INSGC Affiliate

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					                                        2010

INSGC Affiliate Manual version 1.0




                       Indiana Space Grant Consortium
                       Allison Peltier / Angie Verissimo
                       December 15, 2010
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INSGC Affiliate Manual                                                                                                             ver 1.0, 12/15/10


Table of Contents
1     The Indiana Space Grant Consortium .................................................................................................. 1
    1.1     Purpose.......................................................................................................................................... 1
    1.2     History........................................................................................................................................... 1
    1.3     Mission, Vision, Values and Goals ............................................................................................... 2
      1.3.1        INSGC Mission ..................................................................................................................... 2
      1.3.2        INSGC Vision ....................................................................................................................... 2
      1.3.3        INSGC Values: ..................................................................................................................... 2
      1.3.4        INSGC Goals: ....................................................................................................................... 3
2     INSGC Affiliate Information ............................................................................................................... 3
    2.1     Affiliate Types .............................................................................................................................. 3
    2.2     What does it mean to be an affiliate? ............................................................................................ 3
    2.3     Benefits of Affiliation with INSGC .............................................................................................. 3
    2.4     Affiliate Communication with INSGC ......................................................................................... 3
      2.4.1        Central Office Contact Information ...................................................................................... 3
    2.5     Affiliate Communication with NASA .......................................................................................... 4
    2.6     Responding to Requests from Prospective Affiliates.................................................................... 4
    2.7     INSGC and NASA Promotion Policy ........................................................................................... 5
    2.8     Distribution of Information About INSGC ................................................................................... 5
    2.9     INSGC Strategic Plan and Budget ................................................................................................ 5
    2.10       Calendar of Events .................................................................................................................... 5
    2.11       Schedule of Annual Meetings ................................................................................................... 5
3     Proposals, Accounting, and Reporting ................................................................................................. 6
    3.1     Program Targets and Dates ........................................................................................................... 6
    3.2     Applying for Grants ...................................................................................................................... 6
      3.2.1        Scholarships/Fellowships ...................................................................................................... 7
      3.2.2        Internships ............................................................................................................................. 7
      3.2.3        Projects .................................................................................................................................. 7
      3.2.4        Matching funds – General ..................................................................................................... 7
    3.3     Award Process .............................................................................................................................. 7
      3.3.1        Projects .................................................................................................................................. 7
      3.3.2        Scholarships and Fellowships ............................................................................................... 8
      3.3.3        Internships ............................................................................................................................. 8
    3.4     Reporting....................................................................................................................................... 8
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        3.4.1         Scholarships and Internships ................................................................................................. 8
        3.4.2         Fellowships ........................................................................................................................... 8
        3.4.3         Projects and Fellowships ....................................................................................................... 8
    3.5       Invoicing ....................................................................................................................................... 8
        3.5.1         Scholarships .......................................................................................................................... 8
        3.5.2         Fellowships and Internships .................................................................................................. 9
        3.5.3         Projects .................................................................................................................................. 9
4       Affiliate Type-Specific Information................................................................................................... 10
    4.1       Academic Affiliates .................................................................................................................... 10
        4.1.1         Role and Responsibilities .................................................................................................... 10
        4.1.2         Annual Dues........................................................................................................................ 10
        4.1.3         Distribution Information about INSGC on Academic Campuses ....................................... 10
        4.1.4         Award/Grant Process .......................................................................................................... 10
        4.1.5         Matching Funds................................................................................................................... 11
        4.1.6         Academic Affiliate Directors .............................................................................................. 12
    4.2       Industry Affiliates ....................................................................................................................... 13
        4.2.1         Role and Responsibilities .................................................................................................... 13
        4.2.2         Annual Dues........................................................................................................................ 13
        4.2.3         Distribution Information about INSGC by Industry Affiliates ........................................... 13
        4.2.4         Award/Grant Process .......................................................................................................... 13
        4.2.5         Industry Affiliate Directors ................................................................................................. 13
    4.3       Outreach Affiliates ...................................................................................................................... 14
        4.3.1         Role and Responsibilities .................................................................................................... 14
        4.3.2         Distribution Information about INSGC by Outreach Affiliates .......................................... 14
        4.3.3         Annual Dues........................................................................................................................ 14
        4.3.4         Award/Grant Process .......................................................................................................... 14
        4.3.5         Outreach Affiliate Directors................................................................................................ 15
Glossary/ FAQs........................................................................................................................................... 16
Appendix A - NASA Office of Education Outcomes/Priority Programs ................................................... 19
Appendix B - Building Evaluation into Your Project ................................................................................. 22
Appendix C – Example Academic Affiliate Student Research Proposal.................................................... 24
Appendix D - Example Academic Faculty Project ..................................................................................... 29
Appendix E – Example Industry Project..................................................................................................... 34
Appendix F-Example Outreach Affiliate Project ........................................................................................ 37
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1 The Indiana Space Grant Consortium
1.1 Purpose
The Indiana Space Grant Consortium (INSGC) is working to expand opportunities for the people
of Indiana to learn about and participate in NASA's aeronautics and space projects by supporting
and enhancing science and engineering education, research and public outreach efforts. INSGC
is proud to be a source of NASA related information, awards, and programs for the State of
Indiana. Currently, there are 52 consortia - one in each state, the District of Columbia and the
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico. Annually, each consortium receives funds to develop and award
student fellowship and scholarship programs, interdisciplinary NASA related research, education
and public service programs, and cooperative initiatives with industry, research laboratories, and
state, local, and other governments. Although it is primarily a higher education program, Space
Grant programs encompass the entire length of the education pipeline, including
elementary/secondary and informal education.

NASA defines the primary objectives of the Space Grant College and Fellowship Program as:
   1.   A national network that
   2.   Promotes STEM education, through
   3.   Cooperative programs and
   4.   Interdisciplinary programs, while
   5.   Recruiting and training the next diverse workforce
Space Grant consortia, including Affiliates, are expected to know and fulfill these objectives.

1.2 History
Public Law 100-147, passed in 1987, authorized NASA to initiate Space Grant in response to the
need for a coordinated effort to enhance utilization of space resources, improve quality of life,
and help maintain America’s preeminence in aerospace science and technology. The mainly
state-based Consortia consist of college and university systems, government agencies, private
industry, libraries, museums, and informal education organizations involved in aerospace
activities. The lead institutions provide leadership and support for program objectives in their
state and nationally by interacting with other universities and organizations, broadening joint
activities with NASA and aerospace related industries, and providing service functions including
support to elementary and secondary schools and the public. The Indiana Space Grant
Consortium was established in 1991 at Purdue University. This consortium presently consists of
twelve academic (college and university), eight outreach (museums and science centers), and two
industrial (small businesses and larger companies) affiliates.

INSGC has had four eras of affiliate size/growth patterns. The original Indiana Space Grant
Consortium consisted of four affiliates (Purdue West Lafayette, Purdue Calumet, Indiana
University Bloomington, Notre Dame), from 1991 until roughly 1996. There was an era of
affiliate growth in the late 1990s with an explicit goal of having at least one academic affiliate in
each of the Indiana Congressional Districts. However, the Consortium initially used a “block
grant” funding formula based on university type; the research campuses at West Lafayette,
Bloomington, and South Bend received more funds than other campuses. After the current

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Director (Dr. Barrett Caldwell) took over in 2002, there was a shift from the block grant to
competitive award funding, with requirements for proposals for most projects. A successful
upgrade proposal in 2005 resulted in increased funding available for awards and scholarships,
and there has been a slow growth in the number of academic and outreach affiliates.

1.3 Mission, Vision, Values and Goals

1.3.1 INSGC Mission
The mission of the Indiana Space Grant Consortium is to promote workforce development,
formal and informal education, and research in STEM areas by the dissemination of NASA-
related activities, content, and opportunities to the residents of the State of Indiana.

1.3.2 INSGC Vision
The Indiana Space Grant Consortium will be the premier source of coordination, information,
and inspiration for NASA-related education, outreach, and workforce needs of Indiana.

1.3.3 INSGC Values:
   1. A strong STEM education base that supports learning across the lifespan
   2. An organization structure that maximizes the accomplishments of its members
   3. Inspiration of learners of all ages to explore aerospace science and technology
   4. Excellence in the development, delivery, and support of space-related products and
      programs
   5. The development of individuals from diverse backgrounds and experiences in Space
      Grant activities

Education - Indiana Space Grant Consortium values the necessity of developing lifelong
learning, particularly when it pertains to NASA, aerospace sciences and technologies, and
Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics disciplines.

Organization- Indiana Space Grant Consortium values a strong internal structure that allows both
the staff and affiliates of INSGC to operate as a seamless team in order to achieve the excellence
that we are looking for in this organization.

Inspiration– Indiana Space Grant Consortium values the inspiration of learners of all ages.
Learning occurs in those who are very young, and those with a long lifetime of experiences;
learning and inspiration occur in formal and informal education and experiential environments.
We are striving to create a culture that is innovative, creative, and enthusiastic when it comes to
creating inspiration for NASA and NASA-related subjects.

Excellence – Indiana Space Grant Consortium values the ability to provide excellent quality of
service to the residents of the State of Indiana. We endeavor to go above and beyond the
standards for the products that we create, the activities and opportunities that we support, and the
processes that are the foundation of our performance.

Development- Indiana Space Grant Consortium values the development of all persons and
programs touched by this organization. We seek out new ideas and concepts, and explore new
ways in which we can expand the depth and breadth of our organization.

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1.3.4 INSGC Goals:
      INSGC will promote NASA-related STEM workforce development by providing support
      to STEM research and education in higher education settings.
      INSGC will provide educational opportunities for K-12 students and teachers in order to
      inspire students to STEM disciplines.
      INSGC will collaborate with formal and informal STEM educators in order to promote
      awareness of NASA-related missions to the general public.


2 INSGC Affiliate Information
2.1 Affiliate Types
The three types of INSGC affiliates are Academic, Industry, and Outreach.

Academic Affiliates: Any affiliate whose primary role is formal education for (K-12), college
                     academy, or institution of higher education with substantial STEM
                     emphases and student enrollments
Industry Affiliates:   Any business that is considered a legal entity that can enter into contracts

Outreach Affiliates:   Any affiliate that strives to extend community service or benefits as an
                       educational outreach program, focusing on STEM education and literacy

2.2 What does it mean to be an affiliate?
Affiliates have the opportunity to receive direct funding support from INSGC, and have the
opportunity to receive advance information, contribute strategic input, and vote on INSGC
activity and projects. In response, affiliates are noted as official participants in INSGC by
NASA, and are expected to be able to respond to NASA queries regarding information and
knowledge about INSGC policies, procedures, and decision making activities. In addition,
affiliates should be familiar with the mission, goals, and objectives of the National Space Grant
College and Fellowship Program.

2.3 Benefits of Affiliation with INSGC
INSGC is working toward establishing and developing a network of persons and institutions
committed toward common goals. Affiliation with INSGC allows member organizations
networking opportunities that might otherwise be unavailable. These networking opportunities
include connections with INSGC and NASA as well as the Consortia’s over 900 Affiliates which
includes universities, colleges, industry, museums, science centers, and state and local agencies.

2.4 Affiliate Communication with INSGC

2.4.1 Central Office Contact Information
INSGC
Purdue University
Gerald D and Edna E Mann Hall, Room 160
203 South Martin Jischke Drive

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West Lafayette, IN 47907-1971
Tel: 765-494-5873
Fax: 765-494-4850
Email: insgc@purdue.edu

INSGC Program Manager
Dr. Dawn Whitaker
Tel: 765-494-9052
Email: dwhitaker@purdue.edu

INSGC Director
Dr. Barrett Caldwell
Tel: 765-494-5412
Email: bscaldwell@purdue.edu

2.5 Affiliate Communication with NASA
Our program manager is Diane DeTroye, Office of Education, NASA Headquarters. Indiana is
part of the regional service network of the Office of Education at NASA Glenn Research Center.
In general, affiliates are not expected to independently contact NASA on Space Grant activity.
However, if an affiliate has questions or concerns that cannot be addressed by the central office,
they can contact Diane DeTroye through the following:

Diane DeTroye
c/o LaTeicia Durham, Program Analyst/Coordinator Space Grant Program
Suite 6M35, Office of Education
ATTN: Receiving and Inspections (Rear of Building)
NASA Headquarters
300 E Street, SW
Washington, DC 20546-0001
Tel: 202-358-1069
Email: Diane.D.Detroye@NASA.GOV

2.6 Responding to Requests from Prospective Affiliates
The prospective Affiliate (specifically a person at the organization who is able to represent and
act as an authorized representative of the organization) should contact the INSGC Director. The
organization will be asked to consider their potential contributions and organizational (not solely
individual) commitments to participate in STEM student education, program development, and
decision-making in the INSGC as a body.

Prospective new affiliates must complete forms that indicate the STEM strengths of the affiliate,
and demonstrate an awareness of the fiscal, administrative, and organizational requirements of
the affiliate as an institution, rather than simply an interested group of individuals. INSGC
Affiliate Directors reserve the right to reject an application based on limited contributions, poor
administrative or organizational authority or commitment, or excessive competition/overlap with
existing affiliates.



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2.7 INSGC and NASA Promotion Policy
INSGC is a program funded by NASA, and as such, is subject to many of the restrictions that
NASA has on promotion. The host institution for INSGC is Purdue University, but INSGC is
not limited to activities at, or for the benefit of, Purdue University. NASA, Purdue University,
and/or INSGC logos, references, or indications of funding support may not be used to suggest
endorsement, commercial promotion, or official policy. INSGC is not intended to promote or
engage in strictly profit-making activities. The INSGC “Inspire • Engage • Educate • Employ”
logo is explicitly the design of Ann Broughton and Barrett Caldwell, and is derived from the
official seal of the State of Indiana. The INSGC logo should not be used or modified without the
explicit permission of the INSGC Director. No organization should be seen as representing or
committing the official policy, intention, or views of the INSGC without explicit communication
with and permission from INSGC.

2.8 Distribution of Information About INSGC
In an attempt to promote both INSGC and NASA, the INSGC Central Office has at various times
created scholarship/fellowship brochures, annual funding summaries, physical (INSGC
Observer) and electronic (INSGC Voyager) newsletters. More recently, the Central Office
created a Facebook page to help others find out about INSGC. Affiliates should feel free to
request copies of the physical documents available to give out to interested parties, and links to
our electronic documents (including the electronic archive to our Observer newsletter) available
physically and linked to their websites.

2.9 INSGC Strategic Plan and Budget
Affiliates can find information on the strategic plan at the INSGC website (www.insgc.org) as
well as upon request from the INSGC office. Information on INSGC’s annual budget is stored
internally and is not currently available online as it contains information on staff salaries.
Requests for budget information should be directed to the INSGC Director.

2.10 Calendar of Events
A calendar of events for INSGC and its affiliates is located on the INSGC website. Currently,
affiliates contact INSGC with any upcoming events, awards, etc. INSGC then updates
information on the insgc.org website. Affiliates are encouraged to contact INSGC on any
upcoming events and announcement they feel would benefit other affiliates, awardees, and
INSGC.

2.11 Schedule of Annual Meetings
The Affiliate Spring Meeting is held in April each year. The meeting is open to all affiliates and
all out of pocket expenses are covered by the consortium (i.e., reimbursable travel, meal, hotel
expenses). The meeting location alternates each year between affiliate sites.

The Affiliate Fall Meeting is held via teleconference from INSGC headquarters. The meeting is
typically held in October.




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3 Proposals, Accounting, and Reporting

3.1 Program Targets and Dates

INSGC does not select the dates of a grant year. The NASA Program Manager communicates the
cycle year along with base program budget to the Consortium office for each funding cycle. This
date impacts award selection and processing as well as required reporting dates. Based on the
cycle date, final reporting is normally due from the Consortium office to NASA within 45 days
of the ending of the cycle year.
The role of the INSGC within the state and our goals as a state level consortium reflect both
NASA priorities and the social, educational, and economic context of the state. Although this is
is a 5 year grant, NASA expectations and guidance are provided annually. Discussion with
affiliates regarding goals and targets is also conducted on a regular basis. The Consortium office
integrates this input and sets program targets (project and competition goals) on an annual basis
for the health of the organization. Though these change over time, current priorities are listed
below to aid in the development of relevant applications:

   Current Areas of Emphasis (INSGC Priority Programs):
   1. Authentic, hands-on student experiences in science and engineering disciplines
   2. Engage middle-school teachers in hands-on curriculum enhancement capabilities through
      exposure to NASA scientific and technical expertise
   3. Summer opportunities for secondary students on college campuses with the objective of
      increased enrollment in STEM disciplines or interest in STEM careers
   4. Develop new relationships as well as sustain and strengthen existing institutional
      relationships with community colleges
   5. Biomedical research and activities
   6. Environmental Science and Global Climate Change research and activities
   7. Diversity of institutions, faculty, and student participants
   8. Enhance the capacity of institutions to support innovative research infrastructure
      activities to enable early career faculty to focus their research toward NASA priorities

3.2 Applying for Grants
In general, requests should be in the form of a proposal submitted as part of the annual
competition. Guidelines for each year’s competitions are provided via the INSGC website and
office. These requests are subject to external peer review, so please note the requirements for
proposal evaluation. There must be explicit identification of: Who is the money for? What will
get done, and who will do it? Which NASA Education Outcome is met, and how (See Appendix
A)? How many people will be served, and how will it be monitored and reported? What are
your mechanisms for assessment, dissemination, and documentation? What is your logic model
(See Appendix B)? What is the budget and costshare (matching funds)? Proposals that do not
clearly answer all of these questions are unlikely to receive funding. For information on proper
evaluation methods for your project please see Appendix B of this manual.

Specific priority requests, off-cycle/short notice projects, and unique opportunities may be
considered as they fit within INSGC budget availability, NASA Outcome priority (See Appendix

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A), and statewide emphasis. Statements of work will be requested, and should still address all of
the issues indicated above.

3.2.1 Scholarships/Fellowships
NASA requires Space Grant consortia to provide at least 25% of funds for scholarship and
fellowship awards at academic affiliates. Students attending INSGC affiliate institutions who are
US citizens and are in a STEM discipline major with at least a 2.5 GPA may apply for
scholarship and fellowship funding. INSGC encourages these students to be enrolled full time.
There are three levels of awards: undergraduate scholarships, Master’s Fellowships, and
Doctoral Fellowships. Guidelines for applications are available on the INSGC website
(www.insgc.org). Affiliates are strongly encouraged to recruit applicants, especially to improve
diversity of awardees. At least one undergraduate scholarship is awarded each year to every
academic affiliate with multiple valid applications.

3.2.2 Internships
Internship opportunities provide real-world work experience to undergraduate students in an
internship/mentorship environment. Applications for all NASA internships at all locations can
now be completed in one place at the NASA One Stop Shopping Initiative (intern.nasa.gov). A
single annual application through this site will register the applicant for all internship
opportunities.

3.2.3 Projects
Project funding is available for a variety of project types for undergraduate students, graduate
students, faculty, and outreach. Examples include faculty teaching and research, curriculum
development, outreach projects, multidisciplinary and inter-institutional research, hands-on
classroom or project-based experiences for undergraduate or high school programs, professional
development, and summer or after-school programs. Guidelines for the Proposal Narrative and
budget forms are available from the INSGC office or website (www.insgc.org). Appendix A
contains an explanation of priority programs and a brief description of the Discovery,
Engagement, and Themed Competition awards to aid researchers in deciding which program best
fits their research goals.

3.2.4 Matching funds – General
Matching funds, also known as costshare, are required for all non-scholarship awards. This is
non-federal support, either cash or in-kind, that is also used to support a project funded by
INSGC. NASA requires that our total non-scholarship budget is matched 1:1. See the Academic,
Outreach and Industry sections below for specific suggestions, and the Glossary Section for
additional information.

3.3 Award Process

3.3.1 Projects
The official Acceptance Letter notification for the award is sent to the Principal Investigator (PI)
of the project along with the Original Budget form to be completed. INSGC then needs the
signed, original Acceptance Letter and completed Budget form submitted back to INSGC within
two weeks.


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3.3.2 Scholarships and Fellowships
An Award Letter is sent to the recipient from the INSGC office and is copied to the Affiliate
director. The Acceptance Letter is included and must be signed by the recipient and returned to
the Affiliate director, who then signs and returns to the INSGC office.

3.3.3 Internships
The recipient will receive a Support Letter from the INSGC office.

3.4 Reporting
NASA has explicit requirements for all programs funded by INSGC to submit annual reports as a
condition for continued funding and good standing of the Consortium. Thus, the INSGC Central
Office puts a strong emphasis on accurate and timely reporting by awardees. Requirements for
the different award types are discussed below.

3.4.1 Scholarships and Internships
Students who are awarded scholarships are asked to participate in an exit survey and assessment
team interview. The recipients will be contacted directly at the end of their award period with
specific instructions.

3.4.2 Fellowships
Fellowship recipients are asked to provide a digital photo for use in the newsletter, and to
participate in an exit survey and assessment team interview. The recipients will be contacted
directly at the end of their award period with specifics. Fellowship recipients must also meet the
reporting requirements in the following Projects and Fellowships section.

3.4.3 Projects and Fellowships
Interim Report: On January 31 of the current grant year, a three paragraph progress report is due
to the INSGC office reflecting an overview of the project, progress to date and expected
outcome.

Final: Final Reporting and Final Budget for projects can be submitted anytime after the
completion of the project but are required no later than 45 days after the grant year end date.
Templates for Final Reporting and Final Budgets are located on the INSGC website at
www.insgc.org.

3.5 Invoicing
Below are guidelines on invoicing for the different award types. Please keep in mind that
different institutions have different policies which may complicate interactions with the Purdue
University Sponsored Programs office. Contact the INSGC office with any specific questions or
concerns.

3.5.1 Scholarships
Scholarships are currently managed through subcontracts with each academic affiliate. Thus,
scholarship payment requirements and rules are subject to the rules at the affiliate institution, and
not simply INSGC. Generally, invoicing is not required for scholarships. It is INSGC policy that
scholarship and fellowship funds cannot be used for non-educational fees, graduate student
tuition remission, or past due accounts.

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3.5.2 Fellowships and Internships
Payments for fellowships and internships are submitted directly to the awardee. As discussed in
the Award Process section, the information requested with the Acceptance Letter must be
returned to the INSGC office within two weeks of award notice. It is INSGC policy that
scholarship and fellowship funds cannot be used for non-educational fees, graduate student
tuition remission, or past due accounts. A check will be processed by the Purdue University
Sponsored Programs Office and mailed directly to the awardee. Fellowship awards are divided
into three payments over the course of the award year. Summer Internships are divided into two
payments over the course of the internship.

3.5.3 Projects
In order to receive reimbursement for INSGC funded projects, Affiliates must submit their
invoices, preferably on a monthly or minimum quarterly basis, to the Purdue University
Department of Sponsored Programs Service. INSGC desires to be a good business partner to its
Affiliates, and has established a goal that all invoices should be paid in a timely manner. The
responsibility of this directive falls under the Purdue University Department of Sponsored
Programs Service. INSGC has developed and implemented procedures to prevent delays in
processing invoices for payment. The submission of invoices from Affiliates for all costs
involved on a yearly project/scholarships (fellowships and internships are submitted directly to
the awardee) must contain the following information for accurate and timely payment from
INSGC:

       1.   Project name and Assigned Award Number
       2.   Reporting period (Time-frame charges are covering within grant award)
       3.   Total amount of award from INSGC
       4.   Line item for each expense
       5.   Current expenses, total requested
       6.   Accumulated expense balance
       7.   Matching funds
       8.   Detailed receipts attached
       9.   Authorized signature

Not having this information with detail attached will greatly delay the process of reimbursement.
If a dispute occurs with any invoice, INSGC will notify the responsible Affiliate. All invoices
reflecting proper information above along with detailed receipts can be mailed or emailed as a
PDF to the following address:

Electronic submission:
Sponsored Programs Service
spsdhhs@purdue.edu

cc: INSGC Office
insgc@purdue.edu

Mailing Address:
Sponsored Programs Service

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Young Hall
155 S. Grant Street
W. Lafayette, In 47904-2114
765-494-1055
765-494-1066 (Senior Acct Manager)

Except for student internships or scholarships, affiliates should not generally expect to
automatically receive a check for an award in advance of project activity. Affiliates operate
based on an “allowable cost, allowable period” invoice structure. Once an award is approved,
affiliates have authorization to spend money during the active period of the award. They are
expected to fully account for expenses (including budget classifications, cost sharing amounts,
and subtotals by expense type), and invoice Purdue University in a routine and timely manner.


4 Affiliate Type-Specific Information

4.1 Academic Affiliates

4.1.1 Role and Responsibilities
Academic Affiliates represent INSGC’s primary link to institutions of higher education located
in the state of Indiana. Academic Affiliate Directors are asked to share and distribute information
pertaining to INSGC Fellowships, Scholarships and Internships as well as NASA project
requests on their campuses and through outreach organizations.

4.1.2 Annual Dues
Invoices for dues are generated annually just after the Spring Affiliate Meeting. Current charges
are $1,000.00 for academic affiliates. These dues are intended for expenses that cannot be
covered by NASA funds including Space Grant Alliance dues, office equipment, and meetings/
conferences.

4.1.3 Distribution Information about INSGC on Academic Campuses
The best manner in which to distribute information about INSGC funding opportunities, projects,
and activities is through student programs/courses on INSGC affiliate campuses. Examples of
these programs include the following:

       Student STEM professional organizations
       Women in Engineering
       Minorities in Engineering
       First year/introductory courses and design project courses

4.1.4 Award/Grant Process
Students at Academic Affiliate campuses are eligible for Scholarship, Internship, and Fellowship
awards. The amount of the award can vary depending on the academic level of the student (i.e.,
Graduate or Undergraduate). The range for such awards is from $1,000.00 to $18,000.00. All
types of Affiliates are capable of submitting Discovery, Dissemination and Engagement, or
Workforce Development proposals. However, most of the Workforce Development projects
include university students, and should include partnerships with INSGC Academic Affiliates.
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Example of past funded Academic Fellowship: See Appendix C - Adam Johnson: Amino acid
preservation in simulated and natural sulfate mineral assemblages as analogs for surficial
processes on Mars.

Example of past funded Academic Faculty Project: See Appendix D -Ruth Droppo: Exploring
Deep-subsurface Life: A Professional Development Workshop for Educators.

4.1.5 Matching Funds
Donations, in-kind support, or other auditable non-federal contributions are all acceptable. For
academic affiliates, consider the following: dues, fee remissions, contributed faculty effort,
waived indirect costs, under-recovered costs (e.g., reduced fringe benefits), contributed
materials, and equipment directly applicable to the funded project.




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4.1.6 Academic Affiliate Directors
BALL STATE UNIVERSITY *(1995)                 INDIANA UNIVERSITY *(1991)                         INDIANA UNIVERSITY - PURDUE
                                                                                                 UNIVERSITY FORT WAYNE *(2006)
Ronald H Kaitchuck                            Paul D Edwards, MD
Professor, Physics and Astronomy              Office of the Vice President                       Jihad Albayyari
Department of Physics and Astronomy           Bryan Hall 115                                     Assoc Vice Chancellor, Research/External Support
2000 West University Avenue, CP 101C          107 South Indiana Avenue                           Professor, Mechanical & Industrial Eng Tech
Muncie, IN 47306                              Bloomington, IN 47405-7000                         Kettler Hall, Room 252
                                                                                                 2101 East Coliseum Blvd
                                                                                                 Fort Wayne, IN 46805-1499
Telephone: 765-285-8871                       Telephone: 812-856-5700                            Telephone: 260-481-6391
Fax:       765-285-5674                       Fax:       812-856-5119                            Fax:       260-481-6880
E-mail:     rkaitchu@bsu.edu                  Email:     pdedward@indiana.edu                    Email:     albayyaj@ipfw.edu
Core Competencies: Astronomy, Geology,        Core Competencies: Astronomy, Astrobiology,        Core Competencies: Engineering and physics
Education, Geography and Human Performance    Physics, Education

INDIANA STATE UNIVERSITY *(2004)              INDIANA UNIVERSITY - PURDUE                        PURDUE UNIVERSITY (Host Institution; *1991)
                                              UNIVERSITY, INDIANAPOLIS *(1998)
Susan Berta                                                                                      Barrett S Caldwell (INSGC Director)
Department of Earth and Environmental         David E Coats                                      Professor, School of Industrial Engineering
Systems                                       Associate Director, GIS Systems Services           315 North Grant Street, Rm 228D
159-P Science Building                        The POLIS Center                                   West Lafayette, IN 47907-2023
Terre Haute, IN 47809                         1200 Waterway Blvd, Suite 106A
                                              Indianapolis, IN 46202
                                                                                                 Telephone:   765-494-5412
Telephone: 812-237-2444                       Telephone:   317-274-3826
                                                                                                 Fax:         765-494-1299
Fax:       812-237-8029                       Fax:         317-278-1830
                                                                                                 E-mail:       bscaldwell@purdue.edu
Email:     Susan.Berta@indstate.edu           E-Mail:      decoats@iupui.edu
                                                                                                 Website:     http://www.insgc.org
                                              Website:     http://www.polis.iupui.edu/polis
Core Competencies: Remote Sensing, Biology,   Core Competencies: Remote Sensing,                 Core Competencies: Engineering, Sciences, Service
Education                                     Engineering                                        Learning

PURDUE UNIVERSITY CALUMET                     TAYLOR UNIVERSITY *(1996)                          UNIVERSITY OF EVANSVILLE *(1997)
*(1991)
                                              Jeffrey F Dailey                                   Philip Gerhart
Adam W Rengstorf                              Research Engineer                                  College of Engineering & Computer Science
Assistant Professor, Physics & Astronomy      Center for Research and Innovation                 1800 Lincoln Avenue
Department of Chemistry & Physics             236 West Reade Avenue                              Evansville, IN 47722
Gyte Building 268                             Upland, IN 46989
2200 169th Street
Hammond, IN 46323-2094
                                              Telephone: 765-998-4365                            Telephone: 812-488-2648 or 800-423-8633
Telephone: 219-989-2624                       Fax:       765-998-4396                            Fax:       812-488-2780
Fax:       219-989-2130                       E-mail:    jfdailey@taylor.edu                     E-mail:    pg3@evansville.edu
E-mail:    adamwr@calumet.purdue.edu
                                              Core Competencies: Physics, Ballooning,            Core Competencies: Engineering, Service Learning
Core Competencies: Physics, Astronomy,        Satellites, Environmental Studies
Engineering

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTHERN INDIANA                PURDUE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF                       VALPARAISO UNIVERSITY *(1996)
                                              TECHNOLOGY at Columbus/Greensburg
*(2008)
                                              *(2009)
                                                                                                 Bruce J Hrivnak
Glen Kissel                                                                                      Department of Physics & Astronomy
                                              Jack Head
Assistant Professor of Engineering                                                               140 Neils Science Center
                                              Assistant Director, Purdue College of Technology
Technology Center 215                                                                            1610 Campus Drive East
                                              4555 Central Avenue, Suite 2100
8600 University Blvd                                                                             Valparaiso, IN 46383
                                              Columbus, IN 47203-1893
Evansville, IN 47712
                                                                                                 Telephone: 219-464-5379
                                              Telephone: 812-314-8619
Telephone: 812-465-5417 or 464-1877                                                              Fax:       219-464-5489
                                              Fax:       812-314-8536
Fax:       812-465-1263                                                                          E-mail:    bruce.hrivnak@valpo.edu
                                              E-mail:    jhead@purdue.edu
E-mail:    gkissel@usi.edu

Core Competencies: Engineering                Core Competencies: Engineering Technology,         Core Competencies: Astronomy, Engineering
                                              Organizational Leadership
          *Year Joined INSGC


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         4.2 Industry Affiliates

         4.2.1 Role and Responsibilities
         Industry Affiliates are intended to link local industries who can combine their interest in STEM
         workforce development (internships, hiring of students), public engagement (including corporate
         philanthropy and donations), and university-industry-government partnerships (working with
         universities and NASA on projects of shared interest).

         4.2.2 Annual Dues
         Invoices for Dues are generated annually just after Spring Affiliate Meeting. Current charges are
         $250.00 for small business affiliates. Higher dues are assessed for larger corporations.

         4.2.3 Distribution Information about INSGC by Industry Affiliates
         Industry Affiliate Directors are asked to share and distribute information pertaining to INSGC
         Fellowships, Scholarships and Internships as well as NASA projects within their organization
         and through any relevant professional connections.

         4.2.4 Award/Grant Process
         Example of past funded Industry Project - See Appendix E: Jason Kruger/ Dr. Hank D. Voss-
         High-Altitude Balloon Workshop for Jr. High School Instructors-StratoStar



4.2.5 Industry Affiliate Directors
STRATOSTAR SYSTEMS *(2006)                                                 SPACEPORT INDIANA, INC *(2007)
Jason Krueger                                                              Brian Tanner
236 West Reade Avenue                                                      President/Chairman
Upland, IN 46989                                                           4770 Ray Boll Blvd
                                                                           Columbus, IN 47203

Telephone: 765-382-0451                                                    Telephone: 765-606-1512
E-mail:     jkrueger@StratoStar.net                                        Fax:        765-640-1847
                                                                           E-mail:     btanner@spaceportindiana.com
Core Competencies: High-Altitude Ballooning                                Core Competencies: Space technology

                         *Year joined INSGC




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4.3 Outreach Affiliates

4.3.1 Role and Responsibilities
Outreach Affiliates represent INSGC’s primary link to many K-12 and informal educational
programs and help highlight our visibility to the public.

4.3.2 Distribution Information about INSGC by Outreach Affiliates
Outreach Affiliate Directors are asked to share and distribute information pertaining to INSGC
Fellowships, Scholarships and Internships as well as NASA project requests on their websites
and literature, as well as at their campuses or outreach facilities.

4.3.3 Annual Dues
Since Outreach Affiliates do not have students or conduct research and tend to be non-profit
entities, they are not charged affiliate dues. In contrast, since most of their programs are
supported through donations, admission fees, or volunteer efforts as well as philanthropic grants,
they are requested to have their awards matched by greater than the 1:1 cost sharing amount
expected from other affiliates.

4.3.4 Award/Grant Process
Example of past funded Outreach Project: See Appendix F: Cyndy Moriarty-
Indiana State Fair “Indiana Space Travels’ project proposal - Indianapolis Challenger Center.




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4.3.5 Outreach Affiliate Directors
BROWNSBURG CHALLENGER LEARNING               CHALLENGER LEARNING CENTER OF                ETHOS, INC *(2010)
CENTER *(2000)                               NORTHWEST INDIANA *(2001)
                                                                                          Patsy Boehler
Mary Patterson                               Amanda Maynard                               Executive Director
725C South Green Street                      Purdue University Calumet                    1127 Miles Avenue
Brownsburg, IN 46112                         2300 173rd Street                            Elkhart, IN 46514
                                             Hammond, IN 46323

Telephone: 317-852-1008, Extn 1214           Telephone:   219-989-2007                    Telephone:   574-266-7149
Fax:       317-858-4102                      Fax:         219-989-3256                    Fax:         574-264-3021
E-mail:    mpatterson@brownsburg.k12.in.us   E-mail:      maynard@clcnwi.com              E-mail:      patsy@ethosinc.org
                                             Website:     http://www.clcnwi.com/          Website:     http://ethosinc.org/

Core Competencies: Teacher Training,         Core Competencies: Teacher Training,         Core Competencies: Teacher Training,
K-12/General Public Outreach                 K-12/General Public Outreach                 K-12/General Public Outreach


IMAX Theater *(2006)                         INDIANAPOLIS CHALLENGER                      SCIENCE CENTRAL *(1997)
                                             LEARNING CTR OF DECATUR TWNSP
Craig Mince                                  *(2006)                                      Martin Fisher
IMAX Theater in the Indiana State Museum                                                  Executive Director
650 West Washington Street                   Cyndy Meier, NBCT                            1950 North Clinton Street
Indianapolis, IN 46204                       Lead Flight Director                         Fort Wayne, IN 46805
                                             5125 Decatur Blvd, Suite A
                                             Indianapolis, IN 46241
Telephone: 317-232-0757                                                                   Telephone: 260-424-2400, Extn 441
Fax:       317-233-2438                      Telephone: 317-856-2167                      FAX:       260-422-2899
Email:     CMince@imax.com                   Fax:       317-856-2209                      E-mail:    martin@sciencecentral.org
                                             E-mail:     cmoriarty@msddecatur.k12.in.us

Core Competencies: Teacher Training,                                                      Core Competencies: Teacher Training,
K-12/General Public Outreach                 Core Competencies: Teacher Training,         K-12/General Public Outreach
                                             K-12/General Public Outreach

INDIANA STATE MUSEUM *(2007)                                                              TERRE HAUTE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM
                                                                                          *(2008)
Kathleen McLary
Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites                                                   Lynn V Hughes
650 West Washington Street                                                                Executive Director
Indianapolis, IN 46204                                                                    523 Wabash Avenue
                                                                                          Terre Haute, IN 47807
Telephone: 317-232-5607
Fax:       317-232-7090                                                                   Telephone: 812-235-5548, Extn 12
Email:     kmclary@dnr.in.gov                                                             Fax:        812-238-1680
                                                                                          Email:
                                                                                          lhughes@terrehautechildrensmuseum.com
Core Competencies: Teacher Training,                                                      execdir@terrehautechildrensmuseum.com
K-12/General Public Outreach                                                              Core Competencies: Teacher Training,
                                                                                          K-12/General Public Outreach
         *Year joined INSGC




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Glossary/ FAQs

Matching: Matching means contributions of non-federal support, either cash or in-kind, that are
also used to support a project funded by INSGC. NASA requires that our total non-scholarship
budget is matched 1:1. As an example, we would need to demonstrate that at least $610,000 in
non-federal money is used in INSGC projects based on a NASA award of $845,000 with
$235,000 in scholarship funding. "Matching" can come from donated effort by staff and other
personnel; donations of equipment, supplies, money, or other goods; or waived costs (e.g.
agreements that each INSGC academic affiliate will not charge indirect costs to awarded
projects). Purdue West Lafayette contributes a significant fraction of the total matching
requirement through salary support for the current Director (25% academic year salary) and the
Program Manager (50% FTE), as well as waived indirect costs on all subcontract awards and
internal projects ($9000 on each affiliate subcontract that exceeds $25,000).

Direct vs. Indirect Costs: Indirect cost rates are negotiated by research and other institutions
(such as universities, contractors, and other organizations) that receive funding from the US
government to complete projects. These are calculated as general administrative/handling costs
of conducting a specific type of project at a specific institution. The rate for INSGC (which now
is classified at Purdue as "Other Sponsored Projects" rather than "Research") is 36%, but this is
charged only to the administrative cost items (faculty and staff salaries, and some additional
travel and other expenses).These numbers are developed through federal audit with the Office of
Management and Budget.

What is the difference between Goals and SMART Objectives?
The difference between Goals and SMART Objectives is somewhat difficult to understand as the
distinctions between them are not initially apparent. A Goal describes the overall purpose of the
project. Goals are usually stated in general terms and describe broad outcomes and concepts. For
example, an INSGC goal could be to “Inform and engage Affiliates so that they might work as
equal partners in promoting science, mathematics, and technology from elementary through
university levels across the state of Indiana.” SMART Objectives on the other hand, are
measurable and specifically state how the goals will be achieved. SMART Objectives differ
from tasks (e.g., Create an Affiliate Manual) in that an effective SMART Objective is something
a program could fail to achieve. For example, a SMART Objective for INSGC’s E&A Team
could be to “Create an Affiliate Manual so that the number of Affiliate questions directed to the
central office this year is decreased by half compared to that of the previous year.” In this case,
if the central office is contacted by Affiliates regarding policy questions at increased rates from
the previous year, the objective would not have been met. (Disclaimer: These are not actual
goals/objectives of INSGC. Please feel free to contact the Central Office at any time to discuss
INSGC Goals and Objectives). SMART is defined by NASA to address the following criteria:

   •   Specific: Be precise about what you are going to achieve
   •   Measurable: Quantify the objectives
   •   Appropriate: Align with the needs of the target audience
   •   Realistic: Do you have the resources to make the objective happen?
   •   Time-Specific: State when you will achieve the objective


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Additional SMART Objective Examples:

       Faculty attending the three day training session will be able to identify at least three
       NASA grant programs that align with their research interests by the final day of the
       training session.
       By January 2011, at least 40% of the engineering majors at Purdue University will be
       female.
Can you get funds as you expend money or must you turn invoices all in at one time?
Affiliates are strongly encouraged to incrementally invoice (monthly or quarterly) on their
expended funds. This allows the consortium to keep track of how much is getting spent and
prevents situations whereby Affiliates are abruptly asked to submit all invoices (e.g., INSGC
having to track down and confirm/spend/reallocate funds that, if not appropriately spent, would
have to be returned to NASA). Normally, federal grants have to be fully charged (all money
justified, spent, invoiced, and available to be reported on) within 45 days of the end of the grant
period.

What can and cannot be charged to fellowships?
Indirect costs may not be charged to fellowships. Any administrative costs associated with
fellowship and scholarship programs may be provided as matching funds by the institution.
While matching funds are not a requirement for the NASA Space Grant Fellowship/Scholarship
Program, matching funds and in-kind donations can be included for fellowships. For example, at
the discretion of the institution, Teaching Assistantships or Research Assistantships can be
constructed by combining an INSGC Fellowship with other sources of funding to create a
competitive academic year fellowship for the student. Other forms and sources of matching
funds or leveraging (with other federal grants) are also encouraged.
Please note: INSGC Fellowships do NOT include tuition or fee remission. If the student
receives a fee remission or any other form or support from their institution as part of their
fellowship award, that is considered matching funds and should be reported as such.




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Appendices




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Appendix A - NASA Office of Education Outcomes/Priority Programs

Outcome 1: Contribute to the development of the STEM workforce in disciplines needed to
achieve NASA's strategic goals (Employ and Educate)
       1.1 Faculty and Research Support - Provide NASA competency-building education and
       research opportunities for faculty, researchers, and post-doctoral fellows.
       1.2 Student Support - Provide NASA competency-building education and research
       opportunities to develop qualified undergraduate and graduate students who are prepared
       for employment in STEM disciplines at NASA, industry, and higher education.
       1.3 Student Involvement Higher Education - Provide opportunities for groups of post-
       secondary students to engage in authentic NASA-related mission-based R&D activities
       1.4 Course Development - Develop NASA-related course resources for integration into
       STEM disciplines
       1.5 Targeted Institution Research and Academic Infrastructure - Improve the ability for
       targeted institutions to compete for NASA research and development work.

Outcome 2: Attract and retain students in STEM disciplines through a progression of
educational opportunities for students, teachers, and faculty (Educate and Engage)
       2.1 Educator Professional Development-Short Duration - Provide short duration
       professional development and training opportunities to educators, equipping them with
       the skills and knowledge to attract and retain students in STEM disciplines
       2.2 Educator Professional Development-Long Duration - Provide long-duration and/or
       sustained professional development and training opportunities to educators that result in
       deeper content understanding and/or competence and confidence in teaching STEM
       2.3 Curricular Support Resources - Provide curricular support resources that use NASA
       themes and content to a) enhance student skills and proficiency in STEM disciplines; b)
       inform students about STEM career opportunities; c) communicate information about
       NASA's mission activities
       2.4 Student Involvement K-12
               Provide K-12 students with authentic first-hand opportunities to participate in
               NASA mission activities, thus inspiring interest in STEM disciplines and careers
               Provide opportunities for family involvement in K-12 learning in STEM areas.

Outcome 3: Build strategic partnerships and linkages between STEM formal and informal
education providers that promote STEM literacy and awareness of NASA's mission
(Engage and Inspire)
       3.1 Resources
              Provide informal education support resources that use NASA themes and content
              to 1) enhance participant skills and proficiency in STEM disciplines; 2) inform
              participants about STEM career opportunities; 3) communicate information about
              NASA's mission activities
              Develop a significant pool of qualified presenters of NASA aerospace content
              interacting with a large number of participants.
       3.2 Professional Development for Informal Education Providers
              Provide opportunities to improve the competency and qualifications of STEM
              informal educators, enabling informal educators to effectively and accurately

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              communicate information about NASA activities and access NASA data for
              programs and exhibits.
      3.3 Informal Education Provider Involvement Opportunities
              Develop a national pool of qualified informal educators with experience in
              NASA-mission and related activities
              Engage informal educators using NASA themes to enable them to 1) enhance
              participant skills and proficiency in STEM disciplines; 2) inform participants
              about STEM career opportunities; 3) communicate information about NASA's
              mission activities.
              Establish and maintain a single informal education network for accessing NASA
              materials that has the flexibility for Special Interest Groups to function as a subset
              of the larger network.

Current Areas of Emphasis (Priority Programs):

   1. Authentic, hands-on student experiences in science and engineering disciplines
   2. Engage middle-school teachers in hands-on curriculum enhancement capabilities through
      exposure to NASA scientific and technical expertise
   3. Summer opportunities for secondary students on college campuses with the objective of
      increased enrollment in STEM disciplines or interest in STEM careers
   4. Develop new relationships as well as sustain and strengthen existing institutional
      relationships with community colleges
   5. Aeronautics Research
   6. Environmental Science and Global Climate Change research and activities
   7. Diversity of institutions, faculty, and student participants
   8. Enhance the capacity of institutions to support innovative research infrastructure
      activities to enable early career faculty to focus their research toward NASA priorities




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Discovery, Engagement, and Themed Competition Descriptions
Type                            Project Category                                      Brief Description*
                                                                   new faculty and undergraduate/graduate students for
                   Research Initiation Experience Award            NASA-relevant research experience, or faculty linking
Discovery Award




                                                                   teaching experience to new NASA research projects
 Opportunities




                                                                   support faculty and students and highlighting hands-
                   Multidisciplinary/
                                                                   on activities, must relate directly to NASA and INSGC
                   Inter-institutional Research Experiences
                                                                   goals
                   Hands-On Projects for High School &             hands-on classroom or project-based experiences
                   Undergraduate and Students                      geared toward STEM workforce development
                                                                   design and implement a research, outreach, or K-12
                   University Student Team Project
                                                                   education project.
                                                                   summer or after school experiences for K-12 students
                   Education Enrichment Programs
                                                                   promoting STEM activities, majors, and professions
                                                                   develop new STEM-related projects and opportunities
Engagement Award




                   Informal Education Partnerships                 at informal education sites with goals to improve
  Opportunities




                                                                   project evaluation
                                                                   encourage partnerships between high school teachers
                                                                   and university-based principal investigators
                   In-Service Professional
                                                                   encouraging the enhancement in learning for high
                   Development/Education Partnership
                                                                   school students and provide an introduction to STEM
                                                                   careers
                                                                   develop or enhance curriculum offering; inter-
                   Curriculum Development                          institutional course development utilizing classroom
                                                                   and non-classroom experiences and NASA content
                                                                   projects can focus on brain function or trauma,
Competition




                   Biomedical                                      medical devices and technologies, or healthcare
 Themed




                                                                   improvements
                   Climate/Sustainability/                         environmental project topics include climate change,
                   Environment                                     energy, sustainability, etc.
*For full description see Research and Outreach Guidelines at https://engineering.purdue.edu/INSGC/competition_files/Research_and_Outreach




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  Appendix B - Building Evaluation into Your Project
  It helps to start with a picture of how your project is going to work. The logic model provides a roadmap
  of the program, highlighting how it is expected to work, what activities need to come before others, and
  how desired outcomes are to be achieved.

  Why go through this?

            1) Program design benefits - stay more focused on outcomes and link activities to desired
               outcomes.
            2) It is a base from which to conduct evaluation of the program; it spells out how the program
               produces desired outcomes. It enables measurement of each set of events in the model to see
               what happens, what works, what doesn’t and for whom. A logic model helps to discover
               where the model breaks down or is failing to perform as conceptualized.
            3) The logic model requires clarifying the underlying rationale for the project and the conditions
               under which success is most likely to be achieved.
            4) In order for INSGC to report back to NASA how funds where spent, INSGC needs a clear
               picture of how your program meets the objectives of INSGC and NASA and how successful
               your project was. A logic model provides a picture of how you will do this.

  The proposal will include the following:

            1) Your vision for the project.
            2) Your goals (specific, measureable, attainable, relevant, time sensitive) for the project and
               how your goal meets one of INSGC’s and/or NASA’s goals.
            3) What are your objectives? How are you going to reach your goal?
            4) How will you report back to INSGC on the outcome of your project?

  Include a logic model of your project in your proposal:

                                                                                                   Outcome
     Goal                Inputs           Activities          Outputs           Outcomes
                                                                                                   measures
Which INSGC         What do you        What activities    What is the        What will be       How will you
or NASA goal        need to do this    will be done?      quantitative       accomplished?      measure
does your           project? (list                        impact?                               outcomes/ if
project meet?       everything         Ex: data                              Ex: An increase    goal was met?
                    needed)            collection,        Ex: # of           in students’
Ex: NASA                               analyze data,      students funded;   confidence in      Ex: survey
objective 1.2       Ex: Interns,       submit for         # of articles      research process   students about
Student Support     instructors,       publication        submitted for                         experience of
                    supplies                              publication                           doing research


  For additional information on and/or help with evaluating your INSGC funded project, feel free to contact
  INSGC’s Evaluation and Assessment team (i.e., E&A Team).                Please email Anna Douglas
  (douglask@purdue.edu) or Dr. Deborah Bennett (bennett@purdue.edu) with your questions.




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   2009 Indiana State Fair Example

   The vision of this project is to provide professional development opportunities for university
   students in STEM-related majors through interactive presentations given to the public on NASA
   mission activities at the 2009 Indiana State Fair. The goals for this project are: 1) Enhance
   student skills and proficiency in STEM disciplines, 2) Communicate information about NASA’s
   mission activities. These goals are in alignment with NASA objective 2.3. Each goal has a set of
   objectives designed to support the goal.

   Goal 1: Enhance student skills and proficiency in STEM disciplines
   Objectives:
      1) An increase in knowledge about NASA’s mission activities
      2) An increase in knowledge about Indiana’s involvement in space-related activities
      3) An increase in interest in STEM Education and Careers

   Goal 2: Communicate information about NASA’s mission activities
   Objectives:
      1) An increase in effective communication skills

   At the conclusion of the State Fair, students will be interviewed regarding the projected
   outcomes (as discussed in logic model). Results of the interviews will be reported to the INSGC
   office within one month of the conclusion of the State Fair.

   2009 Indiana State Fair
NASA Goals             Inputs/          Activities      Outputs/      Outcomes                Outcome
                       Resources                        Metrics                               Measures

2.3 Curricular         Transportation   Training on     8 students    Increased Interest in   Qualitative
Support Resources      to State Fair    Display                       STEM Education &        Interviews
(Educate &                              Materials                     Careers                 (Student
Engage)                                                 11 Displays                           Volunteers
                       INSGC                                          Increased knowledge     & Student
Enhance student        Funding          Presentations                 about Indiana’s         Staff)
skills & proficiency                                                  involvement in space
in STEM
disciplines            Displays         Management &                  Increased knowledge
                                        Operation of                  about NASA’s
Communicate                             Displays                      mission activities
information about
NASA’s mission                                                        Increased
activities                                                            communication skills




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Appendix C – Example Academic Affiliate Student Research Proposal
Adam Johnson: Amino acid preservation in simulated and natural sulfate mineral assemblages as
analogs for surficial processes on Mars.

Problem Statement
Finding definitive evidence for extinct or extant life on planetary bodies other than Earth has, until
recently, been the domain of science fiction. Innovative life-detection technologies for remote, orbiting,
and landed instruments are progressing rapidly and strategies are urgently needed for predicting the
preservation potential of both biomolecular and abiomolecular organic materials. These predictions are of
critical importance for the next phase of surface and subsurface sampling on Mars. Remarkably little is
known regarding sequestration of organic molecules as dissolved ionic compounds in fluid inclusions and
interfacial water, or as sorbed and/or included solid materials in water ice, gas hydrates, sulfates,
chlorides, or carbonates. The Mars Exploration Rovers (MERs) and orbital spectroscopic instruments
provide evidence for a variety of sulfate-mineral assemblages on the Martian surface, including jarosite,
hydrated calcium sulfates such as gypsum, and hydrated magnesium sulfates such as epsomite and
kieserite. Remarkable textural images from the rover Spirit at Gusev Crater and the rover Opportunity at
Meridiani Planum, as well as orbital spectroscopic techniques, provide evidence for coupled sulfate
precipitation and ferric oxide formation in surface waters and/or chemical alteration of rock and soil by
ground water movement (1, 2, 3). Additionally, the presence of phyllosilicates in the southern highlands
of Mars (4) dated by impact cratering and lava outflows (5) indicate that Mars had an active water cycle
3.5 to 4 billion years ago, during the early evolution of life on Earth. If life was concurrently evolving on
Mars prior to the loss of atmosphere and surface water, then biological remnants or biomarkers of this
early life may be detectable in specific and identifiable mineral products. Evaporitic sulfate deposits are
well suited as crystalline repositories for aqueous and particulate organic molecules because precipitation
can initiate at both the top and bottom of a brine pool, fluid inclusions can be macroscopic, and tightly
interlocking crystals can limit additional exposure to atmospheric reactants. Complications arise during
interpretation of preserved organic molecules, however, because only subtle differences exist between
biomolecular and abiomolecular organic polymers that might be preserved under the corrosive conditions
of the Martian surface.

Previous works have examined the preservation of amino acids and a few other organic molecules as a
means of understanding degradation and racemization on the surface and subsurface of Mars.
Preservation durations range from 106 to 1011 years [6, 7, 8, 9, 10] for organic molecules trapped in the
Martian regolith under cold and dry conditions, indicating the potential for organic molecular biomarkers
for extinct or extant life on Mars as far back as the late Noachian and early Hesperian. Controversy
remains, however with regard to modes of amino acid degradation and racemization, the roles of reducing
microenvironments in preservation, the effects of various forms of radiation, and the relevance of
potential sub- or intra-permafrost brines. Characterization of simple, biologically relevant molecules
under aseptic laboratory conditions can provide valuable insights into whether or not mineral surfaces and
interiors can enhance formation or preservation of such compounds. Laboratory experiments will provide
clues into whether complex organic molecules can be preserved or altered under surface conditions
inferred for Mars. This basic knowledge gap concerning entrapment and preservation of organic
compounds at boundaries between mineral grains and within mineral matrices, as well as the
identification of microenvironments that can enhance the preservation of specific biological signals, is
needed in order to refine life-detection instruments and sampling strategies.

Goals
We propose a series of experiments to characterize the preservation of amino acids in minerals
precipitated from sulfate brines under a low-pressure carbon dioxide atmosphere during diurnal cycling of
intense UV radiation and temperature. Laboratory experiments will be supplemented by analysis of amino

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acid preservation and racemization in core samples retrieved from a topographically and hydrologically-
closed lacustrine environment. These will serve as an Earth analog for an environment that is undergoing
seasonal to decadal evaporation sequences similar to those inferred for the Noachian to Hesperian epochs
of Mars.

Goal One: Identify rates of racemization and degradation of free amino acids in acidic to
moderately acidic sulfate brine solutions and sulfate mineral compounds as they undergo cyclic
evaporation and hydration while being exposed to simulated Martian surface conditions. Sample
brines and minerals will be artificially inoculated with micromolar concentrations of >99% purity
levorotary amino acids, including alanine, valine, aspartic and glutamic acids, as well as the achiral
glycine. Desiccated samples will be collected and analyzed for amino acid content and photochemical
processing through liberation by acid hydrolysis and removal of interfering salts through cation exchange
chromatography. Optically active amino acid products are separated by gas chromatography as their N-
pentafluoropropionyl isopropyl ester derivatives or through high performance liquid chromatography as
their ophthaldialdehyde/N-acetyl cysteine derivatives in order to resolve enantiomeric excesses and extent
of racemization, degradation and secondary product formation. We will focus on: 1) rates of amino acid
racemization and degradation; 2) effects of UV radiation on hydration, dehydration, and solvation of
amino acids in sulfate evaporate precipitation and formation; and 3) crystal boundaries and fluid
inclusions as sites for preservation of organic molecules.

Goal Two: Identify and characterize particular evaporite mineral assemblages that facilitate
increased preservation of biologically relevant amino acids, including their crystal matrices,
hydration states and chemical composition. Samples will be analyzed by x-ray diffraction and FTIR-
microscopy techniques to: 1) Identify spatial relationships between the amino acids and mineral grains (2)
the role of various hydration states in enhancing or deterring amino acid preservation, and (3) identify
particular mineral matrices that provide a preferential microenvironment for preservation of biomarker
signatures, such as amino acid chirality, from photolytic degradation reactions.

The proposed series of laboratory experiments would be aimed at understanding sequestration and
preservation mechanisms for amino acids in sulfate minerals. The specific types of sulfate brines and
evaporitic minerals targeted in our study are based on models of paleo-Martian brines and/or rocks and
minerals detected on the Martian surface that are relevant to refinement of life-detection experiments for
future instrumented missions. Understanding physical and photochemical interactions between mineral
and organic components of saline brines and their precipitates can provide mission-specific guidelines for
geochemical sampling of evaporative deposits from Martian environments. Our experiments will identify
those evaporite assemblages that have a high likelihood for sequestration of biologically relevant
molecules. Extraction and identification of organic compounds from remotely collected samples is a
costly endeavor, mandating clear and insightful criteria for site selection and sampling handling.

Research Plan
Racemization, sequestration and preservation mechanisms of amino acids will be evaluated during cyclic
evaporation and wetting of acidic to moderately acidic sulfate minerals and brine solutions in a Mars-
simulation chamber using facilities at SHOT Laboratories in Greenville, Indiana. These experiments will
be performed in a low pressure cryogenic chamber with UV-radiation, temperature and atmospheric
conditions simulating diurnal environmental fluctuations inferred for low-latitude, low-elevation Martian
settings. Based on previous experiments [6, 7, 11], we will design brines and utilize end member products
that precipitate as sulfate crusts containing minerals in the epsomite-kieserite-gypsum-jarosite
assemblage.

Laboratory simulations will utilize suspensions of relevant amino acids into brine solutions derived from
inorganic salts based on weathering of end-member minerals suspected to exist in the Martian bedrock.

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Relative ion concentrations in solution will represent results from those previous studies [11, 12, 13] as
they most likely represent the composition of a Martian brine or subsurface water table or the composition
of a brine solution in a Martian paleo-lake. Additionally, end member mineral assemblages will be
inoculated with amino acid solutions to identify preferential mineral environments for organic molecule
preservation. This research will involve incorporation models of moderately acidic weathering of olivine-
bearing basalt identified in the Martian bedrock, which will allow the presence of ferrous iron in solution
[12]. Brines will be prepared from deionized, deoxygenated water and then saturated with Coleman grade
(>99.999%) dry CO2 for 24 hours to mimic long-term exposure to a dominantly CO2 atmosphere.
Standard solutions of 2M MgSO4, CaCl2, and FeSO4 (Sigma) and 1M Na2SO4 (Sigma) are prepared in
an anaerobic chamber relative volumes of each standard are added to individual sample bottles so that the
relative proportions of a 100 mL sample are roughly 47% Mg2+, 34% Fe2+, 16% Ca2+ and the
remaining 3% Na+. Amino acid standards are prepared on site from pure (>99%) L-enantiomer forms of
alanine, valine, aspartic and glutamic acids, as well as the achiral glycine (Sigma) using anaerobically
prepared CaCl2 as solvent. Concentrations of amino acids per sample will be in the 10μM range,
simulating a total cell count of 107 cells/mL, assuming a dry weight of 1.15x10- 13 grams of amino acids
per cell [8]; this correlates to halophilic bacteria cell counts (106 cells/mL) in terrestrial hypersaline
environments [14] to within an order of magnitude.

The Mars simulation chamber was designed, built and tested by engineers from TechShot Industries of
Greenville, Indiana. The simulator was built to meet Martian surface conditions including atmosphere
composition and pressure down to 10 mbar, daily temperature extremes (-135ºC to +40ºC), daily solar
intensity cycle (up to 590 W-m2 ), regolith composition, and surface solar spectrum (down to 200 nm)
[15]. The solar spectrum is simulated by an automatically controlled 1,000-W xenon arc lamp with filters,
providing photosynthetically active radiation of 237 W/m2 and UV radiation of 25.5 W/m2 in the 250-
400 nm wavelengths. The low-pressure atmosphere of 10mbar is controlled by a CO2 gas or Mars
simulated gas consisting of a dual mixture composed of 95.3% carbon dioxide, 2.7% nitrogen, 1.6%
argon, 0.13% oxygen and saturated with 0.4% water vapor. Atmospheric water content is monitored by a
cryogenic chilled mirror hygrometer from Buck Research with capabilities of measure part per billion
levels of water vapor at dew points below -100°C. Samples will spend two to five week cycles in the
SHOT Martian simulation chamber exposed to the low-pressure (10-40 mbar) atmosphere consistent with
that suspected on Mars. Twelve-hour UV radiation cycles and twelve hour dark cycles will imitate a
Martian day. Temperature endpoints approach 9-10°C inside the chamber during the light hours and -
80°C in the dark hours

Sample analysis will consist of mineralogical identification and amino acid characterization. Initial
sampling will consist of analysis by Cu-kα x-ray diffraction to determine the mineralogy, crystal structure
and hydration states of the samples. Accurate identification of mineral composition should be enhanced
due to the limited initial brine composition and prior analysis of end member products before introduction
to the simulation chamber. Preliminary sample analysis on samples partially precipitated under Mars
conditions indicate a dominance of gypsum (CaSO4-H2O) and epsomite (MgSO4-7H2O), with minor
phases of hexahydrite (MgSO4-6H2O) and wattevilleite (Na2Ca(SO4)2- 4H2O) and various hydrated
sodium carbonates, as well as various iron oxides such as goethite (FeO(OH)), bernalite (Fe(OH)3) and
hematite (Fe2O3) in samples that contained iron in solution. Additional mineralogical analysis will
include formation of thin section mounts of mineral products and analysis using FT-IR microscopy
techniques. FT-IR will allow identification of inorganic mineral phases at the individual grain level, as
well as identify spatial abundances of organic constituents at mineral grain boundaries. Two dimensional
maps of these interfaces can be developed and conclusions drawn as to the preferential sorptive
characteristics of individual mineral phases on amino acids.

Amino acid analysis is currently performed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection on an HP
5890A, equipped with autosampler and utilizing helium as a carrier gas on a 30m x 0.25mm x 0.16μm

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Alltech Chirasil L-Val polysiloxane column with L-Valine as an enantiomer selective stationary phase.
Bound amino acids are liberated from samples by a vapor phase acid hydrolysis (6N HCl, 100°C, 24 hrs)
[19] and purified to remove interfering metals and organic residues using a cation exchange method
modified from that by Amelung and Zhang [16]. Dried samples are then derivatized into their N-
pentafluoropropionyl amino acid isopropyl esters as described by [16]. Amino acid enantiomer
concentrations are used to determine half lives and destruction rates of each compound on the simulated
Martian surface, as well as Arrhenius activation energy of racemization and degradation of each
compound in a sulfate mineral matrix. These values will then be compared to previously reported values
[6, 7, 8, 17, 9, 10, 18]. The majority of these studies are for amino acid degradation in Martian basaltic
regolith or in thin mounted films; data indicating sulfate minerals show increased preservation over
regolith analogs provides support of previous work [19] and would indicate the active role of sulfate
minerals in preserving a biologically relevant signature of life on the Martian surface.

Dissemination
At the conclusion of the experiment and subsequent analysis we will disseminate the information via my
graduate research thesis as well as publication through an astrobiologically-relevant journal such as
Icarus, Astrobiology, or Earth and Planetary Science Letters. In addition to peer-review publication, this
research would be included in presentations at scientific conferences such as the Lunar and Planetary
Science Conference held each spring in Houston, the 2010 Astrobiology Science Conference, and the
2010 Astrobiology Graduate Conference, all of which focus on space science research and would provide
a platform for engaging fellow scientists with my research results.

Use of Funds
The funds for this project would be divided into two components. The first component would go towards
offsetting the cost of operation of the Mars simulation chamber, which can run from five to tens of
thousands of dollars, depending on the length of the run and the number of intermediate sampling points.
The second component would be used for purchase a used fluorescence detector for incorporation into an
existing analytical pump setup, allowing the analysis of fluorescently-tagged organic molecules such as
amino acids through high performance liquid chromatography techniques. This technique allows an order
of magnitude increase in detection limits as well as the analysis of small molecular weight organic
molecules in natural aqueous samples. Incorporation of such a detector in the biogeochemical laboratories
here at Indiana University would allow increase the amount of data throughput on this project, as well as
allow subsequent researchers and additional labs the ability to expand their analysis of organic molecule
moieties with minimal time input.




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References
1. Squyres, S.W. et al. 2004. “In Situ Evidence for Ancient Aqueous Environment at Meridiani Planum,
Mars.”Science, 306;1709-1714.
2. Haskin, L.A., et al. 2005. “Water Alteration of rocks and soils on Mars at the Spirit Rover Site in
GusevCrater.” Nature, 436; 66-69.
3. Bibring, J.P, et al. 2007. “Coupled Ferric Oxides and Sulfates on the Martian Surface.” Science, 317;
1206-1210.
4. Poulet, F., et al. 2005. “Phyllosilicates on Mars and Implications for Early Martian Climate.” Nature,
438;623-627.
5. Hiesinger H., Head, J.W. 2004. “The Syrtis Major Volcanic Province, Mars: Synthesis from Mars
GlobalSurveyor Data.” J. Geophys. Res. 109; E01004.
6. Stoker, C.R., Bullock, M.A. 1997. “Organic degradation under simulated Martian conditions.” Journal
ofGeophysical Research, 102, E5:10881-10888.
7. Kate, I.L., Garry, J.R. et al. 2005. “Amino acid photostability on the Martian surface.” Meteoritics &
Planetary Science, 40, 8:1185-1193.
8. Kminek, G., Bada, J.L. 2006. “The effect of ionizing radiation on the preservation of amino acids on
Mars.”Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 245; 1-5
9. Bada, J.L., McDonald, G.D. 1994. “Amino acid racemization on Mars: implications for the
preservation ofbiomolecules from an extinct Martian biota.” Icarus, 114:139-143.
10. ten Kate, I.L., Garry, J.R.C., et al. 2006. “The Effects of Martian near surface conditions on the
photochemistry of amino acids.” Planetary and Space Science, 54; 296-302.
11. Bullock, M.A., Moore, J.M., Mellon, M.T. 2004. “Laboratory simulations of Mars aqueous
geochemistry.”Icarus, 170:404-423.
12. Tosca, N.J., McLennan, S.M. 2006. “Chemical divides and evaporite assemblages on Mars.” Earth
andPlanetary Science Letters, 241:21-31.
13. Tosca, N.J., McLennan, S.M., et al. 2005. “Geochemical modeling of evaporation processes on Mars:
Insight from the sedimentary record at Meridiani Planum.” Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 240:122-
148.
14. Anton, J., Rossello-Mora, R., Rodriguez-Valera, F., and Amann, R. 2000. “Extremely halophilic
bacteria in crystallizer ponds from Solar salterns.” Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 66 (7):
3052-3057.
15. Todd, P., SHOT Industries. Personal Communication. 2006.
16. Amelung, W., Zhang, X. 2001. “Determination of amino acid enantiomers in soils.” Soil Biology and
Biochemistry, 33; 553-562
17. Kanavarioti, A. 1990. “Could organic matter have been preserved on Mars for 3.5 billion years?”
Icarus,84:196-202
18. Garry, J.R.C., ten Kate, I.L., et al. 2006. “Analysis and survival of amino acids in martian regolith
analogs.”Meteoritics and Planetary Science, 41 (3); 391-405.
19. Aubrey, A., Bada, J.L. 2006. “Sulfate minerals and organic compounds on Mars.” Geology, 34 (5);
357-360.




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Appendix D - Example Academic Faculty Project

EXPLORING DEEP-SUBSURFACE LIFE
A PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT WORKSHOP FOR EDUCATORS
Ruth Droppo

PROJECT EFFORT
Introduction

This grant seeks funds to create and operate a professional development workshop, primarily for Indiana
educators, based on our Exploring Deep-Subsurface Life educator guide. We intend to introduce Indiana
teachers to the scientists and their research in the Departments of Geological Sciences, Biology, and
Astronomy at Indiana University. This project conforms to NASA Science Mission Directorate’s
education goals and proposed outcomes in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM)
education.

       Outcome 1: Contribute to the development of the STEM workforce in disciplines needed to
        achieve NASA’s strategic goals through high-school laboratory activities that genuinely reflect
        cutting-edge research in Biology and Geochemistry.
       Outcome 2: Attract and retain students in STEM disciplines through a progression of educational
        opportunities starting with an open teacher workshop and leading to selection of individual high
        school teachers for research partnerships in laboratories at IU.
       Outcome 3: Build strategic partnerships and linkages between STEM formal and informal
        education providers that promote STEM literacy and awareness of NASA’s mission by helping
        teachers understand the mission objectives for life detection in a way that enables teachers to
        convey the excitement of Astrobiology to their students.

Workshop Materials: E/PO efforts previously funded by a NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) grant at
Indiana University resulted in the production of an instructional DVD and workbook (educator guide)
entitled, Exploring Deep Subsurface Life. Earth Analogues for Possible Life on Mars: Lessons and
Activities, NASA Product #EG-2008-03-001-ARC. The workbook and DVD are crafted around a series of
videotaped interviews with scientists in laboratories at Michigan State, Princeton, and Indiana University,
who are working on water and gas samples collected from deep gold mines in South Africa and the
Canadian Arctic. The video supports and compliments the workbook lessons and activities and offers
students and teachers insight into the excitement of scientific discovery. With support from NAI’s E/PO
office, the workbooks were accepted as NASA products and printed in 2008 by the Government Printing
Office for distribution through national teacher meetings, direct mailing, and in teacher workshops now
being developed by an emerging Earth and Environmental Science Education Outreach (BSES) group at
Indiana      University.   The     full    package     is   also     available   for     download    from
http://www.indiana.edu/~deeplife/epo_products.html, and podcasts of the DVD episodes are available on
the IU podcasting site, http://podcast.iu.edu/Portal/PodcastPage.aspx?podid=d6875a3d-cbe4-4b94-aca2-
5874954ec2f8

Professional Development Workshops

Purpose: To engage teachers in multidisciplinary team research using laboratory and workshop activities.
Particular effort will be devoted to underserved schools in Indiana.

Teachers will be recruited throughout Indiana for a 4 day/3 night summer workshop held at Indiana
University Bloomington in early July. They will become familiar with the scientific concepts contained in


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materials in the Exploring Deep-Subsurface Life educator guide and will receive a full set of materials to
use in the classroom. The workshops will offer background in microbial life, membrane composition,
genetics, cellular metabolism, ion transfer in microbial communities, the scientific processes and field
techniques that underlie the research, and insight into the team’s remote field sites in the Canadian Arctic
and South Africa.

Beginning on a Monday at noon, and running through Thursday mid-afternoon, teachers will attend
lectures, seminars, and discussions. We plan to invite researchers from the NASA Astrobiology Institute
for opening lectures and discussions. These NASA researchers will be individuals directly involved in
current missions that are being developed or are scheduled to fly in the next decade. Dr. Lisa Pratt, PI on
the project, will be the representative NASA researcher in year one.

In addition to the above visiting lecturers, we will include IU faculty as mentors and lecturers throughout
the workshop. The teachers will spend three days on each lesson and do all the activities and the capstone.
We will ask IU’s University Information Technology Services (UITS) for dedicated computer lab space
so teachers can research topics for their final presentations. On the last day teachers will make
presentations about their workshop experiences, talk about how they will use the materials in their own
classrooms, and give suggestions and comments on the workshop itself. Every teacher will take home all
the materials for immediate use in their classrooms. It is our intent to distribute this product to every high
school in Indiana.

EVALUATION/ASSESSMENT

To evaluate the effectiveness of the planned workshop we plan to collect information from participants on
the workshop instruction and the materials used, as well as follow-up implementation by the teachers.
During the workshop we plan to use short pre/post assessments to uncover common misconceptions and
gauge how much of the Astrobiology content the teachers learned. In addition, we will use an extensive
post-workshop questionnaire to collect feedback on the presentation of the workshop, the materials used,
teacher plans for implementation of the lessons and any suggestions they might have for improvement of
the workshop. During the school year following the workshop, participants will be contacted in December
and May to inquire about how they implemented materials and lessons in their teaching. This contact will
also allow for feedback on changes teachers would make to the workshop curriculum based on their
implementation experiences.

Demonstrated Need for the Product:

National Science Teachers Association, Boston MA, 2008: Exploring Deep-Subsurface Life (EDSL)
materials were featured by NASA at the National Science Teachers Association meeting in Boston.
Adrienne Evans Fernandez, one of the graduate student writers on the project, traveled to Boston in
March, 2008 to present a demonstration and mini-workshop in the NASA products booth at the meeting.
Approximately 350 complete units (workbook, supporting CD-ROM, DVD) were given away during the
first two days in the NASA booth.

National Association of Biology Teachers Meeting, Memphis TN, October 2008: Ruth Droppo, the
project’s producer and graphic artist, traveled to NABT in October to present the Exploring Deep-
Subsurface Life materials to a national group of biology teachers attending a special NASA session;
approximately 45 teachers participating in the exercise. Every teacher who had a laminated set wanted to
take it home with them; we could have handed out twice as many as we brought. These teachers clearly
need teaching resources they can use immediately, and some remarked that this was the best product they
had ever seen at a professional meeting. All 60 copies of the workbook and DVD were distributed.


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Hoosier Association of Science Teachers, Inc. (HASTI) Conference, Indianapolis, IN, February 2009: Dr.
Bruce Douglas (BSES Director), Dr. Adam Maltese (IU School of Education), and Ruth Droppo hosted a
booth and conducted a workshop featuring the EDSL teaching materials. Approximately 25 teachers
attended the workshop, which was focused on Lesson 3. The teachers each took home poster-size trees of
life and gene sequences along with workbooks and DVDs. At the booth, we collected approximately 75
surveys and we distributed more than 100 sets of materials to teachers; many expressed gratitude and
excitement that groups within Indiana University are engaging in outreach to school districts across the
state.

IMPACT

We envision two major lines of impact. First, teachers who complete this workshop will have hands-on
experience with curricular materials and laboratory exercises that they can then use in their regular
classroom setting. Teachers will gain confidence in their ability to engage high school students with the
excitement of searching for extreme life on Earth and for evidence of life beyond Earth by reaching a high
level of familiarity with individual NASA missions and the types of data collected by instruments that are
in orbit or roving on other planets. Second, two or three teachers from the 2009 summer workshop will be
encouraged to spend the following summer (2010) actively pursuing research with an associated faculty
member at Indiana or Purdue University. It is anticipated that these selected teacher researchers will apply
for support from the Formal Professional Development/Education Partnerships through INSGC.

EDUCATION STANDARDS

All lessons and activities are aligned with National Science Education Standards and the AAAS
Benchmark for Science Literacy Standards, included as an appendix in the back of the workbook and
references within each lesson.

Budget
2009 Salaries
Lisa Pratt Director, 2 weeks, summer                                                       XXX
EDSL Teacher Workshops (one 4 to 5-day summer course each year)
Faculty Mentors (2 @$1000/ea)                                                              XXX
Graduate Student Astrobiology Mentors-in-Training (hourly) (2 @$800)                       XXX
Administrative personnel, 1 month                                                          XXX

Total Salaries                                                                             XXX

Fringe benefits
Pratt @22.89%                                                                              XXX
Faculty Mentors @22.89%                                                                    XXX
Administrative personnel @34.35%                                                           XXX

Total Fringe                                                                               XXX

Total Salaries and Fringe                                                                  XXX

Supplies and Expense
Lab supplies glassware, gases                                                              XXX

Total Supplies and Expenses                                                                XXX


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Other Direct Expenses
Teacher Workshops (4 days/3 nights summer course, 16 teachers/year)
parking stickers, 16 @$5/day                                                             XXX
stipends, 16 teachers @$150/ea                                                           XXX
hotel rooms, Wilkie Quad, 3 nights, 16 teachers @$52/night                               XXX

Teacher Workshop Materials
workshop materials (beads, bags, pom-poms, etc)                                          XXX
printing costs for take-home supplies (laminated boards, charts, gamepieces)             XXX

Advertising and Promotion
printing flyers, posters                                                                 XXX
Total Other Expenses                                                                     XXX

Total EDSL Workshop Budget                                                               XXX

Matching Funds
COAS                                                                                     XXX
Total requested from ISGC                                                                XXX

BUDGET EXPLANATION

Salaries and Fringe: Salaries are requested for two weeks’ summer salary for Lisa Pratt, the PI on the
project, and honoraria for two faculty mentors from Geological Sciences and Biology who will work with
Dr. Pratt to facilitate the workshop, present demonstrations, and give lectures on supporting materials
about the science currently being done on the IU campus. In addition, we will be employing two graduate
student Astrobiology Mentors-in-training to facilitate the workshop, and we will be paying them stipends
for their participation. Funds are also budgeted for administrative personnel for coordination, planning,
graphic design, and logistics.
Supplies and Expense: Funds are requested for workshop lab supplies (glassware, gases), and advertising
and promotion (flyers, posters).

Other Direct Expenses: Funds are requested for stipends, lodging on the IU campus at Wilkie Quad, and
parking stickers for 16 teachers. Teacher stipends will help defray the costs of transportation and meals.
We are also requesting money for supplies to run the workshops and prepare take-home packets for each
teacher.

Cost Share: We have received a written confirmation of $XXX in matching funds from IU College of
Arts and Sciences. These funds will be used for salary support for the PI, faculty mentors, and graduate
students. A copy of the confirmation is attached to this document.




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From: de Ruyter, Robert R.
Sent: Wednesday, February 11, 2009 5:19 PM
To: Pratt, Lisa M.
Cc: Brassell, Simon Christopher; Droppo, Ruth A; 'durisen'; Maltese, Adam Vincent; Puckett, Christine L
Weaver, Susan Ida
Subject: RE: support for science outreach
Dear Lisa,
Your workshop proposal is very interesting, and I agree it has great potential to become a very popular
and revenue generating program in STEM education in the near future. Because of these prospects, the
College is willing to supply the $XXX in matching funds listed on the budget proposal, in support of the
workshop. We expect that that this amount, in addition to the forfeited ICR as required by the INSGC,
will fulfill the matching requirements of INSGC.
As soon as you know, please let our budget office (Chris Puckett and Sue Weaver, cc’d on this email) of
the final decision on the proposal.
Good luck with the submission!
Rob
===============================
Rob de Ruyter
Linda and Jack Gill Professor of Physics
Associate Dean for Research
College of Arts and Sciences
Indiana University Bloomington
Kirkwood Hall 104
===============================




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Appendix E – Example Industry Project

Proposal Submitted to INSGC Engagement Program 2/13/09
High-Altitude Balloon Workshop for Jr. High School Instructors
Primary-Investigator / Project Manager
Jason Krueger (PI/PM) StratoStar Systems LLC, Upland IN 46989
Jkrueger@StratoStar.net , 765 382 0451
Dr. Hank D. Voss (C0-I), Dept. of Physics, Taylor University, Upland, IN 46989
Hnvoss@Taylor.edu, 765 998 4843

1. Project Overview
StratoStar Systems and Taylor University have conducted National Science Foundation (NSF) Course,
Curriculum, Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) funded high-altitude balloon workshops for undergraduate
professors. We would like to capitalize on the success of these workshops in order to conduct workshops
for Jr. High instructors to integrate high altitude balloon launches into the classrooms of Indiana Jr. High
Schools.

2. Project Effort
Taylor University and StratoStar Systems have received a grant from National Science Foundation (NSF)
under the Course, Curriculum, Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) program to conduct high-altitude balloon
workshops for University professors with the purpose of exciting and engaging students in the STEM
disciplines. The Psychology department at Taylor has been quantitatively assessing the learning that is
occurring by students who participated in high altitude balloon launches as a result of the NSF workshop.
The department has found: “Students who participated in a high-attitude balloon launch have an increase
in desire to learn about the STEM disciplines.”

2.1 Bringing a proven STEM educational method to Jr. High Schools
Based on Taylor’s research showing that undergraduate students are more motivated about STEM
disciplines through high-altitude balloon launches, StratoStar will partner with Taylor University’s
Education Department to develop a high altitude balloon workshop with an ultimate goal of exciting Jr.
High students in the STEM disciplines.

2.2 Engaging Jr. High School Science Instructors in Continuing Education Workshops
All teachers in Indiana are required to attend continuing education courses in order to receive
Certification Renewal Units (CRUs) which are required to maintain a teaching license. StratoStar and
Taylor’s Education Department will design a CRU summer course where Indiana Jr. High School
teachers will learn all aspects of integrating high altitude balloon launches into their science curriculum.
The workshop topics which will include
    • Integration of balloon launches to Indiana science education standards
    • Building balloon payloads with students
    • How balloon payloads are tracked and recovered
    • What types of experiments students can conduct in a balloon payload
    • How to integrate Climate Change and Outer Space themes
    • What is Near-Space




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2.3 Jr. High school instructors launch a high altitude balloon at the workshop
One of the main components of the workshop will be the instructors building a balloon payload,
launching it on a high altitude balloon, and conducting the data analysis to determine what happened
during the flight. The instructors will experience the entire process of launching a high altitude balloon so
they can better tailor balloon launches into their curriculum.

2.4 University professors to speak at CRU workshop
StratoStar will be asking some of its academic customers to speak at the workshop. The following
professors have been identified as speakers at the workshop:

Professor
Dr. Hank Voss                     Electrical Engineering      and Taylor University
                                  Space Science
Dr. Pamela Meadows                Education                         Taylor University
Dr. Tricia Stan                   Chemistry                         Taylor University
Dr. Bernhard Beck-Winchatz        Astronomy                         DePaul University
Dr. Howard Brooks                 Physics                           DePauw University


2.5 Integration of high-altitude ballooning activities into Indiana Educational Standards
During the second semester of the ’08-’09 academic year Taylor Education majors will be working on
integrating experiments and activities for high altitude balloon launches which meet state standards.
These students will be in a Science Education class and will use this activity as a part of their normal
course work. In the summer an Education major will be hired as an intern to compile all of the ideas and
create a curriculum around these materials.

2.6 Marketing the workshop
This workshop will be open to all Jr. High School teachers in the state, but marketing will be concentrated
in the Indianapolis and Fort Wayne area because of the numbers of Jr. High Schools in each city.
StratoStar will target teachers in Physics, Biology, Earth Science, Engineering, Electronics and Robotics.

2.7 Organize and Conduct CRU Workshop
One of the first steps to organizing the workshop is submitting a “CRU Application” from Taylor to the
Indiana Department of Education to ensure Instructors who attend receive CRU credit towards their
Indiana teaching license. The next step is securing a venue in Indianapolis to take advantage of its central
location in the state. We will then confirm the speakers for each session and accept teacher’s application
to attend the workshop. When the date of the workshop arrives (Summer of 2009) StratoStar staff and
staff from Taylor University will run the workshop and follow up with teachers after its completion to
ensure they have their questions answered.

3. Evaluation/assessment
3.1 Teacher & Student Evaluation
StratoStar will work with the Taylor University Psychology department to assess the learning that
occurred as result of the workshop for the teachers who participated.
As the teachers implement the balloon launches into their curriculum, we will be able to utilize the test
given to students for the NSF workshop to learn how the balloon launch affects the students overall
enthusiasm for the STEM disciplines.

3.2 Data Available to INSGC
The data from testing the teachers will be made available to INSGC after it has been analyzed. We will
also include the necessary information to report who attended the workshop, sex, age, race and any other

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INSGC Affiliate Manual                                                                  ver 1.0, 12/15/10

characteristic desired by INSGC. Data from the student launches will become available as the Jr. High
Schools participate in high-altitude balloon launches.

4. Impact
4.1 Instructors
After instructors have completed the summer workshop, they will have ventured into a relatively
unexplored region of the Earth’s upper atmosphere. Each instructor will have a practical working
knowledge of how to implement a high-altitude balloon launch into their specific classes to excite
students about the STEM disciplines.

4.2 Students
The students of the instructors who attended the workshop will be exposed to a whole new avenue to
learning science and math by launching a balloon 20 miles above the surface of the earth. Students will
use a proven hands-on activity to meet state educational standers, while at the same time having the
opportunity to be inspired to pursue a career in the STEM fields.

4.3 Number of People Reached:
We are looking to have between 10 to 20 Jr. High instructors attend the workshop. If 75% of the
instructors implement a balloon launch into their classroom and the average number of students per class
is 25, there is a potential for between 190 to 375 students directly impacted by this high-altitude balloon
workshop.

5. Educational Standards
Through this project the Indiana State Educational Standards for science will be integrated with labs and
activities involving launching high-altitude balloons for Jr. High students.

Proposed Budget:

INSGC Funding: $XXX
StratoStar & Taylor Matching: $XXX




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Appendix F-Example Outreach Affiliate Project
Project: Indiana State Fair “Indiana Space Travels” Project Proposal
PI: Ms. Cyndy Moriarty
Affiliate: Indianapolis Challenger Center
                                       Project Overview
Challenger Center for Space Science Education is an international, not-for-profit 501 (c)(3) education
organization that was founded by the families of the astronauts lost during the last flight of the
Challenger Space Shuttle in 1986. Through Challenger Center's programs and its international
network of Challenger Learning Centers, the diversity, spirit, and commitment to education that
exemplified the Challenger 51-L mission continues to make an impact on students, teachers, and
families today. Using space exploration as a theme, Challenger Center creates positive learning
experiences that raise students’ expectations of success; foster a long-term interest in mathematics,
science, and technology; and motivate them to pursue careers in these fields.
                                               Goals
During the three weeks of the Indiana State Fair, the Indianapolis Challenger Center will provide,
man and support the ISS Missions System Pentagon™. This unique interactive tool will allow
students to get some feel for the involvement and requirements of manned mission to the ISS. It’s
design takes key attributes of the Indianapolis Challenger Center and makes it transportable and re-
creatable for students across the Hoosier state. This is important for our outreach program and
provides the additional information about the important role that Indiana plays in space activities.
The Indianapolis Challenger Center will have help from both Raytheon and Space Port Indiana in
design and function of the ISS Mission Pentagon™ providing software modifications and interactive
capabilities. They are providing these activities at no charge to the Challenger Center. We are also
getting discounted construction help from Tom Simmons Construction of Zionsville Indiana.
                                        Significance and Merit
This has a significant workforce development impact as The Indianapolis Challenger Center will
engage Indiana students in mission control and ISS activities that are conducted by NASA which will
create an interest in a career in aerospace, engineering and mechanical engineering disciplines. The
students that are involved in the work will also get unique experience that is not readily available to
students in the traditional classroom and will prove to be a valuable experience for career minded
youth. This effort promotes the concept of STEM activities and Inquiry-Based learning applications
for problem solving and team collaboration. It helps students understand the need for an advanced
education in science to become involved in space related activities.
                                               Budget Summary
ISS Mission Systems Pentagon Construction                              $XXX
Computer Screens, controls, electronics, and CPU                       $XXX
TOTAL Amount requested                                                 $XXX
Matches:
Raytheon Staff Support                                                 $XXX
Space Port Indiana                                                     $XXX
Tom Simmons Construction                                               $XXX
Decatur Twp Staffing State Fair                                        $XXX
TOTAL                                                                  $XXX


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