%)
         Two Requirements         224 (19%)                  13 (18%)


                                                                                             29 
           Three Requirements        69 (5%)                   21 (30%)
           TOTAL                     1204                      71
New student basic skills needs for the fall 2008 semester are: 314 required reading, 124 English
and 726 required mathematics. For the spring 2009 semester, 33 students required reading, 26
English and 58 required mathematics. These numbers are after the one-day mathematics
retesting session.

Student requirement by course
         CATEGORY                        FALL 2008               SPRING 2009
         Reading                         314 (26.1%)             23 (46%)
         English                         124 (10.3%)             26 (36%)
         Mathematics                     726 (60.3%)             58 (81%)

Transfers
One thousand five hundred twenty-six (1526) fall 2008 transfer student credit evaluations were
viewed for possible basic skills deficiencies. In the fall, 1261 students transferred coursework
(college-level English and mathematics), which exempted them from basic skills. Thirty-three
(33) chose to re-test, and 232 students demonstrated a basic skills need. In the spring, 670 credit
evaluations were viewed. Five hundred thirty-one (531) transferred coursework (college-level
English and mathematics), which exempted them from basic skills. Nineteen (19) students chose
to re-test, and 120 demonstrated a basic skills need.

Transfer student records that demonstrated a need for basic skills were notified in writing. The
notification provided the options available to them – take William Paterson University’s
placement test, provide additional documentation of completion of the coursework (updated
transcript), or enroll in William Paterson University’s basic skills course(s).

2008-2009 Transfer Student Profile

       COURSE                                    FALL 2008            SPRING 2009
       Cleared from basic skills                 1261                 531
       Tested in demonstrated area               33                   19
       Required basic skills coursework          232                  120

Retesting
A one-day re-testing session in mathematics was held in August for our fall 2008 cohort.
Students who had an Accuplacer Elementary Algebra score of 78-84 were eligible to re-test.
Seventy-one (71) students were invited. Thirty-six (36) students participated in the testing
session, while 35 students did not. Of the 36 students, 20 students received a passing score and
16 did not. Three students were cleared of the basic skills mathematics requirement because they
had a MSAT score of 560 or greater and an Accuplacer Elementary Algebra Score of 83-84.

A post testing session was held for students enrolled in a basic skills course(s) during the EOF
Summer Program. The results of the exams were:




                                                                                                30 
 2008 EOF Summer Program
                                                      MET                    DID NOT MEET
  COURSE                         ENROLLED             REQUIREMENT            REQUIREMENT
  BRI109 (Reading)               63                   60                     3
  ENG108 (Writing)               37                   39                     8
  MATH106 (Mathematics           99                   86                     13

 This Coordinator worked closely with the Registrar’s Office to make certain student schedules,
 where needed, were changed prior to the beginning of the semester. The Office of Testing
 provided written notification of the change to the students.

 Outcomes
 One thousand two hundred twenty-two students were enrolled in a basic skills course(s) for the
 fall 2008 semester. Three hundred eighty-one (381) were enrolled in BRI109; of this number,
 345 met the requirements of the course, 31 did not and 5 students withdrew. One hundred forty-
 five (145) were enrolled in ENG108; 129 met the requirements, 13 did not and 3 students
 withdrew. Six hundred ninety-six (696) were enrolled in MATH106. Three hundred eighty-four
 (384) met the requirement, 303 did not and 9 students withdrew.

 Fall 2008 Semester Basic Skills Outcomes
                                 MET      DID NOT MEET WITHDREW/LOA
COURSE       ENROLLMENT REQURIEMENT REQUIREMENT FROM
                                                       UNIVERSITY
BRI 109      381                 345      31           5
ENG 108      145                 129      13           3
MATH 106 696                     384      303          9
TOTAL        1222                858      347          17


 Six hundred thirty-two (632) students were enrolled in a basic skills course(s) for the spring 2009
 semester. Forty-two (42) were enrolled in BRI109; of this number 37 met the requirement and 5
 did not. Twenty-eight (28) students were enrolled in ENG108; 21 students met the requirement
 and 7 did not. Five hundred sixty-two (562) students were enrolled in MATH106; 308 met the
 requirement, 243 did not, and 11 withdrew.

 Spring 2009 Semester Basic Skills Outcomes
                               MET          DID NOT MEET WITHDREW/LOA
COURSE       ENROLLMENT REQURIEMENT REQUIREMENT FROM
                                                         UNIVERSITY
BRI 109      42                37           5            0
ENG 108      28                21           7            0
MATH 106 562                   308          243          11
TOTAL        632               366          255          11

 The Basic Skills Program was provided class lists reflecting the 602 students who were not
 successful in meeting their requirements this past academic year. The listing provides the Basic


                                                                                                 31 
Skills Program with the opportunity to adjust a student’s program in order to meet the
requirement in a timely fashion.

FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY EXAM
The Office of Testing continues to administer the foreign language proficiency exam to new
freshman students at the time they report for basic skills testing.

Of the 1486 fall 2008 and 71 spring 2009 students assessed; the areas of interest were diverse.
More students are becoming interested in the less commonly taught languages, i.e. Italian and
Japanese.

Foreign Language Areas of Interest
              COURSE                              NUMBER TESTED
              Arabic                              25
              Chinese                             11
              French                              142
              German                              14
              Hindi                               8
              Italian                             65
              Japanese                            28
              Korean                              5
              Latin                               6
              Portuguese                          13
              Russian                             9
              Spanish                             719
              Turkish                             3
              Undecided                           193

Two (2) students received credit via Advanced Placement Testing. Based on a test score, 50
students have been exempt of the language requirement by the Languages Department. Twelve
(12) students were BFA (Art) majors, and 5 music majors.

Due to the inaccessibility to open access labs, 247 students from our fall 2008 cohort were
administered a paper basic skills examination; hence, not tested for foreign language proficiency.

The Department of Languages and Cultures received this data on a rolling basis for evaluation
and placement recommendations. Although the placement was available within the Department
of Languages and Cultures and the Office of Testing, the placement information was not readily
available to a student and/or academic advisor. This Coordinator along with the Director of
Registration Services was instrumental in developing a process to load the foreign language
placement recommendations in Banner as well as official notification to the student. The process
of having placement available in Banner, streamlined the advisement and registration process.
The student received official notification of their level of placement.




                                                                                               32 
Objective S7: Provide effective, efficient and user-friendly student services that meet the needs
of a diverse student body.

COLLEGE LEVEL EXAMINATION PROGRAM (CLEP)
During the 2009 academic year, 610 examinations were administered. This is a 7% increase
over last year. Sixty-three (63) William Paterson University students took CLEP exams.
Twenty-six (26) received credit for their examination. The majority of our students test to meet
their foreign language requirement and history. Detailed analysis will be provided late summer
(when it is available from The College Board).

CLEP promotion campaigns continued during the year. Posters were placed throughout the main
campus. Workshops were held for the Honors College, the Part-time Student Program, and the
Alchemy Program.

Eighty-seven (87) students attended the sessions. Sixty-nine (69) expressed a desire to take
advantage of a CLEP exam. Two (2) students indicated the need to review and 2 students
indicated they are not proficient enough to benefit from an examination. Nine (9) students
indicated they “wanted to save money.” Follow-up with the students showed “try to fit time into
a busy schedule and needing time to review.” Although there was an expressed interest this past
academic year, the office could not get a commitment from the students.

MILLER ANALOGIES TEST
Three hundred (300) Miller Analogies Tests (MAT) were administered this past academic year.
Of the 300 exams, 74 candidates indicated they are or will enroll at William Paterson University.

Since policies and a passing score for entrance into William Paterson University’s graduate
programs vary, data is not available to indicate whether or not a student has been accepted into
their chosen major.

Objective O3: Develop a comprehensive and coordinated program of community service,
including collaborations, partnerships and other activities, which meet the needs of the region
and are consistent with the University’s mission.

EDUCATIONAL TESTING SERVICE (ETS)
The office continues to work closely with the Educational Testing Service. One thousand seven
hundred eighty-eight (1788) PRAXIS exams and 267 SAT examinations were administered
during the fall semester. For the spring, we administered 1392 PRAXIS exams and 772 SAT
examinations.

Data is not available to this office which would indicate how many students and examinations
taken are candidates from William Paterson University.

OTHER TESTING SERVICES
The Law School Admission Test (LSAT) examinations were administered for the academic year.
Three hundred ten (310) were administered during the fall and 185 during the spring.




                                                                                              33 
In partnership with our Kinesiology Department, The Certified Strength and Conditioning
Specialist (CSCS) exam is hosted annually (June). Ten-thirty (10-30) examinations are
administered.

Data is not available to this office which would indicate how many students and examinations
taken for ETS, LSAT and CSCS are candidates from William Paterson University.

One hundred thirty-eight (138) DSST/Distance Testing examinations were proctored during the
academic year. Our partnership includes the Universities of Delaware, North Carolina, Georgia,
Thomas Edison State College and Western Governors University are a few of the colleges and
universities we have provided a service.

RETENTION STRATEGIES
The office will be more aggressive in marketing CLEP to our community. The office will
provide a better understanding of the program’s advantages. The office will conduct workshops
to special groups of students, host a kiosk in the University Commons area, and conduct one-on-
one meetings to tailor or address student needs.


RECRUITMENT STRATEGIES
The Office of Testing should be proactive and develop, where there is a need, an effort with area
high schools whereby University representatives administer the required Basic Skills Placement
Test on site.

OTHER
During the spring of 2009, the office administered the William Paterson University Basic Skills
Placement Test earlier in the season and with more frequency. This time, in 2008, 908 students
were tested and evaluated. In 2009, 1331 students were tested and evaluated.

Because of our economic times, the University has seen an increase in the number of new
student applications; hence, the increase of 423 students. Financially, the office experienced a
shortfall in salary lines to provide payment to per diem proctors. The office had no recourse but
to utilize funding from revenue accounts to sustain the payroll.

GOALS
Enhance testing services – make recommendations on current testing trends in the areas of
foreign languages, i.e. web-based testing instruments.

Provide continued support to academic programs: a) administration of specialized testing
instruments, b) provide data for special cohorts, c) provide placement data for pre-packaging of
semester programs.

UNIVERSITY COMMITTEES AND MEMBERSHIPS
Banner Implementation Team
Director’s Council
New Student Orientation program
New Jersey Test Administrators Group

                                                                                              34 
National College Testing Association

Basic Skills Student Information Fall 2007 – Spring 2008

Institutional Objective S6: Provide effective academic support services to help students
with diverse needs achieve academic success

1. Short Term Basic Skills Objectives

A. Establish baseline rates of remediation and course repetition for future program
      development

Course Enrollment and Remediation rates
Of the incoming Fall 2007 class of 1,299 students 401 or 30.9% of students required remediation
in reading, through the BRI 109 course. One hundred and eight or 8.3% required remediation in
writing through the ENG 108 course and 774 or 53% required remediation in mathematics
through the MATH 106 course.
Due to course restrictions not all students requiring a basic skills class were placed in the
requisite course their first semester. Of 774 students placing in MATH 106 from the full time
first time freshman cohort for Fall 2007 only 408 or 53% were enrolled in a section of MATH
106 in their entering semester (Fall 2007). Of 85 new full time first time freshmen placing into
ENG 108 from the entering Fall 2007 cohort 68 or 80% were enrolled in a section of ENG 108 in
their entering semester (Fall 2007). Of 374 new full time first time freshmen placing into BRI
109 from the entering Fall 2007 cohort 333 or 89% were placed in BRI 109 their entering
semester.
Due to the large numbers of students placing into basic skills math, even the large number of
sections offered are not sufficient to serve incoming and repeating students. In addition to many
students beginning their basic skills coursework their second semester, many course sections are
forced to be oversubscribed due to large demand. Tables one and two illustrate the total
enrollment for Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 across all sections of MATH 106.

  Table 1 Basic Skills Course Enrollment by Skill Area and Average Section Size Fall 2007

   Skill Area        Number of Total           Number                 of Average      section
                     sections  enrollment      sections                  size
                               across sections exceeding
                                               capacity
   MATH 106          28        703             26                         25 (range 14-29)
   ENG 108           6         111             3                          18.5 (range 14-22)
   BRI 109           23        424             13                         18.4 (range 6 – 23)




                                                                                                35 
          Table 2 Basic Skills Course Enrollment by Skill Area and Average Section Size Spr. 2008

             Skill Area      Number of Total           Number                  of Average           section
                             sections  enrollment      sections                   size
                                       across sections exceeding
                                                       capacity
             MATH 106        22        734             22                            33 (range 26 – 74)
             ENG 108         3         34              0                             11 (range 5 – 17)
             BRI 109         5         47              0                             9.4 (range 4 – 16)

         A comparison of new freshmen enrollment rates and total enrollment for the Fall 2007 suggests a
         significant portion of course sections consist of transfer students, and carryover of students from
         one academic year to another through course repeaters and students unable to register for
         required courses during their entering academic semester or year. For MATH, 295 students
         (42%) were not full time first semester freshmen. For ENG, 43 students (39%) were not full time
         first semester freshmen. For BRI, 91 students (22%) were not full time first semester freshmen.
         This suggests an additional reason, beyond high repeat rates in some areas, for the numbers of
         students beyond their freshman year still completing basic skills coursework.

         Success Rates for Basic Skills Coursework by Skill Area
         The table below describes the success rates for each Basic Skills area for the Fall 2007 and
         Spring 2008 semesters. The range of success rates and average rates for each department are
         presented; with Reading having the most consistent and strongest success rates and Math with
         both the lowest pass rates and the greatest variability in pass rates. Statistical analysis using
         inferential tests (one way ANOVA) indicated that class section had a significant impact on
         success rate for MATH 106 courses; this suggests there is variability in math performance across
         sections and may be due to variation in student demographics across sections, pedagogy or other
         factors.

                        Table 1 Success Rates Across Basic Skills Fall 08 and Spring 09

                                                    Avg                                                             Avg
Course         F 07    P     N      WD Range             Course        S 08      P      N       WD Range
                                                    Rate                                                            Rate
BRI 109        468      34    30     4      81-     91% BRI 109          48      41         5   2        50-         86%
                         7                 100%                                                         100%
ENG 108        111      89    19     3      63-      80% ENG             34      19      13     2        40-         52%
                                           100%          108                                             65%
MATH106        691      38   290    13      17-      56% MATH          733       367     35     13      8-78%        50%
                         8                  96%          106                              3

         The English program experienced an unusual shift in success rate from the Fall to Spring term
         and an unusual level of variability in performance in the Fall semester. The reduction in success
         rate in the Spring semester may be due to a group of high need students or an statistical result
         only due to the limited number of sections in the Spring semester. The Reading program was the
         most consistent, with a strong success rate for both semesters and limited variability between
         sections across both semesters, suggesting uniformity in pedagogy between sections and faculty


                                                                                                              36 
experienced in addressing individual students’ skill deficits, a key component to successful
developmental reading programs.

   B. Evaluate repeat student cohort and assess effectiveness of piloted repeat student
      only sections

Following the development of a tracking database for Spring 2008 basic skills students, more
extensive data for the repeat student cohort was obtained. Both the Mathematics and Reading
Departments piloted repeat student sections during Spring 2008, thus more detailed information
regarding this cohort will allow for more data-driven program development in the future. In
addition, there is significant variability across departments in the number of repeat students and
the number of times students are repeating a course to achieve success.

A total of 734 students were enrolled in MATH 106 across 22 sections for the spring 2008
semester, there was one 74 student section designated as repeat student only. Although this
section was large, it did not serve all students repeating MATH 106 during the Spring 2008
semester; data suggests that almost 33 percent of MATH 106 students have repeated the
course at least once. Table 1 presents the distribution of students within all MATH 106 course
sections by how many times they have repeated the course. Due to the large number of students,
repeat status was based on the number of placement scores within the Banner system, thus these
figures are approximate.

Given the extensive number of students repeating mathematics, testing the effectiveness of an
alternate pedagogy for repeat students is critical. The original Mathematics Department pilot
model for a repeat cohort class section was to be three small sections taught by experienced
faculty. Due to limitations in faculty availability this plan was changed to a single section of 74
repeat students taught by an experienced professor with a strong prior success rate. In addition,
the students had access to a teaching assistant and small group work to address individual
problems and questions. This class had a pass rate of 68%; when tested against the mean pass
rate of 50%, this class did significantly better than the average across all sections; and was one of
the highest pass rates for the department, with the highest rate being 78% in one section. This
suggests an alternate model for working with repeat students can yield improved results,
although further curriculum development and assessment is recommended to identify key
components leading to success for this population.

                   Table 1 Distribution of students        in MATH 106 by
                   repeat status
                   Number of times taking the
                                                           N        Percentage
                   course
                   First time taking the course             495         67.4
                   Repeated the course at least once        159         21.6
                   Repeated the course at least twice        53          7.2
                   Repeated the course at least three
                                                               12        1.7
                   times
                   Repeated the course at least four
                                                               15        2.1
                   times
                   Total Students                           734        100.0

                                                                                                  37 
A total of 34 students across three sections were enrolled for ENG 108 during the Spring 2008
semester. There were no repeat-student specific sections, although there was a cohort of repeat
students taking the course. The unusually high percentage of repeat students, 59 percent,
represented across sections is probably more typical of the Spring semester and may indicate a
cohort of older students finishing basic skills coursework much later than intended. In addition,
students are achieving success in basic writing through fewer repetitions of the ENG 108 course;
this suggests wide variability in student skill level may contribute to course failure. However,
exploration of alternate causes behind the high repeat rate and options for individualizing
instruction to manage variable skill level should take place. Table 2 shows the distribution of
students within ENG 108 during the Spring 2008 semester by number of times taking the course.

                    Table 2 Distribution of students in ENG 108 by
                    repeat status
                    Number of times taking the
                                                      N    Percentage
                    course
                    First time taking the course        14   41.1
                    Repeated the course at least once   15   44.2
                    Repeated the course at least
                                                         5   14.7
                    twice

There were a total of 47 students enrolled in BRI 109 across 5 sections. Two sections were
designated for repeat students only and had a total enrollment of 25 students; however several
students within these sections were not repeating the course. Significant curriculum and faculty
development has taken place this year with the faculty teaching BRI 109. Emphasis has been
placed on a unified, skills-based curriculum, utilization of authentic texts and high interest
materials, and early diagnostic assessment to identify student strengths and weaknesses.
Although there is a cohort of students repeating BRI 109, only 1 student in the Spring 2008
semester had repeated the course more than once (Table 3). This suggests that curriculum
development and pedagogy directed at weaker or repeat students has successfully moved
students through the reading curriculum faster than in prior years. Both repeat cohort sections
had strong success rates (100% for section one and 88% for section eight); as both sections were
taught by experienced faculty with a unified text, the difference between the two sections’
success level may be due to class size. The 100% pass section consisted of 8 students, while the
other section had twice that number. Although extremely small class sizes are not practical on a
large scale, identifying which high risk students may benefit from a small class size or tutorial
may reduce repeat rates even further.

                    Table 3 Distribution of students in BRI 109 by repeat
                    status
                    Number of times taking the
                                                      N      Percentage
                    course
                    First time taking the course        26      55.3
                    Repeated the course at least once   20      42.6
                    Repeated the course at least
                                                         1       2.1
                    twice


                                                                                              38 
Future Goals in this Area
   A. Pilot program and policy through early alert to provide intervention services for
      struggling students
   B. Pilot referral mechanisms through Associate Director of Basic Skills to guide students to
      the Academic Support Center
   C. Explore feasibility of mandatory additional services for repeat students, or utilization of
      supplemental instruction or optional supports for repeat students
   D. Pilot research study on diagnostic instruments within BRI course sections

Assessment and Goals for Office of Basic Skills 2007 -2008

I Process Goals for 2008-2009 Academic Year

   1. Increase intrusive intervention with at risk students through use of Early Alert system,
      proactive communication of services and workshops and contact with cohort managers.
   2. Increase mentoring of students in academic jeopardy through Early Alert system, email,
      face-to-face meetings and referrals to appropriate resources on campus.
   3. Reduce number of students repeating basic skills coursework through early intervention
      and collaboration with Basic Skills Coordinators and faculty.
   4. Reduce number of students with outstanding Basic Skills coursework through more
      effective registration and tracking of students.
   5. Expand services available for at risk reading students (students in BRI 109).
   6. Increase collaboration between Basic Skills Coordinators, faculty and Director to
      promote student success.
   7. Increase level and clarity of communication with transfer students to streamline
      placement process and reduce upper level students with outstanding Basic Skills
      coursework.
   8. Increase longitudinal tracking of students and use of entry data to facilitate program
      development, collaboration with cohort managers and student success.

II Timeline for Area Goals

   Summer 2008

   1. Identify Alchemy students for pilot early intervention math tutoring in the Fall of 2008
   2. Pilot proactive communication methods with students needing to repeat basic skills
      coursework for the Fall 2008 semester
   3. Develop initial plan for assessing effectiveness of BRI 109 diagnostic reading instrument
   4. Assess needs to streamline transfer student process
   5. Complete database of incoming students for Fall 2008 for longitudinal tracking
   6. Gather data on placement testing to compare results of computer adapted testing and
      paper and pencil tests. If sample is large enough, evaluate for significant differences and
      potential long term impact

   Fall 2008
   1. Conduct early intervention math tutoring with identified Alchemy students; register those
      students for MATH 106 in the Spring 09 semester

                                                                                              39 
   2. Develop communication plan for transfer students, pilot materials with small scale
      transfers for the Spring 09 semester
   3. Pilot methods of using early alert system to identify at risk students in Basic Skills
      courses; identify areas for development and training
   4. Develop and pilot referral mechanisms to guide students to the Academic Support Center
   5. Begin discussions regarding options for high risk and repeat student services including:
      lab sections, supplemental instruction or mandatory tutoring.
   6. Gather data from BRI 109 courses’ diagnostic reading assessments and outcomes in BRI
      109

   Spring 2009
   1. Track Alchemy students who received early math tutoring in MATH 106
   2. Evaluate BRI 109 diagnostic data, plan for discussions relating to curriculum, scheduling
      and pedagogy
   3. Implement more proactive communication methods with transfer students; maintain data
      for evaluation and development
   4. Plan for and implement continued collaboration on pre-packaging of cohort students with
      the Office of the Registrar
   5. Use data and experience of early alert system from the fall semester to adapt and make
      improvements, continue using the system and pilot gathering data from faculty to
      increase/improve use
   6. Use data and experience from Fall semester referrals to Academic Support Center to
      improve or alter the process and continue making referrals and gathering relevant data
   7. Continue discussions on alternate formats, services for high risk and repeat students; goal
      to develop programming for the 09-10 academic year

III Long Term Goals and Timeline

Reorganization of the Office of Testing

Supervision over the reorganization of the Office of Testing will take place primarily during the
remainder of the 2008 academic year. Tasks and areas to address during this period include
development of a placement testing system that matches the admissions and deposits cycle. The
ultimate goal of this testing process is the majority of testing will be complete and evaluated by
the end of May. Also, given the limited computer lab space on campus, oversight of an office
redesign for this area will be conducted as well. Ideally, the Office of Testing will be able to
accommodate more testing within its space and be much less reliant on outside computer lab
space. Finally, increasing the number of revenue generating exams and the number of WPU
students taking these exams is a goal of the Office of Testing. Assisting with the development of
a marketing plan, updating the Office of Testing and Basic Skills web pages and print materials
will also take place during the next academic year.

It is anticipated that the majority of planning, development and review activities will take place
during the Summer and Fall 2008 semesters, with implementation of the testing schedule and
office structure to be completed for the 2009 Admissions season. Updating of web and print
materials is reliant on available funding and personnel, ideally these changes will also be
complete by the 2009 academic year.

                                                                                               40 
Policy Development and Review

An initial review of existing policy and procedure documents was conducted during the Spring
2008 semester; following this initial review a goal to develop a comprehensive and current
policy document and a procedures manual for the Office of Basic Skills was established. As
there are several areas of policy that need development and discussion an initial review by
appropriate offices and administration should take place throughout the 2008-2009 academic
year. Revisions and additions to the policy document will take place as items are addressed by
appropriate individuals; with an initial review and revision completed by the end of the academic
year. A comprehensive procedures manual will be addressed following the completion of a
policy document.

Basic Skills Council Agenda Items

Several policy and practice issues may be appropriate for the Basic Skills Council to address
during the 2008-2009 Academic year. These include: reviewing implications of limiting
students’ access to their placement scores in light of FERPA; how to encourage collaboration
between faculty and the Early Alert and Academic support Center; and a discussion of current
math 106 pedagogy.

Review of Current Placement Testing Instruments and Norms

Following a limited review of placement instruments used across state Universities in New
Jersey and more in depth review of instruments used, cut-offs and norming samples needs to be
conducted. The first component to be addressed in the 2008-2009 academic year would be a
more in-depth review of instruments and policies surrounding basic skills placement and testing
practice in New Jersey institutions. The primary question to be addressed is how consistent are
WPU’s cut-off scores and policies with other equivalent institutions across the state. Further
research in this area will be addressed based on the results of this initial survey.




                                                                                              41 
Academic Support and Tutoring
Academic Support Center
Rogernelle Griffin, Director
Annual Report 2008-2009

Division:             Academic Development

Unit:                 Academic Support Center

Strategic Direction: University Mission

Institutional Goal S6:

To provide effective academic support to help students with diverse needs achieve
academic success.

Objective 1: Improve student retention and graduation rates.

Outcomes:
Students enrolled through the Sponsored Students Program received academic advisement,
academic support, and personal or career counseling through the Academic Support Center. Each
student averaged 3 advisor visits, and attended at least 3 academic workshops in the fall
semester.

Fall 2008 Cohort

First time freshman accepted, contracted:           169
Accepted, never enrolled                              20
Not enrolled spring 2009                             (12)
Not enrolled fall 2009                               (25)

Total freshman sponsored:                           149
2008 Cohort registered for fall:                    124
Cohort retention rate                               83%

Academic Profile

The 2008 cohort took advantage of advisement and other academic support services available to
them, the direct result of early identification and intervention from the Academic Support Center
staff. Approximately 80% of the ASC Director’s time is utilized filtering parent calls and
requests, as well as monitoring the academic and developmental progress of each student in the
program. The Director maintained contact with 100% of the cohort through email and personal
contact to ensure each student received academic advisement and counseling.




                                                                                              42 
Fall Semester GPAs for 2008 Cohort Sponsored Students:

   GRADES                       # 0F STUDENTS                 PERCENTAGE
   4.0                          1                             1%
   3.5-3.9                      21                            14%
   3.0-3.49                     51                            34%
   2.5-2.99                     34                            23%
   2.0-2.49                     17                            11%
   1.1-1.99                     12                            9%
   0.0-1.0                      8                             5%
   Withdrawals                  5                             3%
   Total                        149                           100%

Spring Semester GPAs for 2008 Cohort Sponsored Students

   GRADES                       # 0F STUDENTS                 PERCENTAGE
   4.0                          1                             7%
   3.5-3.9                      12                            8%
   3.0-3.49                     38                            26%
   2.5-2.99                     40                            27%
   2.0-2.49                     32                            21%
   1.1-1.99                     18                            12%
   0.0-1.0                      4                             3%
   Withdrawals                  4                             3%
   Total                        149                           100%

Sponsored Student Enrollment

Currently, there are 429 students coded as Sponsored Students enrolled since fall 2005 and
registered for fall 2009. Of that number, 125 are still undeclared, and 39 students had a
cumulative grade point average under 2.0. Graduation rate average for sponsored students is 5
years.

Class Status         # of Students         # of Declared Students per Class
Freshman                35                              16
Sophomores             169                              66
Juniors                 92                              89
Seniors                123                             123
Graduate Students       10                              10
Total                  429                             304




                                                                                          43 
Objective 2: Increase in student participation in the Academic Support Center.

Outcomes:
The expansion of academic services and recruitment of new tutors has resulted in a significant
increase in ASC usage by the university community. Twenty-three tutors (17 Master tutors, 6
peer tutors) provided over 5100 contact hours of individual and group tutoring in content areas
for the academic year.
During the 2008-09 academic year 3,712 students received support through the Academic
Support Center, logging 5,139 visits. In addition to tutoring, 1,427 students visited the center for
other related activity, including homework completion, computer usage, and advisement.
Twenty-three tutors (17 Master tutors, 6 peer tutors) provided individual and group tutoring in
content areas for the academic year.

Academic Support Center services continue to be marketed throughout the campus, including the
distribution of tutoring and workshop schedules flyers to academic and administrative
departments, and placed on the college website, dorms and the Student Center Commons.

          ASC Statistics
          Stats for Term 2008 (Fall):
          Total number of student visits:                                           2791
          Total number of student visits who came to ASC for a course-related
                                                                              1932
          reason:
          Total number of student visits who came to ASC for a non course-
                                                                           859
          related reason:
          Total number of courses listed below: 73
                                                                       Actual student
          Class              Total number of visits per class
                                                                       count
          AACS-150           8                                         4
          AACS-155           9                                         2
          ACCT-211           1                                         1
          ANTH-130           3                                         3
          ARAB-110           9                                         3
          ARTH-101           4                                         1
          ARTS-105           2                                         1
          ARTS-110           2                                         2
          BIO-320            1                                         1
          BRI-109            96                                        31
          CHEM-315           1                                         1
          CIEE-329           1                                         1
          CMHL-120           5                                         1


                                                                                                 44 
CMHL-304   1                                  1
COMM-101   12                                 3
COMM-110   13                                 8
COMM-119   3                                  2
                                              Actual student
Class      Total number of visits per class
                                              count
ESP-616    1                                  1
ENG-108    16                                 10
ENG-110    126                                28
ENG-499    6                                  1
ESL-311    1                                  1
ESL-321    1                                  1
FIN-320    1                                  1
FR-110     10                                 5
FR-111     13                                 9
FR-210     16                                 2
GEO-150    9                                  3
HIST-101   8                                  5
HIST-102   4                                  3
IT-110     45                                 6
IT-111     53                                 21
JPAN-110   5                                  2
KORE-110   1                                  1
LAT-110    10                                 1
MATH-106   368                                106
MATH-110   63                                 29
MATH-111   4                                  3
MATH-115   65                                 13
MATH-116   40                                 10
MATH-130   102                                30
MATH-135   44                                 7
MATH-140   92                                 31
MATH-145   161                                40
MATH-160   43                                 10
MATH-161   23                                 6
MATH-230   7                                  3

                                                               45 
MGT-305            1                                        1
MGT-431            2                                        1
MUS-260            1                                        1
MUS-399            2                                        1
NUR-212            4                                        4
NUR-214            31                                       28
PHIL-110           39                                       20
PHYS-110           1                                        1
POL-110            6                                        2
POL-120            13                                       3
PSY-110            12                                       4
PSY-202            13                                       8
                                                            Actual student
Class              Total number of visits per class
                                                            count
SOC-101            26                                       15
SOC-102            2                                        1
SOC-214            5                                        2
SOC-215            1                                        1
SOC-485            7                                        4
SPAN-110           142                                      45
SPAN-111           20                                       8
SPAN-211           2                                        1
SPAN-229           1                                        1
WPU-101            51                                       24
WS-110             5                                        2
WS-150             34                                       11

Stats for Term 2009 (Spring):
Total number of student visits:                             2348
Total number of student visits who came to ASC for a
                                                     1780
course-related reason:
Total number of student visits who came to ASC for a non
                                                         568
course-related reason:
Total number of courses listed below: 75
Class       Total number of visits per class          Actual student count
AACS-150     4                                        3


                                                                             46 
AACS-155   1                                  1
AACS-338   2                                  1
ACCT-430   3                                  1
ANTH-130   4                                  2
ARAB-111   1                                  1
ARTH-101   3                                  3
BIO-112    8                                  1
BIO-170    1                                  1
BIO-308    1                                  1
BRI-109    1                                  1
CHEM-060   1                                  1
COMM-101 1                                    1
COMM-110 7                                    5
COMM-119 4                                    2
COMM-285 3                                    1
CS-230     1                                  1
ECON-201   2                                  1
ECON-210   2                                  2
ENG-110    17                                 4
ENG-150    34                                 8
Class      Total number of visits per class   Actual student count
FR-111     17                                 7
FR-211     5                                  2
GEO-150    2                                  1
GER-110    1                                  1
HIST-101   6                                  5
HIST-102   20                                 6
IT-110     2                                  2
IT-111     48                                 22
JPAN-110   12                                 3
JPAN-111   7                                  2
JPAN-222   8                                  1
KORE-111   1                                  1
MATH-106   340                                85
MATH-110   337                                82


                                                                     47 
MATH-111   15                                 8
MATH-115   101                                21
MATH-116   63                                 14
MATH-130   51                                 23
MATH-135   22                                 7
MATH-140   90                                 24
MATH-145   187                                45
MATH-160   82                                 23
MATH-161   31                                 8
MATH-323   3                                  1
MATH-324   1                                  1
MKT-210    1                                  1
MUS-125    4                                  1
MUS-403    1                                  1
NUR-213    1                                  1
NUR-215    5                                  4
PBHL-120   9                                  2
PHIL-110   74                                 23
PHIL-210   1                                  1
POL-110    2                                  2
POL-625    1                                  1
PSY-110    14                                 9
PSY-202    4                                  3
PSY-203    1                                  1
PSY-325    1                                  1
PSY-342    1                                  1
PSY-365    2                                  1
SOC-101    13                                 11
Class      Total number of visits per class   Actual student count
SOC-366    1                                  1
SOC-368    4                                  1
SOC-374    1                                  1
SPAN-106   2                                  2
SPAN-110   30                                 12
SPAN-111   36                                 14


                                                                     48 
          SPAN-211       3                                    2
          SPAN-222       3                                    1
          WS-110           5                                   3
Group Study
In addition to individual tutoring, group study sessions were scheduled for the following courses
math and language courses during midterm and final exam period:
Math 106               Span 110               Math 110             Span 111
Math 111               Ital 110                       Math 115             Ital 111
Math 116               French 110             Math 130             French 111
Math 140               Arab 110               Math 145             Arab 111
Math 160               Jap 110                        Math 161             Jap 111

Workshops
The Learning Services Coordinator and Graduate Assistants conducted 26 workshops open to
all students on the following topics:

   •   Effective Study Skills
   •   Learning Styles
   •   Self Management
   •   Choosing A Major

Objective 3: Increased collaboration

Outcomes:
The Academic Support Center staff worked with the Office of First Year Experience, Students of
Life, and Athletics Department to provide support services university- wide. Students in each
program were mandated to attend workshops on On Course strategies for success, study skills
and personal development skills.

The ASC provided workshop and tutoring schedules, study skills and success strategies to
students in First Year Seminar. Several sections of the FYS course either toured the ASC or were
visited by a staff member. In addition, both the Associate Director and Learning Services
Coordinator taught FYS courses.

The ASC continues to work with the Offices of Basic Skills and Testing to provide space and
assistance to students with placement exam preparation.
The Academic Support Center staff made presentations on support services offered at each Open
House, Freshman Orientation, New Faculty Orientation and First Year Seminar Instructor and
Peer Leader trainings.

Objective 4: Academic Support Center Tutors are trained.

Outcomes:
All new tutors attended a 3 hour workshop in Academic Support Center covering the following
topics:


                                                                                              49 
   •   learning style assessment
   •   sensitivity and approach coaching
   •   tutoring students with learning disabilities

The workshops were conducted by the Director and the Learning Services Coordinator. In
addition, every tutor attended two unit meetings and an individual meeting to review job
performance and overall department expectations.
Training of tutors, mentors and ASC staff remains ongoing. Graduate Assistants were trained to
conduct workshops, advise students, and tutor as needed. Tutors were trained to use the Banner
ASC sign-in.

ASC staff received ongoing training and feedback in data collection, scheduling and service
implementation. An evaluation form was completed by every student on the service provided
after every tutorial session to ensure effectiveness of ASC resources.
Recruitment and training of new tutors remains ongoing.

Objective 5: Tracking data on student participation and performance will be maintained.

Outcomes:
The ASC continues to work with the office of Information Technology to streamline data
tracking systems through the Banner student information system. Reports on number and type of
visits, contact hours and tutoring per subject are easily generated. The next stage of this project is
the development of electronic Academic Progress Reports for all cohort managers.

Objective 6: Students are provided with a variety of computer aided instruction modules
to reinforce and develop skills.

Outcomes:
Plans to implement online tutoring remain ongoing. The ASC Director and Learning Services
coordinator are working with IT to develop an online tutoring system through Blackboard. As a
result of the increased student participation in ASC, this project was not implemented this year.

Objective 7: Students will have improved academic performance, including increased
problem solving and critical thinking skills.

The Academic Support Center implements several strategies to improve problem solving and
critical thinking skills in WPU students via:
     • On Course strategies for Sponsored and Part-time student cohorts
     • Academic Workshops
     • Intrusive Advisement
     • Tutoring
     • Supplemental Instruction
     • Early Alert




                                                                                                   50 
Outcomes:
  I.     Supplemental Instruction Program

The Supplemental Instruction Program was conceived in fall 2005. SI Leaders are trained on
study skills, collaborative instruction and problem solving techniques. With increased
recognition and faculty support, the program has subsequently improved in quality and student
performance outcomes.

SI Leaders provided three hours per week of scheduled study sessions for each course open to all
sections of Math 106, Math 130 and one section of Philosophy 110. Four SI Leaders ran Math
106 sessions, including in the residence halls and library specifically for Part-time students.

                                Final Grades for SI Attendees

                                                          GRADE
 Course        # Students       P        N          A       B          C         D         F
 Math 106          22          15        7
 Math 130          11                              7          1        0         0         2
 Phil 110          11                              1          6        1         3         0
 Psych 110         14                              4          4        1         4         1

There is a direct correlation between attendance to SI sessions and final grade outcomes. The
ASC will continue to market the SI program and invite more faculty to become engaged in this
service.

SI Leader reports:

Krista Averill:
“This semester I did SI for a large section of MATH 106 taught by Joanne Schifano. Originally,
based on the student surveys, I scheduled SI three times a week on two evenings and on Friday
after class. Early in the semester I dropped the Thursday evening session and extended the
length of the other two sessions. Throughout the semester I had three students who attended on a
fairly regular basis, and several students who attended once or twice, usually right before an
exam. Of the three students who came often, two were freshman taking the course for the first
time and one was a sophomore repeating the course. From what they shared with me, the two
freshmen were passing the course throughout the semester. The other student was determined to
pass the course this semester after having a lot of difficulty with it the year before. Of all the
students, he attended the most often, and fortunately in the end he passed the course. It was most
rewarding to work with those students that come to SI sessions often, because I could see the
progress they were making and because they were dedicated to their work. Time was spent
during SI sessions not only going over the material learned but also going over the most effective
way to take a math multiple choice exam like those issued by the department. Students who knew
how to quickly eliminate incorrect answers had a better chance of passing.

Because overall attendance at SI was low, sessions were announced often and messages were
posted on BlackBoard. Joanne Schifano was very open to my doing SI for her class and helped
"advertise" it throughout the semester. She has approached me about doing SI for her class next

                                                                                               51 
semester, and I look forward to working with her again. I believe that next semester doing SI will
be in a sense easier because now I am familiar with both the syllabus and with her individual
teaching style.

Although I was able to join the class fairly early into the semester, I believe it would have been
better to join the class on the very first day. I think it would have been most effective to present
SI to the students directly after going over the syllabus and course expectations, and I think it
would have increased the sense that I was a true member of the classroom, rather than someone
who intrudes on a pre-established classroom routine. Other than that, I think that the MATH 106
SI sessions went as well as they could have given the students' motivation and attitudes towards
the course.”

Alyssa Learn:
“This semester I have been a supplemental instruction leader for elementary statistics, Math
130. I worked with Dr. Dupree every Monday and Wednesday for his 3:30-4:45 class. From the
very beginning of the semester, Dr. Dupree as well as his students was very receptive to my help.
As the semester went on, more and more students would attend my sessions on a regular basis. I
had three main students that came to almost every one of my sessions. They enjoyed the extra
help and attention they were getting on what they considered tough course. After talking with Dr.
Dupree, I know that those three students all earned an A for the course.

Elementary statistics is all about equations and know how and when to use them. So, with that in
mind, I tried to make the equations process as easy as possible. I found that after a couple of
weeks, making a review sheet of what the class went over and how to solve certain problems is a
great way to help the students understand better.

Dr. Dupree would give his class a quiz every class on the material that he taught the class
before. I found that the best way to help my students was to prepare them as much as I could for
all the quizzes. Once they knew what would be on the quizzes and were comfortable solving
problems with that material, we would go on to any other questions or problems they might have
had from the previous classes. Dr. Dupree’s exams were straight from the format of his quizzes,
so for the session I would have before each exam, I would make up a packet of blank quizzes of
the material that would be covered on the test, and the students and I would go through each
quiz and I would explain every step on how to solve them.

I could tell that the student that came to the sessions were grasping the material easier and truly
understanding how to solve the statistical problems. They really showed great improvement over
the course of the semester and I am proud to say that all the students that I helped throughout
the semester passed the course with a B or higher.

Supplemental Instruction has been a great experience for me and I cannot wait to do it again
next semester. One of the best feelings in the world is seeing other people that you have helped
improve. I am honored to be a part of this fantastic program and I know that many students at
William Paterson are very grateful to the Academic Support Center for putting it together.”

Jason Primavera:



                                                                                                 52 
 “This was my second and final semester as a Supplemental Instructor for Phil 110 with
Professor Collins. Although the professor conducted the class exactly the same as he did last
semester, I found that my skills as a tutor improved significantly now that I have been teaching
the same material for a second time. I also found that I had at least double the number of
students as I had last semester, although I am not entirely sure why that is.

Ultimately, my work as an SI leader has proven to be an incredibly valuable experience in my
endeavor to pursue academia and education in general. The semester ran smoothly, not once
did I encounter any kind of pressing issue or obstacle.

I truly enjoyed working as both an SI leader and as a tutor, thanks so much for the opportunity to
perform such a satisfying and rewarding job.”

The recruitment of SI Leaders and selection of appropriate courses for this program remains
ongoing, and is based on student need.
Early Alert Program
EA Coordinator Loriann Calogero

I. Overview
The Early Alert Program was developed to enable us to reach out to students who are struggling
academically, financially, and/or possibly emotionally. A student is placed on Early Alert by
his/her professor. The placement has been done in the past via the web, through the e-mail
system, or by regular mail using hard copy forms. During the Fall 2008/ Spring 2009 semesters,
the forms were submitted through a custom application using Banner data. The forms are then
processed by the Early Alert Coordinator.

II. Process
        Fall 2008
During the Fall 2008 semester, the new Web-based program was operational. Under this new
system, the special program departments could access their own reports which would make the
process of notifying their students of their Early Alert status an easier task. Without official
notification, 122 faculty members used the Early Alert Program in Fall 2008. The faculty
member was either one of the 37 members who piloted the program in the Spring 2008 semester
or one who had heard from word of mouth. Each student, a total of 1064, was notified through
the email system of their status as Early Alert. The new system enables the Early Alert
Coordinator, Faculty, Advisors and Cohort managers to interact through the update option in the
system. This tool is an essential component to quicker feedback time as well as frequent
interaction among all members.
        Spring 2009
During the Spring 2009 semester, there were a total of 165 faculty members who used the
program. These faculty members were notified of the program during the Spring 2009, through a
campus memo sent through the email system. Periodically throughout the beginning of the
semester, notification of the program was given through the University’s Daily News and
Announcement Page. The total number of Early Alerts for the Spring 2009 semester totaled
1339. Each one of the students was notified immediately of their status within 24 hours of their
placement.



                                                                                               53 
III. Current Status
As a result of the above mentioned the current Early Alert application was a success. Faculty
enjoyed the ease of the new program. The main link to the program was under faculty quick
links which made it easy for faculty to access the program.

During the Spring 2009 semester, there were 1183 students who were placed on Early Alert,
totaling 1339 Early Alert forms. After working diligently throughout both the Fall 2008
semester and the Spring 2009 semester with Noreen Chua from Information Systems, we were
able to develop a robust system. We continually work together to enhance the current views for
cohort managers as well as implementing new pages which will make reporting more accurate.
With any new program there is always the need to review what is in place and to brainstorm on
what may make the program perform better and smoother. Throughout the Spring 2009 semester,
we implemented the automated initial email which made it much easier to reach the students who
were placed on Early Alert within a 24 hour timeframe. In addition to using this tool as an initial
email, we again used it to send out a second email, piloted to those students on early Alert in a
Math 106 course. We used this tool to generate a second email to students half way through
the semester reminding them to contact us regarding their course status.

Fall 2008 Statistics
During the Fall 2008 semester there were 1064 Early Alert forms processed. There were 50
students who withdrew from the class, while there were 32 who withdrew from the University.
(With the new Early Alert Program, if a student drops before the faculty member decides to
place them on Early Alert, they will not appear on the list.) There were 122 faculty members,
representing 95 distinct courses, who used the program during the semester. Several courses
were taught by different referring faculty members totaling 196 different courses within the
semester.

The following is a breakdown of students in class rank:

                                  Rank            Total count
                                  Freshman            442
                                  Sophomore           302
                                  Junior              175
                                  Senior              111
                                  Non-Degree             1
                                  Graduate               1
                                  Not Coded              2

Spring 2009 Statistics
During the Spring 2009 semester there were 1339 Early Alert forms processed. Out of the 1339
students, there were 1183 distinct students placed on Early Alert. There were 110 students who
withdrew from the class with only 10 of them withdrawing from the University. During the
Spring, there were 165 faculty members (attachment #1) who used the program, representing 132
distinct courses. The total number of courses within the semester has risen to 253. This was an
increase over the Fall semester in all categories.



                                                                                                54 
The following is a breakdown of students in class rank:

                                 Rank            Total count
                                 Freshman            481
                                 Sophomore           342
                                 Junior              296
                                 Senior              218
                                 Non-Degree             0
                                 Graduate               0
                                 Not Coded              0

Combined Total for the Year

                              Fall 2008         Spring 2009    Year Total     % Increase
  Number of Early Alerts           1064              1339           2403             25.8
  Number of Referring Faculty       122               165            287             34.4
  Number of Courses                 196               253            449             29.0
  Number of Distinct Courses         95               132            227             38.9

Follow up
    Email status for Spring 2009
Each student received an initial email stating the reason they were placed on Early Alert.
The Early Alert Coordinator made contact through the email system 2105 times. A total of 1339
were sent within 24 hours of receiving the Early Alert placement and another 267 was sent to the
Math 106 students which was a second attempt to contact letter. Both of these combined totaled
1606. A total of 499 emails were sent to students who replied to my initial attempt letter. Out
of all the emails which were sent there were 401 students who made contact with the Early Alert
Coordinator. The 401 student’s either came in person, called or contacted me through the email
system. All student contacts were recorded in the system using the update tool. This made it
possible for faculty, advisors and cohort managers to view student progress.
    Tutoring records for the Spring 2009
 The current program allows faculty, advisors and cohort managers to see attendance records
from the Academic Support Center and the Science Enrichment Center. Both of these centers
have attendance tracking programs which are linked into Banner where the information can be
accessed in the current Early Alert system. The total number of “Attended Tutoring” status of
Early Alert students was 2133. There were 532 contacts at the Academic Support Center and
1601 at the Science Enrichment Center.
    Cohort Updates for the Spring 2009
One of the new tools added to the Early Alert program during the Spring 2009 semester was the
tracking tool for updates. There were 50 faculty members who went back into the system to
update their Early Alert Forms throughout the semester. The 50 members updated 279 times.
There were 2 cohort managers who used the system and they updated 78 times (Donna Potacco
in the Science Enrichment Center and Linda Refsland in the Basic Skills Office). There were 4
advisors who used the program and the total number of updates was 40 (Rosemary Vargas Osso
is listed as an advisor in the system not a cohort manager, 13 updates, and Linda Refsland who


                                                                                             55 
was originally listed as an advisor and was switched over as a cohort manager, 22 updates). The
remaining 5 were done by an advisor who advisee was on Early Alert.

  Breakdown by Cohort
The following chart is a breakdown of students who are in a special program. The chart shows,
the amount of Early Alert forms for the cohort, the distinct number of students in the cohort, and
the number of updates done by the cohort manager.

                            Number          of Distinct      #     of Update           by
Cohort                      Forms              students               Cohort

Alchemy                     72                  50                     0
Athlete                     68                  63                     0
Basic Skills                272                 270                    99
EOF                         54                  52                     0
First Year Experience       289                 235                    0
Freshman Part Time          43                  36                     13
Nursing                     16                  15                     1
SEC                         394                 378                    18
Sponsored Student           0                   0                      0

The Sponsored Student Cohort shows all zeros because they are not coded properly in our
system to be able to be pulled. The Nursing Students have an update because I did the update for
Renee Pevour to demonstrate how easy the program is.

 IV. Development
The program is constantly undergoing enhancements. Throughout the Fall 2008 and Spring
2009 semesters, Noreen Chua and I either spoke on a day to day basis or through email. These
sessions were used to brainstorm on how to make the program easier and more complete.
During the Fall 2008 semester, we were able to link our program with the Academic Support
Center’s program and Science Enrichment’s program so the faculty who used the Early Alert
program were able to view their student’s attendance at these tutoring facilities. The Early Alert
program is also linked into the Advisor notes. If an advisee is placed on Early Alert it will
appear on the advisors page in Employee Applications. They are able to access the information,
as well as, update the student’s status if they feel the need. The overall development of the
system was worked on throughout the semester.

One of the goals for the Spring 2009 semester was to work on a reporting page. Throughout the
semester a reporting page was established and more accurate records are available to view on a
regular basis. This tool is constantly updated to add new items so all data can be accessed.

A new development for the Spring 2009 semester was the automated generic email which was
sent to all students as soon as they were placed on Early Alert. This development worked so well
we piloted two cohorts during the semester to generate their own initial email. Linda Refsland,
the Basic Skills director and Donna Potacco, the Science Enrichment Center’s director,
developed their own initial email which was sent to their cohort of students. With some

                                                                                               56 
overlapping, students were getting more than just one initial email. Half way through the
semester we piloted a second email which went only to those who were in Math 106 course.
These students received a reminder of their original placement and a request to reply to the email
stating what they felt their status was in the class is they have not responded. There were 265
Math 106 students on Early Alert. Out of the 265 students receiving a second automated email,
76 replied.

During the Spring semester, Nursing students in the Nursing Program became a cohort and will
be using the update tool during the Fall 2009 semester.

During the last few weeks a reporting screen was developed so Science Enrichment Center can
view the statistics of their students on Early Alert. This was requested of Noreen Chua by Donna
Potacco in the SEC.

V. Recommendations
 With continued work with Information Systems this program can really be successful.
It should be suggested that other departments who offer some sort of service develop an
attendance tracking program so all information can be gathered under one system.

A high priority for the Fall 2009 semester is to have all cohort mangers use the program and
update regularly their students on Early Alert. This training should take place before the first
week of the semester so the cohort managers know how to use the system. Without full
participation it will become unmanageable with each semester’s increasing numbers. With a
total of 583 students on Early Alert who fall into “no cohort” category, this should be the
responsibility of the Early Alert Coordinator. Another recommendation would be when the
initial email is sent, if the student is in a certain cohort, instead of the Early Alert Coordinator
receiving the email, the cohort manager would receive the reply. This has been worked out with
Information Systems and is ready to go, once it is approved. Another option would be to have all
cohort managers design their own initial email and regularly access the system to send out their
initial email to students who are placed on Early Alert.

All sponsored students should be manually keyed into the system before the beginning of the
semester, so they can be coded in the program if placed on Early Alert.

Goals 2009-2010:

   •   Increase in support for academic services for Students with Disabilities.
       There has been an influx of students with issues that require special expertise. The ASC
       will seek to secure external funding for disability support services. In addition, the ASC
       will work more closely with the Office of Disability Services to identify and provide
       academic support services for students who self-disclose their need for accommodations.

   •   Increase in support for peer tutor payroll.
       The ASC can no longer rely on the Federal Work Study budget to support the hiring of
       peer tutors because the money runs out before the semester ends.




                                                                                                 57 
   •    Implementation of a pre-college transition program for incoming Sponsored
        Students. Students enrolled in the Sponsored Students Program do not have a formal
        orientation and introduction to the program director until the second or third week of the
        semester. A one or two day bridge program, occurring before the start of the fall semester
        would ensure a smooth transition and give students a clear sense of program requirements
        and their responsibility in the academic experience.

ASC Projects for Summer/Fall 2009

Online Progress Reports for Sponsored Students utilizing Banner, summer 2009
Summer Orientation meeting for incoming Sponsored Students, August 2009
SI/Tutor Training, August 2009
Online Tutoring for Blackboard, fall 2009

2007-2008

Division:             Academic Development

Unit:                 Academic Support Center

Strategic Direction: University Mission

Institutional Goal S6:

To provide effective academic support to help students with diverse needs achieve
academic success.

Department Objectives:

Objective 1: Improved student retention and graduation rates.

Outcomes:

Students enrolled at the University through the Sponsored Students Program received academic
advisement, academic support, personal and/or career counseling through the Academic Support
Center. Each student averaged 2.5 advisor visits, and attended at least 3 academic workshops in
the Fall semester. Data on each student, including transcripts, mid-semester grade reports, and
contact information was maintained in files located in the Academic Support Center. The
retention rate for all enrolled Sponsored Students is 81%. Of 294 Sponsored Students, 73
performed below the minimum academic standard.

Assessment Methods:
   • Tracking of advisor contacts
   • Tracking of workshop attendance
   • Mid Semester Performance Reports
   • Workshop and Program Evaluations


                                                                                               58 
Assessment Outcomes: There is a direct correlation between sponsored student participation
and academic success. Sponsored students that adhered to the academic contract required of this
population and met with their advisor at least bi-monthly also attended a minimum of three
academic workshops and sought tutorial assistance for at least one course.

   •   Students that made consistent contact with their academic advisor were more likely to
       declare their major within three semesters.


Current Cohort Retention Data
 Year     of                                       Year        of
 Entry                  #                          Entry                        #
 2005        Grades     Students     Ratio         2006              Grades     Students   Ratio
             3.9-4.0    0            0                               3.9-4.0    1          0.66
             3.5-3.9    4            2.79                            3.5-3.9    10         6.62
             3.0-                                                    3.0-
             3.499      24           16.78                           3.499      29         19.20
             2.5-                                                    2.5-
             2.999      46           32.16                           2.999      42         27.81
             2.0-                                                    2.0-
             2.499      28           19.58                           2.499      37         24.50
             1.001-                                                  1.001-
             1.999      28           19.58                           1.999      24         15.89
             0.000-                                                  0.000-
             1.000      13           9.09                            1.000      8          5.29
 Totals                 143          100           Totals                       151        100

# Stud. < 2.0   41                                 # Stud. < 2.0     32
#
Undeclared      55                                 # Undeclared      102
# Declared      88                                 # Declared        49
#                                                  #
Withdrawals     18                                 Withdrawals       37


Fall 2007
As of July 2007, 152 students admitted to the University under the Sponsored Student Program
have submitted deposits.

Placement Test Results
No. of students    BRI 108          BRI 109        Math 106         ESL 210    ESL 211
166                23               76             144              2            2

Special Admits Academic Profile*
*Data retrieved from Office of Enrollment Management




                                                                                            59 
Since 2005, the academic profile of special admit students at William Paterson University has
declined. Minimum combined SAT scores for special admits has dropped fifty points each year.
As a result, the number of students placed in Basic Skills courses has increased. There is also a
greater need for additional academic support for this population of students in the first and
second year of enrollment (i.e., tutoring, supplemental instruction, intrusive advisement, early
alert).

FALL 2007

                  The MEANS Procedure

Variable Label               N       Mean Std Dev Min                   Max
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
AI             AI            321 191.00           11.94 153.00 225
MATH           MATH          461 435.31           41.25 230.00 550
VERBAL VERBAL 461 430.19                          42.60 300.00 600
CSAT          CSAT           461 865.50           53.21 600.00 1040
PCTILE PCTILE 329                     56.77      22.26          0       98.00
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
FALL 2006

                  The MEANS Procedure

Variable Label                  N        Mean Std Dev Min                 Max
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 AI            AI               144 187.77           13.65 151.00          215
MATH           MATH             187 442.19           45.30 310.00          600
VERBAL VERBAL                  187 435.61           45.86 270.00          640
CSAT          CSAT             187 877.80           65.22 650.00          1240
PCTILE PCTILE                  148       48.50      26.82          0      94.00
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
FALL 2005

                   The MEANS Procedure

Variable        Label       N        Mean Std Dev Min                   Max
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
  AI           AI            103       186.00 10.49 151.00 214
MATH           MATH          145       442.13 39.67 340.00 580
VERBAL VERBAL 145                     439.03 41.97 320.00 560
CSAT           CSAT          145       881.17 49.20 700.00 1000
PCTILE PCTILE 103                       45.65      20.04         0      92.00
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
 Objective 2: Improve and provide diverse academic support services to students.

During the 2006-07 academic year, 825 students received support through the Academic Support
Center, logging 2777 visits/2352 contact hours in the center.

                                                                                              60 
In addition to individual tutoring, group study sessions were scheduled for the following courses
math and language courses during midterm and final exam period:

Math 106              Span 110
Math 110              Span 111
Math 111              Ital 110
Math 115              Ital 111
Math 116              Fren 110
Math 130              Fren 111
Math 140              Arab 110
Math 145              Arab 111
Math 160              Jap 110
Math 161              Jap 111

Extended evening and Saturday hours provided more flexibility in scheduling and allowed for
better provision of services to commuter and non-traditional students.

The Tutor Coordinator and graduate assistants conducted 15 workshops in Fall 2006 and 17
workshops in Spring 2007 open to all students on the following topics:

   •   Study Skills
   •   Test-taking
   •   Preparation for Finals
   •   Choosing A Major
   •   Navigating Campus Resources

The department website was updated and includes a newsletter with study skill tips and
information on services available.

Assessment Methods:
   • TutorTrac tracking system
   • Workshop Attendance Sheets and Evaluations

Assessment Outcomes:
   • Greater accuracy in data collection of actual student usage of the Academic Support
      Center.
   • Quality of academic assistance to students improved – variety of workshops, increased
      number of exam review sessions, greater flexibility in schedule.

Objective 3: Increased collaboration

Outcomes:
The Academic Support Center staff worked with the Education Enrichment Center and the
Education Opportunity Fund to provide support services to Alchemy, Sponsored and EOF
students. Students in each program were mandated to attend workshops on Oncourse strategies
for success, study skills and personal development skills.


                                                                                              61 
The ASC continues to work with the Offices of Basic Skills and Testing to provide space and
assistance to students with exam preparation.

In addition, ten First Year Seminar courses visited the ASC or were visited by a staff member.

The Academic Support Center staff made presentations on support services offered at each Open
House, Freshman Orientation, New Faculty Orientation and First Year Seminar Instructor
training and Peer Leader training.

Objective 4: Increase in student participation in the Academic Support Center.

Outcomes:
Twenty-four tutors provided over 3800 contact hours of individual and group tutoring in content
areas for the academic year. Subject areas in which assistance was provided included the
following courses:

Math, All levels
Italian 110, 111,
Spanish 110, 111
Japanese 110, 111
French 110,111
Arabic 110, 111
German 110, 111
Latin, 110, 111
Anthropology, All levels
Phil 110
Political Science, All levels
History, All levels
Psychology, All levels
Sociology, All levels

Academic Support Center services were marketed to attract students through the distribution of
tutoring and workshop schedules and flyers to academic and administrative departments, and
placed on the college website.

Objective 5: Academic Support Center peer tutors are trained.

Outcomes:
All new tutors attended a 3 hour workshop in Academic Support Center covering the following
topics:

   •   learning style assessment
   •   sensitivity and approach coaching
   •   tutoring students with learning disabilities




                                                                                                 62 
The workshop was conducted by the Associate Director and the Tutor Coordinator. In addition,
every tutor attended two unit meetings and an individual meeting to review job performance and
overall department expectations.

Training of tutors, mentors and ASC staff remains ongoing. Graduate Assistants were trained to
conduct workshops, advise students, and tutor as needed. Tutors were trained to use TutorTrac
software.

ASC staff received ongoing training and feedback in data collection, scheduling and service
implementation.

Assessment Methods:

   •   Attendance records
   •   Evaluations
   •   TutorTrac software

Assessment Outcomes:

   •   Tutors gained greater understanding of their performance expectations.
   •   Increased ability/capacity to service to students was gained.

Objective 6: Tracking data on student participation and performance will be available.

Outcomes:
TutorTrac software continues to be an effective method of tracking and data collection for the
Academic Support Center. All clerical staff has been trained to operate the system, and students
have been signing into the ASC via TutorTrac with little complication. Reports on number of
visits, contact hours and tutoring per subject are easily generated.

Assessment Methods:

   •   Observation of usage
   •   Generation of reports
   •   Evaluation

Assessment Outcomes:

   •   Better accuracy of tracking data (i.e., demographics, student usage)

Objective 7: Students are provided with a variety of computer aided instruction modules
to reinforce and develop skills.




                                                                                             63 
Outcomes:

Plans to complete a new Audio/Visual Instructional Room in the Academic Support Center
remain ongoing. The Tutor Coordinator has collaborated with tutors regarding the gathering of
appropriate instructional materials and the possibility of implementing study sessions for
students that will involve the utilization of the new A/V Instructional Room.

Objective 8: Students will have increased problem solving skills.

Outcomes:
One hundred percent of all students utilizing academic support services completed an evaluation
of services provided. While many students indicated the information received was not new to
them, all of the students said they benefited from workshops and tutoring sessions and would
utilize the Academic Support Center in the future.

Supplemental Instruction Program

The Supplemental Instruction Program was conceived in Fall 2005 and implemented in Spring
2006 to support the institution’s commitment to student success, academic excellence and
community outreach through the reduction of high failure rates in gatekeeper courses and
increase in student retention through graduation. SI Leaders were trained on study skills,
collaborative instruction and problem solving techniques. SI Leaders were highly motivated and
contributed to the success of the program when able to adjust their schedules to accommodate
students and communicating with faculty.

The ASC was unable to recruit students or faculty for supplemental instruction for fall 2006. One
two sections of History 101 utilized SI in Spring 2007

Course                Instructor            # of SI leaders
Hist 101              Dr. Daniel Meaders            1

Outcomes:

Eight students consisted attended SI session during the Spring 2007 semester for two sections of
Dr. Meaders’ History 101 course. Seven students passed with grades above C+, with one student
withdrawing from the University before the end of the semester.

Comments from the SI Leader, Syed Uddin:

On Attendance:
“There was a good mixture of students in the sessions, although there were much more of the
older students who were transitioning to coming back to school, they were consistent in asking
for help and successfully receiving it. The younger first year and second year students were
more likely to show up or ask for help once they were in danger in failing the class and
performing badly.”




                                                                                              64 
Faculty Support:
“Dr. Meaders, was available to me for anything I needed advice or pointers on. He even helped
me with giving extra reviews and assignments to pick up points for some of the students who
were in danger of failing the exam. He was cognizant of the fact that many of the students need
a boost or extra help in order to pass the course and get into their History major. He always
made it a point to announce before and after classes to come to me and seek help.”

“He even enabled me from time to discuss potential questions and assignments with the class. I
assisted students with issues on Rome or The Crusades or anything that was tough for the
students to read and comprehend. I was responsible for prepping the students who did poorly in
quizzes and exams, so they may do better in the future exams. I also made a serious point to sit
down, look through the chapters, and help many of the students to read more effectively. For
example, use highlighters, note cards, and read the bold sections in the chapters. Also, of great
help was the end of the chapter thoughts and questions because they often foreshadowed exam
questions.

He is a great individual with a passion to help others. He put a great deal of faith in me and
emboldened me. He provided me with support in the class and out of the classroom. He saw the
potential in me and helps bring out the best in me.”

“Mrs. Griffin/Ms. Vargas was always available from getting the necessary forms, reservation of
rooms, to advice. They were always available to me at any time of need. Both encouraged me
and provided me with the support necessary for me to have a solid foundation to do my duties.

        I am a believer in this program because many of the students in a tougher course like this
have had no real experience in study skills and time management. Some are coming right out of
high school, where they never had to study, or read as much as they have to independently as
they are required to in college. It provides a great resource to them to have someone who helps
me learn how to study not harder but more efficiently and manage their time. These skills will
translate into success in other courses, and in general in life with work and other things.

        “Also, for many of the older students who work long hours, have children, or coming
back to school after many years it gives them a valuable resource because they need that extra
boost in keeping up. Often having someone to talk with especially upperclassmen, they would
feel more comfortable discussing some of the things they are having trouble understanding.
Often they are afraid to ask younger students for help for obvious reasons. That is why an upper
class to them is like a peer, not someone they could be embarrassed by.”

Objectives: Students will have improved academic performance, including
      increased problem solving and critical thinking skills.

Outcomes:

   •   Students who attended SI sessions consistently received a passing grade in the course.
   •   Students improved study skills, note taking, test-taking and time management skills.
   •   SI Leaders gained increased subject knowledge, critical thinking and problem solving
       skills.

                                                                                               65 
Assessment Methods:

    •   Tracking of SI session attendance.
    •   Comparison of exam grades of SI participants vs. non participants.
    •   Final course grades of SI participants vs. non participants.
    •   Observation of SI leaders.
    •   Overall program analysis with faculty and SI leaders.

Assessment Outcomes:

    •   Greater effort was made to recruit and train SI leaders in summer prior to academic year.
    •   Support of faculty insures attendance of students and success of SI program.
    •   Motivation and perception of course value were key factors in students’ participation in
        SI. Courses that fulfilled a general education requirement receive lower overall course
        participation than gateway courses.

Recommendations
     • Encouragement of faculty participation in SI by Senior-level administration is
        needed.
     • Recruitment and training of SI leaders needs to occur each summer in preparation for
        the forthcoming academic year.
     • An Assistant SI Supervisor is needed to provide additional support to SI leaders and
        maintain accurate data collection for program.

Early Alert Program

The Early Alert Program is being redesigned to interface with Banner. An ad hoc committee
consisting of Kim Daniel-Robinson, LoriAnn Calogero, Donna Patacco and Bob Seal have been
working on having it running for the fall 2007 semester.


Recommendations for the 2007-2008 Academic Year

•   Addition of full time staff to effectively implement ASC initiatives.

•   Purchase and implementation of Advisor Trac for data collection on Sponsored, Part time
    and probation student advisees.

•   Evaluation and restructuring of Academic Support Center staffing needs to increase range of
    services provided to special admit students, part-time students, probation students and regular
    full-time admits.

•   Increased communication/collaboration with faculty and other support offices.

•   Creation of online availability of academic support services.



                                                                                                66 
•   Increased professional development opportunities for Academic Support Center staff.

•   There is a need for an orientation process exclusive for Sponsored Students to connect them
    to the program at the onset of the academic year.




                                                                                            67 
Assessment Report
Education Enrichment Center
2008-2009 Academic Year
Submitted by: Jonnine N. DeLoatch


Institutional Goal 1: S3: Provide effective transitional process for students.
Objective 1
To design and implement a holistic academic support and enrichment program for Alchemy
student participants to improve retention and graduation rates.


Assessment Methods:
   • Tracking of student check in meetings with advisor
   • Evaluations from workshops and programs
   • Mid semester grade performance reports.
   • Tracking student completion of mandatory workshops.
Assessment Outcomes:

       •   Student participants after fulfilling the requirements of the Alchemy program had a
           clear understanding and exhibited better utilization of campus wide services and
           academic policies.
       •   Students expanded their learning curves via their participation in academic support
           and enrichment activities and 84% of the students completed the academic year with
           a gpa of 2.0 or better 78 students (95%) of the Alchemy cohort matriculated for the
           Spring 2009 semester.


Institutional Goal 1:S5: Provide teaching and mentoring opportunities outside of the
classroom environment.
Objective#2
To increase and enhance the student faculty/professional staff relationship/contact by providing
opportunities for interaction outside of the classroom setting.


Assessment Method
   • Student evaluations of EEC Future Focus presentations.
Assessment Outcomes:
   • (40%) of students developed relationships with professors outside of the classroom
      setting.
   • (67%) students gained a better understanding regarding the role of the professor within
      the university setting.
   • (70%) students who participated in the EEC Future Focus indicated that the interaction
      with faculty outside of the classroom setting was beneficial to their academic growth.




                                                                                             68 
Institutional Goal 1: S4: Provide students with programs and services that develop an
appreciation for lifelong learning.
Objective 3: To design and implement academic enrichment experiences for the Education
Enrichment Center scholars that will provide the opportunity for their continued success
and professional development.

Outcomes:
Four workshops were offered during the academic year
Assessment Methods:
   • Student written evaluations of workshops attended.
   • Student surveys.
Assessment Outcomes:
   • Scholar participants increased their involvement and awareness regarding participation in
      outside class room activities.
   • Scholar participants indicated via the evaluations that they wanted to participate in
      community service project and have the opportunity to network with faculty and
      administrators or campus.

Institutional Goal 1:S6: Provide academic support services and enrichment to EEC student
population.
Objective#4
To design and implement academic support and enrichment experiences to ensure that
students develop and nurture the philosophy of life long learning.

Outcome# 1
The EEC Readers Speak Book Club met once a month and discussed the assigned book.            There
were a total of forty-three (43) students who are book club members.

Outcome#2
Images Program Description
IMAGES is a female organization that offers collegiate women the opportunity to discuss
various topics that deal with the perception of women in society. IMAGES not only targets the
perception of women by society, but aims to minimize communication barriers between women,
explore cultural similarities and differences, and discuss pertinent aspects of personal and social
issues that collegiate women encounter. Images has a total of fifty-four (54) members.

Brother to Brother is a national male organization that encourages students to excel
academically, socially, culturally, intellectually, professionally, and in the community. Members
are encouraged to embrace leadership roles by being positive examples for each other through a
strong commitment to academic achievement, brotherhood, and community service. During the
Fall 2008 – Spring 209 Brother to Brother met for a total of 15 times. There are currently
twenty-five (25) members. Special events included the Signature Event held on March 4, 2009.
There were a total of (10) new members who received their pens.

This year a delegation of Brother to Brother members attended the SAAB National conference
held in March 2009. (8) students attended.


                                                                                                69 
Outcome #3
The Education Enrichment Center provides a computer resource center for students to assist with
classroom completion of assignments and personal use for example financial aid services.


Outcome#4
Student Visitation: The Education Enrichment Center provides one on one assistance to
Alchemy and other William Paterson University students who seek our assistance regarding
personal, academic and social concerns.

Assessment Methods:
   • Student evaluations of programming offered.
   • Tracking student use of computer resource room and student visitation logs

Assessment Outcomes:
   • 953 Students used the computer resource room during the Fall 2008-Spring 2009
      academic year
   • 765 students participated in one on one assistance from EEC administrative staff during
      the Fall 2008-Spring 2009 academic year.

Institutional Goal 5:O3: Establish external partnerships/relationships via programs and
services beneficial to all parties involved.
Objective#5
To serve as an educational resource for primary, middle school, and high school students from
the City of Paterson and the surrounding community.

Outcome#1
The Director of the Education Enrichment Center presented 3 informative workshops or
sponsored the participating school for an on campus visit.

Outcome#2
To provide a comprehensive structured, supervised and enriching after school activities for
students at school 27 in Paterson, New Jersey.

Assessment Methods:

Assessment Outcomes
   • 200 students were enrolled in the program.
   • The average daily attendance was 170 students.

Objective#6
To sponsor enrichment activities that foster respectful celebrations of diverse culture on campus
and in the surrounding communities.

Outcome#1
  • Implemented the Political Empowerment Cultural Awareness Lecture Series where Jamal
     Simmons political commentator and authors served as the keynote speaker.

                                                                                              70 
Outcome#2
  • The Education Enrichment Center coordinates the annual celebration & tribute to the life
     and work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. This year the guest speaker was Jonathan
     Sprinkles. Over 150 people attended this event.
                             




                                                                                         71 
Education Enrichment Center
Assessment Report
Academic Year 2007-2008
Submitted by: Jonnine N. DeLoatch

Institutional Goal 1: S3: Provide effective transitional process for students.

Objective 1
To design and implement a holistic academic support and enrichment program for Alchemy
student participants to improve retention and graduation rates.

Assessment Methods:
   • Tracking of student check in meetings with advisor.
   • Evaluations from workshops and programs.
   • Mid semester grade performance reports
   • Tracking student completion of mandatory workshops
Assessment Outcomes:
   • Student participants after fulfilling the requirements of the Alchemy program had a clear
      understanding and exhibited better utilization of campus wide services and academic
      policies.
   • 78% of the students completed the academic year with a gpa of 2.0 or better.
   • 73 students matriculated for the Fall 2007 academic year.
   • 92% (67) students matriculated for the Spring 2008 semester.

Institutional Goal 1:S5: Provide teaching and mentoring opportunities outside of the
classroom environment.

Objective#2
To increase and enhance the student faculty/professional staff relationship/contact by providing
opportunities for interaction outside of the classroom setting.

Outcomes:
A total of eight (8) EEC Future Focus dialogues were offered during the Fall 2007 – Spring 2008
academic year.
Assessment Method
   • Student evaluations of EEC Future Focus presentations.
Assessment Outcomes:
   • 61 students participated in the EEC Future Focus dialogues.
   • 57% of students developed relationships with professors outside of the classroom setting.
   • 49% students gained a better understanding regarding the role of the professor within the
        university setting.
   • 53% students who participated in the EEC Future Focus indicated that the interaction
        with faculty outside of the classroom setting was beneficial to their academic growth.

Institutional Goal 1: S4: Provide students with programs and services that develop an
appreciation for lifelong learning.


                                                                                             72 
Objective #3
To design and implement academic enrichment experiences for the Education Enrichment Center
scholars that will provide the opportunity for their continued academic success and professional
development.

Outcomes:
Nine workshops were offered during the academic year
Assessment Methods:
   • Student evaluations of workshops.
   • Student surveys.
   • Student Focus Group (November 2007)
Assessment Outcomes:
   • 159 students attended Achievers’ Circle workshops during the academic year.
   • Scholar participants increased their awareness and involvement regarding internships and
      outside class room activities based on receiving assistance from the EEC workshops.
   • Scholarships enhanced their leadership skills by increasing their participation in clubs
      and organizations on campus as well as assuming more leadership roles at WPUNJ and
      surrounding communities.
   • Focus group participants indicated that they wanted a regular meeting time and date
      (Focus Group 2007).

Institutional Goal 1:S6: Provide academic support services and enrichment to EEC student
population.
Objective#4
To design and implement academic support and enrichment experiences to ensure that
students develop and nurture the philosophy of life long learning.

Outcome# 1
The EEC Readers Speak Book Club met once a month and discussed the assigned book. The
books selected are as follows. There were a total of forty-three (43) students who were book
club members.

Outcome#2
Images Program Description
IMAGES is a female organization that offers collegiate women the opportunity to discuss
various topics that deal with the perception of women in society. IMAGES not only targets the
perception of women by society, but aims to minimize communication barriers between women,
explore cultural similarities and differences, and discuss pertinent aspects of personal and social
issues that collegiate women encounter.

Brother to Brother Program Description
Brother to Brother is a national male organization that encourages students to excel
academically, socially, culturally, intellectually, professionally, and in the community. Members
are encouraged to embrace leadership roles by being positive examples for each other through a

                                                                                                73 
strong commitment to academic achievement, brotherhood, and community service. There are a
total of 12 Brother to Brother members. Brother to Brother aims to increase the retention and
graduation rates of male students through the program’s peer and advisor support.



Assessment Method:
   • Review of cumulative gpa of group participants.
Assessment Outcome:
   • The cumulative gpa for members of Brother to Brother was 2.45 for the academic year.


Outcome #3
The Education Enrichment Center provides a computer resource center for students to assist with
classroom completion of assignments and personal use for example financial aid services.

Assessment Method:
   • Tracking student use of computer resource room.
Assessment Outcome:
   • 1318 students used the computer resource room during the 2007-2008 academic year.


Institutional Goal 5:O3: Establish external partnerships/relationships via programs and
services beneficial to all parties involved.
Objective#5
To serve as an educational resource for primary, middle school, and high school students from
the City of Paterson and the surrounding community.


Outcome#1
The Education Enrichment Center presented a total of five presentations/workshops or sponsored
a participating school for an on campus visit. Presentations/workshops were designed to
introduce participants to the collegiate environment.

Outcome#2
To provide high quality, comprehensive structured, supervised and enriching after school
activities for students at school 27 in Paterson, New Jersey.

Assessment Method:
   • Daily attendance of NJ After 3 participants.
Assessment Outcome:
   • The average daily attendance for NJ After 3 was 170 students.

Institutional Goal 3:C3: Foster an appreciation of diversity for EEC cohort and community
(internal and external)
Objective#6


                                                                                            74 
To sponsor enrichment activities that foster respectful awareness of the diverse cultures on
campus and in the surrounding communities.

Outcome#1
The Education enrichment Center instituted the Fall Diversity Lectures: The first Diversity
Lecturer was Ms. Roslyn Brock, Vice Chairperson of the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) National Board of Directors. The Diversity Lecture
took place on Wednesday, October 10, 2007. The total number of audience participation was
175.
Outcome#2
The Education Enrichment Center coordinated the annual celebration & tribute to the life and
work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. The the guest speaker was Dr. Lenworth Gunther from
Essex Community College. Over 125 people attended this event.

Outcome#3
Designed and implemented One Nation One World which focused on multiculturalism. The
focus of the program was to engage in a dialogue comparing the similarities and differences
between cultures. Thirty students participated in the program.

Assessment Method
   • Evaluation of programs by participants.
Assessment Outcome
  • 65% participants felt that the programs offered by EEC fostered awareness of diversity
      and culture.


Recommendations for Academic Year 2008-2009

   •   To create a mentoring program between continuing Alchemy students and current first
       year students.
   •   To expand the office’s community involvement.
   •   To expand the diversity component (special events) by celebrating diversity year round.
   •   To explore external grant opportunities to improve programming offered by EEC.




                                                                                           75 
                        Education Enrichment Center
   Alchemy Academic Support Program
   Cohort Management (2003-2008)

   Alchemy Cohort 2003
   Original Cohort #: 38
Year                       #Students retained         Percentage
Fall 2003                  38                         100%
Fall 2004                  35                         92%
Fall 2005                  31                         82%
Fall 2006                  26                         68%
Fall 2007                  18                         47%
Fall 2008                  7                          18%


   Alchemy Cohort 2004
   Original Cohort#: 79
Year                       #Students Retained         Percentage
Fall 2004                  76                         100%
Fall 2005                  62%                        82%
Fall 2006                  50%                        66%
Fall 2007                  42%                        55%
Fall 2008                  32%                        42%


   Alchemy 2005 Cohort
   Original Cohort#: 70
Year                       #Students Retained         Percentage
Fall 2005                  70                         100%
Fall 2006                  59                         84%
Fall 2007                  50                         71%
Fall 2008                  43                         61%




                                                                   76 
   Alchemy 2006 Cohort
   Original #: 79
Year                         #Students Retained         Percentage
Fall 2006                    79                         100%
Fall 2007                    59                         75%
Fall 2008                    42                         55%


   Alchemy 2007 Cohort
   Original Cohort #: 75
Year                         #Students Retained         Percentage
Fall 2007                    75                         61%
Fall 2008                    100%                       81%



   Alchemy 2008 Cohort
   Original Cohort #: 82
Year                         #Students Retained         Percentage
Fall 2008                    82                         100%


   Graduation Rates
                      2007        Percentage 2008   Percentage
Cohort                                                           2009
                      Rate                   Rate
2003                  18%                    39%                 53%
2004                                         7%                  25%
2005                                                             16%




                                                                        77 
                    Educational Opportunity Fund Program
          2004 Retention Outcomes
          Fall        Spring          Fall 2005        Spring       Fall          Spring      Fall      Spring 2008
          2004        2005                             2006         2006          2007        2007

          100         99              84               80           67            60          53        54
          100%        99%             84%              80%          67%           60%         53%       54%

          2005 Retention Outcomes
          Fall 2005         Spring 2006           Fall 2006         Spring 2007         Fall 2007       Spring 2008

          100               99                    85                80                  73              74
          100%              99%                   85%               80%                 73%             74%

          2006 Retention Outcomes
          2006 Cohort Enrollment Outcomes

          Fall 2006            Spring 2007                  Fall 2007        Spring 2008               Fall 2008
          102                  95                           83               74                        67
          100%                 93%                          81%              72%                       65%


          2007 Retention Outcomes
                                 Fall 2007                          Spring 2008

                                 99                                 93
                                 100%                               93.94%

          2004 Cohort Student GPA Range
                      Fall            Spring        Fall          Spring     Fall             Spring     Fall      Spring
                      2004            2005          2005          2006       2006             2007       2007      2008

3.5-4.0               5 (5%)          1 (1%)        1 (1%)        0 (0%)     0 (0%)           0 (0%)     0 (0%)    0 (0%)
3.0-3.49              25              20            12            12         12               12         9 (17%)   12
                      (25%)           (20%)         (14%)         (15%)      (18%)            (20%)                (22%)
2.5-2.99              29              30            31            26         28               19         21        17
                      (29%)           (30%)         (37%)         (33%)      (42%)            (32%)      (40%)     (31%)
2.0-2.49              26              23            24            27         20               25         21        23
                      (26%)           (23%)         (29%)         (34%)      (30%)            (42%)      (40%)     (43%)


                                                                                                                   78 
Below 2.0             15          25        16           15        7 (10%)      4 (6%)           2 (3%)   2 (4%)
                      (15%)       (25%)     (19%)        (18%)
Total # Students      100         99        84           80        67           60               53       54

       2005 Cohort Student GPA Range
                                  Fall      Spring       Fall       Spring          Fall         Spring
                                  2005      2006         2006       2007            2007         2008

            3.5-4.0               12        1 (1%)       3 (4%)     2 (3%)          2 (3%)       2 (3%)
                                  (12%)
            3.0-3.49              21        20           12         14              12           12
                                  (21%)     (20%)        (14%)      (18%)           (16%)        (16%)
            2.5-2.99              29        27           33         25              21           23
                                  (29%)     (27%)        (39%)      (31%)           (29%)        (31%)
            2.0-2.49              14        34           29         20              23           25
                                  (14%)     (35%)        (34%)      (25%)           (32%)        (34%)
            Below 2.0             24        17           8 (9%)     19              15           12
                                  (24%)     (17%)                   (24%)           (21%)        (16%)
            Total # Students      100       99           85         80              73           74

       2006 Cohort Student Grade Range

             2006 Cohort Student GPA Range

                                Fall 2006        Spring 2007      Fall 2007              Spring 2008
             3.5 – 4.0          6 (9.6%)         4(4%)            1(1%)                  1(1%)
             3.0 – 3.49         20 (20%)         10 (10%)         12 (12%)               11(11%)
             2.5 – 2.99         31(31%)          22(22%)          16(16%)                20(20%)
             2.0 – 2.49         20(20%)          28(28%)          31(31%)                29(29%)
             < 2.0              18(18%)          27(27%)          22(22%)                9(9%)

       2007 Cohort Student GPA Range
                                                    Fall 2007           Spring 2008

                            3.5-4.0                 4 (4.04%)           3 (3.23%)
                            3.0-3.49                18 (18.18%)         12 (12.90%)
                            2.5-2.99                32 (32.32%)         18 (19.35%)

                                                                                                          79 
2.0-2.49           26 (26.26%)   12 (12.90%)
Below 2.0          19 (19.19%)   32 (32.61%)
Total # Students   99            93




                                               80 
2004 Cohort Student Average GPA and Average Credit Load
                    Fall      Spring     Fall       Spring       Fall     Spring         Fall          Spring
                    2004      2005       2005       2006         2006     2007           2007          2008
Average GPA         2.35      2.43       2.17       2.46         2.58     2.58           2.59          2.62
Average       #     9.80      10         10.63      11.37        11.66    12.13          12.31         12.3
Credits

2005 Cohort Student Average GPA Credit Load
                           Fall        Spring       Fall         Spring         Fall            Spring
                           2005        2006         2006         2007           2007            2008
   Average GPA             2.56        2.48         2.59         2.5            2.51            2.54
   Average # Credits       10.8        11.55        11.5         11.8           11.48           11.86

2006 Cohort Student Average GPA Credit Load
2006 Cohort Average GPA and Average Credit Load

Fall 2006   Fall           Spring      Spring        Fall 2007     Fall           Spring          Spring
Average     2006           2007        2007          Average       2007           2008            2008
GPA         Average        Average     Average       GPA           Average        Average         Average #
            #     of       GPA         #       of                  #       of     GPA             of Credits
            Credits                    Credits                     Credits
2.56        10.25          2.32        10.5          2.33          9.74           2.41            11.44


2007 Cohort Student Average GPA Credit Load
Fall 2007                                            Spring 2008

Average GPA                Average # Credits         Average GPA                  Average # Credits
2.488                      10.455                    2.27                         10.6




                                                                                                              81 
                          Office of Scholarships
Annual Report --- Academic Year 2007-2008
Submitted by: Amanda Vasquez


During Academic Year 2007-08 the Office of Scholarships monitored a total headcount of 660
institutional and 164 foundation scholarship recipients. There were 774 institutional scholarships
awarded totaling over $5.3 million and 174 foundation scholarships awarded totaling over $330
thousand. The Office of Scholarships supports the Mission of William Paterson University in its
“commitment to promoting student success, academic excellence and community outreach with
opportunities for lifelong learning”. The goal of the Office of Scholarships is to provide support
and guidance, and serve as an additional resource to student scholars. To meet the Institutional
goals as formulated in the Student Success Plan, the Office of Scholarships undertook the
following Departmental Objectives:

Institutional Goal #1 - Student Achievement
William Paterson University will make the academic and professional success of students its
defining characteristics with programs and strategies that reflect best practices.

Department Objective #1A – Maintain personal interaction with scholars to ascertain their needs
and support and guide them academically and personally.

Activities
a) Send welcome/congratulatory letters to new incoming scholars, and congratulatory emails to
   all scholars who earn their name on the Dean’s List.
b) Plan and organize five information sessions for new scholars. Various topics to be covered
   are: Advisement Process, Career Development, Cluster Program, University Honors College,
   Resources at the University and Study Abroad/National Student Exchange Program. And
   scholars will also be given the opportunity to interact informally with the Office of
   Scholarships staff. In addition, the Office will conduct one open session each semester for
   upper classmen scholars to interact/network with new scholars, and address topic(s) specific
   to their needs.
c) Pair up five to ten 1st year Educational Enrichment and/or Trustee scholarship students with
   upper classmen scholars who are performing well at the University ---establish a peer
   mentoring program.
d) Work closely with Office of the First Year Experience and Basic Skills Program to ensure 1st
   year scholarship students placed in Basic Skills courses are adequately supported.
e) Meet regularly one on one with scholars whose scholarship funding is in jeopardy. As
   needed, interact with faculty and refer students to various Services and Resources---
   Academic Support Center, Science Enrichment Center, The Counseling, Health & Wellness
   Center, etc.
f) Respond timely to all emails/correspondences from scholars.

Assessment
The Office of Scholarships utilized a combination of the following methods to assess the
effectiveness of the above departmental objective activities:



                                                                                               82 
   Student Survey --- Scholars were asked to provide feedback on the services they received
   from the Office of Scholarships, input as to how the Office can be more helpful to them, and
   rate their overall satisfaction in regard to their educational experiences at William Paterson
   University.

   Quantitative analysis / Self-study –A quantitative analysis of scholars’ academic progress
   formulated; 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 cohorts & a comparison/analysis of students who
   were placed on scholarship probation fall 2006 and spring 2007 compared to fall 2007 and
   spring 2008.

Outcomes:
  In August 2007, new incoming students were sent welcome/congratulatory letters from the
  Office of Scholarships. The Office of Scholarships welcomed two hundred and one (201)
  new scholars of which one hundred eighty-five (185) were 1st year students and sixteen (16)
  were transfers. They ranged in age from (17-42), and came from as near as (Wayne and
  Paterson New Jersey) and from various states --- (California, Oregon, Florida, Kentucky,
  Kansas and Arizona). Scholars sent back information cards indicating various talents, not
  just students in the classroom (musicians, athletes, sports fans, coin collectors and proud
  parents). William Paterson University for many is just a stepping stone in the journey to
  obtain their long-terms goals. Some aspire to be (lawyers, doctors, nurses, teachers,
  successful business men and women), and a large majority of them indicated how grateful
  and proud they were to have been selected as a University Scholar and promised to work
  hard, excel academically and make William Paterson University proud.

   For the fall 2007, three hundred and thirty-two (332) scholarship recipients earned their name
   on the Dean’s List, 50% of the total headcount of institutional scholarship recipients. All
   scholars on the Dean’s List for fall 2007 were sent congratulatory emails from the Office of
   Scholarships and their names are posted on the Office of Scholarships bulletin board.

   *Summary of the fall 2007 Dean’s List statistics, as well as a full listing of scholars on the
   Dean’s List is attached in the Office of Scholarships Binder.

          Spring 2008 Dean’s List has not been compiled, but will be done prior to the start
          of the fall 2008 semester, posted on the Office of Scholarships bulletin board and
          added to the Office annual report binder.

   Four Information Sessions were planned during the fall 2007 and attended by the incoming
   2007 cohort…scholars in attendance ranged from 80-30 students per session.
   *Individual invitations for each session are attached in the Office of Scholarships Binder.

   Peer Mentoring Program for Educational Enrichment scholars was not established. As of the
   fall 2008, the new Scholarship Coordinator will undertake this new initiative.

   Worked closely with the Office of the First-Year Experience, Basic Skills Program and Early
   Alert Coordinator to ensure that all scholars who were placed in Basic Skills courses were
   adequately supported.



                                                                                              83 
For the fall 2007, forty-five (45) scholars placed in Basic Skills courses, thirty-five (35)
successfully passed…78% success rate. Note: Ten (10) received an unacceptable grade in
Basic Skills course---Seven (7) repeated course(s) in spring 2008, two (2) are withdrawn
from the University, and one (1) will repeat course in fall 2008.

*Basic Skills Spreadsheet is attached in the Office of Scholarships Binder.

       Spring 2008 listing of scholarship recipients enrolled in Basic Skills courses has
       not been compiled, but will be done shortly and added to the Office of Scholarships
       annual report binder.

Students placed on scholarship probation during academic year 2007-08:
   Fall 2007 ---
   Twenty-four (24) total number of students on scholarship probation after spring 2007
   . 3 IACEX / 4 IWPEES / 2 IGSDSM / 2 IPRES / 13 ITRUST
   . Three (3) students did not return for fall 2007
   . Nine (9) students 1st time scholarship probation --- 4 successful / 5 not successful …
   Success rate 4/9=44%
   . Twelve (12) students 2nd semester grace period --- 3 successful / 9 not successful …
   Success rate 3/12=25%
   *Maintained regular contact with 11 students on scholarship probation

   Spring 2008 ---
   Sixty (60) total number of students on scholarship probation after fall 2007
   . 2 IACEX / 19 IWPEES / 6 IGSDSM / 9 IPRES / 24 ITRUST
   . Four (4) students did not return for fall 2007
   . One (1) student withdrew during spring 2008
   . Forty-eight (48) students 1st time scholarship probation --- 10 successful / 38 not
   successful … Success rate 10/48=21%
   . Seven (7) students 2nd semester grace period --- 1 successful / 6 not successful …
   Success rate 1/7=14%
    *Maintained regular contact with 24 students on scholarship probation

   There was a slight decrease in the number of students placed on scholarship probation,
   fall 2007 (24) as compared to fall 2006 (34). However, the students in fall 2006 were
   more successful than fall 2007, 47% success rate as compared to 33%, respectively.

   The spring 2008 probationary headcount was very similar to spring 2007…spring 2008
   (60) student / spring 2007 (62) students. However, there was a marked decrease in the
   success rate for spring 2008 as compared to spring 2007, 29% success rate as compared
   to 20%, respectively.

          NOTE: students on scholarship probation spring 2008 entered the semester with
          very low grade point averages and even though a good number of students did
          well spring 2008, they could not raise their cumulative GPA to meet their
          respective scholarship GPA requirement. There are currently, fifteen (15)
          students enrolled in summer course(s) to raise their cumulative GPA.

                                                                                         84 
*Full summary of the fall 2007 and spring 2008 excel spreadsheet listing students on
scholarship probation is attached in the Office of Scholarships Binder.

   Institutional and foundation scholarship recipients, total headcount of 660 institutional and
   164 foundation scholars were sent via email an online student survey.

   One hundred sixty-three (163) completed the online student survey, approximately 20% of
   the total headcount of institutional and foundation scholarship recipients provided feedback
   in regard to their educational experience at William Paterson University.

   Of the 163 respondents; one hundred seventeen (117)/ 72.7 % indicated the Office of
   Scholarships met their satisfaction. Sixty-two (62) respondents provided written positive
   feedback in reference to their interaction with the Office of Scholarships’ staff.

   Student scholars indicated the following Departments met their satisfaction: Library
   Services (total 107 / 66.5% satisfaction rate), Admissions (total 70 / 43.5% satisfaction rate)
   and faculty met their satisfaction as well (total 133 / 84.2%).

   Student scholars indicated the following Departments did not meet their satisfaction: Bursar
   (total 59 / 52.2% dissatisfaction rate), Registrar (total 47 / 41.6% dissatisfaction rate) and
   were dissatisfied with the availability of course offerings (total 92 / 78.0% dissatisfaction
   rate).


*Full summary of the 2007-08 student survey is attached in the Office of Scholarships Binder.

   Institutional Scholarship Programs’ 2007-08 Headcount:

   Academic Excellence --- 44 recipients enrolled / 36 successful (approximately 82% met
   scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)
      Four (4) 2007-08 graduates

   Educational Enrichment --- 95 recipients enrolled / 74 successful (approximately 78% met
   scholarship criteria of 2.6 GPA)
      Ten (10) 2007-08 graduates

   Garden State Distinguished --- 130 recipients enrolled / 121 successful (approximately 93%
   met scholarship criteria of 2.0 GPA)
      Seventeen (17) 2007-08 graduates

   Outstanding Scholars Recruitment Program --- 18 recipients enrolled / 18 successful (100%
   met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)
      Seven (7) 2007-08 graduates

   Presidential --- 186 recipients enrolled / 176 successful (approximately 95% met scholarship
   criteria of 3.0 GPA)

                                                                                               85 
       Forty-six (46) 2007-08 graduates

   Trustee --- 301 recipients enrolled / 261 successful (approximately 87% met scholarship
   criteria of 3.0 GPA)
       Forty-one (41) 2007-08 graduates

*Full listing of the 2007-08 Institutional scholars is attached in the Office of Scholarships
Binder.

   2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 cohort statistics are as follows:

   Academic Excellence (IACEX)
   . Total number of scholars ---
           2007 cohort headcount decreased approximately 62% from 2006 cohort
       2007 seven (7) recipients
       2006 eighteen (18) recipients
       2005 thirty-seven (37) recipients
       2004 nine (9) recipients

   . Persistence Rate ---
   2007 cohort 1st year 100% continuing (7/7)
   2006 cohort 2nd year 50% continuing (9/18)
   2005 cohort 3rd year 59% continuing (22/37) / 5% retention rate (2 graduates)
   2004 cohort 4th year 67% persistence rate (6/9) / 56% retention rate
           5 graduates…1 student currently continuing


   Educational Enrichment (IWPEES)
   . Total number of scholars ---
           2007 cohort headcount increased approximately 33% from 2006 cohort
       2007 forty-three (43) recipients
       2006 twenty-nine (29) recipients
       2005 forty-six (46) recipients
       2004 thirty-six (36) recipients

   . Persistence Rate ---
   2007 cohort 1st year 67% continuing (29/43)
   2006 cohort 2nd year 59% continuing (17/29)
   2005 cohort 3rd year 30% continuing (14/46)
   2004 cohort 4th year 44% persistence rate (16/36) / 25% retention rate
           9 graduates…7 students currently continuing

   Garden State Distinguished (GSDSM)
   . Total number of scholars ---
           2007 cohort headcount increased approximately 10% from 2006 cohort 2007 thirty-
           three (33) recipients
           2006 twenty-three (23) recipients

                                                                                          86 
       2005 fifty-three (53) recipients
       2004 thirty-four (34) recipients

. Persistence Rate ---
2007 cohort 1st year 88% continuing (29/33)
2006 cohort 2nd year 83 % continuing (19/23)
2005 cohort 3rd year 77% continuing (41/53)
2004 cohort 4th year 76% persistence rate (26/34) / 41% retention rate
        14 graduates…12 students currently continuing

Outstanding Scholars Recruitment Program (OSRP)
. Total number of scholars ---
        As of fall 2007 the State is no longer awarding OSRP
        2006 cohort headcount decreased approximately 90% from 2005 cohort 2006 one (1)
        recipient
        2005 ten (10) recipients
        2004 eleven (11) recipients

. Persistence Rate ---
2006 cohort 2nd year 100% continuing (1/1)
2005 cohort 3rd year 70% continuing (7/10)
2004 cohort 4th year 100% persistence rate (11/11) / 64% retention rate
        7 graduates and 4 students currently continuing


Presidential (PRES)
. Total number of scholars ---
        2007 cohort headcount decreased approximately 13% from 2006 cohort 2007 fifty-
        five (55) recipients
        2006 sixty-three (63) recipients
        2005 sixty-nine (69) recipients
        2004 one hundred three (103) recipients

. Persistence Rate ---
2007 cohort 1st year 95% continuing (52/55)
2006 cohort 2nd year 89% continuing (56/63) and 24% retention rate (15/63)
2005 cohort 3rd year 81% continuing (56/69) and 41% retention rate (28/69) 2004 cohort 4th
year 86% persistence rate (89/103) and 75% retention rate
        77 graduates and 12 students currently continuing

Trustee (TRUST)
 . Total number of scholars ---
        2007 cohort headcount decreased approximately 13% from 2006 cohort 2007eighty-
        one (81) recipients
        2006 one hundred ten (110) recipients
        2005 one hundred four (104) recipients
        2004 sixty-nine (69) recipients

                                                                                       87 
   . Persistence Rate ---
   2007 cohort 1st year 91% continuing (74/81)
   2006 cohort 2nd year 75% continuing (92/110)
   2005 cohort 3rd year 67% continuing (70/104)
   2004 cohort 4th year 72% persistence rate (50/69) and 52% retention rate
           36 graduates and 14 students currently continuing

*Full summary of the 2004, 2005, 2006 and 2007 cohort statistics excel spreadsheets is
attached in Office of Scholarships Binder.

Note:
.2005 cohort continue to have a substantial drop in the persistence rate
.Academic Excellence and Educational Enrichment continue to show a marked drop each year in
the persistence rate


Department Objective #1B: Update and refine Office of Scholarships website.

Activities
a) Revise comprehensive listing of all institutional scholarships and Academic Departmental
   Scholarships and Awards, as needed.
b) Research and continue to build outside scholarship database.

Assessment:

The Office of Scholarships utilized the self-study method to assess the effectiveness of the above
departmental objective activities.

Outcomes:

   During the fall 2007 the Office of Scholarships website was redesigned and updated to reflect
   the new Scholarship Programs and is linked to other support services departments.

   Additional outside scholarship opportunities continue to be sought after and publicized to
   WPUNJ students, while updates on the website are routinely done as needed.

Department Objective #1C: Enhance the Office of Scholarships process and procedures so that it
functions effectively and efficiently.

Activities
a) Maintain files for Institutional scholarship students.
b) Generate and regularly update Institutional and Foundation database.
c) Follow Office of Scholarships Administrative Calendar.




                                                                                               88 
Assessment
The Office of Scholarships utilized the self-study method to assess the effectiveness of the above
departmental objective activities.

Outcome
  Institutional and Foundation scholarships recipient information is accessible, accurate, and
  various scholarship programs reports and information can be generated as needed.

Institutional Goal #3 – Campus Climate
William Paterson University will foster a sense of common purpose, pride and community
among all employees and students.

Department Objective #3A: Maintain good working relationships with various Departments to
assist scholars with their questions and concerns; i.e. First Year Experience, Academic Support
Center, Admissions, Budget Office, Bursar, Campus Activities and Student Leadership,
Enrollment Management, Financial Aid, Institutional Advancement and the Provost Office.

Activities
a) Maintain contact with colleagues via telephone and email, attend working meetings, and make
student presentations on scholarship opportunities as requested.
b) Share Office of Scholarships brochure and outside scholarship websites with Colleges at the
University and other departments on campus.
c) Assist various academic departments with publicizing Departmental Scholarships and Awards.
d) Participated in various committees.
e) Provide scholar information/reports in a timely manner.

Assessment
The Office of Scholarships utilized the self-study method to assess the effectiveness of the above
departmental objective activities. The above meetings, committee participation, various
correspondence and outcomes were maintained and documented.

Outcomes:

   Participated in the following committees; Foundation Scholarship, Increasing Student
   Success in Biology and Biotechnology Scholarship, Orientation, and Student Retention.
   Taught an Honors section of First Year Seminar.
   Successfully organized the University Services Fair and participated in parent check-in at
   each of the three 2007 Orientation sessions. Represented the Office of Scholarships at two
   Transfer Orientation sessions.
   Chaired the Grace Galindo Book Scholarship Committee, reviewed applications, met with
   committee to select recipients, forwarded award confirmation and submitted request for
   disbursement of award to Institutional Advancement.
   Assisted Admissions in conversion efforts to secure accepted scholars to deposited students
   at the University.
   Worked closely through-out the academic year with Institutional Advancement and
   Academic Departments to ensure all Foundation and Departmental Scholarships and Awards
   were awarded in a timely fashion and recipients met scholarship criteria.

                                                                                               89 
Worked collaboratively with Admissions, Bursar, Financial Aid, Registrar and Residence
Life – positive interaction, with the information and assistance provided by these
departments I was able to resolve/assist/advocate for student scholars regarding their issues
before a problem arose.




                                                                                          90 
                          Office of Scholarships
Annual Report --- Academic Year 2008-2009
Submitted by: Amanda Vasquez

During Academic Year 2008-09 the Office of Scholarships monitored a total headcount of 795
institutional and 153 foundation and academic departmental scholarship recipients. There were
990 institutional scholarships awarded totaling over $5.2 million and 177 foundation and
academic departmental scholarships awarded totaling over $320 thousand. As of the fall 2008,
Institutional Scholarship Programs were amended to meet the needs of a larger pool of incoming
students, thereby increasing the scholarship recipient headcount and the number of scholarships
awarded. There was a marked increase from the fall 2007 to the fall 2008 cohort: headcount
increase of 133 students (66%) and scholarship award increase of 256 awards (117%).

The Office of Scholarships supports the Mission of William Paterson University in its
“commitment to promoting student success, academic excellence and community outreach with
opportunities for lifelong learning”. Therefore, the primary goal of the Office of Scholarships is
to provide guidance and advocacy and serve as an additional resource to student scholars
enrolled at William Paterson University. To meet the Institutional goals as formulated in the
Student Success Plan, the Office of Scholarships undertook the following Departmental
Objectives:

Institutional Goal #1 - Student Achievement
William Paterson University will make the academic and professional success of students its
defining characteristic with programs and strategies that reflect best practices.

Department Objective #1A – Maintain personal interaction with scholars to ascertain their needs
and support and guide them academically and personally.

Activities
g) Send welcome/congratulatory letters to new incoming scholars, and congratulatory emails to
   all scholars who earn their name on the Dean’s List.
h) Throughout the academic year, plan and organize Scholars Information sessions and
   workshops which are designed to maintain and enhance student success. Workshop topics
   include: Career planning and development; How to be a successful college student; How to
   navigate the advisement process; Selecting a major and planning courses; Student support
   services, such as tutoring, and study groups; Student leadership and campus activities; Study
   Abroad Programs; and The value of internships. In addition, scholars will also be given the
   opportunity to interact informally with the Office of Scholarships staff. Further, the Office
   will conduct one open session each semester for upper classmen scholars to interact/network
   with new scholars, and address topic(s) specific to their needs.
i) Place a group of scholarship students, selected based on academic profile, in a First-Year
   Seminar section which is taught by the Program Director and/or Scholarship Coordinator.
j) Work closely with Office of the First Year Experience Director, Basic Skills Program
   Director and Early Alert Coordinator to ensure 1st year scholarship students placed in Basic
   Skills courses are adequately supported.
k) Meet regularly one on one with scholars whose scholarship funding is in jeopardy and
   provide academic counseling and advisement---formulate course load, depending on personal

                                                                                               91 
   strengths and weaknesses; develop strategies in order to successfully balance academics and
   personal life; discuss study strategies, time management, and stress management skills and as
   needed, make referrals to Academic Support Center, Career Development and Gloria S.
   Williams Advisement Center, Office of Disability Services, Science Enrichment Center,
   Writing Center and Counseling, Health & Wellness Center.
l) Respond timely to all emails/correspondence from scholars.

Assessment
The Office of Scholarships utilized a combination of the following methods to assess the
effectiveness of the above departmental objective activities:

   Student Survey --- Scholars were asked to provide feedback on the services they received
   from the Office of Scholarships, input as to how the Office can be more helpful to them, and
   rate their overall satisfaction in regard to their educational experiences at William Paterson
   University.

   Quantitative analysis / Self-study –A quantitative analysis of scholars’ academic progress
   formulated (persistence and retention rate); 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 cohorts & a
   comparison/analysis of students who were placed on scholarship probation from previous
   academic semesters.


Outcomes:
  In August 2008, new incoming institutional scholarship recipients were sent
  welcome/congratulatory letters from the Office of Scholarships. For the fall 2008, three
  hundred and thirty-four (334) new scholars entered WPU; of which two hundred seventy-
  three (273) were 1st year students and sixty-one (61) were transfers. They ranged in age from
  seventeen to fifty-two years old (17-52), and came from as near as Wayne and Paterson New
  Jersey and from other states, such as --- Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, New York,
  Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Texas. Many noted various talents/interests on their information
  card, for example; musicians, athletes, sports fans, dancers, and photographers. William
  Paterson University is just a stepping stone in the journey to obtain their long-terms goals;
  they aspire to be lawyers, doctors, nurses, teachers and successful business men & women,
  and a large majority have indicated how grateful and proud they are to have been selected as
  University Scholars and promise to work hard, excel academically and make William
  Paterson University proud.

   For the fall 2008, three hundred and eighty-four (384) scholarship recipients earned their
   names on the Dean’s List, which was 48% of the total headcount of institutional scholarship
   recipients. For the spring 2009, three hundred and seventy-one (371) scholarship recipients
   earned their names on the Dean’s List, which was 47% of the total headcount of institutional
   scholarship recipients. All scholars on the Dean’s List for fall 2008 and spring 2009 were
   sent congratulatory emails from the Office of Scholarships and their names are posted on the
   Office of Scholarships bulletin board.

   *Summary of the fall 2008 and spring 2009 Dean’s List statistics, as well as a full listing of
   scholars on the Dean’s List is attached in the Office of Scholarships Binder.

                                                                                              92 
Five Scholars Information Sessions were planned during the fall 2008 and attended by the
fall 2008 cohort…scholars in attendance ranged from 100-30 students per session.

*Individual invitations for each session are attached in the Office of Scholarships Binder.

Eleven (11) new incoming scholarship recipients were placed in the Scholarship Coordinator
First-Year Seminar course. The Scholarship Coordinator made a concerted effort to reach
out to these students through-out the academic year to ensure their academic success. After
the fall 2008, three (3) students were placed on scholarship probation; of which two (2) were
successful and one (1) student was unsuccessful. And, as of the spring 2009, three (3)
students will be placed on scholarship probation for fall 2009 and one (1) student is not
registered for spring 2009.

*Full informational spreadsheet is attached in the Office of Scholarships Binder.

Worked closely with the Office of the First-Year Experience Director, Basic Skills Program
Director and Early Alert Coordinator to ensure all scholars who were placed in Basic Skills
courses were adequately supported.

For the fall 2008, fifty-six (56) scholars enrolled in Basic Skills courses, forty-six (46)
successfully passed…82% success rate. Note: Ten (10) received an unacceptable grade in
Basic Skills course---two (2) re-enrolled spring 2009, one (1) re-enrolled summer 2009, three
(3) re-enrolled fall 2009, three (3) withdrew from the University spring 2009 and one (1) is
not registered for fall 2009.

For the spring 2009, twenty-nine (29) scholars enrolled in Basic Skills courses, eighteen (18)
successfully passed…62% success rate.

NOTE:
     Total new incoming fall 2008 headcount of WPU Institutional scholarship recipients
     enrolled in Basic Skills for 2008-09: Eight-two (82) out of three hundred and thirty-
     four (334)= 25%
     Scholarship types which had the largest number of students enrolled in Basic Skills
     were: Academic Excellence four (4) out of thirteen (13) 31% and Educational
     Enrichment twenty-nine (29) out of fifty-five (55) 53%.

*Fall 2008 and spring 2009 Basic Skills Spreadsheets are attached in the Office of
Scholarships Binder.


Students placed on scholarship probation during academic year 2008-09:
   Fall 2008 ---
   Twenty-four (24) total number of students on scholarship probation after spring 2008

   4 IACEX / 4 IWPEES/ 2 IGSDSM/ 3 IPRES/ 12 ITRUST
   (* one student has two scholarships)

                                                                                           93 
      . One (1) student did not return for fall 2008
      . Fourteen (14) students 1st time scholarship probation --- 5 successful / 9 not successful
      … Success rate 5/14=36%
      . Ten (10) students 2nd semester grace period --- 4 successful / 6 not successful …
      Success rate 4/10=40%
      *Maintained regular contact with 8 students on scholarship probation

      Spring 2009 ---
      One hundred one (101) total number of students on scholarship probation after fall 2008

      3 IACEX / 19 IWPEES / 15 ITRUST / 54 ITRUSN / 4 ITRUSM / 2 ITRUSA / 21 IHON
      / 2 IPTK / 4 IPRESN
      (* twenty-two students have two scholarships & one student has three scholarships)

      . Fourteen (14) students did not return for spring 2009
      . Eighty-one (81) students 1st time scholarship probation --- 19 successful / 62 not
      successful … Success rate 19/81=23%
      . Six (6) students 2nd semester grace period --- 2 successful / 4 not successful … Success
      rate 2/6=33%
      *Maintained regular contact with 45 students on scholarship probation

      The number of students on scholarship probation for fall 2008 was consistent to fall
      2007; fall 2008 (24) and fall 2007 (23). However, the students in fall 2008 were more
      successful than fall 2007, 39% success rate as compared to 33%, respectively.

      The number of students on scholarship probation for spring 2009 markedly increased
      from spring 2008 since the total 2008 cohort headcount increased by 66%; spring 2009
      (87) as compared to spring 2008 (60). The success rate for spring 2009 (24%) was
      slightly higher than spring 2008 (20%).

             NOTE: students on scholarship probation spring 2009 entered the semester with
             very low grade point averages and even though a good number of students did
             well spring 2009, they could not raise their cumulative GPA to meet their
             respective scholarship GPA requirement. There are currently, fifteen (15)
             students enrolled in summer course(s) to raise their cumulative GPA.

*Full summary of the fall 2008 and spring 2009 excel spreadsheet listing students on
scholarship probation is attached in the Office of Scholarships Binder.

   Institutional and foundation scholarship recipients, total headcount of 795 institutional and
   153 foundation scholars were sent an online student survey via email.

   One hundred twenty-nine (129) completed the online student survey, approximately 13% of
   the total headcount of institutional and foundation and academic departmental scholarship
   recipients provided feedback in regard to their educational experience at William Paterson
   University.

                                                                                              94 
   Of the 129 respondents; eighty (80)/ 65 % indicated the Office of Scholarships met their
   satisfaction. Thirty-two (32) respondents provided written positive feedback in reference to
   their interaction with the Office of Scholarships’ staff.

   Student scholars indicated the following Departments met their satisfaction: Library
   Services (total 76 / 61.8% satisfaction rate), Admissions (total 40 / 38.2% satisfaction rate).
   Faculty met their satisfaction as well (total 102 / 85.7%).

   Student scholars indicated the following Departments did not meet their satisfaction: Bursar
   (total 43 / 54.4% dissatisfaction rate), Registrar (total 36 / 45.6% dissatisfaction rate). They
   were dissatisfied with the availability of course offerings as well (total 59 / 64.8%
   dissatisfaction rate).
*Full summary of the 2008-09 student survey is attached in the Office of Scholarships Binder.

Institutional Scholarship Programs’ 2008-09 Headcount:

   Academic Excellence --- 45 recipients enrolled / 36 successful
   (approximately 80% met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)
      Twelve (12) 2008-09 graduates

   Educational Enrichment --- 110 recipients enrolled / 85 successful (approximately 77% met
   scholarship criteria of 2.6 GPA)
      Four (4) 2008-09 graduates

   Garden State Distinguished --- 93 recipients enrolled / 92 successful (approximately 99%
   met scholarship criteria of 2.0 GPA)
      Twenty-six (26) 2008-09 graduates

   Outstanding Scholars Recruitment Program --- 8 recipients enrolled / 8 successful
   (100% met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)
      Seven (7) 2008-09 graduates

   Presidential --- 104 recipients enrolled / 104 successful
   (100% met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)
      Thirty-two (32) 2008-09 graduates

   Presidential (New) --- 42 recipients enrolled / 40 successful
   (approximately 95% met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)

   Phi Theta Kappa --- 14 recipients enrolled / 12 successful
   (approximately 86% met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)

   University Honors College --- 101 recipients enrolled / 82 successful (approximately 81%
   met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)

   Trustee --- 224 recipients enrolled / 202 successful

                                                                                                95 
   (approximately 90% met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)
      Thirty-eight (38) 2008-09 graduates

   Trustee (New) --- 223 recipients enrolled / 163 successful
   (approximately 73% met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)

   Trustee Talent/Art --- 10 recipients enrolled / 8 successful
   (approximately 80% met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)

   Trustee Talent/Music --- 16 recipients enrolled / 12 successful
   (approximately 75% met scholarship criteria of 3.0 GPA)

*Full listing of the 2007-08 Institutional scholars is attached in the Office of Scholarships
Binder.

Cohort statistics --- 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 and 2008 are as follows:

   Academic Excellence (IACEX)
   . Total number of scholars
       2008 cohort headcount increased approximately 86% from 2007
       ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
       2008 thirteen (13) recipients
       2007 seven (7) recipients
       2006 eighteen (18) recipients
       2005 thirty-seven (37) recipients
       2004 nine (9) recipients

   . Persistence Rate ---
   2008 cohort 1st year 85% continuing (11/13)
   2007 cohort 2nd year 71% continuing (5/7)
   2006 cohort 3rd year 39% continuing (7/18)
   2005 cohort 4th year 43% persistence rate (16/37) / 32% retention rate
   (12 graduates) --- 4 students continuing
   2004 cohort 5th year (5/9) --- 56% retention rate (5 graduates)


   Educational Enrichment (IWPEES)
   . Total number of scholars
       2008 cohort headcount increased approximately 24% from 2007
       ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
       2008 fifty-five (55) recipients
       2007 forty-three (43) recipients
       2006 twenty-nine (29) recipients
       2005 forty-six (46) recipients
       2004 thirty-six (36) recipients

   . Persistence Rate ---

                                                                                              96 
2008 cohort 1st year 76% continuing (44/55)
2007 cohort 2nd year 47% continuing (20/43)
2006 cohort 3rd year 45% continuing (13/29)
2005 cohort 4th year 26% persistence rate (12/46) / 11% retention rate
(5 graduates) --- 7 students continuing
2004 cohort 5th year (14/36) --- 39% retention rate (14 graduates)

Garden State Distinguished (GSDSM)
. Total number of scholars
    2008 cohort headcount decreased approximately 118% from 2007
    -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2008 seventeen (17) recipients
    2007 thirty-three (37) recipients
    2006 twenty-three (23) recipients
    2005 fifty-three (53) recipients
    2004 thirty-four (34) recipients

. Persistence Rate ---
2008 cohort 1st year *no WPU match established, students will receive funding in fall
‘09*
2007 cohort 2nd year 78% continuing (29/37)
2006 cohort 3rd year 87 % continuing (20/23)
2005 cohort 4th year 75% persistence rate (40/53) / 40% retention rate
(21 graduates) --- 19 students continuing
2004 cohort 5th year (22/34) --- 65% retention rate (22 graduates)

Outstanding Scholars Recruitment Program (OSRP)
. Total number of scholars
    As of fall 2007 the State is no longer awarding OSRP
    2006 one (1) recipient
    2005 ten (10) recipients
    2004 eleven (11) recipients

. Persistence Rate ---
2006 cohort 3rd year (1/1) --- 100% retention rate (1 graduate)
2005 cohort 4th year 70% persistence rate (7/10) / 60% retention rate
(6 graduates) --- 1 student continuing
2004 cohort 5th year (11/11) --- 100% retention rate (11 graduates)

Presidential (PRES)
. Total number of scholars
    2008 cohort headcount decreased approximately 31% from 2007
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    2008 forty-two (42) recipients
    2007 fifty-five (55) recipients
    2006 sixty-three (63) recipients
    2005 sixty-nine (69) recipients

                                                                                            97 
    2004 one hundred three (103) recipients

. Persistence Rate ---
2008 cohort 1st year 88% continuing (37/42)
2007 cohort 2nd year 87% persistence rate (48/55) / 9% retention rate
(5 graduates) --- 43 students continuing
2006 cohort 3rd year 87% persistence rate (55/63) / 44% retention rate
(28 graduates) --- 27 students continuing
2005 cohort 4th year 81% persistence rate (56/69) / 64% retention rate
(46 graduates) --- 10 students continuing
2004 cohort 5th year (89/103) --- 86% retention rate (89 graduates)

Trustee (TRUST)
  . Total number of scholars
     2008 cohort headcount increased approximately 177% from 2007
     -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
     2008 two hundred and twenty-four (224) recipients
     2007 eighty-one (81) recipients
     2006 one hundred ten (110) recipients
     2005 one hundred four (104) recipients
     2004 sixty-nine (69) recipients
. Persistence Rate ---
2008 cohort 1st year 82% continuing (183/224)
2007 cohort 2nd year 81% continuing (66/81)
2006 cohort 3rd year 69% continuing (76/110)
2005 cohort 4th year 65% persistence rate (68/104) / 35% retention rate
(36 graduates) --- 32 continuing students
2004 cohort 5th year (48/69) --- 70% retention rate (48 graduates)

Honors College (IHON)
 . Total number of scholars
    2008 one hundred and one (101) recipients

. Persistence Rate ---
2008 cohort 1st year 91% continuing (91/101)

Trustee Talent / Art (ITRUSA)
 . Total number of scholars
    2008 ten (10) recipients

. Persistence Rate ---
2008 cohort 1st year 70% continuing (7/10)

Trustee Talent / Music (ITRUSM)
 . Total number of scholars
    2008 sixteen (16) recipients



                                                                                             98 
   . Persistence Rate ---
   2008 cohort 1st year 75% continuing (12/16)

   Phi Theta Kappa (IPTK)
    . Total number of scholars
       2008 fourteen (14) recipients

   . Persistence Rate ---
   2008 cohort 1st year 93% continuing (13/14)

*Full summary of the 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 & 2008 cohort statistics excel spreadsheets are
attached in Office of Scholarships Binder.

Note:
. 2005 cohort continues to have a substantial drop in the persistence rate
(Attrition and/or loss of scholarship funding, based on not meeting scholarship GPA
requirement)
.Academic Excellence and Educational Enrichment recipients have the highest attrition and/or
loss of scholarship funding.


Department Objective #1B: Update and refine Office of Scholarships website.

Activities
c) Revise and update comprehensive listing of all institutional scholarships and Academic
   Departmental Scholarships and Awards, as needed.
d) Research and continue to build outside scholarship database.

Assessment:
The Office of Scholarships utilized the self-study method to assess the effectiveness of the above
departmental objective activities.

Outcomes:
  Through-out academic year 2008-09 the Office of Scholarships website was updated to
  reflect revisions in the comprehensive listing of all institutional scholarships and Academic
  Departmental Scholarships and Awards.

   Additional outside scholarship opportunities continue to be sought after and publicized to
   WPUNJ students, while updates on the website are routinely done as needed.

Department Objective #1C: Enhance the Office of Scholarships process and procedures to it
function effectively and efficiently.

Activities
a) Maintain files for Institutional scholarship students.
b) Generate and regularly update Institutional and Foundation databases.
c) Follow Office of Scholarships Administrative Calendar.

                                                                                               99 
Assessment
The Office of Scholarships utilized the self-study method to assess the effectiveness of the above
departmental objective activities.

Outcome
  Institutional and Foundation scholarships recipient information is accessible, accurate, and
  various scholarship programs’ reports and information can be generated as needed.

Institutional Goal #3 – Campus Climate
William Paterson University will foster a sense of common purpose, pride and community
among all employees and students.

Department Objective #3A: Maintain good working relationships with various Departments to
assist scholars with their questions and concerns; i.e. First Year Experience, Academic Support
Center, Admissions, Budget Office, Bursar, Campus Activities and Student Leadership,
Enrollment Management, Financial Aid, Institutional Advancement and the Provost Office.

Activities
a) Maintain contact with colleagues via telephone and email, attend working meetings, and make
student presentations on scholarship opportunities as requested.
b) Share Office of Scholarships brochure and outside scholarship websites with Colleges at the
University and other departments on campus.
c) Assist various academic departments with publicizing Departmental Scholarships and Awards.
d) Participated in various committees.
e) Provide scholar information/reports in a timely manner.

Assessment
The Office of Scholarships utilized the self-study method to assess the effectiveness of the above
departmental objective activities. The above meetings, committee participation, various
correspondence and outcomes were maintained and documented.

Outcomes:
  Internal Audit conducted fall 2008. The Office of Scholarships documentation, procedures
  and internal controls were found to be in order for all areas of review. No recommendations
  were made as a result of the audit.
  Participated in the following committees; Foundation Scholarship, Increasing Student
  Success in Biology and Biotechnology Scholarship, Orientation, The Statewide Hispanic
  Chamber of Commerce of New Jersey, Student Retention and University Mentoring.
  Scholarship Coordinator taught a section of First Year Seminar for which a group of scholars
  were selected.
  Successfully organized the University Services Fair and participated in parent check-in at
  each of the three 2008 Orientation sessions. Represented the Office of Scholarships at two
  Transfer Orientation sessions.
  Participated in several on-campus professional training workshops.




                                                                                              100 
     Chaired the Grace Galindo Book Scholarship Committee, reviewed applications, met with
     committee to select recipients, forwarded award confirmation and submitted request for
     disbursement of award to Institutional Advancement.
     Assisted Undergraduate Admissions in conversion efforts to secure accepted scholars to
     deposited students at the University; attended Open Houses, Scholars’ brunch and
     Multicultural Day.
     Worked closely through-out the academic year with Institutional Advancement and
     Academic Departments to ensure all Foundation and Departmental Scholarships and Awards
     were awarded in a timely fashion and recipients met scholarship criteria.
     Worked collaboratively with Center for Student Services, Department of Residence Life,
     Office of Student Accounts, Office of Financial Aid, Office of Registration Services and
     Undergraduate Admissions – positive interaction, with the information and assistance
     provided by these departments I was able to resolve/assist/advocate for student scholars
     regarding their issues before a problem arose.


  Office of Scholarships
  Outcomes of Entering Cohorts 2004-2008

ACACEMIC EXCELLENCE                       Headcount         Persistence         Graduation
                                                            Rate                Rate
Cohort 2004   First Year                                    88% (8/9)
              Second Year                                   67% (6/9)
              Third Year                  9                 67% (6/9)           11% (1/9)
              Fourth Year                                   67% (6/9)           56% (5/9)
              Fifth Year                                    ---                 56% (5/9)
Cohort 2005   First Year                                    89% (33/37)
              Second Year                                   68% (25/37)
                                          37
              Third Year                                    59% (22/37)         5% (2/37)
              Fourth Year                                   43% (16/37)         32% (12/37)
Cohort 2006   First Year                                    78% (14/18)
              Second Year                 18                50% (9/18)
              Third Year                                    39% (7/18)
Cohort 2007   First Year                  7                 100% (7/7)
              Second Year                                   71% (5/7)
Cohort 2008   First Year                  13                85% (11/13)



EDUCATIONAL ENRICHMENT                    Headcount         Persistence         Graduation
                                                            Rate                Rate
Cohort 2004   First Year                                    86% (31/36)
              Second Year                 36                61% (22/36)
              Third Year                                    47% (17/36)


                                                                                         101 
              Fourth Year                            44% (16/36     25% (9/36)
              Fifth Year                             ---            39% (14/36)
Cohort 2005   First Year                             94% (43/46)
              Second Year                            46% (21/46)
                                        46
              Third Year                             30% (14/46)
              Fourth Year                            26% (12/46)    11% (5/46)
Cohort 2006   First Year                             62% (18/29)
              Second Year               29           59% (17/29)
              Third Year                             45% (13/29)
Cohort 2007   First Year                43           67% (29/43)
              Second Year                            47% (20/43)
Cohort 2008   First Year                55           76% (44/55)


GARDEN STATE DISTINGUISHED              Headcount    Persistence    Graduation
                                                     Rate           Rate
Cohort 2004  First Year                              91% (31/34)
             Second Year                             85% (29/34)
             Third Year                 34           82% (28/34)    3% (1/34)
             Fourth Year                             76% (26/34)    41% (14/34)
             Fifth Year                              ---            65% (22/34)
Cohort 2005 First Year                               94% (50/53)
             Second Year                             85% (45/53)
                                        53
             Third Year                              77% (41/53)
             Fourth Year                             75% (40/53)    40% (21/53)
Cohort 2006 First Year                               100% (23/23)
             Second Year                23           87% (20/23)
             Third Year                              87% (20/23)
Cohort 2007 First Year                  37           81% (30/37)
             Second Year                             78% (29/37)
Cohort 2008 First Year                  *17
         *Note: No WPU Match provided for 2008-09*

OUTSTANDING       SCHOLARS Headcount                 Persistence    Graduation
RECRUITMENT PROGRAM                                  Rate           Rate

Cohort 2004   First Year                             100% (11/11)
              Second Year                            100% (11/11)
              Third Year                11           100% (11/11)   9% (1/11)
              Fourth Year                            100% (11/11)   64% (7/11)
              Fifth Year                             ---            100% (11/11)
Cohort 2005   First Year                10           100% (10/10)


                                                                            102 
            Second Year                                       80% (8/10)
            Third Year                                        70% (7/10)
            Fourth Year                                       70% (7/10)          60% (6/10)
Cohort 2006 First Year                                        100% (1/1)
            Second Year                    1                  100% (1/1)
            Third Year                                        100% (1/1)
Cohort 2007 First Year                     *0
            *Note: As of Fall 2007 the State of New Jersey is no longer funding OSRP*


PRESIDENTIAL                               Headcount         Persistence         Graduation
                                                             Rate                Rate
Cohort 2004    First Year                                    97% (100/103)
               Second Year                                   93% (96/103)
               Third Year                  103               89% (92/103)        23% (24/103)
               Fourth Year                                   86% (89/103)        75% (77/103)
               Fifth Year                                    ---                 86% (89/103)
Cohort 2005    First Year                                    99% (68/69)
               Second Year                                   86% (59/69)         20% (14/69)
                                           69
               Third Year                                    81% (56/69)         41% (28/69)
               Fourth Year                                   81% (56/69)         64% (46/69)
Cohort 2006    First Year                                    95% (60/63)
               Second Year                 63                89% (56/63)         24% (15/63)
               Third Year                                    87% (55/63)         44% (28/63)
Cohort 2007    First Year                  55                95% (52/55)
               Second Year                                   87% (48/55)         9% (5/55)
Cohort 2008    First Year                  42                88% (37/42)



TRUSTEE                                    Headcount         Persistence         Graduation
                                                             Rate                Rate
Cohort 2004    First Year                                    96% (66/69)
               Second Year                                   75% (52/69)
               Third Year                  69                75% (52/69)
               Fourth Year                                   72% (50/69)         52% (36/69)
               Fifth Year                                    ---                 70% (48/69)
Cohort 2005    First Year                                    97% (101/104)
               Second Year                                   75% (78/104)
                                           104
               Third Year                                    67% (70/104)
               Fourth Year                                   65% (68/104)        35% (36/104)
Cohort 2006    First Year                                    84% (92/110)
               Second Year                 110               75% (83/110)

                                                                                          103 
              Third Year                69% (76/110)
Cohort 2007   First Year    81          91% (74/81)
              Second Year               81% (66/81)
Cohort 2008   First Year    224         82% (183/224)

HONORS COLLEGE              Headcount   Persistence     Graduation
                                        Rate            Rate
Cohort 2008   First Year    101         90% (91/101)


ART TALENT TRUSTEE          Headcount   Persistence     Graduation
                                        Rate            Rate
Cohort 2008   First Year    10          70% (7/10)



MUSIC TALENT TRUSTEE        Headcount   Persistence     Graduation
                                        Rate            Rate
Cohort 2008   First Year    16          75% (12/16)


PHI THETA KAPPA             Headcount   Persistence     Graduation
                                        Rate            Rate
Cohort 2008   First Year    14          93% (13/14)




                                                               104 
Office of International Students and Scholars

Expectations for Outcomes 2009-2010 and Assessment Report of program activities

Cohort Management Activities for International Students

   1. Academic support services

Activity 1: Monitor students in academic jeopardy based on prior semester grades. Follow up for
students with a GPA below 2.0 and referrals to Academic support areas

Timelines: October 15 for the Fall semester and February 1 for the Spring semester

Assessment method: review of grades and cumulative grade point average every semester

   2. Retention efforts

Activity1: New Students orientation programs

The orientation program for new/first year students available each semester offers the
opportunity to acquaint students with a new educational, social and cultural environment. It also
provides students a unique opportunity to be introduced to the intricate federal regulations that
affect their legal stay in the US. This program is designed to complement the orientation
programs for new freshmen, transfer and graduate students offered through Undergraduate and
Graduate Admissions, Office of First year experience and the Student Development areas.

Timelines: October 15 for the Fall semester and February 1 for the Spring semester


FY 2008-09 Student Cohort Management Report

1. Total number of International students:

   Fall 2008 Total number of enrolled students             118

       Total Number of Undergraduate students        77
       Total Number of Graduate students             41


   Spring 2009 Total number of enrolled students    105

       Total Number of Undergraduate students       68
       Total Number of Graduate students            37

2. Rate of persistence/attrition




                                                                                             105 
       Graduate students: For the spring 2009, all but 4 students returned from the previous
semester, two students transferred out to schools outside the state of new jersey and two students
stopped out. The rate of persistence was 90%.

        Undergraduate students: For the spring 2009 students returned from the fall 2008
semester- 9 undergraduate students completed their programs in the fall and 14 new students
enrolled for a total of 71 undergraduate - the rate of persistence was 90% as the attrition was a
result of students completing their undergraduate degree and obtaining a bachelors degree.

3. Average Cumulative GPA

      The average gpa for graduate students for the Fall 2008 was 3.53 and 3.52 for the Spring
2009. Graduate students earned an average of 8.3 credits per semester in the fall and an average
of 8.12 credits in the spring 2009 for a total of 16.42 credits for the academic year.

      The average gpa for undergraduate students for the Fall 2008 was 3.18 and 3.11 for the
Spring 2009. Undergraduate students earned and average of 14.5 per semester in the fall and an
average of 13.8 in the spring 2007 for a total of 28.3 credits for the academic year.


Summary of Activities towards retention efforts for International Students:

1. A comprehensive New International Students Orientation program offered every semester.
The results of the New International student survey indicates that the majority of the students are
satisfied with the orientation program for new students.

2. Regularly scheduleled information sessions on rules and regulations that affect students with
F-1 and J-1 student visas. 4 sessions were offered in the Fall and 4 sessions were offered in the
spring semester.

3. Follow up, advisement and referrals to academic support areas for those undergraduate
students with a gpa below 2.0. Three (3) students did not meet the minimum academic standing
and were sent notices to contact the office for assistance and academic referrals. We were not
successful in bringing any of the three students.

An overview of available services for students in academic jeopardy and the impact of academic
standing as it relates to maintaining legal F-1 and J-1 status was thoroughly discussed with
students and in one instance the parent of one international student.


4. Legal compliance of international students visas, F-1 and J-1 visas through the SEVIS system
- Adherence to legal reporting procedures with ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement
Unit of the Department of Homeland Security)


5. Fostering International understanding within the University community and surrounding
communities is achieved through fostering, promoting, planning and implementing cultural

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activities to celebrate and increase awareness of multicultural issues and people from other
countries.

International students are trained to be international ambassadors and WPU representatives
through their participation as guest speakers for educational programs in nearby schools,
churches and civil and non profit organizations.
( Cross Cultural Series). A total of 4 students participated in the Fall and Spring semesters by
visiting 3 area schools where they made presentations to approximate 350 students. Participating
students and representatives from the schools visited were surveyed to obtain feedback from both
the students who participate in the Cross cultural series and the schools visited. The majority of
the students indicated that they enjoyed their participation, and that they would recommended it
to other students. The responses from the schools indicate that all schools received the students’
participation and efforts very well and that they plan to invite international students back for
Cross cultural presentations.

In addition, every fall a week long calendar of events in celebration of International Educational
Week is developed and executed with collaboration with other offices and departments across
campus. (second week in November).
A review of last year’s IEW program (see attached) confirms that at least one activity was
directed to target a particular student population and or faculty. Tow new activities were added
this year, one a “meet and greet” program to introduce
returning Study Abroad and returning students to prospective students looking to participate in
an exchange program for the next academic year.


6. Collaborative efforts with the Center for Career Development and Advisement Services have
been very successful- All graduating seniors are required to develop a Career planning portfolio
the semester prior to applying for Post-Completion of Studies work authorization. This portfolio
consists of a job readiness session which consists of: resume writing, interviewing job search
strategies and techniques. A written confirmation is sent to OISS to indicate that student has
completed his/her portfolio.

In addition, a handout on employment regulations was updated to reflect new updates in F-1
student visas regulations and the Optional Practical Training packet was updated to reflect new
fees set forth by ICE. (see attached).


7. Incorporation of assessment instruments and techniques to regularly evaluate students needs
and satisfaction with available services ( revised international students survey). See survey
attached.

8. Efforts to reconcile clear and accurate data for accepted and registered international students
are on going. These efforts are a result of working together with data stewards from the areas
from enrollment management and planning and research. In addition, clear and accurate data in
BANNER is accurately reported in SEVIS thus meeting international students reporting
requirements set forth by the Department of Homeland Security ( F-1 visas) and the department
of State (J-1 visas).

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The National Student Exchange Program

A total of 7 WPUNJ students applied to go on exchange for FY2008-09. All 7 outgoing students
were placed in their first or second choice of schools. 2 of the outgoing NSE students applied for
the academic year, 2 students applied for the Fall 2008 only and 2 students applied for the Spring
2009 semester

Out of the total number of students (7) students, 3 students applied and were accepted on Plan A
(Paying tuition and fees/ and room & board) to the host school, 4 students applied and were
accepted on Plan B, paying tuition and fees to WPUNJ and paying room and board to the host
school.

The preferred state of destination for outgoing students continues to be Hawaii (2 students). The
other 5 students chose to go to: Canada, California, Florida, Alaska and South Carolina.

A pre-departure orientation meeting was held in the Spring 2008 for all students placed during
the March annual placement conference and the office continues to promote the National Student
Exchange program through print advertisement, classroom presentations and by providing
information to prospective and newly admitted students and their parents through all campus
wide open house programs.

A total of 23 students applied and were accepted to come to William Paterson as part of the NSE
program. The students applied from 9 different states within the country, the majority of the
students (6) applied from various campuses in Puerto Rico, the second state of origin was a tie
between California and Florida. Efforts to attract students from any of the Canadian partner
universities participating in NSE yielded 2 students from Sherbrooke university coming to WPU
in the summer 2009.

A total of 22 students applied and were accepted to WPUNJ with Plan B, paying their home
school’s tuition and fees and paying room and board to WPUNJ and just one (1) student applied
on Plan A, paying our in state tuition and fees.

A welcoming program is scheduled every semester for Incoming NSE students. It should be
noted that the welcoming program includes a presentation by a representative from the Office of
Graduate Admission and Enrollment Services as we recognize that visiting students through the
NSE program are a potential cohort of applicants for our Graduate programs.

In addition, the office coordinates all requests for course registration with the Registrar, provides
lists of incoming students to the Bursar and Registrar Office and the Office of Residence Life
(for billing purposes). Furthermore, all housing contracts are sent to incoming students, and their
housing questionnaires and deposit fees are collected and forwarded to the Bursar and Residence
Life.

Each year, OISS negotiates the number of bed spaces available for NSE students and is
responsible for coordinating all logistical arrangements for incoming students prior to their
arrival to campus including informing students on the sate requirement for immunization

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vaccines, collecting evidence of compliance and forwarding copies of immunization records to
the Center for health and wellness.

At the conclusion of the semester of year of exchange, the OISS ensures that an official
transcript is sent to the students’ home campus free of charge.

The Study Abroad Program

William Paterson University is part of the New Jersey Consortium for International Studies,
NJSCIS which is comprised of 8 member schools: Kean, Montclair, Rowan, NJ City University,
Stockton, The College of New Jersey, Ramapo College and WPUNJ.

A total of 7 WPUNJ outgoing students were placed in SA programs in the Fall 2008, and 12
students were placed in the Spring 2009 for a total of 19 outgoing students for the academic year.
No students came from abroad in the Spring 2009.

The office coordinates all logistical arrangements for Incoming Study Abroad students as it
relates to pre-arrival information, course registration and billing procedures and arrangements for
housing and follow up with sate mandated information on required immunization records. The
OISS also provides all J-1 student visa services for incoming SA students including the issuance
of DS2019 forms.

Our incoming SA students are invited to participated in the New International Students
orientation program each semester and all outgoing students are required to attend a pre-
departure orientation meeting where students and their parents are informed on academic policies
and procedures for coursework completed while abroad, travel, visa and consular information.
A representative from the Financial Aid Office is invited to discuss loans and grants applications
for Study Abroad. The OISS also works closely with the Office of Scholarships by confirming
WPU enrollment in Study Abroad programs as it relates to students’ eligibility for scholarships
and grants for Study Abroad.

The OISS supports all Faculty led programs by providing advertisement and marketing support
by having application materials available in the office and through Information sessions
throughout the year and during International Education Week.



Assessment method: review and summary of findings from the New International Student survey

Activity 2: Monitoring legal compliance for maintain F-1/J-1 student status

In order to inform and continue to provide information to students on their rights and
responsibilities related to maintaining their legal status, regular and timely notification on
“reportable events” in the SEVIS system such as: initial status, change of status, employment
authorizations, and reduced course loads.

Timelines: on going

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Assessment method: monthly SEVIS generated reports will be utilized to monitor and follow up
student’s legal status. Reports are used to monitor students and satisfy legal reporting
requirements to the University and the Department of Homeland security.


Activity 3: To develop and execute an International Education Week program each year.

Timelines: Second week in November

Assessment method: An International Education Week program will be offered each year. In
addition the following assessment activities will be incorporated from the fall.

1. A survey to participants ( prospective SA and NSE students, SA faculty leaders, SA
organization participants) in order to evaluate the program success.

Activity 4: To increase students participation in Cross Cultural series and community outreach
programs

Timelines: October 30 for the Fall semester and February 1 for the Spring semester.

Assessment method: Administer survey to participating students and host area schools before the
end of each semester

Activity 5: To further promote scholarship opportunities for currently enrolled international
students

Timelines; October 30 for the Fall semester and February 1 for the Spring semester

Assessment method:

   1. Review and monitor students eligibility for the out of state tuition waiver and      submit
   full report each semester.
   2. In collaboration with the Office of Scholarships a special presentation on the scholarship
       application process will be organized in the Spring.
       Students in attendance will be asked to respond to a survey to determine the likelihood of
       students applying for scholarships after attending the program.
   3. Improve collaborative efforts and partnerships across Academic support service areas

Activity 1: Promote Students Portfolios. This activity is conducted in collaboration with the
Office of Career Development and Advisement

Timelines: On going

Assessment method: International students seeking off campus employment authorization are
required to meet with a representative from the office to discuss eligibility requirements for the
type of employment authorization sought. In addition, students are required to meet with a

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representative from Career development to discuss career and employment objectives, job
searching strategies and to develop a resume/career portfolio.
A career portfolio is part of the students’ file.


   4. Implement at least one innovation in program design and function to increase and
      enhance offerings

Activity 1: At least one program activity during International Education Week will be directed at
special target student populations such as honors, graduate students, undecided majors and or
faculty.

Timeline: November each year

Assessment: A review of IEW program will show that at least one activity is directed at special
target student populations or faculty.

   5. Refine data collection processes

Activity 1: To further refine data integration and information flow between BANNER and
SEVIS systems.

Timelines: on going

Assessment: Increased accuracy for data reports for accepted and registered international
students

   6. Update program Portfolio

Activity 1: An updated Unit Portfolio

Timeline: July 1 every year

   7. Enhance program and services offered for greater efficiency and improved outcomes.

Activity 1: To identify areas of student satisfaction with services and programs provided and
areas in need of improvement.

Assessment: Students satisfaction survey

Cohort Management Activities for Study Abroad and NSE programs

Acitivity 1: New SA and NSE Orientation/Welcoming program/Pre-departure orientations.

An orientation/Welcoming program is offered each semester for incoming students and a pre-
departure orientation is organized for outgoing students and their parents each semester.



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Timeslines: July 30th for the Fall semester and November 30th for the Spring semester.

Assessment method: Survey for outgoing and incoming students participating in Study Abroad
and NSE programs.


Activity 2: To organize a Study Abroad Information session to promote program opportunities
available through the New Jersey State Consortium for International Studies and also to promote
WPU faculty led summer programs abroad.

Timelines: November 15 for the fall and March 1 for the Spring

Assessment method: Survey for students participating in the event, survey for program affiliates
(Study Abroad organization representatives) attending the event to promote programs and survey
for SPU summer program leaders.

Activity 3: To further promote Study Abroad scholarship opportunities for our outgoing students

Assessment method: A review of roster of outgoing study abroad students who receive
institutional scholarships for Study Abroad and scholarship from external agencies.

Activity 4: To evaluate student satisfaction (outgoing students) with the Study Abroad
application process.

Timelines: July 30 for the Fall and April 1 for the Spring

Assessment method: A student satisfaction survey.




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2008 Assessment Report

Office of International Students and Scholars

Cinzia Richardson, Director

July 15, 2008

The following plans and activities will enable the Office of International Students and Scholars
to continue to provide services for international students, international faculty and WPU students
interested in Study Abroad and National Student Exchange opportunities. (Based on 2007-08
outcomes and assessments)

Plans for the Office of International Students and Scholars:

   1. The physical layout of the office will include a resource room with 2 computers, print and
      electronic resource materials for international faculty or researchers and or students. A
      resource room will include newspapers and magazines and journals in foreign languages
      for faculty and students and it will also be utilized to provide training to students who
      volunteer to participate in Cross cultural series. Finally, the resource room will be made
      available to area schools and community agencies interested in international and
      multicultural activities and for students to meet with representatives from our affiliate
      study abroad organizations and international health insurance organizations.

   2. A conference room will be utilized for hosting international visitors and
      representatives from universities abroad to conduct pre-departure meetings for students
      and parents (Exchange programs) and for Faculty who organize short term programs
      abroad to conduct their orientation meetings. Finally, the International Student
      Association will also conduct regular club meetings in this facility.

   3. Continue to work with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to develop a program for
      prospective international students by establishing regular information sessions
      (prospective international students days) in order to further cultivate the number of
      prospects international students in this area ( mainly students who are already attending
      schools in the US and in NJ).


   4. Develop a proposal for a separate budget for International Education Week (observed
      every year - second week in November).

   Plans for Services for International Faculty (Teaching and research):

   1. Continue to work with the Office of Human Resources to assist in the review of
      documents necessary for international faculty and researchers to work at WPUNJ.




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2. Review and redefine logistical arrangements and collaborative efforts with other office
   and departments on campus for hosting international faculty and incorporate same in
   revised Outlines for sponsoring department (s), international visitors and the office.

Plans for Services for International Students:

1. Purchasing software for International Students (and faculty) for filing   Federal and tax
   income taxes.

2. Continue to work with other offices and departments to provide early intervention, and
   academic support information and activities for students in academic jeopardy. (Students
   with a gpa below 2.0)

Plans for The National Student Exchange Program and the Study Abroad programs:

1. Continue to work with the Office of Undergraduate Admissions to host a special
   presentation on Exchange Opportunities during Open House programs. (To promote NSE
   and Study Abroad programs to prospective undergraduate students and their parents).

2. Expand the NSE/ Study Abroad Welcoming program for FY 2008-09 to include
   additional services for newly arrived students such as a shopping trip to local
   convenience stores and supermarkets.

3. Develop a job description for a student assistant to work in the office promoting the NSE
   and SA programs. Returning students who participated in either program will have an
   opportunity to work in the office and assist with promoting the NSE and or SA program
   to WPU students.




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International Students and Scholars
Activity report for FY 2007-08
Summary

The Mission statement of the William Paterson University of New Jersey states the university’s
goal of preparing students for a “productive citizenship in an increasingly global economy and
technological world.”

Towards that overarching goal the activities, programs and services offered through the Office of
International Students and Scholars, the Study Abroad Program and the National Student
Exchange program support William Paterson’s commitment to international education.

The Mission of the Office of International Students and Scholars is to serve international
students, scholars and their dependents by providing services and programs that enable our
international community to have positive academic, social and cultural experiences at William
Paterson University.

This activity report for FY 2007-08 is based on the strategic goals outlined in the Assessment
Plan and Outcomes for FY 07-08.

The OISS staff consists of one Director, Cinzia Richardson, a clerk typist,
Ms. Madeline Garcia and a work study student, who works 15 hours per week during the fall and
the spring semesters through funding from the Work Study program.

Additional resources for staffing and additional funding will prove to be crucial
In order to sustain the diverse initiatives and activities for international students, scholars coming
from abroad to teach, conduct research and scholars activities and for incoming and outgoing
study abroad and national student exchange program participants.


Unit Goal 1: To increase student satisfaction with the “New International Students
Orientation program”.

Activities:

1. Developed and implemented all pre-arrival logistical plans for newly international admitted
students and scholars. These plans include sending welcoming letters, visa forms, and pre-arrival
packets every semester (fall and spring). Information on the New International Students
orientation programs, late registration dates, information on Basic Skills placement test for
freshmen students, information on orientation dates for new Transfer and new graduate students.
In addition, OISS is a liaison with the Health and Wellness Center for new International
Students, including all pertinent literature regarding the required vaccines records, collecting
health records and forwarding same to the Health Center and the Office of Residence Life to
ensure that international students are in full compliance with state requirements.




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2. Planned and executed all logistical arrangements for an orientation program for new
international students each semester. In addition, several mini-orientation programs for late
arrivals are offered every semester.

A regular feature for the orientation program is to invite representatives from a local bank to the
program to assist students with their banking needs without leaving campus. Also, late arrivals
in any given semester are referred to our contact from Bank of America, in Wayne, NJ for
assistance. Students who miss the orientation program and wish to take advantage of this service
are paired up with current international students to take them to the Wayne branch in order to
open a bank account.

This service has proved to be particularly helpful with the students funded through the Fulbright
program, “regular” fulbrighters and the Fulbright Teaching Assistants (FLTA). This particular
cohort of students tends to arrive in NJ a few weeks before the beginning of the fall semester and
oftentimes have their first check from the Institute for International Education, IIE waiting for
them upon arrival to campus. Another group of students who take advantage of this service are
our incoming study abroad students who come to WPUNJ for a semester or one academic year.
The majority of international students are transferring from other US schools, has lived in the
area for 1-4 years before coming to WPUNJ and thus they do not typically require this service.


Assessment: The OISS administered a student satisfaction survey to new students in the Fall 07
and the Spring 08 semesters.

Outcomes: For both semesters, more than 76% of the respondents indicated that they were “very
satisfied” with the orientation program including the format and the information provided. When
asked if they would recommend that other international students attend the orientation program,
over 76 % of the students indicated that they would.

Unit Goal 2: To monitor legal compliance for students and scholars with F-1 and J-1 visas.

Activities:

1. Information on F-1 and J-1 visas legal requirements provided during the New students
orientation program.

2. A total of 4-6 information sessions are offered every semester pertaining to F-1 and J-1 rules
and regulations.

3. Students who reach senior year and have applied for graduation through the Registrar Office
are sent a letter explaining all legal options available after completing their educational objective
at WPUNJ and in the US. Since the majority of students take advantage of a 1 year of authorized
employment in the US following the completion of their undergraduate or graduate programs,
the OISS has established that one mandatory activity be part of the work authorization
application process: Students are required to develop a career portfolio which consists of three
components: a job hunting information session, a final resume and attendance to an F-1/J-1
employment options session.

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In addition to the letter for “graduating seniors”, multiple emails are sent to remind students of
their legal options, procedures, work authorization application deadlines as well as information
on possible legal consequences for students who fail to meet requirements and deadlines set for
by the US Immigration and Customs Enforcement unit (ICE) of the Department of Homeland
Security (DHS) and the Department of State (DOS).

4. Students whose I20 (F-1 visas) and DS2019 (J-1 visas) forms are about to expire are sent a
warning letter and information on “Extension of F-1/J-1 status” processes and procedures.

5. Students are sent a reminder to register full time (12 credits minimum for undergraduate, 9
credits minimum for graduates) prior to the end of program adjustment each semester and
students who fail to enroll full time are sent a warning letter prior to the corresponding legal
reporting requirement is made in the SEVIS system - information on the eligibility to apply for a
reduced course load authorization is included. Finally, students who fail to enroll full time or
those who do not enroll at all (students who stop out) are sent a letter informing them that their
SEVIS records AND legal status are terminated in the SEVIS system. Follow up information for
those students who wish to apply for “reinstatement of status” are offered throughout the
semester.

6. Students and or scholars who attend, teach or engage in research activities at WPUNJ on a non
immigrant visa other than F-1 and J- visas and wish to apply for a change of status to F-1/
student/scholar visa are assisted with advisory opinions and with the completion of their change
of status applications.

In addition, I met with an international faculty from the College of Business, and the Chemistry
and Biology department and the Languages and Culture department to assist in the process of
hosting international visitors and scholars hosted by the respective academic departments.

7. All legal reporting requirements in SEVIS for students in F-1 and J-1 student status were
monitored, updated and completed according to rules, regulations and deadlines set forth by
USCIS and DOS. There were no technical difficulties encountered during AY2006-07.

8. Attendance to national, regional and state conferences for the purpose of updating and gaining
information on F-1 and J-1 visas processes and SEVIS procedures. In May 2007, I attended the
NAFSA national conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota and in June, I attended the NAFSA
annual state meeting at Montclair University.

9. Advisory opinions for the Office of Human Resources and academic departments when hiring
individuals with a non immigrant visa is provided on a regular basis.

Assessment: Monitor SEVIS system on a regular basis - particular attention granted to system
built in “alert” notification processes and procedures - Written and email notification to students
and scholars regarding all “reportable’ events, the rules and regulations that affect their legal
status.




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Outcomes: The percentage of students who are not maintaining their F-1 or J-1 student visa
status is less than 10 percent of the total international student population and the university
continues to meet all legal reporting requirements set forth by DHS and DOS.

Unit Goal 3: To monitor international students who are not maintaining minimum
academic standing.

Activities:

1. Review of semester’s grades following completion of Fall and Spring semesters.

2. Sent letters to all undergraduate students with a gpa less than a 2.0 and graduate students with
a gpa less than a 3.0.

3. Follow up meeting with students who are not maintaining academic progress.

The purpose of these meetings is two fold: first to inform students of available resources on
campus, such as the academic support center, the writing center, the science enrichment support
center and all tutorial services, the second purpose is to advise students on the legal implications
of academic probation, and or dismissal and maintenance of legal status in the US and
ramifications on campus employment (including graduate assistantships and or students funded
by outside agencies such as IIE).

Assessment: Quantitative analysis of international undergraduate students and international
graduate students.

Outcomes:

1. More than 75% of the total number of international students is maintaining good academic
progress.

2. Less than 10% of the total number of international students had their legal status terminated in
SEVIS due to failure to maintain academic progress (due to enrollment of less than full time or
due to academic dismissal).


Unit Goal 4: To review and improve all marketing pieces targeted to international students.

Activities:

1 Two meeting were scheduled with Yuri Marder from the Office of Marketing and Public
Relations and the area’s website was updated. The revisions are in progress.

Assessment:

Review and update of the area’s website.



                                                                                                118 
Outcomes: Not available yet as a website traffic report has not been implemented yet.

Unit Goal 6: To increase students participation in the cross-cultural series programs and
community outreach programs.

Activities:

1. A letter with information on the Cross cultural series was sent to area schools in the fall 2007
inviting them to host international students to speak at their schools.

2. A total a total of 5 presentations were scheduled during the academic year.

Outcomes:

1. The total number of students who participated in the Cross Cultural series remains declined
from 6 to 5. However, it should be noted that for the first time this year, a Fullbright Language
Teaching Assistant, FLTA participated in two presentations at area schools.

2. All of the students who participated in the Cross Cultural series responded to the satisfaction
survey administered following their presentations and all respondents reported a high level of
satisfaction.

3. All of the schools that participated in the Cross Cultural series responded to the follow up
survey sent after the presentations. All schools reported a high level of satisfaction and when the
respondents were asked if they would bring back international students to their schools next year,
all schools reported that they would.

Unit Goal 7: To increase campus wide awareness on international education values and the
contributions of members of various cultures.

Activities:

1. A calendar of events to celebrate international education week was planned and executed in
November in collaboration with the Women’s Center and the Office of Career Development and
Advisement.

2. The IEW incorporates a Study abroad Information Session to promote exchange programs at
the national and international level.

Outcomes: A minimum of two activities and programs in celebration of International education
values is presented each year.

Unit Goal 8: To further promote the National Student Exchange program and the Study
Abroad Programs.

Activities:



                                                                                               119 
1. Classroom presentations for Freshmen seminar classes and Language courses in the fall and
the spring semesters to promote the NSE and the Study Abroad programs.

2. Hosted representatives from various affiliates within the NJ Consortium for International
studies, NJSCIS. These affiliates are: Cultures Studies Abroad; CEA and International Studies
abroad, ISA. A representative from each of these affiliate organizations was invited to come to
the campus and set up information tables to recruit prospective study abroad students.

3. Attended the NSE annual Placement Conference in Minneapolis.

4. Interviewed NSE and Study abroad candidates and process all NSE and SA applications and
supporting materials, and sent letters to students placed during the NSE placement conference
and Study Abroad.

5. Collected application fees and forwarded appropriate payments and supporting materials to
NSE headquarters and the NJSCIS headquarters.

6. A pre-departure orientation program for accepted NSE students and a pre-departure program
for study abroad students were offered last year.

7. Welcoming packets and all logistical arrangements for incoming NSE and 1 incoming Study
abroad student were completed in the Spring. These logistical arrangements include: processing
of course registration requests, negotiating the number of bed spaces set aside for NSE and SA
students with the Office of Residence Life, sending information on the required immunization
vaccines, to incoming students, collecting health vaccine records and sending them to the Health
Center to assist with university wide efforts for adhering to state compliance.

Assessment:

A quantitative analysis of the number of students applying for the NSE and the Study abroad
programs in comparison with last year.



Outcomes:

The number of students applying to go on the National Student Exchange program decreased
from 12 to 7.

The number of students applying to participate in SA programs (through the NJSCIS), is 12. ( 3
students applied for summer programs, 8 student applied for the Fall 2008 and 1 students applied
for the Spring 2009 semester).

As stated earlier the myriad of programs, services and the needs of the various cohorts of
students, scholars, and international visitors served through the Office of International Students
and Scholars continue to increase in scope. The unit can only be effective with an appropriate



                                                                                              120 
and increased allocation of physical space and human and fiscal resources in order to continue
to support university wide goals for international values and global understanding.




                                                                                          121 
International Students and Scholars
FY 2007-2008 Student Cohort Management Report

1. Total number of International students in this year’s cohort:

   Fall 2007 Total number of enrolled students               106

       Total Number of Undergraduate students          79
       Total Number of Graduate students               27

Notes: the total number of Undergraduate students includes four (4) non degree students
attending through the Study Abroad program. And the total number of graduate students includes
two (2) Fulbright Language Teaching Assistants enrolled as non degree students.

   Spring 2008 Total number of enrolled students      102

       Total Number of Undergraduate students          75
       Total Number of Graduate students               27

2. Rate of persistence/attrition

       Graduate students: For the spring 2008, all 27 students returned from the fall 2007
semester, the rate of persistence was 100%.

       Undergraduate students: For the spring 2008, 102 students returned from the fall 2007- 3
undergraduate students graduated in the fall. Two students applied for a medical leave of
absence. In sum, the rate of persistence was 99.9% as the greater attrition was a result of students
completing their undergraduate degree and obtaining a bachelors degree or completing their
study abroad programs.
.

3. Average Cumulative GPA.

      The average gpa for graduate students for the Fall 2007 was 3.55 and 3.3 for the Spring
2008. Graduate students earned an average of 9.2 credits per semester in the fall and an average
of 9.11 credits in the spring 2008 for a total of 18.31 credits for the academic year.

      The average gpa for undergraduate students for the Fall 2007 was 3.157 and 3.03 for the
Spring 2008. Undergraduate students earned and average of 13.2 per semester in the fall and an
average of 12.99 in the spring 2008 for a total of 26.1 credits for the academic year.




Summary of Activities towards retention of International Students:




                                                                                                122 
1. A comprehensive New International Students Orientation program offered every semester (fall
2007 and spring 2008). The results of the New International student survey indicates that the
majority of the students are satisfied with the orientation program for new students.

2. Regular information sessions on rules and regulations for students with F-1 and J-1 student
visas provide students with up to date information on all regulations that affect their legal stay in
the US.

A blast email and follow up sessions were offered regarding major changes in
F-1 employment regulations published by the Federal Registry this past April 2008. A major
development in this area affects students with degrees in Science, Mathematics and Technology
(STEM majors), as they are now eligible for an additional 17 months of employment (optional
practical training). Students who are in the process of applying for H-1B work visas are also
eligible for a “cap gap” employment extension and finally the application deadline for applying
for post completion of studies optional practical training is now during the grace period (60 days
after completion of studies).

I attended two town hall meetings hosted by SEVP (ICE) in September 2007 and in the Spring
2008, as well as participating in a SEVIS teleconference, and attending the Annual NAFSA New
Jersey/New York Professional meeting to keep abreast of late developments in the SEVIS
system and to gather information on the implementation of new F-1 regulations.

3. Monitoring, follow up, advisement and referrals to academic support areas for those
undergraduate students with a gpa below 2.0. Two (2) students did not meet the minimum
academic standing, were contacted by OISS and all three students were referred for tutoring
services.

An overview of available services for students in academic jeopardy and the impact of academic
standing as it relates to maintaining legal F-1 and J-1 status was thoroughly discussed.

4. Legal compliance of international students visas, F-1 and J-1 visas through the SEVIS system
- Adherence to legal reporting procedures with ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement
Unit of the Department of Homeland Security)

5. Fostering International understanding within the University community and surrounding
communities is achieved through promoting, planning and implementing cultural activities to
celebrate and promote awareness of multicultural issues and people from other countries.

International students are trained to be international ambassadors and WPU representatives
through their participation as guest speakers for educational programs in nearby schools,
churches and civil and non profit organizations.
( Cross Cultural Series). A total of 5 students including one of the Fulbright Teaching Assistants
(FLTA) participated in the Fall 2007 and Spring 2008 by visiting 5 area schools where they
made presentations about their culture and customs, promoting international friendship and
understanding. Participating students and representatives from the schools visited were surveyed
to obtain feedback from both the students who participate in the Cross cultural series and the
schools visited. The majority of the students indicated that they enjoyed their participation in the

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Cross cultural series and that they would recommended it to other students. The responses from
the schools indicate that all schools received the students’ participation and efforts very well and
that they plan to invite international students back for Cross cultural presentations. However, the
number of participating students declined in comparison to last year. Further ways to promote
students’ participation should be examined to increase participation.

Each fall a calendar of events in celebration of International Educational Week, IEW is
developed and executed with collaboration with other offices and departments across campus.
(second week in November).

In collaboration with the Women’s Center an event was sponsored on November 13, 2007
(South Indian Ancient dancing) which included a lecture by a WPU faculty. On Thursday,
November 15th, Information and promotion tables were organized to promote the National
Student Exchange program and Study Abroad programs. Representatives from Study Abroad
partner organizations (ISA, CEA and the Scholar Ship) participated.

6. Fostering leadership and student development by serving as an advisor for the International
Student Association. Participating students are assisted with planning and implementing cultural
and social activities which include members of this student organization as well as collaborative
programs with other students organizations sponsored by the Student Government Association.

This past spring semester, the International Students Association hosted a group of students and
an International Student Advisor from Bergen Community College. The event included a
presentation by the Office of Undergraduate Admissions, a campus tour and the program
concluded with pizza (brought in by our guests) and refreshments donated by ISA. Current
International students shared their college experience with the prospective students and made
plans to participate in joint future social and leadership activities.

7. Collaborative efforts with the Center for Career Development and Advisement Services have
been very successful- All graduating seniors are required to develop a Career planning portfolio
the semester prior to applying for Post-Completion of Studies work authorization. This portfolio
consists of a job readiness session which consists of: resume writing, interviewing job search
strategies and techniques. A written confirmation is sent to OISS to indicate that student has
completed his/her portfolio. This past semester, an additional joined activity, hosting an
employer searching for Computer Science students was organized, however the event yielded a
low number of attendees.


8. Incorporation of assessment instruments and techniques to regularly evaluate student’s needs
and satisfaction with available services. A satisfaction survey is administered during the New
International Students Welcoming program.

9. Efforts to reconcile clear and accurate data for accepted and registered international students
are on going. These efforts are a result of working together with data stewards from the areas
from enrollment management and planning and research. In addition, clear and accurate data in
BANNER is accurately reported in SEVIS thus meeting international students reporting
requirements set forth by the Department of Homeland Security ( F-1 visas) and the department

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of State (J-1 visas). This past Spring semester I attended two meetings with the Committee on
Institution Data Standards. An institutional definition of “international student” was discussed
and agreed upon, in addition to institutional data standard reporting requirements.

10. Recruitment activities for the FY 2007-08 year included:

       A recruitment presentation at Bergen Community college.

       Hosted a group of International Students and their International Advisor from Bergen
CC.

      A Training presentation on International Students documents for the Office of
Undergraduate Admissions (13 professional and support staff attended),

        Compiling a revised list of current International Credentials Evaluation agencies for the
Office of Undergraduate and Graduate Admissions.

      An International Students Recruitment Plan to be implemented with the Offices of
Undergraduate and Graduate Admissions.




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       The National Student Exchange Program

A total of 13 WPUNJ students applied to go on exchange for FY2007-08. All 13 outgoing
students were placed in their first or second choice of schools. A total of 6 of the outgoing NSE
students applied for the academic year, 6 students applied for the Fall 2008 only and 1 student
applied for the Spring 2008 only.

Out of the total number of students 13, 8 students applied and were accepted on Plan A (Paying
tuition and fees/ and room & board) to the host school, 5 students applied and were accepted on
Plan B, paying tuition and fees to WPUNJ and paying room and board to the host school.

The preferred state of destination for outgoing students continues to be Hawaii, (6 students), 1
chose California, 1 student applied to go to Colorado, 1 student to Alaska, 2 students to Florida,
1 student to NY state, and 1 to South Carolina.

A pre-departure orientation meeting was held in the Spring 2008 (March 25, 2008) for all
students placed for the academic year (2007-08). Students are placed during the March annual
placement conference and the office continues to promote the National Student Exchange
program through print advertisement, classroom presentations to Freshmen seminars,
Admissions sponsored events for newly admitted students, scholarship recipients and their
parents, other students groups such as the students in the Achievers Circle (Office of Sponsored
Students) and by providing information to prospective and newly admitted students and their
parents through all campus wide open house programs.

A welcoming program was scheduled every semester (September 13, 2007) for Incoming NSE
students. It should be noted that the welcoming program includes a presentation by a
representative from the Office of Graduate Admission and Enrollment Services as we recognize
that visiting students through the NSE program are a potential cohort of applicants for our
Graduate programs. In addition, the office coordinates all requests for course registration with
the Registrar, provides lists of incoming students to the Bursar and Registrar Office and the
Office of Residence Life (for billing purposes). Furthermore, all housing contracts are sent to
incoming students, and their housing questionnaires and deposit fees are collected and forwarded
to the Bursar and Residence Life.

Each year, OISS negotiates the number of bed spaces available for NSE students and is
responsible for coordinating all logistical arrangements for incoming students prior to their
arrival to campus including informing students on the state requirement for immunization
vaccines, collecting evidence of compliance and forwarding copies of immunization records to
the Center for Health and Wellness.

This past spring 2008 I met with representatives from the Registrar Office and the Bursar to
review and change the course registration process for incoming NSE and Study Abroad students
from a manual process to web registration.

At the conclusion of the semester of year of exchange, the OISS ensures that an official
transcript is sent to each student home campus free of charge.



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A total of 22 incoming students applied to WPU through the NSE program. 20 students were
accepted on Plan B, and 2 students were accepted on Plan A. 9 students applied to participate in
the academic year 13 students applied to participate in either the Fall or the Spring semesters
only.

The Study Abroad Program

William Paterson University is part of the New Jersey Consortium for International Studies,
NJSCIS which is comprised of 8 member schools: Kean, Montclair, Rowan, NJ City University,
Stockton, The College of New Jersey, Ramapo College and WPUNJ.

A total of 15 WPUNJ outgoing students were placed in SA programs, 2 students for the summer,
3 for the fall 2007, and 10 students were placed for the Spring 2008 for a total of 15 outgoing
students for the academic year.

The office coordinates all logistical arrangements for Incoming Study Abroad students as it
relates to pre-arrival information, course registration and billing procedures and arrangements for
housing and the necessary follow up with state mandated information on required immunization
records. The OISS also provides all J-1 student visa services for incoming SA students including
the issuance of DS2019 forms.

Our incoming SA students are invited to participate in the New International Students orientation
program each semester and all outgoing students are required to attend a pre-departure
orientation meeting where students and their parents are informed on academic policies and
procedures for coursework completed while abroad, visa and consular information. A
representative from the Financial Aid Office is invited to discuss loans and grants applications
for Study Abroad. The OISS also works closely with the Office of Scholarships by confirming
WPU enrollment in Study Abroad programs as it relates to student’s eligibility for scholarships
and grants for Study Abroad.

The OISS supports all Faculty led programs by providing advertisement and marketing support
by having promotional materials available for interested students. This was an excellent
opportunity to publicize Study Abroad opportunities through the NJSCIS and programs available
through WPU Faculty led programs.

Finally, I was a co-presenter in the NAFSA regional Conference in Brooklyn, NY last Fall 2007.
“Developing Quality Short term Study Abroad Programs”.




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