CONSTRUCTION SITE SAFETY - mlohs.com by huanghengdong

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									                CONSTRUCTION SITE SAFETY

An office worker’s overview of construction site
                                       hazards




                     May 20, 2009 J. Manning
                      HAZARDS


•   Physical hazards (slips, trips, falls, falling objects,
    pinch points and snags)
•   Hazardous substances
•   Environmental (Heat/cold, Noise)
•   Machinery and tools
•   Confined spaces
•   H2S (Hydrogen Sulfide)
        Identification of hazards


• FLRA (Field Level Risk Assessment)
 A way to manage risks and hazard on the
 job as per the Construction Owner’s
 Association of Alberta.
  – Identify hazard
  – Assess the risks
  – Control the risks
       Spot the hazards
            Hint: there are at least 5

              Trip hazard           PPE not being
                                    used




Open hole                          Confined space
                  Not using
                  railing/ladder
                  Physical hazards

• Slips, trips and falls: be aware of your surroundings, wear
    appropriate clothes/shoes/gear.
•   Be aware of open holes and ditches. Areas marked “hole”.
•   Stay fit, to be able to do the job.
•   Falls: fall protection and fall protection training required (2m and
    above)
•   Use a rope or hoist to carry tools up a ladder.
•   Falling objects; be aware of people and objects above you.
•   Pinch points: areas where you can get limbs or body parts
    caught. Snags: ensure clothing doesn’t get caught. Note: if you
    can’t see where you are putting a hand or foot, don’t put it there.
•   Use rails and handholds
•   Scaffolds: be aware of tagging. Red = don’t use, Yellow =
    caution, issues, Green = safe to use.
              Chemical hazards
•   Know your WHMIS symbols
•   Follow directions, by supervisor and on the
    labels
•   Use PPE
•   Be mindful of spills
•   Wash your hands before eating or smoking if
    you’ve been handling
    chemicals.
         Environmental hazards

•   Dress appropriately for work
•   Know the signs of frost bite, hypothermia and
    hyperthermia
•   Use noise protection PPE where appropriate
    (lawnmower level and above)
•   If outdoors, get informed about the weather
•   Be cautious around bodies of water
              Machinery and tools
• Be aware of your surroundings, wear traffic vests where
    appropriate.
•   Watch out for the turning radiuses of large vehicles and swing
    radiuses of heavy machinery (cranes, backhoes etc.). Keep a
    line of sight and stay well back.
•   Welding torches: don’t stare directly at them
•   Be aware of hearing damage from loud machinery and tools
•   Learn how to properly use tools before using them and the wear
    the appropriate PPE when around items such as: chain saws,
    power tools, welding torches, air tools and explosive charge
    tools.
•   Special training for air tools, explosive charge and impact tools.
•   Be aware of dangerous equipment. If it tagged, then don’t use.
    Be aware of equipment where safety guards have been
    removed, grounding pin has been removed or cords are frayed.
                    Spot the hazards
                    Hint: there are at least 3
   Not using fall                     Falling object
   protection                         risk
   PPE
                                                       Falling
                                                       object risk

                                                       Pinch point


No line of
sight
w/forklift
driver
              Confined spaces
•   Know what a confined space is.
•   Be certified before entering a confined space
•   If someone collapses for no reason, don’t
    immediately rush in after them in a confined
    space.
•   PPE can include gas detectors and
    sometimes safety harnesses
•   With excavations, there should always a
    second way out/ladder out.
          H2S (Hydrogen sulfide)
•   Colorless, toxic and flammable gas that in low
    quantities can smell like rotten eggs. In high
    quantities, it is odourless.
•   Heavier than air and tends to accumulate in confined
    spaces.
•   Byproduct of oil/gas impurities, volcanoes, swamps
    and sewers.
•   Can be found at wellsites, refineries, and in many
    areas oil/gas companies operate.
•   Before working in areas where this gas is known to
    be present, H2S training is usually required. Ex: H2S
    Alive.
•   PPE for H2S can include gas detectors and SCBA
    (self-contained breathing apparatus).
               Take away

• Be aware of your surroundings
• Conduct Field Level Risk Assessments.
  Identify hazards then eliminate, avoid or
  minimize them
• Get trained for the job and the jobsite
  hazards
• Wear PPE
             THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME.

								
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