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					  A+
Tutoring
 Training Session
    Fall 2008
        A+ Requirements
•   Attendance: 95%
•   GPA: 2.5
•   Citizenship: Good standing
•   Tutoring Hours: 50

Please refer to the handout in your folder for
   detailed explanation of these requirements.
Goals/Purpose of A+
     Tutoring
• Provide individualized instruction
• Help students improve their grades
• Offer fun and creative ways to learn
• Help students develop a more
  positive attitude toward school
• Increase students’ self-esteem
      Goals/Purpose con’t.
• Provide positive role models for
  students
• Help build relationships across age
  groups
• Improve attendance

Keim & Tolliver (1993). Tutoring & Mentoring: Starting a Peer
   Helping Program in Your Elementary School.
     A+ Tutor’s Code of
          Ethics
• I will have respect for the people I help.
• I will keep confidentiality at all times
  except in situations where there is a
  threat to the safety of others.
• I will not give advice but will only offer
  possible solutions.
• I will refer a helpee to a responsible adult
  if there is a problem.

       Keim & Tolliver (1993). Tutoring & Mentoring:
       Starting a Peer Helping Program in Your Elementary
       School.
 LOOSE LIPS SINK
     SHIPS
• Confidentiality is the most
  important rule of tutoring.
• Information that could threaten
  the safety and/or welfare of
  others MUST be shared with
  supervising teacher.
    Confidentiality
• Tutors must not talk about any student or
  teacher or tutoring situation outside of
  the tutoring area.
• Telling just one person, even your best
  friend, about some confidential matter,
  breaks the ethical code of confidence.
• Remember, it takes weeks and months to
  build the trust of another person, but only
  a minute to destroy it.


         Foster, E. (1992). Tutoring: Learning by Helping
     How to Tutor
• Young children like structure. Try to
  follow the same routine every session until
  the helpee feels comfortable.
• Make sure you use your helpee’s name
  when you are with him or her.
• Give positive feedback as much as possible.
  It’s very important for young children to
  feel special.
      How to Tutor
         con’t.
• Give clear directions
• Make sure you understand what
  you’re supposed to be doing with the
  helpee.
• If the helpee isn’t cooperating, talk
  to the supervising teacher about
  finding ways to solve the problem.
      How to Tutor
         con’t.
• Start a session off with easy
  questions and work up to harder ones.
• Never resort to putdowns or threats.
  Remember how important you are to
  the helpee.
• Be enthusiastic.
.


       Keim & Tolliver (1993). Tutoring & Mentoring: Starting a
       Peer Helping Program in Your Elementary School
 Your First Meeting with
      Your Helpee
• Introduce yourself. As the first
  meeting may be awkward, talk about
  yourself to reduce the tension. This
  situation will improve with time.
• Ask why the student thinks he or she
  needs an A+ tutor.
 Your First Meeting with
    the Helpee con’t.
• Define your role with the helpee:
  the schedule, what you’ll be doing,
  etc.
• State your desire to help and be
  available for the person.



       Keim & Tolliver (1993). Tutoring & Mentoring: Starting a
       Peer Helping Program in Your Elementary School
  Do’s and Don’ts for A+
          Tutors
• Do interact with younger students by
  engaging them in games and fun activities.
• Do follow through on your commitments to
  the person who needs your help.
• Do maintain your own good grades and good
  relationships.
• Do reach out and help others become
  successful.
    Do’s and Don’ts for A+
         Tutors con’t.
• Do accept people as they are.
• Do listen and pay attention.
• Do give support and encouragement.
• Do realize that not all problems can be
  solved and not all people want to be helped.
• Do refer serious problems to a
  professional at school.
  Do’s and Don’ts for A+
       Tutors con’t.
• Do be available.              • Don’t judge people.
• Do listen between the         • Don’t put people down.
  lines.                        • Don’t gossip about
• Do be genuine and               what is said during A+
  sincere.                        tutoring sessions.
• Do respect other              • Don’t expect all
  people’s need for               problems to be solved
  privacy.                        quickly and easily.
                                • Don’t argue.



         Keim & Tolliver (1993). Tutoring & Mentoring: Starting a
         Peer Helping Program in Your Elementary School.
  What Shall I Do Now,
        Tutor?
After all homework is complete,
  students may need additional
  activities to occupy their time.
• Review subject area vocabulary such
  as Science or Social Studies.
• Create flashcards for this
  vocabulary.
  What Shall I Do Now,
     Tutor? con’t.
• Use math flashcards.
• Practice weekly spelling words.
• Read a book together for enjoyment.
      Role Playing
• How to Handle Right and Wrong
  Answers
• Test Your Management in Tutoring
   Tutor/Mentor Training
• In discussing a story from reading
  class, a third grader says, “The
  character’s bruise reminds me of
  this bruise my mom gave me on my
  arm. See?” How do you react?
  Tutor/Mentor Training
• At work at the grocery store, your
  manager is trying to figure out
  which of two 7th graders was
  responsible for knocking over a
  display isle. You’ve worked with
  Billy and Tommy in tutoring and
  have an opinion about which is a
  repeated behavior problem. How do
  you react?
   Tutor/Mentor Training
• For the second day in a row, the
  student you’ve been assigned to
  tutor shows up without any work.
  How do you react?
   Tutor/Mentor Training
• Your student refuses to cooperate
  and attend to the activity at hand.
  How do you react?
  Tutor/Mentor Training
• When checking his homework, your
  student misses two algebra
  problems. How do you react?

				
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