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					ME4000 Design Document                                                                            10/5/11




1. Front Matter
     1.1. Executive Summary




                                                                      Photo: Jay Cederberg



Fig. 1: Chumbleysticks Proto-Zero Wasatch backcountry winter 2005.


The University of Utah is a research university located in the foothills of the Wasatch Mountains in
Salt Lake City Utah. The Wasatch Mountains are home to some of the finest skiing North America
has to offer. Throughout the years there have been numerous snow sport related senior design
projects, each of which has been responsible for finding a way to get their prototypes built. The
intellectual merit of this proposal lies in the effort to further the technical aspects of ski design and
manufacturing.


Since the majority of the world lives away from mountainous areas, many people do not get to
experience skiing on a regular basis. Many of those who ski for the first time are deterred from
continuing because of the high amount of physical endurance and coordination it requires. The
main goals of this project are to simplify the technicality of skiing by reducing the ski like while at
the same time predicting where ski manufacturers are headed in their design and getting there
before they do. By accomplishing these goals, we hope to provide a product that is enjoyable to
all types of skiers and being along the frontrunners of design. This proposal will discuss the
theory behind our project as well as the process that has been followed, up to its current point of
conception.




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Table of Contents
1     Front Matter .............................................................................................................. 1-1
    1.1       Executive Summary ................................................................................................... 1-1
    1.2       Table of Contents ........................................................................................................ 1-2
    1.3       List of Figures ............................................................................................................. 1-3
    1.4       List of Tables. ............................................................................................................. 1-3
2     Context ...................................................................................................................... 2-4
    2.1       Need Statement ........................................................................................................... 2-4
    2.2       Problem Statement ...................................................................................................... 2-4
    2.3       Design Team ............................................................................................................... 2-4
      2.3.1       Student Design Team Members ........................................................................................... 2-4
      2.3.2       Faculty Advisors ................. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
      2.3.3       Teaching Teams ................................................................................................................... 2-4
    2.4       Team Circumstances . Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
3 Design Requirements ............ Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not
defined.
    3.1      Introduction ............... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
    3.2      Functional Requirements ......... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not
    defined.
4 Design Development ............. Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not
defined.
    4.1       Overview ................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
    4.2       Benchmarking ........... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
    4.3       More Development ... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
5 Design Specifications ............ Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not
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    5.1      Functional Specifications ......... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not
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    5.2      Physical Specification Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
6     Recommendations ... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
    6.1       Vision ........................ Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
      6.1.1        Enhancements of the Textura 310 Test System and Procedures for Additional Research
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7     Project Planning ...... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
    7.1       Project Time Line...... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
    7.2       Project Budget ........... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
8 Resources and Reference Materials ................ Error! Bookmark not defined.Error!
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    8.2     Resources Consulted . Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.
    8.3     Vendors ..................... Error! Bookmark not defined.Error! Bookmark not defined.




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       1.2. List of Figures
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     “Caption!!!].......................................................................................................................... 1-1
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Fig. 3. Complete Project Plan for Toyota Optimum Human Machine Interface Project..
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       1.3. List of Tables.
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2. Context
    2.1. Need Statement
       As the popularity of skiing increases, the need for newer, functional equipment must also progress.
       Many people find skiing difficult as they experience it for the first time. The difficulty of having
       to control long skis occasionally deters them from continuing. The completion of this senior
       design project should enable those skiing for the first time to have more control than existing
       products and also be versatile enough for experienced skiers to utilize our product.


    2.2. Problem Statement
       The main goal of the snow sport senior design team is to develop a ski form that will deliver
       consistent performance in all snow conditions. This ski form will have the ability to be used by all
       types of skiers from beginning to expert and everywhere in between. It will provide a considerable
       amount more maneuverability than existing commercial products because of its condensed length.
       By producing this ski form, we hope to persuade those who ride the ski to endorse it with positive
       feedback and ultimately sway the perception of how existing designs are viewed. The team will
       also develop a handbook and tooling to be used by future design teams that are engaged in ski
       development.




    2.3. Design Team




       2.3.1    Student Design Team Members
               Chris Choi        warmpizza@yahoo.com
               Coury Morris      courymorris@msn.com
               Holly Oldroyd     hollyjo42@rocketmail.com
               Leo O’Connor      tubbytime@msn.com




       2.3.2    Faculty Advisor
               Dr. Paul Borgmeier




       2.3.3    Teaching Teams
               Dr. Wil Provancher,        Professor

               Steve Virost ,    Teaching assistant

               Nick Sylvester,   Teaching assistant




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   2.4. Team Circumstances

       The concept of Chumbleysticks stemmed from group member Leo O’Connor’s idea of riding kids’
       snowboards as telemark skis. After seeing how well they performed, the opportunity arose to
       implement the design and production of this concept into a senior design project. Leo put together
       a presentation of his idea for the ME EN 3910 Design Methodology class at the University of Utah
       in the spring of 2005. Holly, Coury, and Chris soon came in contact with Leo expressing their
       interest in the project and this is how Team Chumbleysticks came to be.




3. Design Requirements
   3.1 Introduction
        Since the Chumbleystick is a conceptual generation, there are no specific requirements to adhere
        to other than those laid out by team members. In order to maintain the goal of being functional for
        beginners, experts, and everywhere between, we need to maintain some parameters.

       The majority of production skis on the market today commonly exceed six feet in length. This
       length is extremely hard to manage for a beginning skier whose muscles aren’t accustomed to such
       physical exertion. The theory of a long ski is to keep it from wandering underfoot as a load is
       applied on it by a skier. By reducing the length and increasing the with of a production ski, the
       amount of surface area is maintained and the amount of physical exertion is reduced due to the
       lowering of the moment necessary to turn the ski tips and tails.


   3.2 Functional Requirements
       The Chumbleystick will be designed to be functional in all types of skiing conditions for all types
       of skiers. The majority of the skiing population is content with skiing groomed trails. By designing
       the Chumbleystick with a common lay up process that includes a hard metal edge, carving on
       groomed trails should be easier than production skis because of the length decrease.

       There is typically a smaller population within the skiing community that pursues more difficult
       and aggressive terrain. Backcountry and “powderhounds” are typically advanced to expert skiers.
       They pay a lot of money for their equipment and demand the best performance. This is a harder
       target market but conforming to industry standards as far as ski construction goes will yield good
       results and happy skiers.




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Section 4: Design Development

    4.1 Overview
       Design, manufacture, and deploy 3 prototype skis that span the range from mini snowboard to full
       size adult ski. The design team will proportion the prototypes to represent fractional geometric
       steps between the specified boundary forms. One form will represent the geometric middle, while
       the other two will be one quarter of the geometric difference from the boundary design.



    4.2 Development Strategy
       Since very little information regarding optimal ski design exists. The development of this project
       is based on prototyping, by building skis and testing the skis to determine how the ski form affects
       performance. The idea is that each successive prototyping and testing sequence approaches the
       optimal ski form. Hence if all goes as planned, the final prototype will be very close to the
       optimal ski form.



    4.3 Brainstorming
       Brainstorming will take place after the initial testing of the first prototype. We will brainstorm
       how to alter the ski form in order to eliminate whatever performance criteria was not met by that
       prototype.




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   4.4 Benchmarking

                               Summit Classic    Karhu Karver     Hagan Freedom

                     Tip       14 cm             12 cm            13 cm

                     Waist     11 cm             10 cm            9 cm

                     Tail      14 cm             11.5 cm          11 cm

                     Length    110 cm            130 cm           133 cm




   4.5 Prototypes
       We have created a critical function prototype (CFP) out of cheaper materials. We did this in order
       to study the laminate lay-up process, test the ski press, and test the mold. Specifically, we are
       looking to find out: how the epoxy will cure, if the press is working properly, and if the mold
       works with the total system.



   4.6 Lessons Learned from the Prototype
       We learned that we need to increase the clearance between the mold and the press. This will allow
       more maneuverability when setting the press and mold to press a ski. Also, we learned that the
       frame is very heavy. We must perform a test on the press frame to discover whether or we can
       reduce the weight by removing members.




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         5: Design Specifications


             5.1 Customer Needs and Design Specifications




                               Need                                            Specification
Performance in powder snow                               Better floatation and maneuverability
Performance in hard-pack snow                            Better ability to maneuver at high speeds
Binding interface                                        Allows ski and snowboard bindings
Easy for beginners to use                                More manageable size and turning ability
Provides experienced skiers with a more maneuverable ski Increased side-cut and decreased length
Performance between trees                                Increased side-cut and decreased length
Performance on moguls                                    Increase speed and maneuverability
Floatation                                               Better than average skis (more like snowboard or better)
Turning radius                                           Decreased (more like snowboard or better)
Adaptability for all skill levels                        Necessary skills are much like regular skiing



              5.2 Functional Specifications
                 The initial phase of the project will require the establishment of design boundaries. This will be
                 accomplished by choosing two existing commercial ski forms to represent the extreme parameters.
                 One end of the range will be represented by an Atomic Teledaddy with an effective length of
                 153cm. The other boundary will be represented by a Burton Mini-Chopper Snowboard with an
                 effective length of 111cm. The surface area of each boundary form will be determined, as will the
                 turning radius, tip width, waist width, and tail width.




                 The design team will use the established parameters to represent a range from which three
                 prototype dimensions will be calculated. One prototype, B, will be constructed to fall on the
                 average of the two extreme forms in all dimensions. Prototype A will be constructed to fall on the
                 average of the mini-snowboard and prototype B. Finally prototype C will be constructed to fall on
                 the average of the full size ski and prototype B.



             5.3 Physical Specifications

                                           Burton Chopper Prototype A Prototype B Prototype C Atomic Teledaddy
                   Board Size (cm)                111        121.5        132        142.5           153
                   Waist Width (mm)               212        183.75      155.5       127.25           99
                  Side cut Radius (m)            4.88        10.91       16.94       22.97            29
                   Nose Width (mm)               240.5      211.875      183.25     154.625          126


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                       Tail Width (mm)                  240.5             209.375         178.25         147.125             116




           6. Project Planning
                     6.1 Project Timeline


                                Summer       September              October       November         December    BREAK BREAK
                                            1   2   3    4      1    2    3   4   1   2   3   4      1     2            3          4
Research Materials
Research Manufacturing
Research Tooling
Preliminary design
Design drawings Type 1
Material selection
Finalize Prototypes Type 1
Research Local Prospects
Procure Materials
Locate Workspace
Build Press Frame
Construct bladder assembly
Construct molds Type 1
Build Prototype 1
On snow testing Type 1


           Fig. 2 Gantt Chart

           The red portions on the above Gantt Chart indicates project milestones. The first milestone was achieved on
           10/7 and was the completion of the press frame construction. The second milestone, the completion of the
           air bladder assembly, was completed on 10/18.




           6.2. Project Budget




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Budget



Expenses
Item                                                Quantity    Cost per Unit      Extended Cost

Ski Press
frame:    (total cost for frame)                          1      $       200.00     $     200.00
          2" x 2" x 79" square steel tubing
          2" x 2" x 12" square steel tubing
          1/2" x 12" round steel tubing
          1/2" x 2" x 79" wood
          1/2" x 1/2" x 12" angle iron
          5/6" threaded rod
          5/6" bolts ans nuts
5" diameter fire hose                                   7.5      $          7.00    $      52.50
ski mold                                                 1       $        50.00     $      50.00
edge bender                                              1       $        20.00     $      20.00
                                                                     sub total      $     322.50
Ski Materials
wood                                                      3      $        30.00     $      90.00
Composites                                                3      $        20.00     $      60.00
top sheet                                                 3      $        15.00     $      45.00
epoxy                                                     1      $        50.00     $      50.00
tempered steel (edges)                                    3      $        15.00     $      45.00

                                                                     sub total      $     290.00
Testing Costs
resort access                                             4      $       300.00     $   1,200.00

                                                                Total Expenses $        2,112.50
NOTE: bold font indicates big ticket items

Income
student fees per year                                     4      $       100.00     $     400.00

Fundraising Need                                                                   $    1,612.50
Possible sources:                   Material donation
                                    Ski pass donation
                                    Monetary donation


As the Fall semester of 2005 progressed, Team Chumbley sticks received a generous cash donation in the
amount of $500.00 from Prince-Yeates, a law firm located in Salt Lake City, Utah. Also, the Salt Lake
County Fire Department donated a used fire hose that we used as a bladder in our ski press. Crown Plastics
donated ski base for our project and the only substantial cost we sustained this semester was the steel for
our ski press.



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   7. References

   7.1 Reference material
       www.skibuilders.com This website was used for information on how to build a ski press, ski mold
       and skis.


   7.2 Vendor References
       Mountain View Building Systems. Rolled steel vendor.
       See also the sponsor portion of the budget.




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