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					N’CAT Tutor Program
Tutor Manual 2009-10




         N ORTHWESTERN U NIVERSITY
 D EPARTMENT OF A THLETICS AND R ECREATION
  O FFICE OF A CADEMIC S ERVICES & S TUDENT
                 D EVELOPMENT
                                                                    09/10


                               TABLE OF CONTENTS

 N’CAT PROGRAM AND STUDY SKILLS OVERVIEW ………….………………... 3
 PROGRAM OBJECTIVES AND EXPECTATIONS ………………………………….. 4
      EXPECTATIONS OF N’CAT TUTORS …………………………………... 4
            TUTORING GUIDELINES………………………………………... 5
            CONFIDENTIALITY & INSIDER INFORMATION………………….. 6
            NCAA COMPLIANCE GUIDELINES…………………………….. 7
                  EXTRA BENEFIT RULE …...……………………………. 7
                  POLICY ON WORKING WITH PAPERS .…………………. 8
      EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENT-ATHLETES ………………………………. 9
 GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR STUDY SKILLS SERVICES…………………………. 9
 INDIVIDUAL TUTORING PROCESS…………………………………………….... 9
   REQUESTING COURSE TEXTBOOKS/PACKETS …………………………….. . 12
 REPORTING TUTORIAL SESSIONS…………………………………………….... 12
      NO SHOWS/MISSED INDIVIDUAL APPOINTMENTS ……………………... 13
      CANCELLING OR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS …………………………… 13
 PAYROLL ……………………………………………………………………… 13
      INITIALIZING PAYROLL PROCESS ...………………………………...…. 14
      RECEIVING PAYMENTS ...……………………………………...…..…... 14
      PREPARATION TIME COMPENSATION ...……………………………..… 14
 PROGRAM & TUTOR EVALUATIONS ...………..… …………………………….. 15
 FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ’S) ………..… ………………………. 16
 CONTACT INFORMATION AND IMPORTANT FORMS…………………………….. 17
 LIBRARY CLASSROOM GUIDE.………..….……………………………..……… 18
 APPENDIX .………..… ………………………………………………….……. 19
      LEARNING STYLES.………..… …………………………………..…… 19
      UNETHICAL CONDUCT, PRIVACY INFORMATION, ACADEMIC FRAUD,
        EXTRA BENEFITS, AND COMPLIMENTARY ADMISSIONS .………..……. 23
      SAMPLE TUTOR HOUR REPORT SHEET (TIME SHEET) .………..….……. 28




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                                   INTRODUCTION & OVERVIEW
The goal of Northwestern University’s Department of Athletics and Recreation (NUDAR) is for student-
athletes to receive a world class experience both academically, athletically and socially. To ensure this
goal is met, the Office of Academic Services & Student Development offers student-athletes a
comprehensive system of services and resources. The Northwestern Community of Athletic Tutors
(N’CAT) is a vital part of Academic Services & Student Development and is responsible for offering
study skills and tutorial assistance to more than 450 student-athletes.


STUDY SKILLS
Study Skills sessions for student-athletes are scheduled Monday through Thursday nights, from 7:00
p.m. to 10:00 p.m., at the University Library. The Study Skills program provides student-athletes with
three different tutoring resources:
                               •      Drop-In Tutoring
                               •      Learning Teams
                               •      Individual Tutoring

DROP-IN TUTORING
Drop-in tutoring assistance consists of quick, easily answered questions (no longer than 10-15 minutes).
The primary job of a tutor during drop-in hours is to offer basic review, feedback, and/or suggestions to
student-athletes, rather than providing a basis for understanding difficult course material (which is
provided during individual tutoring sessions and learning teams).


LEARNING TEAMS
Learning teams are small group review sessions led by a learning leader/tutor. The group generally
consists of 5-10 student-athletes enrolled in the same class. Learning teams regularly meet once or
twice per week to discuss weekly lecture notes and/or reading material. Additional sessions can be
scheduled during midterm and final exam preparations.

INDIVIDUAL TUTORING
Individual tutoring is one-on-one tutoring with a student-athlete to cover specific course material. This
service must be requested by the student-athlete by submitting an online “Individual Tutor Request”
form located on the Academic Services & Student Development website.


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All three of the above tutoring services are significant components to the success of the Study Skills
program. Each service works collaboratively to provide the best course assistance for Northwestern’s
student-athletes and is a service that lasts throughout the academic year. Although student-athletes are
asked to request tutors early in the quarter, before midterm grades are posted, requests are accepted
throughout the quarter.


                                          PROGRAM OBJECTIVES
The Office of Academic Services & Student Development devotes a considerable amount of time and
effort in selecting tutors for the N’CAT program. Specifically, we try to employ tutors who are able to:
provide an educational structure, encourage time management skills, offer structured study sessions,
promote effective study habits, clarify course material, and assist student-athletes with exam
preparation.


N’CAT staff must recognize the unique demands and/or pressures that student-athletes face in order to
assist in their academic development. These may include limited free time, competitive pressures, high
visibility, fear of injury, travel schedules, and stress created by the pressures to succeed academically as
well as athletically. These demands, particularly the time demands, require a strong and competent
tutoring program to assist the student-athlete in making the most of his/her busy schedule. The
program is not intended to replace regular class attendance, completion of all homework and
exams, or attendance at class review sessions; rather, it is intended to supplement these activities.


EXPECTATIONS OF N’CAT TUTORS
Tutors are expected to demonstrate professional behavior with student-athletes at all times. Tutors must
be punctual and prepared for each tutoring session and remain in control of the entire session. Tutors
must have the ability to engage the student-athlete, as well as explain and demonstrate difficult course
material, rather than simply reiterate what is written in lecture notes or course texts. In order to achieve
this task, tutors should be aware of various learning styles1 and be able to modify their techniques, and
make appropriate recommendations. If a tutor has questions about this aspect of tutoring, s/he should
contact the tutor coordinator.


1
    See APPENDIX for more information on learning styles


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TUTORING
GUIDELINES
Tutors should be a valuable resource for student-athletes and be able to offer assistance. However, tutors
must also remain ethical in their academic dealings and never complete assignments for the students
being tutored.2 Unethical actions will not help student-athletes in any way and will result in the
immediate termination of employment for the tutor and possible expulsion for student-athletes.
Quarterly
training
sessions
are
provided
for
all
tutors;
these
sessions
cover
policies,

accountability/evaluation,
and
tutorial
methods.

All
tutors
must
sign
statements
of
academic

integrity
and
tutorial
ethics.




In general:

      •   Individual tutoring sessions must take place on campus in an academic setting (e.g., an on-
          campus library, graduate students’ offices, or in the office of Academic Services and Student
          Development). Tutors are not allowed to meet with students in residence hall rooms on campus
          or anywhere off campus.
      •   Drop-in tutoring and small study groups take place ONLY in NU’s main library, in classrooms
          the Office of Academic Services & Student Development has reserved.
      •   Tutors
will
not
write
papers
for
student‐athletes,
nor
will
they
do
homework,
write
foreign

          language
compositions,
or
provide
any
other
materials
a
student
may
submit
to
an

          instructor
as
his/her
own
work.
(Only
writing
specialists,
with
specific
training
and

          approved
by
Academic
Services
&
Student
Development,
are
allowed
to
assist
student‐
          athletes
with
writing
assignments).

      •   Tutors
are
not
permitted
to
sit in or take notes in class or take an exam for a student-athlete,
          nor are they allowed to provide answers to take-home exams.
      •   Tutors may not copy or fax information, notes or assignments for student-athletes; such action
          may be considered an extra benefit, which is a violation of the NCAA regulations.
      •   Tutorial
sessions
are
designed
to
supplement
completed
class
work
and
are
not
designed

          as
substitutes
for
class
attendance.

      •   Each
tutorial
session
will
be
documented,
indicating
the
level
of
preparation
of
the
student‐
          athlete
as
well
as
the
performance
of
both
the
student‐athlete
and
tutor
during
the
session.



2
    See APPENDIX for Principles Regarding Academic Integrity


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   •   Student-athletes are expected to keep all appointments, be punctual and arrive prepared to
       participate in each tutorial session. Failure to fulfill these responsibilities may result in forfeiture
       of the privileges of the tutorial program. (Please refer to the “No Show” Policy on page 13 of
       this manual).

   •   If tutors have an Individual Tutoring Session scheduled between the hours of 5:00 p.m. and
       10:00 p.m., Sunday through Thursday, please contact Shea’na Grigsby via e-mail
       (sgrigsby@northwestern.edu) to reserve a room in Northwestern University’s main library.



CONFIDENTIALITY

As a member of the N’CAT Tutor Program, tutors will have access to information about student-athletes
that is not to be shared with others outside of Academic Services & Student Development.
Northwestern University is not permitted to disclose information regarding a student’s academic or
medical records to anyone on a formal or informal basis without the student’s written consent.
Occasionally, student-athletes with whom you routinely work may disclose personal information to you.
Confidential matters, especially those concerning the academic status and ability of student-
athletes, should not be compromised under any circumstances. If a tutor feels the information
disclosed warrants action or follow-up by the Office of Academic Services & Student Development, the
tutor should contact the tutor coordinator immediately.


INSIDER INFORMATION

Information related to the physical health/condition of a student-athlete must be closely guarded as well.
For example, if Willie Wildcat shows up to a tutoring session on crutches and admits he is unable to
play in Saturday’s big game, such knowledge could be passed along as insider information to a bookie.
Again, please safeguard the information and inform the tutor coordinator immediately if you are
contacted by anyone inquiring about insider information pertaining to student-athletes.


                             NCAA COMPLIANCE GUIDELINES

Strict observance of NCAA rules and regulations is another factor that contributes to the success of a
program. Student-athletes and employees of college athletic departments, including tutors, are governed
by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). The N’CAT Tutor Program adheres to a zero
tolerance policy with regards to the following NCAA rules and regulations. Any violation a tutor


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commits will result in immediate termination of employment, and may result in the loss of practice and
competition eligibility for the student-athlete(s) involved, including loss of athletic scholarship.

EXTRA BENEFIT RULE
The extra benefit rule is a regulation of NCAA compliance with which tutors must become familiar
with to avoid jeopardizing their employment with NUDAR and the eligibility of student-athlete(s) being
tutored. An extra benefit is defined as:
       Any special arrangement by an institutional employee or a representative of the
       institution’s athletic interests to provide a student-athlete or the student-athlete’s relative
       or friend a benefit that is not expressly authorized by NCAA legislation. Receipt of a
       benefit is not a violation if it is demonstrated that the same benefit is generally available
       to the institution’s students or their relatives or friends or to a particular segment of the
       student body (e.g., foreign students, minority students) determined on a basis unrelated to
       athletics ability.

   An N’CAT tutoring staff member may not provide a student-athlete with extra benefits or services,
including, but not limited to:
   ∅ Special discounts, payment arrangements or credit (e.g., credit line at a store) on a purchase or
       service (e.g., dry cleaning).
   ∅ Use of institutional telephones, long distance access codes or credit cards for personal reasons.
   ∅ Use of institutional copy machines and fax machines for personal reasons.
   ∅ Loan of an automobile or use of an automobile.
   ∅ Free or reduced-cost services, rentals or purchases of any type.
   ∅ Free or reduced-cost housing. A student-athlete cannot accept free or reduced-cost housing from
       any NU employee or booster. This includes in the Evanston area, in the student-athlete’s home
       city or any other location.
   ∅ Free or reduced-cost storage of personal belongings.
   ∅ Loan of money, signing or cosigning of loans or guarantee of bond.
   ∅ Free transportation (e.g., a ride home with a coach, ride with a booster).
   ∅ Gifts of cash or like items (e.g., gift certificates).
   ∅ Gifts of tangible items (e.g., clothing, cars, jewelry), including extra gear or equipment.
   ∅ Provisions of impermissible academic services (e.g., typing reports, papers, letters for a student-
       athlete).




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   ∅ Free or reduced-cost entertainment services from commercial agencies (e.g., movie tickets,
       dinners, use of car, reduced admission to institutional or community events).
   ∅ Payment of educational expenses (other than from permissible institutional and outside sources).


IN SUMMARY, AS AN EMPLOYEE OF NUDAR, A TUTOR MAY NOT:
1. Transport any student-athletes to or from campus or any other locations;
2. Give gifts or loans of money, food, clothing or other items of value to student-athletes;
3. Type papers for student-athletes, even if they offer to pay you;
4. Provide any services for a student-athlete that are not available to the general Northwestern
   University student body.
5. Be placed on a student-athlete’s complimentary admission list (a.k.a., comp or pass list) for any
   athletics contest.

            IMPORTANT NOTICE ON ASSISTANCE WITH PAPERS:
TUTORS ARE NOT ALLOWED TO ASSIST STUDENT-ATHLETES WITH
WRITING ASSIGNMENTS (PAPERS) WITHOUT FIRST RECEIVING WRITTEN
APPROVAL FROM THE TUTOR COORDINATOR AND THE SENIOR ASSISTANT
ATHLETICS DIRECTOR-ACADEMIC SERVICES. IF STUDENT-ATHLETES
REQUEST ASSISTANCE WITH A WRITING ASSIGNMENT, PLEASE DIRECT
THEM TO HIS/HER ADVISOR IN ACADEMIC SERVICES OR TO THE WRITING
PLACE IN THE LIBRARY.

      ANY TUTOR WHO DISREGARDS THIS RULE WILL BE TERMINATED
                          IMMEDIATELY.


               WHEN IN DOUBT ABOUT ISSUES OF NCAA COMPLIANCE,
               PLEASE STOP AND ASK BEFORE YOU ACT!

EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENT-ATHLETES
We view each N’CAT tutor as a valuable asset to the program and expect our student-athletes to show
proper respect. If improper conduct, unethical behavior, unexcused/repeated absences or repeat
tardiness occurs, that student-athlete may lose tutorial privileges.


Student-athletes are expected to participate actively in tutoring sessions, whether they are attending
drop-in sessions, have an individual appointment, or participating in learning teams. If student-athletes



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arrive unprepared for tutoring sessions, it is unlikely the tutoring session will be beneficial. Student-
athletes who are repeatedly unprepared are wasting tutors’ time and their own, as well as Athletics
Department funds. Should this occur, tutors should report this behavior to the tutor coordinator
immediately on the “Individual Tutor Session Feedback” form. 



               GENERAL GUIDELINES FOR STUDY SKILLS SERVICES
Study Skills assistance is available to all Northwestern University student-athletes for all classes in
which they are enrolled during a specific quarter. Student-athletes may use drop-in tutors, learning
teams available during study skills, or arrange for individual tutorials through their academic advisors in
Athletics. Drop-in tutoring assistance consists of quick, easily answered questions (no longer than 10-15
minutes). If a tutorial consists of more than this, a student-athlete is asked to request an individual
appointment with a tutor, which can be done through an academic advisor in athletics or the tutor
coordinator.


                              INDIVIDUAL TUTORING PROCESS

STUDENT-ATHLETE’S RESPONSIBILITY
       For individual tutoring, the student-athlete must complete an “Individual Tutor Request
Form” (located online). Once submitted, the tutor coordinator will subsequently forward the request to
the tutor who specializes in that specified course requested.

TUTOR’S RESPONSIBILITY
After a tutor has received the “Individual Tutor Request” from the tutor coordinator, it is the tutor’s
responsibility to contact the student-athlete no more than 48 hours after the request has been made.
Once the student-athlete and tutor agree on a meeting time, the tutor should go to the N’CAT Tutor
Program website (www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/tutorprogram_main.htm) and submit an
“Initial Appointment Contract”
(http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/form_tutorinitial_appt.htm)


       NOTE: Tutors will not be compensated for individual tutoring sessions conducted with student-
       athletes who have not signed up for tutoring assistance through the Office of Academic Services
       & Student Development.


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Tutorial sessions will normally occur during study skills hours in the rooms designated by the tutor
coordinator. Special arrangements at other locations (such as the Tech Library or tutor’s office) or times
may be made at the convenience of the student-athlete and tutor. However, tutorials MAY NEVER
occur at a student-athlete’s or tutor’s home or dorm room. In addition, tutors are asked, whenever
possible, to maintain a consistent location on campus for tutoring appointments; this reduces confusion
between the tutor and the student-athlete as to where the particular session should take place.

THE INITIAL TUTORIAL SESSION
The first few minutes should be for the tutor and the student-athlete to get acquainted. It is also
important for the tutor to establish the appropriate tone for each session and remain in control
throughout. The tutor should also use this time to become familiar with the course content and required
textbooks/course packets for the class by examining the course syllabus. All student-athletes should
come to tutoring sessions with an additional copy of their course syllabus for their tutor. If additional
material is needed, such as texts books or course packets, to assist the student-athlete further, the tutor
should complete a “Tutor Book Request Form” (see page 12).


DURING TUTORING SESSIONS
As each session begins, the tutor should develop a realistic plan with the student-athlete as to what will
be accomplished in the tutorial session. It is important to develop strategies and techniques that will
stimulate the student’s intellectual curiosity and motivate him/her to be challenged during each session.
In guiding student-athletes through the learning process, the tutor should give feedback for work
accomplished by the student-athlete, as it will positively reinforce all attempts at learning. Always
review materials learned in previous sessions. This strategy encourages the student-athlete to go back
and show mastery of areas from preceding sessions.


DEFINING THE STUDENT-ATHLETE’S NEEDS
Determining the best method of learning for each student-athlete is vital to tutoring success. The
student-athletes being tutored may be visual, auditory, or physical learners. It is important that the mode
for instructing student-athletes be immediately established. For example, it is usually ineffective to get
into a lengthy discussion of a topic with a student who is a visual learner. Sometimes students may not




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know their learning style. However, there are approaches a tutor can use to discover the preferred mode
of learning.


Begin each session by letting the student-athlete explain class difficulties. Allow student-athletes time
to explain themselves without interruptions or interpretations. Then ask open-ended questions
(beginning with why, how, or what) rather than closed-ended questions (beginning with who or when)
which elicit yes/no responses.


Defining student-athletes’ academic difficulties and learning styles is sometimes complex. If a tutor
feels that they need assistance in assessing a student-athlete’s needs, contact the tutor coordinator, who
can put tutors in touch with that student’s academic advisor in Athletics. Remember the three most
common problems likely to be encountered while tutoring students are weak study skills, poor reading
comprehension, and/or lack of motivation.


CONCLUDING EACH TUTORING SESSION
          At the conclusion of the first session (as well as all sessions throughout the quarter), the tutor and
student-athlete should review the time, date, and location for next session. Student-athletes should also
leave each session with a plan for additional study. After each session a tutor must complete the
“Individual Tutor Session Feedback Form”
(http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/form_tutorfeedback.htm) and have the student-
athlete sign your Tutor Time Sheet3 to verify the session has taken place. Again the above steps must
be completed to receive payment for tutoring sessions. If at any time you feel that the goals set for
certain tutorial sessions are not being met, please discuss any concerns with the tutor coordinator.


REQUESTING TEXTBOOKS AND COURSE PACKETS
Tutors may request the required textbooks/course packets being used in the course(s) they are tutoring.
To do so, simply complete the form located on-line (web address below) and return it to the tutor
coordinator via fax (847/491-7194), scanned and attached as an e-mail, or in person. Once the textbook
is ready for pick up, the tutor coordinator will contact the tutor.
        http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/pdf_tutor_bookrequest_form.pdf


3
    See APPENDIX for sample Tutor Time Sheet.


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All tutors must keep track of the books received since they are for tutors’ use ONLY. All materials must
be returned at the end of the quarter to the tutor coordinator. Failure to return course materials may
result in a delay of payment for services rendered and having a hold placed on the tutor’s student
account, barring course registration, until all materials are returned. Exceptions will be made for any
tutoring materials that can be used the following quarter (e.g., the yearlong General Chemistry
sequence).

                              REPORTING TUTORIAL SESSIONS

DROP-IN / LEARNING TEAM
Tutors who facilitate learning team or drop-in tutorials are required to submit a “Drop-in/Learning
Team Feedback Form” (insert link to access form when available) via the N’CAT Tutor Program
website. Any relevant comments or individual concerns should be included on this form and is strongly
encouraged. A “Drop-in/Learning Team Feedback Form” should still be completed and submitted to the
tutor coordinator for No- Shows, to ensure you are credited for time worked.

INDIVIDUAL
Individual tutoring sessions are to be reported to the tutor coordinator by submitting an “Individual
Tutor Session Feedback Form” within 24 hours of ALL tutorial sessions. The form can be accessed
online at:
                  www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/form_tutorfeedback.htm
The online form is brief, but includes important information. Examples of information to be included in
the session report/feedback include additional meeting time, date, and location; whether the student-
athlete was prepared, punctual, and attentive; and level of subject comprehension. Also, please include
any additional relevant comments.


It is very important that tutors give honest and complete feedback. Tutor input, combined with
observation from the academic advisor and comments from professors and teaching assistants, will
supply information necessary to determine whether we are meeting the needs of the specific student-
athlete. The student-athlete’s signature must be obtained on the Tutor Time Sheet during each
tutorial session (see next page for detail). If there is no student-athlete signature verifying the session,
the tutor will not receive credit for time logged.




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NO SHOWS/MISSED INDIVIDUAL APPOINTMENTS
If student-athletes fail to inform the tutor 24 hours in advance that they are unable to attend a scheduled
individual tutoring session, a student-athletes tutoring privileges could be suspended for up to a quarter.
Student-athletes and tutors must wait at least fifteen minutes after the start of the session before either
party may leave. If the student-athlete does not show up for tutoring, tutors will be compensated for
thirty minutes and should document this by checking the field labeled “No Show” on the Tutor Time
Sheet. This information should also be clearly noted on the “Individual Tutor Session Feedback
Form” on the days of missed scheduled appointments. If this procedure is not followed, tutors will not
be compensated for their time.


CANCELLING OR EMERGENCY SITUATIONS
It is imperative for tutors who cannot attend a scheduled tutoring session (drop-in, learning team, etc.),
to notify the tutor coordinator at least 24 hours in advance. In case of an emergency or illness, a tutor
must call as soon as they can to notify the tutor coordinator of their absence. This also allows the tutor
coordinator the opportunity to inform the student-athletes and the Study Skills Monitor before the
tutorial session.


                                               PAYROLL
Tutor salaries are determined by the tutor coordinator based on classification in school, prior tutoring
experience, educational opportunities, faculty recommendation, and other experience. All salary
agreements are considered confidential and should not be discussed with other tutors.
INITIALIZING THE PAYROLL PROCESS
Upon employment, tutors who are not currently employed by Northwestern University must schedule an
appointment with the tutor coordinator (Anderson Hall, located on the northeast side of Ryan Field, on
Central Street) to complete the necessary new university employment paperwork. Tutors should bring
two forms of identification such as a driver’s license, social security card, passport, state identification
card, or alien registration card to provide proof of citizenship or permission to work. University ID
cards are not accepted. All paperwork must be completed before tutors are added to the payroll.




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TIME SHEETS & RECEIVING PAYMENT
All tutors are paid biweekly. For tutors employed by another department on campus and who receive a
monthly stipend (e.g. a funded graduate student), the hours worked for the N’CAT tutor program will be
identified as additional pay in their monthly check. All time sheets must be submitted before the time
and date indicated on the Time Sheets Due Date sheet in order to ensure compensation for that time
period. A Tutor Time Sheet4 must be completed for each pay period. To submit completed Tutor
Time Sheets and other necessary materials a tutor may:
          1.) Scan and send materials via e-mail attachments to Shea’na Grigsby
              (sgrigsby@northwestern.edu)
          2.) Fax materials to (847)491-7194; ATTENTION: Shea’na Grigsby.
          3.) Drop materials off at Academic Services & Student Development (Ryan Field)


PREPARATION TIME COMPENSATION
As an N’CAT tutor, you have been hired for your knowledge and expertise in a specific academic area.
Occasionally, learning team and/or individual tutors can receive compensation for preparation time
(maximum 3 hour per session). Examples of approvable prep time include preparing for learning teams,
creating practice test/problem sets, extra reading, or other as approved. Any created documents must be
turned in with your prep-time record sheet.
In order to receive compensation, tutors must submit a Tutor Preparation Time Sheet (located online)
along with documents created for the tutoring session; failure to turn in either of the forms mentioned
above could result in not being compensated for time spent preparing for your tutorial session.
http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/pdf_preparation_time_record_sheet.pdf



                                                 EVALUATIONS

PROGRAM EVALUATION

Evaluations are an important part of the success for our Study Skills program. At the end of each
quarter, student-athletes and tutors will be asked to complete a short evaluation form. This information
will be used to assess and improve the N’CAT Tutor Program. Throughout the quarter, tutors are
encouraged to submit comments or suggestions to the tutor coordinator.
4
    See APPENDIX for sample Tutor Hour Report Sheet.


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TUTOR EVALUATION

We want to ensure your participation as an N’CAT tutor is beneficial; thus, your feedback is an integral
part of the process. One of the program’s goals is to help tutors develop their skills. Tutors are
encouraged to schedule a meeting with the tutor coordinator to discuss evaluations from the student-
athletes at the end of each quarter.


The ability to communicate effectively and teach difficult material to others is a highly transferable skill
to any job setting. If tutors are pursuing outside job interests and would like our office to provide a
letter of recommendation/reference or verify employment history, please feel free to contact the tutor
coordinator to make arrangements.




                                                     15
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                            FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS (FAQ’S)

Q: WHEN DO I GET PAID?
A: Tutors are paid biweekly or monthly based on the dates provided on the TIME SHEET DUE DATE
form. If you are employed or receive a monthly stipend from another university department, your pay
for tutoring will be included in your monthly check.

Q: WHAT IS THE PROCESS TO ENSURE I WILL BE PAID ON TIME?
A: If you are paid bi-weekly, you must submit hours you have worked from each pay period as it is
listed on your Tutor Time Sheet on ETES. The ETES website can only be accessed from on campus
computers; so it is best to record your hours on ETES each time you work.

Q: IF MY TIME SHEET IS TURNED IN AFTER THE DUE DATE/TIME, WHAT HAPPENS?
A: Your time sheet will not be processed until the following pay period. Please submit time sheets on
time to avoid waiting on your check (see Time Sheet Due Dates).

Q: WHO DO I TELL IF I AM UNABLE TO MAKE A SCHEDULED TUTORING SESSION?
A: You should inform the tutor coordinator and the student-athlete at least 24 hours in advance. If it is a
last minute emergency, contact the tutor coordinator and student-athlete as soon as possible.

Q: WHAT IS CONSIDERED AN EXTRA BENEFIT?
A: An extra benefit can be anything from letting a student-athlete you are tutoring use your car, giving
them notes you’ve taken from a course ,or lending them money.

Q: HOW LONG DO I WAIT FOR A STUDENT-ATHLETE TO SHOW UP FOR AN INDIVIDUAL
APPOINTMENT BEFORE I LEAVE?
A: Tutors must wait at least fifteen minutes before they leave. If the student-athlete does not show up
for the tutoring session, tutors will be compensated for thirty minutes and should document this by
checking the “No Show” field on the Tutor Time Sheet. This information should also be clearly noted
on the “Individual Tutor Session Feedback Form” on the days of missed scheduled appointments.

Q: MY STUDENT-ATHLETE CONTINUES TO MISS SCHEDULED APPOINTMENTS…WHAT DO I DO?
A: Provide this information to the tutor coordinator after the first missed appointment when you submit
your Individual Tutor Session Feedback Form. If this is ongoing the student-athlete may lose their
tutoring privileges.

Q: CAN I CONDUCT INDIVIDUAL OR LEARNING TEAM TUTORIAL SESSIONS WITHOUT PRIOR
ARRANGEMENT WITH THE TUTOR COORDINATOR?
A: No. All appointments must be pre-approved by the tutor coordinator in order to be paid. If a
student-athlete wants an individual tutor, please refer them to their academic advisor in athletics.

Q: I DON’T THINK MY TUTORING IS HELPING MY STUDENT…WHAT DO I DO?
A: You should speak with the tutor coordinator and/or the student-athlete’s academic advisor in
athletics about effective strategies to work with the student-athlete. (See Steps for Effective Tutoring
Sessions on page 9)




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       CONTACT INFORMATION AND IMPORTANT FORMS
                      N’CAT Tutor Coordinator
              Shea’na Grigsby (sgrigsby@northwestern.edu)
            Office of Academic Services & Student Development
                            Office: 847.491.8805
                            (1-8805 on campus)
                           Fax: 847.491.7194

 N’CAT Tutor Program website address (main)
http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/tutorprogram_main.htm

 N’CAT Tutor Quarterly Renewal Form
http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/form_tutorupdate.html

 Drop-in Feedback Form
http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/form_tutordropinfeedback.html

 Learning Team Feedback Form
http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/form_tutorlearningteamfeedbac
k.html

 Tutor Initial Appointment Contract
http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/form_tutorinitial_appt.htm

 Individual Tutor Session Feedback Form
http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/form_tutorfeedback.htm

 Tutor Book Request Form
http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/pdf_tutor_bookrequest_form.pdf

 Tutor Preparation Time Sheet
http://www.northwestern.edu/academicservices/pdf_preparation_time_record_s
heet.pdf




                                   17
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                        LIBRARY CLASSROOM GUIDE
All Library Classrooms are assigned a 4 digit room number. Each number in the
sequence provides information as to the location of the classroom:

1st digit = Floor Level

2nd digit = Tower

            3 = North Tower
            6 = East Tower
            7 = South Tower

3rd and 4th digit = Room Number

Once you ENTER the Tower in which the room is located: if the last two digits in the
room number are 22, go left. If the last two digits are 70, go right.

For example: to find room number 5722, go to the fifth floor (5722), then follow the
signs to the South Tower (5722). Once you enter the South Tower, turn left (5722) and
keep walking until you see room number 5722.




                                          18
                                                                                                                09/10


                                                    APPENDIX

“Learning Styles and Preferences” borrowed from the Office of Student Development Services,
University of Western Ontario
http://www.sdc.uwo.ca/learning/index.html?styles

What is a "learning style"?

To put it simply, your learning style (or learning preference) is the way you tend to learn best. It involves your
preferred method of taking in, organizing, and making sense of information. Learning styles do not tell us about a
person's abilities or intelligence, but they can help us understand why some tasks seem easier for us than others.
There are several benefits of thinking about and trying to understand learning preferences:


    •   people learn most effectively when the strategies used are closely matched with their preferred learning
        style
    •   sometimes we can improve our learning by knowing what our strengths are and then doing more of what
        we're good at
    •   often we can improve our learning by knowing what our weakness are and trying to enhance our skills in
        these areas
    •   different situations and learning environments require different learning strategies, so it's best to have a
        large repertoire from which to draw


Expanding Your Learning Preferences

There are 3 learning style preferences discussed here:


    1. auditory (learning by hearing)
    2. visual (learning by seeing)
    3. kinesthetic (learning by doing)


The ideas are not meant to be the absolute best strategy for each student in all situations. Rather, if you're looking
to improve your effectiveness as a tutor, choose the learning preference category that you feel best matches the
way your student likes to learn (e.g. visually), and check to see if you can follow the suggested strategies (e.g.
enhancing visual learning). Then, look at the strategies for the other two learning styles, and try to implement
some of these ideas into your repertoire as well.




                                                          19
                                                                                                          09/10



              Enhancing Auditory Learning (Learning By Hearing)

             Lecture Learning                                     Text Learning

•   listen to instructions and information given    •    rehearse/repeat information either silently in
    orally                                               your head, or out loud
•   sit towards the front of the room so you can    •    study with a partner and take turns reading to
    hear well and so that you won't be distracted        each other - discuss key concepts
    by the noises other students make               •    work in quiet areas to minimize hearing
•   sit away from doors, windows, and other              music, television or other distractions
    sources of noise                                •    if you prefer to study with music playing,
•   repeat information silently to yourself              choose something with no lyrics, and keep
•   "subvocalize" as you take notes - repeat             the volume low
    information to yourself as a quiet "mumble"     •    use rhymes or jingles to help remember
    that's barely audible                                important points
                                                    •    talk to yourself about textbook diagrams and
                                                         illustrations
                                                    •    ensure you understand by creating verbal
                                                         descriptions
                                                    •    tape yourself summarizing key points, then
                                                         play the tape as a memory rehearsal strategy
                                                    •    try to remember important terminology by
                                                         thinking about how parts of the words sound
                                                    •    read instructions and questions out loud to
                                                         yourself (or subvocalize in test situations)




                                                    20
                                                                                                              09/10



                 Enhancing Visual Learning (Learning By Seeing)

         Lecture Learning                                           Text Learning

•   watch for key words written on                   •    minimize visual distractions in your study space
    transparencies, PowerPoint slides, or the             (eg. cover your computer screen, do not sit
    board to help organize notes                          facing a window)
•   sit towards the front of the room                •    make an outline of key topics in chart or
•   choose a location where you can see the               diagram format
    instructor and all visual aids well              •    make pictures in your mind
•   sit away from doors, windows, bulletin           •    use the Cornell note-taking system - include a
    boards, and other potential distractions              left margin with key words
•   choose a seat where you can see the              •    look for sketches, diagrams, or charts to help
    instructor and all visual aids well                   interpret information - practice re-drawing them
•   try to listen and write down what you hear;           to help remember
    fill in your notes and check for                 •    write down problems and/or questions and
    understanding after each class                        practice writing solutions and/or responses
•   if confused about a detail, ask the instructor   •    use flash cards to help rehearse
    for clarification, write down what she/he        •    try to remember important terminology by
    says, then review later to ensure you                 looking for parts of the word you already know
    understand                                       •    make notes colorful
•   use visuals like symbols and color in notes      •    highlight notes so all information relating to
    to help flag new concepts and key ideas               one topic is in the same color category
•   ask the instructor if other visual               •    draw boxes or circles around terms/ concepts
    information is available (eg. course web              and draw lines or arrows to show how they are
    site, lecture outline)                                related to one another
•   complete readings before lectures                •    learn when and how to translate text into charts,
                                                          graphs, or pictures, such as make a time-line
                                                          from dates, or draw percentages or statistical
                                                          information in a pie chart




                                                         21
                                                                                                                     09/10


                    Enhancing Kinesthetic Learning (Learning By Doing)

             Lecture Learning                                                   Text Learning

•   ask questions and participate in discussions               •   do something physical before sitting down to read or
    whenever possible                                              study
•   question the relevance and applicability to the            •   highlight, underline, or take notes
    course, yourself, and life in general...                   •   use your fingers or a piece of paper to help keep track
•   take a small object (e.g., stress-ball) to class to            of where you are
    play with in one hand while the other takes notes          •   break reading tasks into small chunks
•   consider using a lap-top to take notes (for some           •   stop after each chunk, think about what you learned,
    courses with a lot of equations, graphs, and                   and write a brief summary
    diagrams, such as math and chemistry, a lap top            •   personalize the information - think about how the
    may not be practical)                                          concepts apply to you or other people you know
•   consider choosing course sections offering 3 one-          •   think about how you can use the information outside
    hour segments rather than 1 three-hour segment                 the classroom or course
    when possible                                              •   take regular, brief breaks to move around
•   use class breaks to stand up and stretch                   •   use the discussion or practice questions in the
                                                                   textbook or study guide to help rehearse information -
                                                                   if none are available, make up your own questions as
                                                                   you study
                                                               •   move a body part (e.g., swing or tap your foot) or
                                                                   walk around if it helps you concentrate
                                                               •   write processes, etc. on cards, mix them up, then
                                                                   practice physically arranging them into the correct
                                                                   sequence
                                                               •   if you typically use your hands when talking to
                                                                   people, try using your hands when studying and
                                                                   explaining concepts to yourself




                                                          22
                                                                                                      09/10


                               NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
                 DEPARTMENT OF ATHLETICS AND RECREATION


THE PURPOSE OF EDUCATION FOR STUDENT WORKERS


   •   Compliance is a shared responsibility of student-athletes, coaches, athletic department staff and
       student support staff.
   •   Our goal is to encourage all to ask first to avoid a NCAA violation.
   •   There have been a number of NCAA infractions cases involving student workers.


GENERAL GUIDELINES

As a student worker you are a representative of the Northwestern University Department of Athletics
and Recreation. Your demeanor and actions must be professional at all times.

Student workers should never use their position within the department for personal gain (i.e. obtaining
student-athlete’s autographs, getting extra marketing give-a-ways etc.).

                                 PRIVACY OF INFORMATION

An institution is not permitted to disclose information regarding a student’s academic or medical records
to anyone on a formal or informal basis without the student’s written consent. Student workers may be
privy to confidential information and it is imperative that no comments be made to anyone either
publicly or privately.

In addition an institution may not comment publicly or privately about the recruitment status of a
prospect nor may they publicize a prospect’s visit to campus.

                                    UNETHICAL CONDUCT

Unethical conduct by a prospective or enrolled student-athlete or a current or former institutional staff
member, including student workers may include, but is not limited to:

(a) Refusal to furnish information relevant to an investigation of a possible violation of an NCAA
    regulation when requested to do so by the NCAA or the individual’s institution;
(b) Knowing involvement in arranging for fraudulent academic credit or false transcripts for a
    prospective or an enrolled student-athlete;
(c) Knowing involvement in offering or providing a prospective or an enrolled student-athlete an
    improper inducement or extra benefit or improper financial aid;




                                                    23
                                                                                                        09/10

(d) Knowingly furnishing the NCAA or the individual’s institution false or misleading information
    concerning the individual’s involvement in or knowledge of matters relevant to a possible violation
    of an NCAA regulation;
(e) Receipt of benefits by an institutional staff member for facilitating or arranging a meeting between a
    student-athlete and an agent, financial advisor or a representative of an agent or advisor (e.g.,
    “runner”); or
(f) Knowing involvement in providing a banned substance or impermissible supplement to student-
    athletes, or knowingly providing medications to student-athletes contrary to medical licensure,
    commonly accepted standards of care in sports medicine practice, or state and federal law.

                                         EXTRA BENEFITS

An extra benefit is any special arrangement by an institutional employee or a representative of the
institution’s athletics interests to provide a student-athlete or the student-athlete’s relative or friend a
benefit that is not expressly authorized by NCAA legislation. Receipt of a benefit is not a violation if it
is demonstrated that the same benefit is generally available to the institution’s students or their relatives
or friends or to a particular segment of the student body (e.g., foreign students, minority students) on a
basis unrelated to athletics.

An institutional employee or representative of the institution’s athletics interests may not provide a
student-athlete with extra benefits or services, including, but not limited to:
    ∅ Special discounts, payment arrangements or credit on a purchase or service.
    ∅ Use of telephones, long distance access codes or credit cards for personal reasons.
    ∅ Use of institutional copy machines and fax machines for personal reasons.
    ∅ An automobile or use of an automobile.
    ∅ Free or reduced-cost services, rentals or purchases of any type.
    ∅ Free or reduced-cost housing from any NU employee or booster. This includes in the Evanston
       area, in the student-athlete’s home city or any other location.
    ∅ Free or reduced-cost storage of personal belongings.
    ∅ Loan of money, signing or cosigning of loans or guarantee of bond.
    ∅ Transportation (e.g., a ride home with a coach, ride with a booster).
    ∅ Cash or like items (e.g., gift certificates).
    ∅ Tangible items (e.g., clothing, cars, jewelry), including extra gear or equipment.
    ∅ Impermissible academic services (e.g., composing or typing papers)
    ∅ Free or reduced-cost entertainment services from commercial agencies (e.g., movie tickets,
       dinners, use of car, reduced admission to institutional or community events).
    ∅ Educational expenses (other than from permissible institutional and outside sources).

                                        ACADEMIC FRAUD

                                        Northwestern University
                                Principles Regarding Academic Integrity

Registration at Northwestern requires adherence to the University's standards of academic



                                                     24
                                                                                                        09/10

integrity. These standards may be intuitively understood, and cannot in any case be listed exhaustively;
the following examples represent some basic types of behavior that are unacceptable:

1. Cheating: using unauthorized notes, study aids, or information on an examination; altering a graded
   work after it has been returned, then submitting the work for regarding; allowing another person to
   do one's work and submitting that work under one's own name; submitting identical or similar papers
   for credit in more than one course without prior permission from the instructors.
2. Plagiarism: submitting material that in part or whole is not entirely one's own work without
   attributing those same portions to their correct source.
3. Fabrication: falsifying or inventing any information, data or citation; presenting data that were not
   gathered in accordance with standard guidelines defining the appropriate methods for collecting or
   generating data and failing to include an accurate account of the method by which the data were
   gathered or collected.
4. Obtaining an Unfair Advantage: (a) stealing, reproducing, circulating or otherwise gaining access
   to examination materials prior to the time authorized by the instructor; (b) stealing, destroying,
   defacing or concealing library materials with the purpose of depriving others of their use; (c)
   unauthorized collaborating on an academic assignment (d) retaining, possessing, using or circulating
   previously given examination materials, where those materials clearly indicate that they are to be
   returned to the instructor at the conclusion of the examination; (e) intentionally obstructing or
   interfering with another student's academic work or (f) otherwise undertaking activity with the
   purpose of creating or obtaining an unfair academic advantage over other students' academic work.
5. Aiding and Abetting Academic Dishonesty: (a) providing material, information, or other assistance
   to another person with knowledge that such aid could be used in any of the violations stated above,
   or (b) providing false information in connection with any inquiry regarding academic integrity.
6. Falsification of Records and Official Documents: altering documents affecting academic records;
   forging signatures of authorization or falsifying information on an official academic document,
   grade report, letter of permission, petition, drop/add form, ID card, or any other official University
   document.
7. Unauthorized Access to computerized academic or administrative records or systems: viewing
   or altering computer records, modifying computer programs or systems, releasing or dispensing
   information gained via unauthorized access, or interfering with the use or availability of computer
   systems or information.


                                                    25
                                                                                                    09/10



The NCAA strictly prohibits any institutional staff member (e.g., coach, professor, tutor, teaching
assistant, student worker) from completing coursework for student-athletes. This prohibition includes,
but is not limited to, the following:
• Providing student-athletes with course supplies (e.g., calculators, art supplies).
• Completing homework or coursework for a student-athlete.
• Allowing student-athletes to copy your homework.
• Typing or writing a paper and/or an assignment for a student-athlete.
• Providing answers to take-home exams.
• Sitting in or taking notes and/or an exam for a student-athlete.
• Copy or fax information, notes or assignments for student-athletes.


                                           GAMBLING

The NUDAR has instituted the following rule, separate and apart from any governing the University
community generally or any imposed by the NCAA. It applies to student-athletes, student trainers,
student managers, student workers, coaches and all athletic department personnel.
There is a zero tolerance for participating in any gambling activity prohibited by the NCAA. Prohibited
gambling activities include, but are limited to the following:
   •   placing a wager on any college or professional athletic contest through legal means such as a
       casino sports book or internet gambling or illegal means such as a bookie or someone the bettor
       knows will transmit the wager to a bookie;
   •   participation in fantasy leagues, pools or contests that involves a wager or entry fee in exchange
       for the opportunity to reap a reward;
   •   knowingly providing information directly or indirectly to a gambler or a bookie that might
       reasonably influence betting on an athletic event (including but not limited to information about
       injuries, game plans or field conditions); or
   •   in the case of a student-athlete, altering his/her performance in a way designed to affect in a
       negative way the outcome of an athletic event in which the athlete participates.

                             REMEMBER: ASK BEFORE YOU ACT!




                                                   26

				
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