Decent Trade Meeting Materials by xiaohuicaicai

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									      Decent Trade: Meeting Materials
1st Brainstorming meeting of high-level theme group on “Decent Trade”
                     29-30 January 2008, Berlin
OVERVIEW




   • Workshop agenda

   • List of participants
   • “Decent Trade” – Select Discussion Points

   • Background on the Geneva Forum

   • Organization of theme group “Decent Trade”
   • Various background materials
AGENDA (1/3)


29 JANUARY 2008
07:00pm INFORMAL OPENING
  Dinner speech: “Realizing decent trade: The role of bilateral development agencies”
  Speaker: Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul, Minister for Economic Cooperation and
  Development, Germany (invited)
  Venue: Hotel Mövenpick, Berlin


30 JANUARY 2008
09:00am PLENARY: WELCOME
  Evita Schmieg, Division Chief Trade, Globalization, Investment (305) Federal Ministry for
  Economic Co-operation and Development (BMZ)
09:15am PLENARY: SETTING THE STAGE
  Introduction and background: The Geneva Forum for Trade & Development and the role of
  the theme group on “Decent Trade”
  Introduction: Inge Kaul (Adjunct Professor, Hertie School of Governance) and Jan Martin
  Witte (Global Public Policy Institute)
  Q+A
                                                                                              2
AGENDA (2/3)


30 JANUARY 2008 (CONT’D)
10:00am Coffee break
10:30am PLENARY: DEFINING DECENT TRADE
   “Conceptualizing Decent Trade”
   Introduction: Inge Kaul (Adjunct Professor, Hertie School of Governance)
   Guiding questions for the discussion:
   • How is “decent trade” different or complementary to the notions of free trade and fair
     trade?
   • Why develop the notion of decent trade now?
12:30pm Lunch




                                                                                              3
AGENDA (3/3)


30 JANUARY 2008 (CONT’D)
02:30pm PLENARY: REALIZING DECENT TRADE: WHERE DO WE STAND? ON WHICH
   INITIATIVES COULD WE BUILD? WHERE TO NEXT?
    • Identification of relevant initiatives, including voluntary and mandatory norm and
       standard setting
    • Assessment of the strengths/limitations of these initiatives and progress to date
    • Identification of possible new, added initiatives to explore
04:00pm Coffee break
04:30pm PLENARY: ORGANIZING THE THEME GROUP
    • Agreeing on outputs, timelines, and next meeting
    • Modus operandi of the theme group
    • Any other matters
06:00pm Meeting closes




                                                                                           4
OVERVIEW




   • Workshop agenda

   • List of participants
   • “Decent Trade” – Select Discussion Points

   • Background on the Geneva Forum

   • Organization of theme group “Decent Trade”
   • Various background materials
LIST OF PARTICIPANTS – WORKSHOP (1/3)*


Eduardo Galvez                     Director of Multilateral Policy, Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Chile
                                   egalvez2001@yahoo.com
Ulrike Grote                       Professor, Leibniz University of Hanover*
                                   grote@iuw.uni-hannover.de
Anita Househam                     Program Manager, AccountAbility*
                                   anita@accountability21.net
George Jaksch                      Senior Director of Corporate Responsibility and Public Affairs,
                                   Chiquita*
                                   gjaksch@chiquita.com
Inge Kaul                          Adjunct Professor, Hertie School of Governance*
                                   inge-kaul@t-online.de
Gunther-A. Kellermann              BASF
                                   gunther-alexander.kellermann@basf.com
Eddy Lee                           Director, International Policy Group International Labour Office
                                   (ILO) (ret’d)*
                                    lee_eddy@ilo.org



* Member of theme group “Decent Trade” or representing theme group member                                  6
LIST OF PARTICIPANTS – WORKSHOP (2/3)*



Robert Marten                      Research Assistant, Global Public Policy Institute
                                   rmarten@gppi.net
Ismail Hussein Mfinanga            Assistant Director, Regional Intergration Programmes,
                                   Government of Tanzania*
                                   ihmfinanga@hotmail.com
Anna Peters                        Project Manager Corporate Social Responsibility, Bertelsmann
                                   Foundation*
                                   Anna.Peters@Bertelsmann.de
Diego Pizano                       International Adviser, National Federation of Coffee Growers,
                                   Colombia*
                                   Diego.Pizano@cafedecolombia.com
Stefanie Scharf                    Division 305, German Federal Ministry for Economic
                                   Cooperation and Development
                                   stefanie.scharf@bmz.bund.de
Björn Schildberg                   Division 305, German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation
                                   and Development
                                   bjoern.schildberg@bmz.bund.de

* Member of theme group “Decent Trade” or representing theme group member                          7
LIST OF PARTICIPANTS – WORKSHOP (3/3)*


Evita Schmieg                      Division Head 305, German Federal Ministry for Economic
                                   Cooperation and Development
                                   evita.schmieg@bmz.bund.de
Vera Scholz                        Head, Program Office for Social and Environmental Standards,
                                   GTZ GmbH
                                   vera.scholz@bmz.bund.de
Philipp Schukat                    Project Manager, Program Office for Social and Environmental
                                   Standards, GTZ GmbH
                                   philipp.schukat@gtz.de
Frank Weissenfels                  Project Manager, GTZ AgenZ
                                   frank.weissenfels@gtz.de
Jan Martin Witte                   Associate Director, Global Public Policy Institute
                                   jmwitte@gppi.net




* Member of theme group “Decent Trade” or representing theme group member                         8
OVERVIEW




   • Workshop agenda

   • List of participants

   • “Decent Trade” – Select Discussion Points

   • Background on the Geneva Forum

   • Organization of theme group “Decent Trade”
   • Various background materials




                                                  9
DECENT TRADE – ELEMENTS OF A DEFINITION (1/2)


Trade could be said to be decent, if it does not do any harm—if it does:


•   Not adversely impact the attainment of agreed-upon priority goals of the global community,
    such as the MDGs, the objective of decent work, or the goal of halting, or even, if possible,
    reversing the trend towards global warming and climate change;
•   Not undermine existing development opportunities and achievements, for example, by
    further exacerbating current pollution levels, further increasing the rate at which biodiversity
    is being lost, intensifying existing socio-economic inequities, funneling conflicts, or
    reversing past achievements for example, through increasing risks of financial crises.




                                                                                                  10
DECENT TRADE – ELEMENTS OF A DEFINITION (2/2)


Trade should be organized so as if:

      Development—people’s improved well-being
      mattered, in poorer and richer countries mattered


      Environmental sustainability and inter-generational
      equity mattered



      Sustained economic growth and stability mattered



      Peace and security mattered




                                                            11
WHAT IS THE ADDITIONALITY OF THE CONCEPT ‘DECENT TRADE’?
(1/2)


  • “Free trade” primarily focuses on the
    rules of the game that ought to guide
    trade relations between countries.
    However, it also has fairness
    dimensions, e.g.: the process of
    negotiating the rules should be fairly
    structured; all countries should
    comply with agreed-upon rules in
    equal measure, recognizing the
    agreed-upon principle of
    differentiated responsibility in terms
    for example, of speed of realizing
    compliance.

  • To some extent, “fair trade” also
    focuses on the working conditions of
    producers, notably of poor and
    marginalized producers.



                                                           12
WHAT IS THE ADDITIONALITY OF THE CONCEPT ‘DECENT TRADE’?
(2/2)


“Decent trade”, if defined as in point 1 above, would focus on the traded products and be
   concerned with three main issues:


•   One—How were the traded goods (and services) produced? E.g.: Does the work they
    embody meet expectations of decent work, as for example, defined by ILO? Were the
    production technologies and processes environmentally sound and peace-preserving or
    conflict avoiding?
•   Two—Can the goods in question be traded freely? Do they find market access? And, are
    they themselves “open”: Do they inform about their contents and potential side-effects?
•   Three—Once potential buyers will use/consume the traded goods, what further effects on
    sustainable economic growth and human development are likely to result? How
    environmentally sound or healthy are their usage/consumption? Does it support or subtract
    from financial stability, risk management, social cohesion, peace and security?




                                                                                              13
PLACING “DECENT TRADE” ON THE AGENDA: WHY, AND WHY
NOW?


We know: The world needs continued growth in international trade. Especially those countries
that have so far been left outside of the globalization process need to be “linked in” and get fair
and sustainable access to the global economy.

We also know: There are important social and environmental issues related to trade that need
to be dealt with effectively.

•   How can trade be made socially sustainable (building e.g. on the decent work agenda
    defined by the ILO) while not building up competitive barriers for developing countries?
•   How can environmental issues – specifically climate change – be dealt with effectively and
    equitably in the international trade system?

These environmental and social issues are increasingly global (e.g., climate change), and
increasingly impossible to address if each country goes its own way. Global agreements to
address these issues, for which countries voluntarily sign up, need to be the ultimate objective.
These are also preconditions for the international community to reach the MDGs.




                                                                                                 14
HOW TO MAKE ‘DECENT TRADE’ OPERATIONAL: ACTION ON ALL
LEVELS AND BY ALL SECTORS REQUIRED




         I N T E R N A T I O N A L

         Public                                Market-based
                           Public-private
     (Governments,   N A T I O N A L
                             interface          solutions
         IGOs)


                         L O C A L
                     Continuum of Governance




                                                              15
FOSTERING DECENT TRADE – SOME INNOVATIVE IDEAS (1/4)


Idea 1: Create the required database in order to facilitate informed decision-making

•   To begin with, it would be important and interesting for industrial and developing countries
    to establish what could be called a decent-trade balance (DTB). The main purpose would
    be to explore whether and to what extent countries import and export goods that may not
    meet decent-trade standards.
•   In order to develop the format and methodology for establishing DTBs, one could, for
    example, select two test-case countries—an industrial country (e.g. Germany) and a
    developing country.




                                                                                               16
FOSTERING DECENT TRADE – SOME INNOVATIVE IDEAS (2/4)


Idea 2: Putting Decent Trade Balances to Work

The establishment of DTBs would signal a country’s willingness to act and be among the
coalition of movers towards more decent trade. They would help identify areas in need of
potential public policy intervention. For example:


•   DTBs could draw attention to product areas in which a particular industrial country or
    several industrial countries still rely on imported goods and services that embody work,
    which fails to meet ILO criteria. Thus, DTBs could serve as a tool for (re-)orienting official
    foreign aid efforts and/or strengthening official (public-policy) support for relevant civil-
    society and business initiatives.
•   DTBs could also help highlight product areas in which there exists significant scope for
    reducing the environmental footprint of traded products, at home or abroad. And--
•   DTBs could also help flag once again that traded goods (drugs, arms, diamonds) are only
    all too often linked to conflict and war as well as corruption.




                                                                                                     17
FOSTERING DECENT TRADE – SOME INNOVATIVE IDEAS (3/4)


Idea 3: Appointing national and international decent-trade sheperds


•   During recent years we have come to recognize and accept that many of today’s policy
    issues are of a multi-sector, multi-level nature and do no longer fit easily into conventional
    institutional set ups for public policymaking. As a result, we have seen a rise in the number
    of issue ambassadors for the environment, health, human rights, and trade.
•   It might be interesting to explore, whether the appointment of issue ambassadors could
    also help promote decent trade concerns.
•   To explore this issue more systematically, one could perhaps organize a
    feasibility/desirability meeting with high-level experts and policymakers. Such a meeting
    could perhaps be the beginning of a network of decent-trade shepherds/ambassadors.




                                                                                                 18
FOSTERING DECENT TRADE – SOME INNOVATIVE IDEAS (4/4)


Idea 4: Fostering national policy ownership in promoting decent trade


•   Issues like those linked to the issue of fair or decent trade often appear in international
    dialogues as contentious issues. This is in a way strange, because one would perhaps be
    hard-pressed to find nationally many people who would be against decent working
    conditions or environmental sustainability (if they do not happen to be marginal
    entrepreneurs who fear about their competitiveness).
•   Progress on decent trade will in large measure depend on clarifying the hopes and
    aspirations that various population groups associate with decent trade for a decent life.
•   Hence, a measure of utmost urgency might also be to organize national workshops on this
    question—in developing and industrial countries. Only then will it be possible to recognize
    the policy priorities that different countries/population groups would like to pursue and how
    differences between their priorities could eventually be overcome.




                                                                                                  19
REINFORCING EXISTING INITIATIVES – SOME INITIAL IDEAS


1. Putting “decent trade” on governmental and intergovernmental agendas, and raising the capacity
    to act, including e.g.
- Enhancing the availability of domestic and international (e.g. ODA) resources for country initiatives,
    including national capacity building in policy analysis and design aimed at enhancing decent work—
    recognizing also the close link between “decent work” and the MDGs
- Encouraging speedy and decisive follow-up to the UNFCCC conference in Bali, notably in respect to the
    issue of environmental impact assessments of new investments; etc.
- Review the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Corporations from the viewpoint of decent trade
- Launch public information campaigns on “aid for decent trade”, because why should we just have a
    programme on “aid for (free) trade”? Why not one, too, on “aid for decent trade”? Etc., etc.
- …
2. Promote and support initiatives that are designed to enhance coherence and effectiveness of
    market-based mechanisms that help to realize decent trade, including e.g.:
- Initiatives designed to foster voluntary social and environmental reporting, e.g. the Global Reporting
    Initiative (GRI) and the International Standardization Organization (ISO 26000)
- Initiatives designed to bring more coherence and reliability to the world of voluntary codes of conduct
    and ‘labeling’ approaches
- Supporting independent third-party certification approaches
- …

3. Provide financial and other support for relevant CSO campaigns that promote “decent trade”
    agenda, including e.g.
- Clean Clothes Campaign
- …
                                                                                                            20
OVERVIEW




   • Workshop agenda

   • List of participants

   • “Decent Trade” – Select Discussion Points

   • Background on the Geneva Forum

   • Organization of theme group “Decent Trade”
   • Various background materials




                                                  21
GENEVA TRADE & DEVELOPMENT FORUM


“A Pro-poor, Pro-growth, Pro-market Development Strategy For the Poorer Developing
Countries”

Motivation:
Many poorer nations have not yet been fully able to take advantage of globalization.
•   Their problems do not affect the world economy
•   their concerns are only marginally taken into account in global policy forums
•   they are economically insufficiently attractive to mobilize meaningful private sector activity.
Goal:
Establishing a global forum particularly for developing countries to discuss strategies on how to
   link them into the global economy
Approach:
Adopting a pragmatic process by concentrating activities and objectives on concrete issues of
relevance to poorer countries, based on inclusive participation on a multi-disciplinary platform.




                                                                                                  22
GENEVA TRADE & DEVELOPMENT FORUM – WORKING METHOD


1. Identify major issues to be addressed to maximize benefits and minimize costs of trade
   liberalization for poorer countries.
2. Make use of the existing research on trade and development and poorer countries and
   translate it into concrete and operational proposals to be submitted beforehand to relevant
   actors for discussion at the Forum. This will be achieved through a one year work program
   for expert teams tasked with identified themes.
3. Bring together all stakeholders needed to foster real change in poorer countries and in the
   international system that defines the rules of inclusion and the reasons of exclusion:
   political decision-makers, the private sector, civil society, academia, from the developed
   and developing world as well as the actors and financiers of development i.e. donor
   agencies and international institutions.
4. Deliver concrete outcomes through a multi-sectoral and cross-cutting approach and identify
   the responsibilities of the various stakeholders in their implementation.
5. Promote the achievement of the eighth Millennium Development Goal.




                                                                                             23
THE THEME GROUP AND THE GENEVA TRADE & DEVELOPMENT
FORUM

•   The theme group “Decent Trade” is one of 11 expert commissions that prepare input for
    the Geneva Trade and Development Forum
•   The GTDF seeks to launch a long term, informal process in which all relevant stakeholders
    from government, civil society as well as the private sector come together in a non-
    negotiating, solution-oriented to setting to develop realistic and implementable
    recommendations designed to build a fair and sustainable global economy.
•   It is the vision of the GTDF is to launch a process that helps to network practitioners in the
    field of trade and development and that provides them a novel platform to brainstorm new
    ideas, exchange best practices and lessons learned, and to engage high-level
    policymakers in a dialogue on how to foster a sustainable globalization.
•   The results of the work of the theme group on “Decent Trade” will be fed into the first
    GTDF meeting from 2-5 July 2008 in Crans Montana (Switzerland).
•   However, the results of this theme group will also be disseminated through other channels.




                                                                                                24
THEME GROUPS FOR GENEVA TRADE & DEVELOPMENT FORUM


1. Harnessing trade opportunities to enhance livelihoods: strategies for employment creation
   and mitigation of negative effects of trade
2. Unleashing the power of SMEs: the case for trade facilitation in a regional context
3. The trade governance architecture - developing countries in global rule making
4. Labour mobility: a win win model for trade and development
5. Bridging the technological divide: how can LDC’s promote innovation and growth?
6. New comers to the world trade system: is the price right?
7. From commodities revenues to real development benefits: the case of Botswana , Kenya
   and Bolivia
8. The conundrum of trade in agriculture and food security: how to solve it?
9. Services: unappreciated tool for development
10. How to reconcile the decent trade agenda of the ILO and global trade?
11. How to reach "the hard to reach": a pladoyer for a strategic approach to pro poor
    development


See http://www.gtdforum.org/themes.php?action=themes (23 January 2008).

                                                                                           25
OVERVIEW




   • Workshop agenda

   • List of participants

   • “Decent Trade” – Select Discussion Points

   • Background on the Geneva Forum

   • Organization of theme group “Decent Trade”
   • Various background materials
THE THEME GROUP ON “DECENT TRADE”: SUGGESTED OUTCOMES
(AND DESIRED IMPACT)


Note: This page will be completed in light of the discussion on Wednesday, at the
closing session




                                                                                    27
PLANNING PROGRESS: HOW WE SUGGEST TO ORGANIZE THIS
PROCESS


We would like to engage you in this process through various means:

•   Two “in-person” meetings (30 January 2008; late April 2008).
•   Continuous exchange and feedback through email and phone throughout the process.
•   Online discussion forum for our theme group www.gtdforum.org.
•   Participation in the proceedings of the Geneva Trade & Development Forum 2008.


Also tentatively planned:
•   Regional consultation in (East) Africa.
•   Targeted consultations with decision-makers and experts (if needed).




                                                                                       28
PRINCIPLES OF ENGAGEMENT




                               Fresh thinking

                           Open and frank debate

                               Inclusiveness

                           Conceptual exploration

                              Careful listening




                                                    29
PHASES



      Phase 1: Setup and         Phase 2: Research and          Phase 3: Disseminating
    agreement on approach              dialogue                        results



    Completing theme group      Synthesizing existing          Finalizing Action Paper
    membership                  knowledge on “decent trade”

    Agreement on goals and      Consulting with theme group    Participation in GTDF
    objectives                  members (email, phone) on
                                structure and substance of     Dissemination of Action
    Agreement on key concepts   Action Paper                   Paper
    and terminology
                                Targeted interviews with
    Agreement on timeline and   decision-makers and experts
    deliverables                to source further knowledge


    Until mid-February 2008       Until late April 2008       Until early July 2008




                                                                                         30
We are looking forward to working with you!

     Thank you for your participation!




                                              31
OVERVIEW



   • Workshop agenda
   • List of participants
   • “Decent Trade” – Select Discussion Points

   • Background on the Geneva Forum
   • Organization of theme group “Decent Trade”
   • Various background materials
       • Relevant international initiatives
       • Public-Private Initiatives Promoting Decent Trade
       • Additional background material
                                                             32
OVERVIEW



   • Workshop agenda
   • List of participants
   • “Decent Trade” – Select Discussion Points

   • Background on the Geneva Forum
   • Organization of theme group “Decent Trade”
   • Various background materials
       • Relevant international initiatives
       • Public-Private Initiatives Promoting Decent Trade
       • Additional background material
                                                             33
RELEVANT INTERNATIONAL INITIATIVES – QUICK OVERVIEW




     • UNCTAD XII: Addressing the opportunities and challenges of
       globalization for development

     • The ILO and the “Decent Work” Agenda

     • The G24’s work on labor and social issues
     • Helsinki Process on Globalization and Democracy
     • ILO and “Fair Globalization”: Follow-up work on the World
       Commission on the Social Dimension of Globalization




                                                                    34
OVERVIEW




    • UNCTAD XII: Addressing the opportunities and challenges of
      globalization for development

    • The ILO and the “Decent Work” Agenda

    • The G24’s work on labor and social issues
    • Helsinki Process on Globalization and Democracy
    • ILO and “Fair Globalization”: Follow-up work on the World
      Commission on the Social Dimension of Globalization




                                                                   35
UNCTAD XII: ADDRESSING THE OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES
OF GLOBALIZATION FOR DEVELOPMENT


•   UNCTAD XII will take place on 20-25 April 2008 in Accra (Ghana). Meeting every four
    years to set the organization's mandate and work priorities, Ministerial conferences are
    UNCTAD's highest decision-making body.
•   Theme for UNCTAD XII focuses on “fair globalization”: “By now it is widely acknowledged
    that globalization has generated remarkable wealth and prosperity . But those benefits
    have not reached large swathes of the world population; in numerous developing countries,
    and even within some of the more prosperous countries, there are many people who have
    not benefited or who are even worse off. Given that globalization will continue for the
    foreseeable future, the conference will explore ways to harness globalization to raise living
    standards, reduce poverty and ensure sustainable development.”
•   Subthemes include:
    • Enhancing coherence at all levels for sustainable economic development and poverty
      reduction in global policy-making, including the contribution of regional approaches.
    • Key trade and development issues and the new realities in the geography of the world
      economy.
    • Enhancing an enabling environment at all levels to strengthen productive capacity, trade
      and investment: mobilizing resources and harnessing knowledge for development.
Sources:
http://www.unctadxii.org/en/The-Conference/
                                                                                               36
THE ILO AND THE “DECENT WORK” AGENDA


•   For the ILO, fostering “decent work” is one of organization’s central objectives.
•   Decent work calls for the integration of economic and social objectives and for a well-
    orchestrated combination of measures in the areas of employment promotion, rights at
    work, social protection and social dialogue. This coherent approach is proving its relevance
    to a wide-ranging policy agenda, from social dimensions of globalization to poverty
    reduction strategies.
•   The ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work is one of the central
    tools for the ILO to implement its “decent work” objective. The Declaration promotes
    freedom of association and the effective recognition of the right to collective bargaining; the
    elimination of all forms of forced or compulsory labor; the effective abolition of child labor;
    and the elimination of discrimination in respect of employment and occupation.
•   The ILO is also implementing Decent Work Pilot Programs.The Decent Work Pilot Program
    was initiated in October 2000 to pioneer ways in which the concept of decent work can be
    effectively promoted and applied in ILO member countries. Eight countries formed part of
    the Pilot Programme: Bahrain, Bangladesh, Denmark, Ghana, Kazakhstan, Morocco,
    Panama, Philippines.
Sources:
http://www.oit.org/public/english/standards/relm/ilc/ilc87/rep-i.htm
http://www.oit.org/public/english/bureau/dwpp/index.htm
                                                                                                 37
THE G24’s WORK ON SOCIAL AND LABOR ISSUES


•   The Intergovernmental Group of Twenty-Four on International Monetary Affairs and
    Development (G-24) was established in 1971. Its main objective is to concert the position
    of developing countries on monetary and development finance issues. It consists of the
    following countries from each of the three regions (Africa , Latin America and the
    Caribbean, and Asia).
•   The G24 meets twice a year at the Ministerial and Central Banker level.
•   Most of the work of the G24 relates to development finance. However, they have also
    engaged in discussions on trade, as well as on social and labor issues related to trade.


Sources:
http://www.g24.org/index.htm
http://www.g24.org/publicat.htm




                                                                                                38
HELSINKI PROCESS ON GLOBALIZATION AND DEMOCRACY


•   The Helsinki Process on Globalisation and Democracy was jointly initiated by Finland and
    Tanzania as a result of the Helsinki Conference of December 2002. During the First Phase
    of the Process - from 2003 to September 2005 - the Helsinki Group and three thematic
    Tracks worked on developing a concept for multi-stakeholder cooperation in global problem
    solving and suggested ways of addressing various global problems using this concept.
•   The work of the Helsinki Group was supported by 3 thematic tracks (New Approaches to
    Global Problem Solving, Global Economic Agenda and Human Security). Trade was so far
    not included in the “Global Economic Agenda.” However, it was realized that the issue of
    trade could not be disconnected from debates about development finance.
•   A major conference in 2005 concluded that the Helsinki Process should continue and focus
    on a number of objectives, including: Promoting the implementation of selected proposals
    made during the first phase of the process; continuing multi-stakeholder dialogue for
    finding feasible solutions to global problems; promoting multi-stakeholder cooperation in
    institutions and mechanisms of global governance; etc.
•   From the website it is unclear how the Helsinki Process will continue in 2008. It appears
    that the process focuses primarily on organizing conferences and workshops.


Sources:
http://www.helsinkiprocess.fi/
                                                                                                39
THE ILO AND ‘FAIR GLOBALIZATION’


•   The World Commission on the Social Dimension of Globalization released its Report, A
    Fair Globalization: Creating Opportunities for All, in February 2004. It was the first attempt
    at structured dialogue among representatives of constituencies with different interests and
    opinions on the social dimension of globalization, aimed at finding common ground on one
    of the most controversial and divisive subjects of our time.

•   The ILO’s follow-up activities at this stage are mostly focused on raising awareness for the
    report and its recommendations. That includes the organization of international-level and
    national-level dialogues.

•   In a second phase, concrete, implementation-level follow-up is planned, but so far no
    specifics have been provided.

Sources:
http://www.ilo.org/fairglobalization/index.htm
http://www.ilo.org/public/english/wcsdg/docs/report.pdf




                                                                                                 40
OVERVIEW



   • Workshop agenda
   • List of participants
   • “Decent Trade” – Select Discussion Points

   • Background on the Geneva Forum
   • Organization of theme group “Decent Trade”
   • Various background materials
       • Relevant international initiatives
       • Public-Private Initiatives Promoting Decent Trade
       • Additional background material
                                                             41
PUBLIC-PRIVATE INITIATIVES FOSTERING DECENT TRADE –
SAMPLE




     • Common Code for the Coffee Community
     • Conservation Coffee Alliance

     • GTZ – AVE Alliance

     • Social Accountability 8000
     • Flower label




                                                      42
COMMON CODE FOR THE COFFEE COMMUNITY (4C)



•   4C is a strategic alliance initially launched by GTZ which brings together more than 100
    member firms.
•   The initiative has developed a sustainability concept for the international coffee industry
    and a code of conduct specifying social and environmental norms for sustainable global
    coffee production, processing and trade.
•   With the participation of all important stakeholders in a tripartite governance structure, the
    concept and code of conduct were developed by, and for, all market participants. The long-
    term objectives of the 4C initiative are higher efficiency, cost reduction, quality
    improvement (including environmental and social aspects) and increased profitability in
    coffee production.

Sources:
http://www.sustainable-coffee.net/
http://www.oxfam.de/a_zusatzseite.asp?id=89
http://www.bmz.de/de/themen/globalisierung/arbeitsfelder/Global/Kaffeeproduzenten.html
http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Common_Code_for_the_Coffee_Community




                                                                                                43
SIERRA LEONE PEACE DIAMONDS INITIATIVE



•   The purpose of the alliance – launched by USAID – is to create a transparent, fair, and
    safe alluvial diamond market that delivers equitable and sustainable benefits to local
    miners, diggers, and the extended local community in Sierra Leone.
•   The illicit diamond trade in Sierra Leone has fueled civil war, money laundering, and
    possibly
•   terrorist activities. It also limits legitimate foreign investment in the diamond sector that
    might raise the living standards of the hundreds of thousands of Sierra Leone’s smallscale
    diamond miners.
•   Alliance members include the Government of Sierra Leone, U.S. Agency for International
    Development, U.K. Department for International Development, World Bank Communities
    and Small Scale Mining Project, Global Witness, Koidu Holdings, The Rapaport Group,The
    DeBeers Group, Kono’s Hope, Management Systems International.

Sources:
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_partnerships/gda/pdf/GDA_Report_Jan2006_Part2a.pdf




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CONSERVATION COFFEE ALLIANCE


•   A major coffee company builds an alliance with an international conservation organization
    and USAID to promote sustainable coffee-farming practices that fairly compensate
    growers, restore rain forests, and supply a growing market for quality coffee beans.
•   The purpose is to expand the cultivation and sale of high quality, shade-grown coffee.
•   The El Triunfo reserve in Chiapas, Mexico is among the world’s largest reserves of
    biological diversity under intensive human management. The small-scale farmers from
    such regions typically grow their crop under a canopy of shade trees, often alongside other
    crops for domestic consumption or local markets. Because this system provides native
    flora and fauna critical to conserving the diverse ecosystems in which coffee is produced,
    coffee farmers are also stewards of biodiversity.
•   The Conservation Coffee Alliance has taken up the challenge to make sustainable
    livelihoods and sustainable ecosystems possible through a “field to cup” intervention in
    which stewardship is practiced throughout the supply chain, from grower to consumer.
•   The alliance has succeeded in improving the supply of premium coffees that meet the
    market demands for high-quality, shade-grown coffee. In Mexico, the initial group of 300
    farmers has grown to 1,000 growers in six producer organizations.

Sources:
http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/global_partnerships/gda/pdf/GDA_Report_Jan2006_Part2a.pdf
http://www.greenbiz.com/news/news_third.cfm?NewsID=27226
http://www.newfarm.org/international/news/090104/0929/coffee_group_print.shtm
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AVE-GTZ ALLIANCE


•   The GTZ and the Foreign Trade Association of the German Retail Trade (AVE) have joined
    forces to improve working conditions in developing countries.
•   As part of the GTZ-AVE partnership project, recognized social standards are to be
    introduced at companies in 11 Asian and Eastern European countries that supply the
    German textile industry. The aim is to increase corporate competitiveness by improving
    employee living and working conditions. Internationally recognized guidelines, such as the
    core labour standards formulated by the International Labour Organization (ILO) and
    SA8000 standards for corporate social responsibility, constitute the foundation for the
    effort.
•   In the current project phase, independent auditors are inspecting the companies. Supplier
    companies that fail to meet the requirements of their German partners will be helped to
    draft improvements and put them in place. No supplier is to be cut out of the market rashly
    or without due deliberation.
•   Questionnaires and audits not only permit project partners to support individual companies
    but also enable them to jointly provide regional consulting and training services where
    needed. Forums moderated by GTZ are to support these initiatives and to stimulate a wider
    discussion about social standards in individual countries.

Sources:
http://www.social-standards.info/
http://www.gtz.de/en/presse/4300.htm
                                                                                             46
SOCIAL ACCOUNTABILITY 8000


•   SA8000 has been developed jointly by NGOs, industry and academic institutions.
•   Content:
       • " abolition of child labour
       • " abolition of forced labour
       • " abolition of physical and mental disciplinary practices
       • " freedom of association and right to collective bargaining
       • " safe and healthy working conditions
       • " a living wage: at least the legal minimum
       • " compliance with laws on working hours
• Procedures:
       • " introduction of a social management system
       • " obligation to document and report
       • " appointment of responsible persons at management and staff levels
       • " assumption of responsibility for the entire value-added chain, commitment to monitor
         subcontractors
       • " inspections by externally accredited certifiers
    • " inclusion of external information sources (trade unions, NGOs, etc.)
    • " proof of satisfactory working conditions by SA8000 certificate
Sources:
http://www.sa-intl.org/index.cfm?&stopRedirect=1
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SA8000
                                                                                              47
FLOWER LABEL


•   The Flower Label was launched by the Flower Campaign, an initiative of the Children's
    Fund Terre des Hommes, the Protestant Church's “Brot für die Welt”, the human rights
    organisation FIAN and others, together with the Association of German Flower Wholesale
    and Import Trade and trade unions.
•   The producers commit themselves to comply with human rights, basic environmental
    standards and major regulations on working hours, health and safety. In addition, they
    guarantee a living wage to workers, who are mostly women, in Kenya, Colombia and other
    countries of origin. Flowers with the Flower Label seal of approval are available at more
    than 700 German flower shops.

Sources:
http://www.fairflowers.de/
www.flower-label-program.org




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OVERVIEW



   • Workshop agenda
   • List of participants
   • “Decent Trade” – Select Discussion Points

   • Background on the Geneva Forum
   • Organization of theme group “Decent Trade”
   • Various background materials
       • Relevant international initiatives
       • Public-Private Initiatives Promoting Decent Trade
       • Additional background material
                                                             49
ADDITIONAL BACKGROUND MATERIAL




    • Decent Work – Select Discussion Points

    • ILO Decent Work – FAQ

    • ILO -- From Pilot to Decent Work Country Program

    • ILO Declaration on Fundamental Rights and Principles at Work
    • Press Release – Decent Work still the exception to the rule
    • President’s Summary: Informal Preparatory Meeting for the 2006
      ECOSOC High-Level Segment on “Creating an environment at the
      national and international levels conducive to generating full and
      productive employment and decent work for all, and its impact on
      sustainable development”, 4-5 April 2006.

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