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					Course Descriptions




Biological Sciences (03-xxx) ..................................... 3 6 7
Chemical Engineering (06-xxx) ................................. 3 8 3
Chemistry (09-xxx) ................................................. 3 8 7
Language Technologies Institute (11-xxx) .................. 4 5 3
Civil and Environmental Engineering (12-xxx) .............. 3 8 5
Computer Science (15-xxx) ...................................... 3 9 1
Robotics (16-xxx) .................................................... 5 0 9
Software Engineering (17-xxx) .................................. 5 1 6
Electrical and Computer Engineering (18-xxx) ............. 4 1 5
Engineering and Public Policy (19-xxx) ....................... 4 2 6
Mathematical Sciences (21-xxx) ............................... 4 5 9
Mechanical Engineering (24-xxx) ............................... 4 5 7
Materials Science and Engineering (27-xxx) ................ 4 5 4
Military Science - Army ROTC (30-xxx) ..................... 4 6 4
Aerospace Studies - Air Force ROTC (31-xxx) ............ 3 5 4
Naval Science - Navy ROTC (32-xxx) ........................ 4 8 9
Physics (33-xxx) .................................................... 5 0 1
Statistics (36-xxx) .................................................. 5 1 6
Mellon College of Science Interdisciplinary (38-xxx) .... 4 5 3
Carnegie Institute of Technology Interdisciplinary
  (39-xxx) ............................................................... 3 8 0
Biomedical Engineering (42-xxx) ............................... 3 7 6
Architecture (48-xxx) .............................................. 3 5 5
Design (51-xxx) ...................................................... 3 9 5
Entertainment Technology Center (53-xxx) ................. 4 3 8
Drama (54-xxx) ...................................................... 4 0 2
Music (57-xxx) ....................................................... 4 7 9
Art (60-xxx) ........................................................... 3 6 4
College of Fine Arts Interdisciplinary (62-xxx) ............. 3 7 9
Center for Arts in Society (64-xxx) ............................ 3 8 3
H&SS Interdisciplinary (66-xxx) ................................ 4 5 0
Physical Education (69-xxx) ..................................... 5 0 0
Business Administration (70-xxx) ............................. 3 7 1
Economics (73-xxx) ................................................ 4 2 3
English (76-xxx) ..................................................... 4 2 7
History (79-xxx) ..................................................... 4 3 8
Philosophy (80-xxx) ................................................ 4 8 9
Modern Languages (82-xxx) ..................................... 4 6 4
Psychology (85-xxx) ............................................... 5 0 5
Social and Decision Sciences (88-xxx) ....................... 5 1 0
Carnegie Mellon University-Wide Studies (99-xxx) ....... 3 8 2




All courses listed in this catalog are expected to be
offered in the next two years.
3 5 4 Course Descriptions




Course Descriptions
Descriptions Accurate As Of: July 17, 2006                            31-201     The Evolution of Air and Space Power
                                                                      Fall: 3 units
                                                                      The AS200 course designed to examine general aspects of air
Aerospace       Studies-ROTC                                          and space power through a historical perspective. Utilizing this
31-101    Foundations of the United States Air Force                  perspective, the course covers a time period from the first
Fall: 3 units                                                         balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning
AS100 is a survey course designed to introduce cadets to the          systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are
United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training        provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities
Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the       (competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the
Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and      evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power.
courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to   Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths
communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for          associated with war in the third dimension: e.g. Principles of War
AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing                and Tenets of Air and Space Power. As a whole, this course
cadets with followership experiences.                                 provides the cadets with a knowledge level understanding for the
                                                                      general element and employment of air and space power, from an
31-102    Foundations of the United States Air Force                  institutional doctrinal and historical perspective. In addition, the
Spring: 3 units                                                       students will continue to discuss the importance of the Air Force
AS100 is a survey course designed to introduce cadets to the          Core Values with the use of operational examples and historical
United States Air Force and Air Force Reserve Officer Training        Air Force leaders and will continue to develop their
Corps. Featured topics include: mission and organization of the       communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for
Air Force, officership and professionalism, military customs and      AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing
courtesies, Air Force officer opportunities, and an introduction to   cadets with followership experiences.
communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for
AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing                31-202     The Evolution of Air and Space Power
cadets with followership experiences.                                 Spring: 3 units
                                                                      The AS200 course designed to examine general aspects of air
31-105    Air Force Leadership Laboratory                             and space power through a historical perspective. Utilizing this
All Semesters: 0 units                                                perspective, the course covers a time period from the first
The AS100 and AS200 Leadership Laboratory courses (LLABs)             balloons and dirigibles to the space-age global positioning
include a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and        systems of the Persian Gulf War. Historical examples are
ceremonies, and military commands. The LLAB also includes             provided to extrapolate the development of Air Force capabilities
studying the environment of an Air Force officer and learning         (competencies), and missions (functions) to demonstrate the
about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers.        evolution of what has become today's USAF air and space power.
The AS300 and AS400 LLABs consist of activities classified as         Furthermore, the course examines several fundamental truths
leadership and management experiences. They involve the               associated with war in the third dimension: e.g. Principles of War
planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps,   and Tenets of Air and Space Power. As a whole, this course
and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral      provides the cadets with a knowledge level understanding for the
and written communications. LLABs also include interviews,            general element and employment of air and space power, from an
guidance, and information, which will increase the understanding,     institutional doctrinal and historical perspective. In addition, the
motivation, and performance of other cadets.                          students will continue to discuss the importance of the Air Force
                                                                      Core Values with the use of operational examples and historical
31-106    Air Force Leadership Laboratory                             Air Force leaders and will continue to develop their
All Semesters: 0 units                                                communication skills. Leadership Laboratory is mandatory for
The AS100 and AS200 Leadership Laboratory courses (LLABs)             AFROTC cadets and complements this course by providing
include a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and        cadets with followership experiences.
ceremonies, and military commands. The LLAB also includes
studying the environment of an Air Force officer and learning         31-301    Air Force Leadership Studies
about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers.        Fall: 9 units
The AS300 and AS400 LLABs consist of activities classified as         AS300 is a study of leadership, management fundamentals,
leadership and management experiences. They involve the               professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation
planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps,   systems, leadership ethics, and the communication skills
and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral      required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to
and written communications. LLABs also include interviews,            examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a
guidance, and information, which will increase the understanding,     means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of
motivation, and performance of other cadets.                          the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory
                                                                      complements this course by providing advanced leadership
31-107    Air Force Leadership Laboratory                             experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the
All Semesters: 0 units                                                opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of
The AS100 and AS200 Leadership Laboratory courses (LLABs)             this course.
include a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and
ceremonies, and military commands. The LLAB also includes             31-302    Air Force Leadership Studies
studying the environment of an Air Force officer and learning         Spring: 9 units
about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers.        AS300 is a study of leadership, management fundamentals,
The AS300 and AS400 LLABs consist of activities classified as         professional knowledge, Air Force personnel and evaluation
leadership and management experiences. They involve the               systems, leadership ethics, and the communication skills
planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps,   required of an Air Force junior officer. Case studies are used to
and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral      examine Air Force leadership and management situations as a
and written communications. LLABs also include interviews,            means of demonstrating and exercising practical application of
guidance, and information, which will increase the understanding,     the concepts being studied. A mandatory Leadership Laboratory
motivation, and performance of other cadets.                          complements this course by providing advanced leadership
                                                                      experiences in officer-type activities, giving students the
31-108    Air Force Leadership Laboratory                             opportunity to apply the leadership and management principles of
All Semesters: 0 units                                                this course.
The AS100 and AS200 Leadership Laboratory courses (LLABs)
include a study of Air Force customs and courtesies, drill and        31-401     National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active
ceremonies, and military commands. The LLAB also includes             Duty
studying the environment of an Air Force officer and learning         Fall: 9 units
about areas of opportunity available to commissioned officers.        AS400 examines the national security process, regional studies,
The AS300 and AS400 LLABs consist of activities classified as         advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special
leadership and management experiences. They involve the               topics of interest focus on the military as a profession,
planning and controlling of military activities of the cadet corps,   officership, military justice, civilian control of the military,
and the preparation and presentation of briefings and other oral      preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military
and written communications. LLABs also include interviews,            professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is
guidance, and information, which will increase the understanding,     given to refining communication skills. A mandatory Leadership
motivation, and performance of other cadets.                          Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced
                                                                      leadership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply
                                                                      the leadership and management principles of this course.
                                                                                                             Course Descriptions      355




31-402     National Security Affairs and Preparation for Active       48-115     Physics for Architects
Duty                                                                  Spring: 9 units
Spring: 9 units                                                       Physics is a basic science, typically taught by the College of
AS400 examines the national security process, regional studies,       Science. Physics for Architecture was introduced in Spring, 2005
advanced leadership ethics, and Air Force doctrine. Special           to best address the academic needs of students in the School of
topics of interest focus on the military as a profession,             Architecture. It is taught as a science course that provides an
officership, military justice, civilian control of the military,      emphasis on the physics topics most essential to architecture.
preparation for active duty, and current issues affecting military    The course covers units, vectors, motion in 2D and 3D, Newton’s
professionalism. Within this structure, continued emphasis is         Laws of Motion, Applying Newton’s Laws, work, energy,
given to refining communication skills. A mandatory Leadership        conservation of energy, momentum, impulse, collisions, rotation,
Laboratory complements this course by providing advanced              equilibrium, gravitation, periodic motion, fluids, temperature, heat,
leadership experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply      thermal properties, and the first law of thermodynamics. The
the leadership and management principles of this course.              course is very similar to those offered by the physics department,
                                                                      but it is modified to place heavier emphasis on those topics
Architecture                                                          pertinent to architecture, specifically: forces, reactions,
                                                                      equilibrium, dynamics, vibration, thermal properties of matter,
48-095      Architecture for Non-Majors I                             heat transfer, and insulation.
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                              Prerequisites: 21114 or 21120
This course serves as an architectural appreciation course for
students from other disciplines. The course is dedicated to           48-120     Introduction to Digital Media I
understanding historical, technological, and social forces that       Fall: 9 units
shape contemporary architecture. A large portion of the course is     IDM is a required course for all first year architecture students.
focused on the actual studio experience that architecture             The course introduces students to a wide range of digital methods
students undertake. Form-making, problem solving, and visual          and concepts available to architects for design, representation,
literacy are explored through discussions and a variety of drawing    and documentation. The coursework is directly coordinated with
and three dimensional exercises. Students are encouraged to           Studio assignments providing the students with the opportunity to
explore their own areas of interest with respect to their work in     master their digital skills in a meaningful manner. Due to the
class. The course will consist primarily of design and drawing        amount of content covered there is no single text for this course,
exercises augmented by contemporary history and theory                but the course is supported by materials created by the
discussions based upon readings and slide presentations. In           instructor. IDM addresses topics such as digital image editing,
addition, students will visit a significant work of architecture in   vector illustration, HTML coding, and 3D modeling.
the region and an architectural office. The semester will conclude
with a small non-residential architectural project that will          48-125    Introduction to Digital Media II
integrate previous exercises. No prior architectural, engineering     Spring: 6 units
or artistic experience is required. Students are expected to          IDM2 is a required course for all first year architecture students.
perform work (readings, drawings and model building) both inside      This course is the continuation of IDM. IDM2 introduces
and outside of class. Students should be prepared to purchase         students to measured drafting and the process of creating a
various drawing and model making supplies throughout the              construction drawing set. The coursework is directly coordinated
course. This course fulfills requirements for an Architecture         with Studio assignments providing the students with the
Minor.                                                                opportunity to master their digital skills in a meaningful manner.
                                                                      Due to the amount of content covered there is no single text for
48-100    Architecture Design Studio: Form                            this course, but the course is supported by materials created by
Fall: 12 units                                                        the instructor. IDM2 addresses topics such as digital drafting,
Methods and Transformation in Form is the first course in the         construction drawings, advanced 3D modeling and HTML
design studio sequence. As such, it establishes the foundation of     programming.
exploration into the design and development of architectural          Prerequisites: 48120
systems, and provides the fundamental abilities required to
represent ideas, form, and language. The semester is divided into     48-130     Architectural Drawing I: A Tactile Foundation
two halves: The first half of the semester is devoted to              Fall: 6 units
observations and formal manipulation of systems from natural          Architectural Drawing I: A Tactile Foundation is the introductory
specimens. Students document, diagram, and map out these              course in a sequence of three drawing courses required by the
systems initially, also taking note of spatial/temporal quality of    school of architecture for its professional degree program. It
natural systems. The design process then shifts into methods of       consists of exercises in free-hand perspective, orthographic
transformation to turn these observed systems into dynamic            drawing, and general life-drawing. Part 1 focuses on volume, Part
systems of architectural syntax that are authored by the              2 on contour, and Part 3 on mass: a structure that parallels, in
students. Similarly, the second half of the semester is devoted to    some respects, the on-going work in 48-100. Topics are
observations of specific landscape environments. Students are         introduced through figure drawing and lecture demonstrations and
asked to quantitatively map elements and relationships between        subsequently applied to architectural subjects. The approach of
elements that begin to define the use and ambient qualities of the    each part is based on the work of Kimon Nicholaides as presented
natural environment (re: movement, light, etc.). Students are then    in his landmark book, the Natural Way to Draw. Part 3 provides a
given a program to be adapted to these environments using             review of earlier work as well as two joint projects with the design
mappings as a primary formal design catalyst.                         studio 48-100.
48-105     Architecture Design Studio: Space                          48-132     Architectural Drawing I: A Tactile Foundation
Spring: 12 units                                                      Fall: 9 units
The spring semester, Methods and Transformations in Space of          Architectural Drawing I: A Tactile Foundation is the introductory
the first year architecture program extends from experiences in       course in a sequence of three drawing courses required by the
the fall semester Methods and Transformations in Form.                school of architecture for its professional degree program. It
Architecture as a spatial practice is introduced. Design projects     consists of exercises in free-hand perspective, orthographic
evolve from previous studies of structure surface and volume in       drawing, and general life-drawing. Part 1 focuses on volume, Part
plant and landscape paradigms. Systems and sequences                  2 on contour, and Part 3 on mass: a structure that parallels, in
previously explored in nature are developed in cultural contexts      some respects, the on-going work in 48-100. Topics are
through a progressive series of projects. Mapping human behavior      introduced through figure drawing and lecture demonstrations and
and studying architectural precedents create spatial temporal         subsequently applied to architectural subjects. The approach of
experiences and narratives. Architectural and interdisciplinary       each part is based on the work of Kimon Nicholaides as presented
analyses launch each project as a vehicle for generative design       in his landmark book, the Natural Way to Draw. Part 3 provides a
strategies. Fluid connections between drawing (freehand and           review of earlier work as well as two joint projects with the design
drafted) and modeling (physical, computer, and wood shop) are         studio 48-100. This course is open to other disciplines.
continued. The semester is divided into three primary design
projects: WOODSHOP: The studios explicit relationship to the          48-135     Architectural Drawing II: Appearance
woodshop is expanded in this course. ROOM (Private)                   Spring: 9 units
INTERIOR: This project introduces a group research project of         Architectural Drawing II: Understanding Appearance aims at
architectural precedents as its analytical catalyst. The study of     building students’ understanding of projective geometry,
an interior space focuses the transition from form to that of         understanding of the appearance of architecture and its’
space. PLACE (Public) BUILDING: This project uses,                    representation in light and color. Part 1 focuses on free-hand and
interdisciplinary, cultural research as its analytical formal         constructed linear perspective, Part 2 on shade, and shadow
catalyst. The study of a public infill building establishes           construction and chiaroscuro drawing, and Part 3 on pastel color
architecture within an urban context and requires ability to create   drawing. Topics are introduced through lecture demonstrations
spatial sequences of public / private programmatic function. The      and in-class exercises with subsequent application to
process includes freehand drawing, model building, shade and          architectural subjects. Parts 2 and 3 include joint studio
shadow, digital modeling, and drafting.                               assignments with 48-105.
Prerequisites: 48100                                                  Prerequisites: 48130
3 5 6 Course Descriptions




48-137     Architectural Drawing II: Appearance                         course of the technology sequence and focuses on the principles
Spring: 6 units                                                         of building construction utilizing contemporary systems.
Architectural Drawing II: Understanding Appearance aims at              Materials and Assembly, taught in parallel with the design studio
building students’ understanding of projective geometry,                and Structures I, allows in - depth exploration of the
understanding of the appearance of architecture and its’                fundamentals of contemporary construction systems, while the
representation in light and color. Part 1 focuses on free-hand and      studio provides a simultaneous setting for the application and
constructed linear perspective, Part 2 on shade, and shadow             synthesis of this knowledge. The materials science content of the
construction and chiaroscuro drawing, and Part 3 on pastel color        course examines construction materials with regard to their
drawing. Topics are introduced through lecture demonstrations           process of manufacture, their physical properties, their
and in-class exercises with subsequent application to                   environmental performance and their methods of selection and
architectural subjects. Parts 2 and 3 include joint studio              specification. The assembly content of this course examines the
assignments with 48-105.                                                selection, design, preliminary sizing and methodology of
Prerequisites: 48130 or 48132                                           construction systems in wood, masonry, steel, sitecast concrete
                                                                        and precast concrete, including the applicable fundamentals of
48-200     Architecture Design Studio: Composition                      enclosure systems.
Fall: 18 units                                                          Prerequisites: 12235 or 48210
This studio is an introduction to architectural language and
composition stressing concept generation and development,               48-217      Structures
design process, and spatial experience. Understanding the               Spring: 9 units
compositional principles which characterize the buildings of the        Structures is a required course taught in the second year. It is a
past and present, and applying them with intent and significance        successor course to Statics, complementing that previous
in the design studio are the central thrusts of this studio. Building   course by emphasizing structural member design, spatial
on the 1st year studios that explored "Methods &                        synthesis of structural systems, exploration of structural types,
Transformations in Form & Space," the studios in the 2nd year will      interaction with other building functions, and an introduction of
explore design problems that investigate the complexity and             codes and standards in actual design practice. The course
integrated nature of the architectural object and the architectural     syllabus is broader than found in any existing text treatment, but
design process. We will explore the artistic, conceptual, poetic,       is supported by one required textbook and numerous additional
creative, and experiential side of architecture as a way of             sources including handouts prepare by the instructor and
developing ideas on architectural form and space making. By             extracts from other sources. Structural types covered
becoming and remaining conscious about the process that is              extensively include hierarchical one-way floor systems (slabs,
architectural design, and developing methods, parameters and            joists, beams, girders, trusses, etc.), the family of gravity load
alternatives that shape architectural form, we will explore issues      types, and the family of lateral load types (braced frame, shear
such as contextualism, expression, perception, experience, and          wall, rigid frame). Geometric structure types (such as cable nets,
representation. Architectural Drawing II: Understanding                 domes, shells, and air-supported structures) are introduced but
Appearance aims at building students’ understanding of                  are not given comparable in-depth treatment. There is an overall
projective geometry, understanding of the appearance of                 objective of gaining insight into architectural forms associated
architecture and its’ representation in light and color. Part 1         with structural system design. More specific technical objectives
focuses on free-hand and constructed linear perspective, Part 2         include the command of structural analysis and structural
on shade, and shadow construction and chiaroscuro drawing, and          member design as required in practice and as established in
Part 3 on pastel color drawing. Topics are introduced through           governing codes and standards; topics in member design include
lecture demonstrations and in-class exercises with subsequent           wood joists, beams, and columns; steel joists, beams, and
application to architectural subjects. Parts 2 and 3 include joint      columns; and reinforced concrete beams. Emphasis is placed on
studio assignments with 48-105.                                         continuity with foundations established in Statics.
Prerequisites: 48105                                                    Prerequisites: 12207 or 48210

48-205     Architecture Design Studio: Materials                        48-230     Architectural Drawing III: Perspective
Spring: 18 units                                                        Fall: 9 units
This studio is concerned with more in-depth understanding and           Architectural Drawing III: Perspective emphasizes free-hand
development of designs for small-scale buildings informed by the        perspective skill and its’ use as a design tool. Following a brief
technical knowledge related to materials and the act of                 review of perspective construction from orthographic views at the
construction. The creative opportunities and design implications        outset, the course addresses perspective on the basis of three
of using varied materials, structural systems, and assembly             distinct understandings of perceptual psychology. In sequence,
techniques are elaborated. The studio and the lectures focus on         these are: 1) A Kinesthetic Basis for Perspective: This work is
the application and integration of knowledge acquired in parallel       built on the drawing pedagogy of Kimon Nicholaides. It aligns with
“Materials & Assembly” course. Building on the Fall                     the transactionalist understanding of perception, and it considers
“Composition” studio 48-200, this studio is concerned with the          perspective as partly invented and partly discovered truth. 2)The
development and refinement of architectural design skills as            Order of Appearance: This work is built on the early work of the
informed by the aesthetic and experiential knowledge related to         perceptual psychologist, J.J. Gibson, and aligns with the
the meaning of materials (WHY?) and the technical knowledge             ecological position of Gibson and his followers It considers
related to the use of materials and the processes of construction       perspective as an absolute truth of the visual field. 3)
(HOW?). We will explore how attention to materials, assembly            Perspective Imposed: This work aligns implicitly with the position
systems and construction processes can and should influence             of Gestalt psychology. It treats perspective as an imposed
the architectural design process and results, especially in             schema. Each of these three sequences is introduced in lecture
determining the artistic, conceptual, poetic, creative, and             and developed through in-class exercises.
experiential aspects of architecture.                                   Prerequisites: 48105 or 48135
Prerequisites: 48200 and 48210         Corequisites: 48-215
                                                                        48-232     Architectural Drawing III: Perspective (for Drama
48-210     Statics                                                      students)
Fall: 9 units                                                           Fall: 6 units
Statics is a required course taught in the second year. Its             Architectural Drawing III: Perspective emphasizes free-hand
prerequisites are calculus and physics. Statics is a prerequisite       perspective skill and its’ use as a design tool. Following a brief
for structures courses. The course covers the portion of                review of perspective construction from orthographic views at the
engineering mechanics that deals with equilibrium of rigid bodies.      outset, the course addresses perspective on the basis of three
Taught by the School of Architecture, the course is very similar to     distinct understandings of perceptual psychology. In sequence,
statics courses offered in engineering curriculum, but it is            these are: 1) A Kinesthetic Basis for Perspective: This work is
modified to place heavier emphasis on those topics pertinent to         built on the drawing pedagogy of Kimon Nicholaides. It aligns with
architecture, specifically: columns, cables, beams, trusses,            the transactionalist understanding of perception, and it considers
frames, and moments of inertia. Textbook sections addressing            perspective as partly invented and partly discovered truth. 2)The
gears and friction are omitted and machines are covered                 Order of Appearance: This work is built on the early work of the
minimally. During the final two weeks, strength of materials            perceptual psychologist, J.J. Gibson, and aligns with the
(stress and displacement) is covered briefly as an introduction to      ecological position of Gibson and his followers It considers
Structures.                                                             perspective as an absolute truth of the visual field. 3)
Prerequisites: (21114 or 21120) AND (48115 or 33106)                    Perspective Imposed: This work aligns implicitly with the position
                                                                        of Gestalt psychology. It treats perspective as an imposed
48-215     Materials and Assembly                                       schema. Each of these three sequences is introduced in lecture
Spring: 9 units                                                         and developed through in-class exercises.
The fourth semester of architectural studies at Carnegie Mellon         Prerequisites: 48135 and 48137
University is concerned with the detailed development and
refinement of architectural design as informed by the technical
and aesthetic knowledge related to the meaning and usage of
materials and the act of construction. This is the fourth lecture
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions     357




48-240     Historical Survey of World Architecture and Urbanism        48-312     Site Engineering and Foundations
Fall: 9 units                                                          Fall: 6 units
This foundation course is the first in the architectural history       Site Engineering and Foundations is a required course taught in
sequence, and introduces students to the subject and skills of         the third year. It is a companion course to the Site Studio (48-
world architectural history. It is a prerequisite for all subsequent   300) and covers materials related to the issues of surface and its
architectural history courses. Reflecting the inseparable relation     manipulation (grading, road alignment and stormwater), soils
between building and human needs, this course is not only a            (fundamentals of soil mechanics) and structures (fundamentals of
history of architecture, but also a history through architecture.      foundation design). Students are introduced to the conceptual
The act and art of building is a complex one. The design, use,         fundamentals, exposed to applications in the field, and develop
meaning and legacy of a building is conditioned not only by the        skills which are demonstrated in this class and in their studio
architect's will or the patron's desire, but also by a complex web     work. The course syllabus is broader than found in any existing
of technological, social, cultural, economic, and political factors    text treatment, but is supported by one required textbook, two
of the time. In this course, students examine world architecture       recommended texts and excerpts from other sources.
and urbanism from the Egyptians through the 20th century.              Prerequisites: 48217
Although the world cannot be completely surveyed in one
semester, we cut a broad swath through geography and cultures,         48-315     Environment I: Climate & Energy
examining the built environment of Europe, the Middle East, Asia,      Fall: 9 units
and the Americas.                                                      Environmental Systems is a required course taught in the third
Prerequisites: 64100 or 79104                                          year. This course introduces architectural design responses for
                                                                       energy conservation, human comfort, and the site-specific
48-299      Passport                                                   dynamics of climate. Students are expected to combine an
All Semesters: 1.5 units                                               understanding of the basic laws of comfort and heat flow with the
Students enrolled in Passport will attend approved extracurricular     variables of local climate to create regionally appropriate energy
lectures and workshops organized and sponsored by CMU and a            design guidelines for their design projects. The state of the art in
variety of educational and cultural institutions throughout the city   building energy conservation and passive heating and cooling
of Pittsburgh and region. Through first hand observation and           technologies, as well as the emerging field of sustainable design
participation, the primary intention of Passport are to engage         are presented, with take-home readings and assignments. To
students in contemporary ideas and debates, encourage and              stress the significance of architectural design decision making on
support interdisciplinary work and discourse, and to stimulate an      energy consumption and comfort, full design specifications and
active dialogue between a student’s academic pursuits and their        hand calculations are completed individually by each student for
real world experience. Participating in Passport will strengthen       a residential-scale building. Students compile a professional
student’s critical thinking skills and provide them with a structure   energy consultant's report, designing the most viable energy
and foundation to further develop their interests in scholarship,      conservation retrofit measures for their client from: siting,
research and practice.                                                 massing, organization, enclosure detailing, opening control, to
                                                                       passive system integration and management. An overview of
48-300     Architecture Design Studio: Site                            world energy consumption in buildings and energy design
Fall: 18 units                                                         standards is challenged by lectures on building energy
Design Studio III: Building and Site is a required course taught in    conservation successes and competitive challenges of
the third year. The subjects of the Third Year Fall Semester are       sustainability. The course ends with a focus on the design
the reciprocal orders of buildings and landscapes and the              integration of natural conditioning systems and the potentially
development of the building site. The work builds on knowledge         dynamic interface of mechanical systems in small- and large-
gained in prerequisite and co-requisite courses including 48-312       scale buildings.
Site Engineering. This course asks students to continue their          Prerequisites: 33106 or 48115
investigations into the formal and spatial composition and
enquiries of previous semesters with a focus on the following          48-340      Modern Architecture and Theory 1900-1945
concepts: Occupancy: Social and cultural phenomena,                    Intermittent: 9 units
dimension/measurement and cycles of time relating to human and         Modern Architecture and Theory 1900-1945 is an architectural
non-human occupancy Site assessment: site inventory at many            history lecture course that surveys the modern buildings and
scales Grading and surface manipulation: compatibility of grading      literature of the first half of the twentieth century, focusing
with related technical considerations for water management,            primarily on Europe but extending also to non-western countries.
ground structures, surfacing, plants, and maintenance Road             We begin with a look at the "crisis of modernity" that plagued
alignment: design of roads and parking to support construction,        most of western civilization in the late 19th-century, and then
service and the anticipated occupancies, design of roads to            focus on the major movements of both the avant-garde and other
connect to other roads with appropriate sight lines, stack spaces,     responses to modernity from 1900-1945. The course includes
and turning requirements, layout and sizing of parking spaces for      lectures, readings, and discussions about a broad range of issues
vehicles Stormwater: volume and direction of runoff water on both      and how they affected the conception, design, building, and
the undisturbed and developed areas, storm water surface               reception of modern architecture, including 1) Formal tendencies
system, Plants: selection of plants and plant communities with         such as Art Nouveau, Classicism, De Stijl, and the International
consideration for regional, local, and site-specific factors           Style, Rationalism; 2) Theoretical issues such as the avant-
Prerequisites: 48205 and 48217                                         garde, craft, Gesamtkunstwerk, the role of history, monumentality,
                                                                       modern/modernism/modernity; 3) the National traditions in
48-305     Architecture Design Studio: Advanced Construction           countries such as Germany, France, Russia and Finland; 4)
Spring: 18 units                                                       Biographical sketches of figures such as Aalto, Asplund, Loos,
The basis for the CMU studio course sequence is the expectation        Taut, and Terragni; 5) Technologies and materials such as steel,
that the student retains and applies knowledge gained each             reinforced concrete, transport, and mass-production; 6) Political
semester to current assignments in the studio. The spring              motivations such as Communism, Democracy, Fascism,
semester of the third year of architectural studies at Carnegie        colonialism, and nationalism; 6) Social & cultural influences such
Mellon University is concerned with the detailed development and       as housing the worker, mass culture, patronage & power, tradition,
refinement of an architectural design as informed by the technical     utopianism, urbanism, regionalism. Emphasis will be placed on
knowledge of structural systems, enclosure systems and the             the relationship of buildings to the more general cultural,
process of construction. The student is expected to work in            intellectual, and historical circumstances in which they were
teams and to articulate concepts and develop designs with more         created. Special attention will be devoted throughout the course
precision and in greater detail than done in previous studios and      to the important manifestoes, theoretical and critical writings that
courses. In addition to criteria related to the development of         so determined the project of modern architecture.
design skills appropriate to one's sixth semester of the studio        Prerequisites: 48240
sequence, the following criteria are an explicit part of the
evaluation of the student work: Aesthetics: The degree to which        48-341     History of Architectural Theory
the design responds to formal issues as articulated in prior           Intermittent: 9 units
design studios. Structural System: The degree to which the             History of Architectural Theory is an architectural history
proposed building is presented as a statically stable structure        seminar that surveys in roughly chronological order some of the
which defines the spatial order and satisfies the architectural        major theories and theoreticians of architecture, from Vitruvius,
intentions made explicit in the project. Enclosure System: The         through the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, the 19th-century,
degree to which the proposed enclosure system satisfies the            up to the present. The final weeks of the course are dedicated to
design requirements and responds to the physical phenomena of          student presentations on “contemporary” (1945-present)
the environment into which it is placed. Material Selection: The       theoreticians. The seminar is based on the premise that
degree to which the selected building materials and their              architecture is not only building, technology, drawings, etc., but
implementation are appropriate to the occupancy, articulate the        also discourse, meaning, communication, and concept: or theory.
architectural order, and satisfy the physical design requirements.     It seeks to make clear that theory arises in relation to a wide
Constructability: The degree to which the proposed building is         range of factors both from within architecture and from
developed in response to an understanding of the processes of          surrounding culture and other fields. Throughout the seminar we
construction. Presentation: The clarity, craft and completeness of     attempt to define what constitutes "theory" in architecture, how it
the presentation.
Prerequisites: 48300 and 48312
3 5 8 Course Descriptions




relates to other types of architectural writing such as criticism      South America from prehistory to the 20th century. The
and history, and especially how (if at all) it relates to the          geographical and chronological scope of such a survey is far too
intellectual context and built works of its day, as well as to         vast for one semester so we will be focusing on certain areas and
theories that came before and after it. We explore a wide variety      periods of intense building. We will primarily examine Mexico,
of theoretical works, from treatises and building manuals to           Guatemala, Peru, and Brazil. The course is roughly divided into
manifestoes and theatrical pieces. Students are encouraged to          three major periods: (1) the Pre-Columbian cultures of the
discern trends, cycles, and differences across time and in various     Mayas, Aztecs, and Incas, (2) the Spanish and Portugese
geographic areas, and we discuss the relationship of the “old”         colonial imprints of the 16th-18th centuries, and (3) the 20th-
theory to present ideas and context, with students often surprised     century search for an appropriate regional modernism.
at how relevant older ideas are to the present if read closely and     Prerequisites: 48240
interpreted appropriately.
Prerequisites: 48240                                                   48-351     Human Factors in Architecture
                                                                       Spring: 9 units
48-343      American Built Environment Since 1860                      Required course Human Factors is an investigation of what
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  makes buildings tick for people: the internal spaces, transitional
This course examines the history of the American built                 spaces, transactional spaces, defensible space, owned space,
environment from approximately1860 to 1980. It can be used to          shared space, public space, and most importantly, occupied
satisfy one of the core required courses in architectural history.     space. We move up in scale from the individual and group to the
The term "built environment" encompasses a wide range of               community to consider our designers’ biases in how we analyze
human building on the landscape. It includes not only the              the human needs, how we judge the quality of space and
construction of individual pieces of architecture, but also the        subsequently, how we apply this knowledge to our own design
fashioning of rural, urban, and suburban landscapes, and the           work. Students develop a research question and test it in field
infrastructure that links them. The American built environment         research using observation, interviews and surveys. They draw
can be interpreted as a series of architectural responses to           conclusions about the quality of a space and place and how to
perceived aesthetic, social, and planning problems. The resulting      improve it. Students should leave this class with the ability to
manmade landscapes are therefore not only seemingly objective          discern a problem, experience in applying their understanding of
artifacts of “what happened” but also subjective arguments about       behavioral settings and the human condition to specific research
“what should be.” In this course we will investigate significant       foci, and the ability to use their knowledge and skills deftly in
movements in the evolution of the American built environment           practice, where time and resources are limited. Assignments will
from the late 19th through the late 20th centuries, paying             be a mix of individual and group work, with emphasis on the latter.
particular attention to the issues of cities and suburbs, including    There will be an emphasis on reading relevant literature, field
the factors of class, gender, and race. Throughout the course we       investigations and understanding research methods and
will seek to understand the perennial question of “what were they      collaboration for applications in practice.
thinking?”
Prerequisites: 48240                                                   48-399      Passport
                                                                       All Semesters: 1.5 units
48-344     Architecture of Henry Hornbostel                            Students enrolled in Passport will attend approved extracurricular
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  lectures and workshops organized and sponsored by CMU and a
This course addresses the architectural career of Henry                variety of educational and cultural institutions throughout the city
Hornbostel (1867-1961) from the beginning of his architectural         of Pittsburgh and region. Through first hand observation and
education at Columbia University in the late 1880s though his          participation, the primary intention of Passport are to engage
retirement from the profession in 1939 until the revival of interest   students in contemporary ideas and debates, encourage and
in his work in the 1980s. Hornbostel studied at the Ecole des          support interdisciplinary work and discourse, and to stimulate an
Beaux-Arts in Paris, which is reflected in his early work. Later       active dialogue between a student’s academic pursuits and their
designs incorporate the abstracting tendencies of the Streamline       real world experience. Participating in Passport will strengthen
Moderne or Art Deco. Throughout his career, Hornbostel was             student’s critical thinking skills and provide them with a structure
consistently innovative, eclectic and not necessarily easy to          and foundation to further develop their interests in scholarship,
classify, even though the Beaux-Arts label provides an easy way        research and practice.
to pigeon-hole (some of) his work. Interest in Hornbostel often
begins with his buildings on campus. Many consider the CFA             48-400      Architecture Design Studio: Occupancy
building Hornbostel’s masterpiece. Nearby, Hornbostel designed         Fall: 18 units
the Rodef Shalom Synagogue, the Soldiers’ and Sailors’ Memorial,       The Occupancy Studio raises a designer’s involvement with
the Schenley Apartments, Webster Hall and a number of buildings        human needs, functional and space programming, building
for the University of Pittsburgh in Oakland alone. Downtown, the       planning and schematic design with its focus on the relationship
City County Building, the Grant Building and the German                of the building user (owner/client, occupant or visitor) to the built
Evangelical Protestant (now Smithfield United) Church are also         environment. At the crux is how an architect develops a
prominent elements in his corpus. Not simply a “Pittsburgh             methodology to understand the individual or aggregated occupant
architect,” Hornbostel enjoyed national prominence in the              and assemble decoded, distilled and articulated criteria for the
profession during his career. He consistently won design               design of space. Studios may emphasize intellectual or
competitions for prestigious commissions throughout the country        theoretical approaches to user-based design, in-depth study of
in New York, Ohio, West Virginia, Georgia, Illinois and California.    client needs resulting in a detailed program, or participatory
Hornbostel died in 1961, Modernism’s heyday, so he was largely         design with a real or surrogate client such as a community group.
forgotten. There is only a single monograph on Hornbostel and a        Each semester offers a range of such ideas. Studio faculty varies
comparatively small bibliography of recent publications. The           building typology, conceptual approach, programming studies or
exciting counterbalance to this dearth of secondary literature is      development and historical precedent. Studios share information
the presence of many nearby significant built works and major          and project knowledge with each other. This healthy mix enlivens
archives of original drawings and other documents at CMU. These        design process and class participation. An important aspect of
play a role in the course.                                             the Occupancy studio and the following Systems Integration
Prerequisites: 48240                                                   studio is understanding the application of codes and zoning
                                                                       requirements, which students research themselves after
48-348      History of Central American Architecture                   attending lectures on the basics of life safety, egress and the
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  intrinsic order of code applications. Students are encouraged to
This course is a chronological and thematic survey of                  work both in teams and as individuals.
architectural and urban developments in the Central and South          Prerequisites: 48305
America from Pre-Columbian times through the 20th century. It
can be used to satisfy one of the core required courses in             48-405      Architecture Design Studio: Systems Integration
architectural history. When the Spanish conquistadors Hernan           Spring: 18 units
Cortes and Francisco Pizarro landed in the Americas during the         In today’s climate of complex clients and large-scale
early 16th century, they encountered two of the world’s largest        architecture, design students research and discuss broad
and most spectacular empires. The Aztec and Inca empires,              political, economic, infrastructure, management and operational
however, were only the latest urban civilizations in a                 systems. Following this theme and in the students’ quest of
Mesoamerican and the Andean tradition that stretched back              building integration, they examine the complex interrelationships
approximately 1,500 years. The ensuing European architectural          between performance criteria, building subsystems and their
and urban imprints can be seen as both a victory of colonialism’s      integration, specification, and evaluation. This studio is
political, social, and architectural ideals, and as a fusion of        concerned with the detailed design development relating to the
European practices within indigenous conditions and traditions.        spatial, visual, acoustic and thermal performance of complex
Centuries later, as 20th-century Latin America grappled with the       buildings as well as the long-term integrity of the integrated
issues of industrialization, economic swings, and political and        systems. Students achieve design integration of at least two
social revolutions, its architecture and urbanism again sought to      building systems and their interdisciplinary objectives -
reconcile competing visions of national, modern identity. This         structure, enclosure, interior, mechanical, communications and
course surveys the architecture and urbanism of Central and            information, and the safety systems--addressing issues of
                                                                                                                Course Descriptions      359




constructability and technical innovation while combined with            48-442     Asian Architecture
suitability to the user, studied in the previous semester of             Intermittent: 9 units
Occupancy.                                                               Asian Architecture is an elective open to Architecture students.
Prerequisites: 48400 and 48412           Corequisites: 48-415            The course introduces fundamental forms of Asian architecture in
                                                                         India, China, Japan, and the Islamic nations, and examines the
48-410     Environment II: Acoustics and Lighting                        cross-cultural influence among these countries and others in
Fall: 9 units                                                            Southeast Asia. Primary focus is on the architectural history of
This course introduces theoretical foundations and computational         religious and state architecture as well as the plan and design
methods in architectural acoustics and lighting. Topics in               and use of public space within the respective traditions. Overall,
acoustics include: a) review of physiological and psychological          the course follows a chronological and geographic format. Course
acoustics; b) computation of outdoor and indoor airborne sound           material is divided into four units of study respective to the four
propagation; c) interaction of air-borne and structure-borne             main cultural traditions surveyed. The course is meant to be a
sound with building structures; d) sound transmission between            survey followed by successor courses such as Chinese
rooms; e) design methods in room and building acoustics; f)              Architecture and Japanese Architecture. In-class lectures
fundamentals of vibration control; g) application of computer-           elaborate on a wide selection of seminal readings by key authors
aided simulation tools in building and room acoustics. Topics in         on respective topics. A class field-trip to a local Hindu temple
lighting include: a) review of visual comfort criteria and lighting      gives students a live experience of Indian religious architecture.
psychology, b) analytical and numeric methods for the                    Prerequisites: 48240
computation of lighting conditions in interior spaces, c)
application of computer-aided lighting simulation tools in               48-445      The City in History
architecture, d) lighting engineering and design methods.                Intermittent: 9 units
Prerequisites: 33106 or 48115                                            This Course is a chronological and thematic survey of major
                                                                         developments in urban design in the European and American
48-412     Environment III: Mechanical Systems                           context since the Middle Ages. This seminar can be used to
Fall: 9 units                                                            satisfy one of the core required courses in architectural history.
Mechanical Equipment is a study of the mechanical systems                Cities are manmade artifacts, created for a purpose. Students
required to heat, cool, ventilate, wire and plumb a building.            examine the history of the design and redesign of cities and the
Students will focus on energy usage and savings for buildings            reasons for those interventions. The scale of urban interventions
along with a look at the various system types and equipment used         varies greatly, from the macro-scale of designing totally new
– past, present, and future. The course parallels the AIA review         cities to the micro-scale of experimenting with new forms of urban
class for the professional license examination, and should               housing. Students explore the relationship between form and
become a future study guide for the exam.                                culture by considering the theoretical, social, political, economic,
Prerequisites: 48105                                                     and aesthetic forces that have shaped urban spaces in American
                                                                         and European great cities from the Middle Ages through today’s
48-415     Advanced Building Systems                                     New Urbanism.
Spring: 9 units                                                          Prerequisites: 48240
Advanced Building Systems is a required course taught in the
fourth year with a direct connection to the studios emphasizing          48-446     Renaissance & Baroque Architecture
system integrations. This course introduces the concept of Total         Intermittent: 9 units
Building Performance , delineating the full range of performance         This course examines European architecture from the early
mandates required for today’s architecture, including building           fifteenth century to the early eighteenth century: the periods
integrity. Advanced Building Systems highlights the state-of-the-        designated by historians as Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo.
art and major challenges and innovations in building technologies        These periods are characterized by a series of changing
for structure, enclosure, mechanical, telecommunications,                approaches to classical architecture in building, but they also
lighting, and interior systems. The course explores the                  raise points of inquiry in regard to patrons, cities and landscapes.
relationships, opportunities, and conflicts of the performance           Architecture serves as a focal point for design of spaces and
mandates, and the integration of building systems necessary to           materials, but it is also an armature of expression for philosophy,
achieve total building performance.                                      history and politics. This course will examine buildings as
Prerequisites: 48305                                                     expressive forms within this variety of contexts. Lecture Topics
                                                                         include: Tuscan Tradition and Brunelleschi; Alberti & Palazzo
48-440     The American Built Environment to 1860                        Design; Filarete, Leonardo and Bramante; Raphael, Giulio
Intermittent: 9 units                                                    Romano, Peruzzi, Antonio da Sangallo; Michelangelo;
This course examines the history of the American built                   Sanmichele, Sansovino, Serlio; Vignola, Palladio; Bernini;
environment from approximately 1000 through 1860, examining              Borromini and Guarini; 18th century Rome and the Piedmont;
vernacular, high style, and popular styles of building. It can be        17th Century France: Classicism and City Planning; Versailles
used to satisfy one of the core required courses in architectural        and the Louvre; Rococo in France and Austria;
history. The term "built environment" encompasses a wide range           Prerequisites: 48240
of human building on the landscape. It includes not only the
construction of individual pieces of architecture, but also the          48-447     History and Preservation
fashioning of rural, urban, and suburban landscapes, and the             Intermittent: 9 units
infrastructure that links them. We will look at regional and ethnic      This course is an introduction to the issues of historic
patterns of vernacular architecture, as well as the forms and            preservation, including not only the traditional concept of
dissemination of high style and popular architecture, particularly       architectural preservation but also the preservation of collective
as there is a shift from regional and colonial to national identities.   memory and history. This seminar can be used to satisfy one of
We will analyze the built environment as a way of understanding          the core required courses in architectural history.
broader social, cultural, and economic trends in America.                Prerequisites: 48240
Prerequisites: 48240
                                                                         48-448     History of Sustainable Architecture
48-441     Frank Lloyd Wright                                            Intermittent: 9 units
Intermittent: 9 units                                                    While the Modern Age has created a view of nature as separate
Frank Lloyd Wright and Modern Architecture is an architectural           from the built environment, relatively recent advances in theory
history lecture course that developed out of a Spring and Summer         and practice of environmentally conscientious or sustainable
1999 seminar and project course titled “Frank Lloyd Wright and           architecture have led architects and other designers to think
his Taliesin Legacy.” The present course investigates the career         otherwise. Architecture separate from environmental
and legacy of the famous American architect Frank Lloyd Wright           considerations is a luxury that we can’t afford and shouldn’t
within the context of modern architecture. We attempt to                 desire. In fact, architecture separate from nature is an unusual
understand the great variety of work and ideas produced by               outlook specific to the Industrial Revolution and its adherents.
Wright over seven decades, as well as the context which                  Before industrialization, rich, disparate and changing concepts of
stimulated and fed off of his designs. We will focus on issues           nature were fundamental elements in understanding the both the
including: 1) Wright's buildings and projects; 2) the concept of         theory and practice of building. Furthermore, even though many
organic architecture; 3) the historical and intellectual climate         Modernist historians have proposed the factory and the machine
that gave rise to FLW’s work, including the work of Richardson and       as ideal models for building, some critics and detractors in
Sullivan, the Shingle Style and International Style, Japanese and        architecture, landscape design and city planning even during the
European modern architecture; 4) investigations of Wright's              era of industrialism have frequently provided intellectual
progressive clients, innovative use of building materials,               counterpoint or direct social protest to the despoiled cities and
changing design theories, invented building systems, radical             landscapes that have too often been the by-products of the
social & political theories, broad urban experiments, and                industrial mindset. The purpose of the History of Sustainable
publishing prowess; 5) the influences Wright had on modern               Architecture is to examine designs and texts created either
architecture worldwide, especially the tremendous influence he           before or in response to the Industrial Revolution that
had in America through his own buildings, writings and lectures,         productively inform today’s renewed efforts to build with minimal
as well as some 1200 disciples he trained through his Taliesin           impact of the natural environment. Materials will be drawn from
Fellowship.
Prerequisites: 48240
3 6 0 Course Descriptions




ancient Rome, Renaissance Italy, Enlightenment France,                  Evidence and application of knowledge gained through other
nineteenth century Germany, England and Italy, as well as               studios and courses is required in the design resolution and
numerous twentieth and twenty-first century examples.                   presentation.
Prerequisites: 48240                                                    Prerequisites: 48105

48-452      Real Estate Design and Development                          48-550     Issues of Practice
Spring: 9 units                                                         Fall: 9 units
This course investigates the feasibility of an architectural            Issues of Practice is a required course taught in the fifth year. It
project, simultaneously focusing on financial, cost and design          consists of three modules: Personal Promotion, Emerging
considerations. Emphasis is placed on the integration of                Professional’s Companion, and Excursions. The Personal
professional design practice, project requirements, and client          Promotion module provides the students with a framework to
needs through case study project-based examples and guest               create a resume, cover letter, and portfolio. The EPC (Emerging
lectures. The course is divided into four parts. First, students        Professional’s Companion) provides concentrated study in
select three potential projects in the Pittsburgh area. Second, an      different aspects of professional practice. The Excursions require
initial feasibility analysis is conducted of each project based on      students to see how architecture relates to the wider world with
several criteria, including market, location and site evaluation,       architecturally related events that can include volunteer
conceptual design, cost and rent comparables, and financial             opportunities, lectures, mentorship, or teaching.
analysis. The most promising project is selected for further            Prerequisites: 48105
development during the remainder of the semester. Third,
computer tools are used to study the strengths and weaknesses           48-551     Ethics and Decision Making in Architecture
of the project in greater detail. Design development is carried out     Spring: 9 units
in conjunction with construction cost estimation at the unit-cost       Ethical Decision Making in Architecture is a required course in
level of detail and sensitivity analysis of key variables. Finally,     the fifth year. It is a course in the sequence that is identified with
students prepare a final feasibility report based on their findings.    the professional aspects of our student’s education, including
The report incorporates materials from throughout the semester          among others the following courses: Psychology of Habitation,
and contains an executive summary of investment strategy and            Design Economics, and Issues of Practice. It builds on an
rationale.                                                              understanding of the issues of occupancy, economics and
Prerequisites:                                                          practice which are central to decision making in architecture and
                                                                        provided by the preceding courses. The text for the course is a
48-453     Urban Design                                                 manuscript by the instructor which is being developed into a
Spring: 9 units                                                         manuscript for publication.
This is a course of 32 illustrated lectures and discussions, with
written and graphic assignments. The goal of the course is to           48-560      Computer Modeling
introduce students to the concept that every city is a physical         Intermittent: 9 units
language of perpetually evolving form. This evolving form is            This course explores the role and significance of advanced
produced by the interplay of a number of factors – physical,            visualization the design process, in doing so, projects from the
cultural, economic, social, technological, political, historical,       current state-of-the-art to glimpses of the future. Advanced
aspirational, etc. Subtitled “Felicitycity”, the goal of urban design   digital technology – in multimedia and virtual reality, through
is always to make the city felicitous for people who occupy it and      state-of-art modeling, animation, motion dynamics, compositing
whose culture the city represents. At the core of the course is         and video editing software – have provided the impetus to
training students to read and understand the language of the city.      radically improve the human designer’s ability to see and
Pittsburgh is used as a ‘lab’ to demonstrate that built form, the       understand physical reality. A range of technical visualization
physical context of the city, not only reveals the city’s cultural      skills together with the conceptual basis make these capabilities
and social values, but it is the context into which the architect       meaningful and useful.
inserts his or her language and values through the design of            Prerequisites: 48120
buildings. To achieve this, the course emphasizes writing skills,
precedent research, critical discourse, and graphic presentation.       48-563     Building Virtual Worlds
In some field-work assignments in Pittsburgh’s neighborhoods,           Fall and Spring: 24 units
students work in teams, experiencing first hand how the language        Building Virtual Worlds (BVW) is a project course, where
of spatial and built diversity and tradition play out in the streets.   interdisciplinary teams build immersive (helmet-based)
                                                                        interactive virtual worlds, as well as a variety of other interactive
48-499      Passport                                                    content, usingn Entertainment Technology Center (ETC)
3 units                                                                 platforms, such as the Jam-O-Drum, camera-based audience
Students enrolled in Passport will attend approved extracurricular      interaction techniques, Sony AIBO robotic dogs, and Quasi the
lectures and workshops organized and sponsored by CMU and a             robot. The goal of the course is to take students with varying
variety of educational and cultural institutions throughout the city    talents, backgrounds, and perspectives and put them together to
of Pittsburgh and region. Through first hand observation and            do what they couldn't do alone. The key thing is that there are no
participation, the primary intention of Passport are to engage          "idea people" in the course; everyone must share in the
students in contemporary ideas and debates, encourage and               mechanical creation of the worlds. Students use 3D modeling
support interdisciplinary work and discourse, and to stimulate an       software, such as Maya, and painting software, such as
active dialogue between a student’s academic pursuits and their         Photoshop. We use the ETC's Panda3D engine, originally
real world experience. Participating in Passport will strengthen        developed by Walt Disney Imagineering's Virtual Reality studio,
student’s critical thinking skills and provide them with a structure    to display our virtual reality worlds. Note that we don't try to
and foundation to further develop their interests in scholarship,       teach artists to program, or engineers to paint; we form teams
research and practice.                                                  where everyone does what they're already skilled at to attack a
                                                                        joint project. Visit this year's home page. http://www.alice.org/
48-500     Architecture Design Studio: The Urban Laboratory             bvw.html The proof of the pudding is in the eating - below are
Fall: 18 units                                                          many samples of student work: each of these projects was done
The Urban Lab is an outreach program that works in existing             by a team of 4 or 5 students, who had 2 or 3 weeks (maximum) to
urban neighborhoods, and/or in other communities in the                 create the work you see. The course culminates in a raucous
Pittsburgh region. Our approach is a bottom up / grass roots            stage show, where a juried selection of the best work is shared
effort, where community input is the most important reference for       with the campus community. These videos show the students
our work. Our final products are reports that contain policies,         "performing" their worlds in front of a live, 500-person audience
plans and graphics that capture projected visions for the future        in McConomy Auditorium on Carnegie Mellon's campus.
for these communities, and step-by-step recommendations for
their implementation. There are 380 communities in the                  48-564     Furniture Design & Construction
Pittsburgh region divided by topography, economics, class, and          Fall: 9 units
ethnic and racial differences. This fragmentation and separation        There are two distinct shop elective courses. The first has
has been and is a major regional problem. Such diversity,               previously been offered only in the fall, but now will be offered in
however, presents opportunities as well as challenges. In this          the spring as well. It is a structured course for students who wish
project students will study both the factors that divide                to further their ability in designing and constructing functional
communities and those that promote connections between them,            objects by building on the skills they acquired during their first
building upon the experience of the Urban Lab in studying regional      year. The course will extend their experience with basic
issues on the local neighborhood scale.                                 techniques. General class assignments, exercises and
Prerequisites: 48405                                                    demonstrations will be given.
                                                                        Prerequisites: 48105
48-505     Studio X
Spring: 18 units                                                        48-565    Model Making in Wood: Barns of Western Pennsylvania
This studio focuses on changing projects presented by fifth year        Spring: 9 units
faculty. The goal of the studio is to take a project from a             In the spring an independent study course is offered for students
contextual beginning to a fully explored and detailed conclusion.       with higher competency who wish to design and fabricate objects
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions     361




using processes they research on their own. This is an advanced       have not been the solution to our housing needs. While these
course for students who are already very familiar with basic shop     historic efforts introduced new technologies and processes, they
procedures. The student is required to have a clear idea of           were not fully integrated into the structure of the domestic
projects and techniques that he or she want to explore. A written     homebuilding industry. Japan and the European Community, faced
course plan developed through discussion with director is             with higher energy costs and high density housing conditions,
required. There are regular class times and attendance is             have been leading the way globally with innovative ideas and
required, but the course of study is self defined.                    financial incentives to produce better housing. The concepts of
Prerequisites: 48105                                                  “low–”, “zero–” and “plus–” house are well known and describe the
                                                                      annual energy balance for homes with respect to the grid.
48-568      Advanced AutoCAD and 3D Visualization                     Prerequisites: 48105 and 48315
Fall: 9 units
This class is designed to introduce a person to advanced CAD          48-573     Color Theory
commands, including AutoCAD 3D, 3D Studio MAX, and                    Intermittent: 9 units
Autodesk REVIT. Students will learn how to properly set up and        Color Theory is a course designed to build sensitivity to visual
manipulate CAD projects integrating all three software                perception and application of color. It will provide an overview of
applications, replicating real world projects in leading              the impact on physiological and psychological functions. The
architectural firms. Building information and parametric modeling,    course will also integrate hands on manipulation of color
animations, materials, lighting, and rendering concepts will allow    materials. The first half of the term will be study through trial and
students to create integrated projects,3D video animations, and       error processes using Josef Alber's Interaction of Color. Collage
realistic renderings. At the conclusion of this course, students      materials will be utilized to investigate color's flexibility and
will have projects and animations created and architectural CAD       nuance. Lectures, discussions and reading will provide the
standards outlined. Students should have some familiarity with        groundwork for the application of developed sensitivities to
basic AutoCAD 2D commands. Those who don't have AutoCAD               ongoing architectural studio projects during the second half of the
2D knowledge can contact the professor to arrange for on-line         term. Because it is a nine unit class a minimum of six hours out of
tutorials that need to be completed before classes begin.             class work per week will be expected of the students.
Prerequisites: 48120                                                  Prerequisites: 48130

48-569      GIS/CAFM                                                  48-575     Design/Build: Solar Decathlon
Spring: 9 units                                                       Intermittent: Mini Session - 6 units
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) is a system of hardware,         This elective will be dedicated to the construction of the 800
software, and procedures designed to support the capture,             square foot, solar-powered Pittsburgh Synergy house to be
management, manipulation, analysis, modeling and display of           entered into the Solar Decathlon competition in the Fall of 2005.
geospatially referenced data for solving complex planning and         Students are required to have their own basic equipment - steel-
management problems. GIS applications use both spatial                toed work boots, hard hat, safety glasses, tool belt, 20 oz framing
information (maps) and databases to perform analytical studies.       hammer, 25 foot tape measure and speed square. Instructor
Facilities management is the practice of coordinating the physical    permission required.
workplace with the people and work of the organization. FM
integrates the principles of business administration, architecture,   48-576      Mapping Urbanism
and the behavioral & engineering sciences. CAFM integrates            Intermittent: 9 units
various tools that demonstrate the use of software in facilities      The aim of this course is to provide future architects and urban
management to streamline operations, boost productivity and           designers with the critical tools necessary to examine the city as
develop strategic planning goals for an organization.                 both a representation and a reality in flux. Physical, psychological
Prerequisites: 48120                                                  and social processes and the relationships between them will be
                                                                      thoroughly examined through the juxtaposition of geography,
48-570     Digital Media Elective                                     history, sociology and ideology. Investigations and recordings will
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 be processed and distilled into micro and macro readings,
Digital technology has resided in the profession of architecture      challenging the notion of site as a bounded place. The course will
for over a decade, but remains primarily a tool for expediency and    be conducted through an interdisciplinary framework and explored
production. In the mid 90’s, animation software developed for         utilizing a diverse set of tools. Weekly lectures will introduce
Hollywood was co-opted by hungry architecture students,               world cities and their typologies – e.g. the shrinking city, the
frustrated by archaic software supposedly developed for               growing city, the megalopolis, etc. New definitions of urbanity will
architects. Just as Zaha Hadid’s Hong Kong Peak design was            be examined through readings of both fiction and non-fiction, the
declared unfeasible and “Paper” architecture, the work that has       viewing of cultural and controversial films, and individual
emerged from the students and young architects of this                observations gained from field investigations. Parallel to these
generation has received a similar response. However, recent           urban explorations, we will study and employ a variety of tools
advances in manufacturing, the steady growth of computing             with which to map urbanism: from traditional mapping techniques
power, and falling software prices have popularized these forms       such as navigational charts and Nolli plans, to more
and added to their legitimacy.                                        contemporary experimental explorations which draw from leading
Prerequisites: 48105 and 48120                                        architectural critiques of recent decades as well as related fields
                                                                      such as art and interactive digital design. Weekly assignments
48-571     Architectural Project Management                           will include student projects and presentations that synthesize
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 required readings, writing and mapping. The final outcome will
This is a hands-on management class that focuses on the               involve case studies of multiply scaled sites and/or local site
elements of running a design project and a design firm, intending     investigations and the utilization of various representational
to groom CMU graduates for leadership in the practice of              techniques to create inventive mappings, possibly documented in
architecture. This course is also intended to assist designers to     a multi-media format. Our aim will be to learn new ways of seeing
do projects on their own and to begin independent practices.          the city, resulting in a more holistic and sensitive awareness for
Students study and emulate the process of marketing for and           the architectural site.
winning a project, negotiating a scope of work and fee, crafting a    Prerequisites: 48453
project plan and team structure, and meshing this with learned
knowledge of a practice’s mission, staff dynamics and finances.       48-578     Solar Decathlon: Construction
Prerequisites: 48400                                                  Intermittent: 6 units
                                                                      This elective will be dedicated to the construction of the 800
48-572     Zero Energy Housing                                        square foot, solar-powered Pittsburgh Synergy house to be
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 entered into the Solar Decathlon competition in the Fall of 2005.
Traditional American methods of homebuilding are not adequately       Students are required to have their own basic equipment - steel-
responding to the need for flexible, affordable, energy effective     toed work boots, hard hat, safety glasses, tool belt, 20 oz framing
and resource efficient homes. This elective will take at fresh look   hammer, 25 foot tape measure and speed square. Instructor
at the housing delivery process in response to global and regional    permission required.
change. From climate change, to power deregulation, to suburban       Prerequisites:
sprawl to the rapid proliferation of information technology, change
is occurring at a more rapid pace than at any other time in our       48-579      Contemporary London Architecture
history. Yet, the housing industry is a fragmented, multi-headed      Intermittent: 9 units
beast in which change is slow to occur, if at all. Our houses of      In recent years a new generation of architects has emerged in
today are not meeting the needs of the users, nor are they            London, a generation separate from the great High-Tech offices
performing as good “global” citizens. Applying industrial             (Foster, Rogers, Hopkins, Grimshaw) and the cosmopolitan orbit
engineering principles to the housing delivery process could          of the Architectural Association in the 1970s (Koolhaas,
potentially offer solutions to directly solve these problems.         Tschumi, Hadid, Coates). This new generation is intimately
History however, shows us that the houses constructed in this         engaged with England’s contemporary urban condition. In
fashion, from the panelized houses of Konrad Wachsmann and            particular, these "Gritty Brits" operate in the East End of London,
Walter Gropius to Operation Breakthrough and HUD-code homes,          a context that is both post-industrial and home to many
3 6 2 Course Descriptions




successful Young British Artists. If the Walsall Art Gallery by       cores can become manufactured products or product assemblies
Adam Caruso and Peter St.John appears remarkably sober and            with superior performance and aesthetic detailing. Moreover, the
tailored, Blue House by Fat is an instantaneous Pop icon. If          design of the integrated systems can contribute to enhanced
Sergison Bates’s Social Housing Prototype is a discreet re-           sustainability through material, energy and water conservation,
presentation of the generic semi-detached house, urban design         enhanced environmental quality and even energy generation. In
proposals by muf mix community memories with new modes of             this course, students will identify, design, develop and mock-up
decoration. David Adjaye has built homes for successful artists       robust, integrated, solutions for external modular service cores
(Tim Noble/Sue Webster) as well as Idea Stores, a                     that address persistent demands in existing and new
reinterpretation of the traditional borough library. This course      construction. After conducting product reviews and field studies,
investigates certain key works in recent English architecture         students will develop performance specifications and design
together with aspects of urbanisation and visual culture in           variations for components and integrated assemblies. The
contemporary London (music, literature, cinema, fashion). Also        students will take the best design solutions for modular, plug and
included is an appraisal of London culture in the 1950s when          play, and sustainable stacking infrastructures into final
appreciation of The Everyday ranged from New Brutalist                documentation. The integrated kit-of-parts will be based on
architecture and Kitchen Sink dramas to early Pop collages by         specification, visualization and mock-ups capable of inspiring the
Richard Hamilton.                                                     manufacturing community to market new high performance
Prerequisites: 48105                                                  integrated solutions. This course is intended for upper level
                                                                      undergraduate and graduate students with strong understanding
48-583     History and the Literature of the Contemporary             of systems and 3D visualizing capabilities.
Architectural Speech                                                  Prerequisites: 48315
Intermittent: 9 units
This course will explore some of the history and literature that      48-592      Details, Working Drawings and Prototypes
supports certain terms that have particular currency in today?s       Intermittent: 9 units
architectural vocabulary and debates. This class will explore the     Studio courses in the School of Architecture allow students to
use and origins of such terms as New Urbanism, contextualism,         explore and represent design concepts for buildings that grow in
postmodernism, sustainability, functionalism, technology, and         size and complexity over the course of the undergraduate
space. The course will show that our current lexicon has origins in   curriculum. Technology courses introduce the fundamentals of
specific authors and events, but that the various meaning applied     structure, construction, environment and management, but there
to such terms do not imply the consensus that users often             is seldom time to apply and synthesize the knowledge in a
imagine. Most authors will be Western, dating from the twentieth      comprehensive way. This course is intended to provide just that
century, but there will be some from the nineteenth (and a few        opportunity through the vehicle of the 2005 Solar Decathlon
from the twenty-first). This course is organized as a seminar.        competition. Using the Pittsburgh Synergy competition entry as
Students will be assigned approximately three to six articles or      the platform, we will develop details that address the issues of
excerpts to read each week, which they are expected to read           aesthetics, durability, performance and constructability. As
closely and critically. Students will take turns leading discussion   required, we will build large, and sometimes, full scale mock-ups
of the readings. All students will be expected to be prepared to      of the detail to gain better understandings of the relevant issues.
participate in discussion each class. In addition to reading          Using these details, we can then develop a full set of construction
assignments, students will write four short papers.                   documents, including specifications for the house. The last part of
Prerequisites: 48105                                                  the course will select critical components that can be prototyped
                                                                      at full size for installation in the house during the design/ build
48-587     Lighting Design                                            course in the spring. We will be developing the construction
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 documents to conform with the Uniform Drawing System of the
Architectural Lighting Design is an elective course open to           Construction Specifications Institute. Instructor permission
undergraduate and graduate students. It presumes no previous          required.
knowledge in lighting design. Analyzing visual examples of light in
art, theatre, film and nature, the course demonstrates how lighting   48-593      Portfolios, Presentations, and Publications
affects not only what we see but how we see it and how we feel        Intermittent: 9 units
about it. Once the students have a basic understanding of light       Architectural graphics, marketing, printed portfolios, web
and its’ physical properties they apply this knowledge to             portfolios, resume and cover letter packages, competition entries,
designing architectural applications.                                 exhibit design and installations, speeches and verbal
Prerequisites: 48105                                                  presentations of graphic work, press releases, graphic programs
                                                                      and posters, branding/logo identity - to name a few - are topics to
48-588      Synergistic Form                                          be explored in order to examine effective means of graphic, verbal
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 and written communication. Each week the course will be
In the spirit of cross-disciplinary collaboration embodied in the     structured around a communication method including a lecture on
Bauhaus, Constructivist, Metabolist and Situationist movements,       representation and precedents, followed by a presentation and
this course will reference these 20th century experimental            workshop facilitated by a guest on their own work as it relates to
modernist collectives as the impetus for new ways of                  the means of communication studied. In-class workshops will
conceptualizing and creating space through the physical and the       serve as a means of testing the communication method while
virtual. Digital media provides us with a new framework within        assignments, often involving a client, will be a means to further
which to invent and experience space. Some of the greatest            evolve your own representation. A final project, the culmination of
architectural concepts and proposals of the 20th century, Tatlin’s    a semester-long body of work, will strive to finalize effective and
“Monument to the Third International”, Kiyonori Kikutake’s            evocative communication strategies.
“Marine City”, Constant’s “New Babylon”, Kiesler’s “Endless           Prerequisites: 48105
House”, never constructed in full scale establish virtual
possibilities that enable the imagination to envision expanded        48-595     Under the Influence: Architecture & Art
spatial realities. Contemporary examples of architectural             Intermittent: 9 units
innovation that incorporate the intangible, ephemeral, infinite and   Under the Influence: Architecture and Art is an elective course
transcendent include James Turrell’s “Roden Crater”, Diller and       taught in the spring semester. Many of the world’s leading
Scofidio’s “Blur Building”, and the “Tate In Space” competition.      architects cite art and cinema and other cross disciplinary
These works challenge the functionality of architecture as            factors among their most significant inspirations. Rather than
enclosure, dissolving the edges of human construction by              basing their successful architectural practices on narrowly
expanding the ontology of the building as an experience relative      focused foundations, these architects boldly cross borders into
to time and environment. This course will ask students to respond     the worlds of music, fashion, photography, film, art. New York
to the question: what is the possibility for the future of space?     architects Scofidio & Diller reference Marcel Duchamp, Rem
Students will access inspiration from these ongoing collective        Koolhaas and Herzog & deMeuron design for Prada, Peter
movements in order to develop new architectural paradigms             Eisenman acknowledges the writings of Robert Morris among
through individual work and collaboration on writing, experimental    other artists, and Bernard Tschumi has based buildings on the
design, architectural systems and multi-media installations not       editing principles of Sergei Eisenstein…The list goes on. At the
excluding any medium or creative form.                                same time, many contemporary filmmakers look to architecture
Prerequisites: 48105                                                  for their conceptual framework. Why are these artists and
                                                                      architects looking outside of their disciplines to cross over into
48-589    Innovative Product Development: Sustainable Design &        each-others worlds for inspiration and direction? What are they
Integrated Systems                                                    learning and how are they applying their discoveries? What can
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 we learn from these leading figures and how can we ourselves
The distinctions between architecture, industrial design, and         begin to cross borders to develop new working methods and
manufacturing are beginning to fade, leading to opportunities to      approaches that will advance our own professional and creative
create innovative integrated systems that meet emerging               processes? These are some of the questions that the course
sustainability, technological and organizational challenges. The      addresses.
creation of service cores, stairs, vertical transport, kitchen and    Prerequisites: 48105
copy centers, conference rooms, atrium roofs, even mechanical
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions      363




48-596     LEED Buildings and Green Design                              tools in building and room acoustics Topics in lighting include: o
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   review of visual performance criteria and lighting psychology o
Green building and sustainable design have been rapidly gaining         analytical and numerical methods for the prediction of lighting
acceptance in all sectors of the building market. Global issues of      conditions in interior spaces o lighting engineering and design
energy use, emissions, resource depletion, and land use are             methods o application of computer-aided lighting simulation tools
forcing building professionals to re-evaluate standard design and       in architecture
construction processes, and look to more environmentally                Prerequisites: 33103 and 33106
friendly practices. The U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC)
developed a green building rating system entitled Leadership in         48-728    Special Topics in BPD
Energy and Environmental Design (LEEDTM) in order to define             Intermittent: 9,12 units
"green building" by establishing a common standard of
measurement. LEED considers green building methods and                  48-729     Productivity, Health and the Quality of Buildings
technologies in several categories including site, water, energy,       Intermittent: 9-12 units
materials, and indoor air quality, and awards points towards an         Given the growing demand for green buildings by federal and
overall green building rating of certified, silver, gold or platinum.   private sector clients, professional practices are “tooling up” all
Currently, LEED registered projects make up 3% of the current           over the world to deliver high performance, environmentally
U.S. commercial building market, and Pennsylvania is the third          responsive, “green” buildings and communities. However,
leading state with LEED registered projects. There is now a             investments in green, high performance building solutions and
demand for design professionals with knowledge and experience           technologies are still limited by first cost decision- making, and
not only in sustainable design but specifically with the LEED           life cycle tools are still largely inaccessible to professionals. A
rating system as well. This course will provide students with           new building investment decision support tool – BIDS™ - has
background knowledge of the USGBC, the LEED system, as well             been developed by the NSF/IUCRC Center for Building
as referenced standards related to specific topics. The course will     Performance at Carnegie Mellon University, with the support of
benefit greatly from the large number of LEED projects in the           the Advanced Building Systems Integration Consortium. This
Pittsburgh region, which will serve as case studies. Upon               cost-benefit decision support tool presents the substantial cost-
completion of the course, students will be prepared to take the         benefits of a range of advanced and innovative building systems
LEED Professional Accreditation Exam, which is quickly                  designed to deliver – privacy and interaction, air quality,
becoming the standard of recognition for green building                 ergonomics, lighting control, thermal control, network flexibility,
professionals.                                                          and access to the natural environment - from field case studies,
Prerequisites: 48315                                                    laboratory studies, simulation studies, and other research efforts.
                                                                        This course will explore the relationship of quality buildings,
48-705      Architecture Design Studio: The Urban Laboratory            building systems, and land-use to productivity, health, and well-
Fall: 18 units                                                          being. The course will engage students in the literature relating
The fifth year urban design studio takes the optimistic view that       building design decisions to ten cost/performance impacts:
the work of the architect derives its significance from interaction     energy, facilities management, organizational change,
with the society at large. The competing and even contradictory         technological change, attraction/retention (quality of life) of
pressures of political, economic, and societal interests are            employees, individual productivity, organizational productivity,
welcomed as the true source of complexity in architecture. This         salvage/ waste, tax/insurance/litigation, and health. Each student
studio focuses on comprehensive urban design and architectural          will then develop a "state-of-the-knowledge" paper in one of
intervention in Pittsburgh as a laboratory, in light of the rich        these key cost-benefit areas for key building design decisions in
historical, contextual, economic, and political factors affecting its   a system, building type, or land-use choice and profile a research
form. The studio employs a multi-disciplinary team structure to         project that could significantly enhance our professional
characterize and explore the opportunities for urban rejuvenation       knowledge about the relationship of quality of the built
and sustainability.                                                     environment to productivity, health, and well-being.

48-711     Paradigms of Research in Architecture                        48-746     Graphics User Interface Design
Fall: 9 units                                                           Intermittent: 9 units
This course is both an introduction to important models and             Graphics User Interface (GUI) can be critical to the success or
methods of academic research particularly as they are related to        failure of a computer system, as a well-designed GUI can free the
building design issues and a forum for intellectual curiosity.          user from learning complex command languages and allow
During the initial ten weeks of the semester, the course presents       interacting with the computer system efficiently. Traditionally
an overview of the field and covers several models of research as       building a GUI has not been an easy task for non-professionals.
they relate to the building design. These will include models of        With mature of programming languages such as Java, it is
natural sciences, social sciences, sciences of the artificial,          becoming more common and easier to build a graphics user
engineering and aesthetics in building design. During the final five    interface by using the increasingly familiar, common, object-
weeks of the semester faculty both CFA and CIT will be invited to       oriented, event-driven programming model. Apart from the
make presentations about their areas of research and the                programming language aspect, the success of a GUI depends on
methods they use. These presentations correspond in many                visual effects, which involve visual elements such as typography,
respect to those covered in lectures.                                   symbols, color, and other static and dynamic graphics. We are
                                                                        planning to offer a course to exploring these issues. We will use
48-722     Building Performance Modeling                                Java 2 as the programming language vehicle. The topics include,
Fall: 12 units                                                          but not limited to, generating graphics, event handling, user
This course introduces fundamentals and computational methods           interface components, selected user interface design patterns,
in building performance modeling. Topics include: modeling and          and interface visual evaluation. Some lecture material will be
design, overview of thermal, visual, and acoustical domain              based on canons/readings in the interface + design literature.
knowledge, integration of performance simulation in computer-           Your motivation will have to do with user gestalt. For any type of
aided design, introduction to the application of advanced               application, the interface affords conformance between user
computational building simulation tools, case studies and design        conceptions of the functionality of the interface, and user
assignments on the application of simulation in the evaluation          perception of the model of behaviour as projected by the
and improvement of building performance.                                interface. The course is PROJECT BASED. Every student is
                                                                        expected to complete a working visually appealing interface
48-725      Building Economics                                          project by the end of the semester. The project will be a
Fall: 9 units                                                           demonstration of ability to bring interface design principles to
This course investigates the feasibility of an architectural            practice. The development environment is a combination of Flash
project, focusing on financial, cost, and design considerations. Its    (or similar) for storyboarding the interface, and Java GUI classes
primary objective is twofold: to provide students with quantitative     for the actual implementation. Both Flash and Java GUI will be
skills for analyzing the economic implications of their design          taught/covered. PREREQUISITE is the ability to program in Java.
decisions and to foster development of a critical perspective in
making these decisions. The need for economic analysis to               48-755      Spatial Constructions
develop concurrently with design is emphasized throughout the           Intermittent: 0-27 units
course. Topics include site selection, building design,                 The purpose of this course is to enable you to explore spatial
construction cost estimation, and real estate finance.                  constructions from both a theoretical and practical stand point
                                                                        that may be of use to the world at large. In order to do so, I will
48-726     Environment II: Acoustics and Lighting                       briefly introduce you to a variety of construction paradigms that
Fall: 9 units                                                           are in any way related to spatial or geometric forms, with a slant
This course introduces theoretical foundations, computational           towards design or composition. The emphasis, for the most part,
approaches, and design methods in architectural acoustics (room         will be on the ‘mechanical’ aspects of spatial constructions, and
acoustics, building acoustics, vibration control) and architectural     how these different approaches have evolved towards computer
lighting (daylighting, electrical lighting). Topics in acoustics        implementation. The goal of the course is not merely to provide
include: o review of physiological and psychological acoustics o        spatial constructions skills, but, rather, and perhaps more
prediction of outdoor and indoor air-borne sound propagation o          importantly, to open up new areas or problems to research and
sound transmission between rooms o design methods in room and           explore.
building acoustics o application of computer-aided simulation
3 6 4 Course Descriptions




48-756     Object Oriented CAD                                       60-105    Pre-Industrial Visual Cultures to 1789
Fall: 12 units                                                       Spring: 9 units
This course extends the approach underlying our Microstation-        An exploration of selected examples from the visual arts.
based course Strategic Use of CAD to the task of object-oriented     Addresses ancient to pre-industrial times, across global cultures.
application development in CAD. The motivation is the realization    Contextual issues investigated for both distinctive differences
that the switch from procedural application programming              and cross-linkages in human experience and expression. Open to
languages to object-oriented ones requires a significant cognitive   freshmen in the School of Art, or by instructor permission.
retooling on the part of developers, who must know more than the
syntax and semantics of the new programming language to be           60-110     Electronic Media Studio I
used: they have to be able to employ appropriate strategies that     Fall: 10 units
are specifically appropriate for the new paradigm. The software      An introduction to the computer as a multi-purpose, art-making
platform supporting the course will be JMDL, ProjectBank and the     tool that utilizes software application programs. Students use the
CustomObjects framework offered by Bentley Systems, which            computer to develop a variety of two-dimensional imagery,
actively supports the course. Goals (a) to introduce and test        animated and interactive artworks. Multiple output media and
strategies of object-oriented application development in general     distribution options are explored. Open to freshmen admitted to
and in the context of Microstation (b) to develop - as a course      the School of Art, or by instructor permission.
team project - an interesting application that illustrates our
findings (c) to document our approach and findings so that others    60-130    3-D Media Studio I
can learn from them. Prerequisites: Programming experience in at     Spring: 10 units
least one programming language.                                      An introduction to three-dimensional form and space. Various
                                                                     materials and methods are explored through projects covering a
48-760      Spatial Constructions                                    broad range of sculptural concerns. Students are introduced to
Intermittent: 9 units                                                welding techniques, wood fabrication and ceramic processes.
This course explores the role and significance of advanced           Students become proficient with a variety of hand and power
visualization the design process, in doing so, projects from the     tools. Materials fee required. Open to freshmen in the School of
current state-of-the-art to glimpses of the future. Advanced         Art, or by instructor permission.
digital technology – in multimedia and virtual reality, through
state-of-art modeling, animation, motion dynamics, compositing       60-150     2D Media Studio I: Drawing
and video editing software – have provided the impetus to            Fall: 10 units
radically improve the human designer’s ability to see and            The first of a two-semester sequence of drawing courses. Focus
understand physical reality. A range of technical visualization      on the language, materials and concepts of drawing as foundation
skills together with the conceptual basis make these capabilities    for all the visual arts. Initial emphasis on the development of
meaningful and useful.                                               perceptual, analytical, and structural drawing skills with
                                                                     increasing attention to idea development. Exposure to methods of
48-763      Collaborative Work Environment                           creating pictorial and illusionistic space; recording the external
Intermittent: 9 units                                                world of light and form; and making visible the internal world of the
Workplaces are changing in response to technological and             heart, the mind, the soul. Experience with line, texture, tone,
organizational challenges, as well as the globalization of           shape and mass; in a variety of wet and dry drawing media. Open
business, engineering, design and manufacturing processes.           to freshmen in the School of Art, or by instructor permission.
Interactive multi-media and web-based technologies create the
possibility to work within ever changing teams, both locally and     60-151    2D Media Studio II: Drawing
globally. This requires that built environments be dynamic and       Spring: 10 units
able to respond to changing organizational and evolving              A continuation of 60-150 2D Media Studio I: Drawing. Includes
technological needs. All these inter-linked issues require a         an expanded exploration of 2D materials, techniques, and
fundamental rethinking of collaborative work environments.           processes. Emphasis on drawing as a foundation for various forms
Meeting places (MP) are evolving into project places (PP), and       of artmaking. Open to freshmen in the School of Art, or by
service places (SP - such as copy rooms and coffee areas) are        instructor permission.
evolving into new forms of collaborative work environments. The
shifts in individual workspaces (IP) and electronic workspaces       60-201     Concept Studio III
(EP) to support collaboration are equally significant. In this       Fall: 10 units
course, students will identify, design, develop and mock-up          "Systems and Processes" A continuation of Concept Studios I
robust, integrated, solutions for collaborative work places - plug   and II with a focus on systems and processes. The utility,
and play solutions that might be identified as "Collab-Kits". In     discovery, and the generation of systems and processes are
this course, students will: Conduct strategic literature and         addressed through projects. Open to sophomores in the School of
product search · Conduct field studies of existing collaborative     Art, or by permission of instructor.
work environments, their design variations and performance
successes and failkures. · Create visualizations and mock-ups to     60-203    Sophomore Honors Project
support design development of high performance "Collab-Kits", in     Spring: 10 units
collaboration with the furniture industry. · Document "Collab-       A non-medium-specific studio course which encourages students
Kit"complete with instruction manual ready for market                to develop independently generated projects. Open to
                                                                     sophomores in the School of Art with a minimum QPA of 3.0.

Art                                                                  60-205      Modern Visual Culture 1789-1945
                                                                     Fall: 9 units
60-101     Concept Studio I                                          Explores the diverse roles of artists in the complexity of modern
10 units                                                             society from the Industrial Revolution through World War II.
"The Self and the Human Being" The first of a sequence of eight      Contextual issues include the relationship of artists and art to
studio courses designed to develop a personal approach to            culture, politics, economics and modern technologies. Attention
generating art and to learning transferable conceptual skills. The   is paid to the decline of patronage, the diminishing role of the
topics of the first three Concept Studios are addressed through a    academy and the emergence of an avant-garde and art promotion.
sequence of structured, media-independent projects. Open to          Open to sophomores in the School of Art, or by instructor
freshmen admitted to the School of Art, or by instructor             permission.
permission.
                                                                     60-206     Contemporary Visual Culture; from 1945 to the
60-102     Concept Studio II                                         Present
Spring: 10 units                                                     Spring: 9 units
"Space and Time" A continuation of Concept Studio I with a focus     This course traces the shifts in art from late Modernism until our
on space and time through projects of increasing complexity.         After Post era. It will examine the diversity of art produced, as
Such topics as biological time, historical time, psychological       well as the critical ideas that arose over a span of 60 years. The
time, celestial time, clock time, and public space, private space,   rise of a pluralist / conceptual art will be discussed within the
mathematical space, and virtual space are addressed through          context of social change, technology and globalization. Open to
projects. Open to freshmen in the School of Art, or by instructor    sophomores in the School of Art, or ONLY by the instructor
permission.                                                          permission.
60-104    Contemporary Issues Forum                                  60-210      Electronic Media Studio II
Fall: 6 units                                                        Fall and Spring: 10 units
Introduces students to contemporary issues in the visual arts.       Introduction to video production. Explore video art production,
Thematic rather than chronological approach. Lecture/discussion      post and pre-production. Focus on skills needed to realize
format. Requires attendance at the school bi-weekly lecture          intended video projects through discussions and examples of
series. Open to freshmen in the School of Art, or by instructor      processes, techniques and aesthetic issues. We will look at
permission.                                                          multi-media, computer effects and digital audio. We will move
                                                                     from traditional narrative to experimental and performative/
                                                                     installation work. Pre-requisite: 60-110, or by instructor
                                                                     permission.
                                                                                                            Course Descriptions      365




60-230    3-D Media Studio II                                        60-416      Advanced ETB: Interactive Multimedia
Fall: 10 units                                                       Intermittent: 10 units
An introduction to light metalworking techniques, foundry            Within this class students will engage in a personally directed
processes and mixed media construction. A broad range of             exploration of the creative, conceptual and tactical possibilities
techniques and processes are introduced through demonstrations       of interactive scenarios within their art practice. The term
and placed into practice through assignments. Students gain a        "interactivity" will be used and discussed in its broadest possible
basic understanding of the language and processes of sculpture.      context, and students will be given space to explore a wide range
Materials fee required. Prerequisite: 60-130. Open to School of      of digital and non-digital approaches to user orientated strategies
Art sophomores, or by instructor permission.                         within the art making process. We will also examine and discuss a
Prerequisites: 60130                                                 range of historical and contemporary strategies employed by art
                                                                     makers who have used forums from on-line and virtual spaces to
60-250     2D Media Studio III: Painting                             physical and site specific venues to expand and explore the
Fall and Spring: 10 units                                            relationship between the art object and the audience.
A pragmatic introduction to the tools, materials, and techniques     Prerequisite: 60-110, 60-210, or by instructor permission.
of painting, including instruction in the fabrication of sound       Prerequisites: 60110 and 60210
painting supports and the application of permanent grounds.
Students become conversant with the range of visual options          60-417     Advanced ETB: Video
unique to the vocabulary of painting. Prerequisite 60150 and         Intermittent: 10 units
60151, or by instructor permission.                                  ADVANCED VIDEO -- This course offers an in depth exploration
                                                                     of video as a tool for creative expression. Topics for investigation
60-251    2D Media Studio IV: Printmaking                            and discussion will include: histories of experimental video,
Spring: 10 units                                                     contemporary trends in the field, technological developments,
An introduction to the three major areas of printmaking: Intaglio,   performativity, perception and manipulation of time, and theories
Lithography, and Serigraphy. Provides students with an overview      of representation. Additionally this course will provide instruction
of printmaking in its historical context. Demonstrates the impact    in advanced production and post-production techniques, including
of the print processes on contemporary art. Prerequisites: 60-       lighting, editing, compositing, 2D animation, graphics and sound
150 and 60-151. Open to sophomores in the School of Art, or by       design. Prerequisites: 60-110 and 60-210, or by instructor
instructor permission.                                               permission.

60-301     Art in Context                                            60-421     Advanced ETB: Gizmology
Fall: 10 units                                                       Intermittent: 10 units
Students affiliate artmaking with a context outside of the           Gizmology introduces artists to the fascinating, real world of
university and within the Pittsburgh community. Students develop     three-dimensional time-based/kinetic media. Students will be
a relationship with an organization and artmaking is carried out     given intensive instruction in digital electronics as well as an
within the context of that organization. Students may take this      introduction to mechanics and machine/sculpture fabrication.
course for one or two semesters. Open to juniors in the School of    Students will complete assignments as well as pursue their own
Art, or by instructor permission.                                    self-directed kinetic project. A $60.00 material fee is required.
                                                                     Suggested Prerequisites: 60-110 (EMS1) and 60-210 (EMS2).
60-303    Junior Honors Project                                      Prerequisites: 60110 and 60210
Spring: 10 units
A non-medium-specific studio course which encourages students        60-422     Advanced ETB: Robotic Art Studio
to develop independently generated projects. Open to juniors in      Intermittent: 10 units
the School of Art with a minimum QPA of 3.0.                         Advanced ETB: Robotic Art Studio (Fabian Winkler). The Robotic
                                                                     Art Studio is an experimental and interdisciplinary class. It
60-353     High and Popular Culture in the Arts                      focuses on three areas: technical workshops exploring basic
Intermittent: 9 units                                                electronics, the presentation and discussion of key texts relevant
Explores issues influencing art at the close of this century.        to robotic art and the creation of individual art works. In the
Investigates the impact on culture and creative thinking by          technical workshops students will explore the functionality of
social, political and technological developments since World War     basic electronic components, work with sensors, actuators and
II. Analyzes how the visual slang of mass culture has entered the    alternative power sources such as solar energy. In the discussion
language of modern art. Priority for art majors.                     of assigned readings, we investigate some of the cultural, social
                                                                     and technological issues inherent to the field of robotics. These
60-354     Art Aesthetics and Literature                             discussions will be complemented and extended by presentations
Intermittent: 9 units                                                of relevant historic and contemporary artworks. Students will also
Surveys the development of modernist European aesthetics, as         work on a variety of different project assignments, some of them
expressed in the applied forms of art and literature. Focuses on     exploring the networking of individual work to a system. A course
the parallelisms between visual and literary movements, and on       material fee is required. Students can expect to purchase some
the deviation of these movements from their philosophical            individual items outside of those provided if they are unique to
counterparts. Discusses aesthetic systems, those arising out of      their project design.
German idealism, Existentialism, Psychoanalysis, and
Phenomenology.                                                       60-429     ETB Studio: Physical Computing: Wearable Machines
                                                                     and High-Tech Gizmos
60-399     Art History/Theory Independent Study                      Intermittent: 10 units
All Semesters: 9 units                                               Students enrolled in the Physical Computing: Wearable Machines
A tutorial course in which an Art student works individually on a    and High-Tech Gizmos course will learn how to build experimental
self-generated project under the supervision of a School of Art      electronic devices to be worn on the body for augmenting
faculty member. Prior to enrolling in Independent Study, the         personal and collaborative experiences in the physical world.
student must complete an "Independent Study Proposal" form           Projects may range from collaborative games and techno-chic
(available in the bins on the 3rd floor of CFA) which is signed by   fashions to self-monitoring accessories. The emphasis in this
the faculty member and the Assistant Head of the School of Art.      class is the use of electronic technology for creative, critical and
Prerequisite: Art junior or senior status, or permission of          social purposes that extend beyond and challenge common
instructor.                                                          interface devices (e.g. mouse, keyboard, monitor, etc?). The
                                                                     course includes electronics technique workshops to learn how to
60-401     Senior Project                                            program microcontrollers and work with sensors and actuators,
Fall: 10 units                                                       and student projects. This class is designed to accommodate
Students initiate a comprehensive two-semester project in the        students with a broad range of experience working with
first semester to be completed in the second semester of their       electronics, from beginners to those who have worked with
senior year (60-402). Open to seniors in the School of Art, or by    electronic technologies and are interested in exploring creative
instructor permission.                                               and innovative interactive art and design prototypes.
                                                                     Undergraduate and graduate students from the School of Art,
60-415     Advanced ETB: 3-D Animation                               Human Computer Interaction Institute, School of Design and the
Fall and Spring: 10 units                                            Entertainment Technology Center are encouraged to enroll in this
60-415 Advanced ETB: 3D Animation (James Duesing) --This             class. Students from other departments are welcome to enroll
studio will introduce students to the techniques of 3D computer      pending available seats. All students must have introductory
modeling and animation including techniques for lighting,            experience working with computer applications in art, design or
mapping, and rendering. The class will look at examples of           programming. Please contact the Professor with any questions
animation emphasizing 3D object animation done with and without      regarding prerequisites.
the computer. The students will have the opportunity to use
techniques of 3D animation as a means of self expression.            60-430    Advanced SIS: Sculpture
Prerequisites: 60-110 and 60-210, or by instructor permission.       Intermittent: 10 units
                                                                     Sculpture is perhaps the broadest field among the contemporary
3 6 6 Course Descriptions




visual arts. Through its privileged relationship to the physical        60-450     Advanced PDP: Drawing
world and the viewer's body, sculpture is the glue that connects        Intermittent: 10 units
the intermedia practices of object, installation, interactive art and   ADVANCED PDP: DRAWING (Christopher Sperandio)--Studio
performance. In this class we build on skills and concepts learned      course with an expanded definition of drawing to include a large
in 3D media 1 and 2 to develop students' individual approach.           variety of media, methodologies and practices. Subjects will
Students define independent responses to topics proposed                include observable sources as well as conceptual approaches.
through discussion of contemporary sculptors. Emphasis is               Students will be encouraged to identify resources, research and
placed on individual development. Students are encouraged to            develop a sustained body of work. Prerequisites: Drawing I
explore inter-disciplinary approaches. Pre-requisites: 60130 and        (60150) and Drawing II (60151), or by instructor permission.
60230, or by instructor permission.
                                                                        60-451     Advanced PDP: Anatomy/Drawing
60-431      Advanced SIS: Installation                                  Intermittent: 10 units
Intermittent: 10 units                                                  60-451 Advanced PDP: Anatomy/Drawing. For thousands of
60-431 Installation Art (Michelle Illuminato) The Warhol will           years artists have seen the human body as an object of beauty,
celebrate its 10th year this February. They have invited 10             and as a powerful metaphor for documenting the passion and the
contemporary artists to create works that are inspired by               pathos of human experience. This course will focus on that
Warhol’s art, his artistic practice or his legacy in art and            complex and compelling subject. In class, students will work from
contemporary culture. They want to include emerging artists from        the model, studying the figure as a means to heighten sensitivity,
Warhol’s alma mater--Carnegie Mellon. Warhol's diverse                  expand visual perception, and refine drawing skills. An
practices are narrowed down to five areas: collecting,                  introduction to the landmarks of anatomical bone and muscle
collaborating, experimenting, reproducing, and documenting. This        structure will be included. Outside class, students will be
class will look at collecting from many angles: collecting              encouraged to seek meaning in the humanity of the figure as a
materials, collecting as a research method, collecting to               vessel for expression, be it personal, social, political, spiritual,
document time/memory, critiquing the collection, collection             narrative or emotional.
display, who collects, and using collection/collecting as the
content of the work. This class will have behind-the-scene              60-453     Advanced PDP: Painting
access to the installation of the fall Warhol show as well as to        Fall and Spring: 10 units
other resources of the museum. It will be a combination of              60-453 Advanced PDP: Painting. In this course you will be
learning about Warhol and other artists who use collecting/             encouraged to expand your skills and develop a personal vision,
collections as a means for gathering materials, research or             while maintaining a spirit of investigation into the developmental
content; and the creation of installation works that are inspired by    process, the magic, the illusion and the physical reality of
the student's interest in collecting or collections.                    painting. The professor will act as critic and advisor as students
                                                                        work independently developing self-generated ideas and setting
60-432      Advanced SIS: Site-Work                                     personal goals. We will meet as a class for group critiques,
Intermittent: 10 units                                                  discussions, presentations on the practical aspects of the
Studio focus on work designed for a specific site. Object work,         profession, and slide lectures on contemporary artists.
installations, and environmental work are included. Site analysis,      Prerequisite: 60-250, or by instructor permission.
environemental work, and social dimensions are addressed.
Prerequisite: 60130, or by instructor permission.                       60-455      Advanced PDP: Intaglio
                                                                        Intermittent: 10 units
60-433     Advanced SIS: Clay                                           60-455 Advanced PDP: Intaglio. Advanced intaglio studio
Intermittent: 10 units                                                  focuses on the development of additional techniques such as lift
60-433 Advanced SIS: Clay (Joe Mannino). Studio focus on                and soft grounds, photographic processes, color and multiple
ceramic materials and processes as applied to sculptural issues.        plate printing, and viscosity printing. Emphasis will be placed on
Fabrication, glazing, and kiln-firing are addressed. Material fee       artistic/image development in relationship to the print as a
required. Prerequisite 60-130, or by instructor permission.             democratic multiple. In addition cross disciplinary work will be
Prerequisites: 60130                                                    encouraged within other printmaking studios to expand the visual
                                                                        vocabulary and image development. Prerequisites: 60-251, or by
60-434    Advanced SIS: Foundry                                         instructor permission.
Intermittent: 10 units                                                  Prerequisites: 60251
60-434 Advanced SIS: Foundry (Ron Bennett). Studio focus on
metal casting processes. Objects are created in clay, wax, wood         60-456    Advanced PDP: Lithography
and plaster and cast into bronze or aluminum. Fabrication and           Intermittent: 10 units
welding techniques are presented. Materials fee required.               Studio focus on the processes and issues of lithographic
Prerequisites: 60-230, or by instructor permission.                     printmaking. Includes both traditional stone and aluminum plate
                                                                        processes along with photographic techniques.
60-435     SIS: Metals
Intermittent: 10 units                                                  60-457      Advanced PDP: Idea Generation
Studio focus on fabrication using light metalworking techniques         Intermittent: 10 units
including forming, joining, and finishing. Metalsmithing and jewelry    This course will support rapid development within each student's
techniques will be explored in the context of sculptural issues.        self-directed body of work. The course will facilitate the
Metal stretching, forging, brazing, texturing, small scale casting      development of that body of work by challenging it through a
and coloring are also presented. Slides looking at small scale          series of exercises designed to alter habits, question
metalwork, as well contemporary sculpture using metal                   assumptions, provoke material and procedural experimentation,
techniques will be presented periodically. Metals provided include      multiply avenues of approach, and expand on the conceptual
copper ,brass, and bronze sheet and wire. Materials fee will also       issues inherent in the work. Materials and content will be
cover silver solder and other expendables.                              determined by each student individually (primarily 2-D media but
                                                                        trans-media and crossover experiments will be encouraged).
60-437     Advanced SIS: Environmental Sculpture                        Sophomore status. Priority to Art students.
Intermittent: 10 units
Studio focus on sculpting within the environment. Includes object       60-458     Advanced PDP: Serigraphy
making, installations and site work with an emphasis on                 Intermittent: 10 units
ecological materials, environmental impact and related issues.          Advanced PDP: Serigraphy. Studio focus on processes and
Students required to explore and develop proposal-making skills         artmaking issues related to water-based/acrylic serigraphy.
in order to implement projects in public places. Both individual        Emphasis on individual conceptual/artistic development. Material
and collaborative projects are assigned.                                fee required.

60-438     Advanced SIS: Intimate Objects                               60-469      Advanced PDP: Special Topics
Intermittent: 10 units                                                  Fall and Spring: 10 units
60-438 Advanced SIS: Intimate Objects (Carol Kumata).                   >>>>SUMMER 2002<<<< Advanced PDP Special Topic: MEDIA
Explores the issues of small scale sculpture. This class will deal      OF DRAWING -- The aim of this course is to explore the
with the creation of objects that require a one-on-one interaction      definition of Drawing through experimentation with a wide variety
with the viewer. Unlike much heroically scaled sculpture, there is      of traditional and untraditional drawing media. We will examine a
a distinctly personal and intimate connection that these objects        variety of methodologies and approaches to drawing both
engender. The class will look at historical examples, as well as        historical and contemporary through slides, video, readings and
20th century works starting with the dada and surrealists.              field expeditions. Students will be inspired to invent, experiment
Problems of small scale sculpture will include topics such as the       and broaden their response to a large range of materials and
miniature versus actual size, the nature of materials, the issues       structures, identify resources and develop a sustained body of
of craftsmanship, the problem of preciousness. Sophomore                work. We will work in-class from the model and observable
status. Priority to Art majors.                                         sources as well as from conceptual frames which include: Time,
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions     367




Mapping, Collaboration and Systems. All levels of students are         speciation, and macroevolution; relationship of evolution and
welcome. There are no course pre-requisites. NOTE: This course         systematics; molecular approaches to the study of evolution and
will count as an Advanced PDP Studio for the Art Major (BFA,           the construction of phylogenies.
BHA, BSA). For the Art Minor, it will count as a Foundation or as      Prerequisites: 03121
an Advanced PDP Studio.
                                                                       03-130    Biology of Organisms
60-499     Studio Independent Study                                    Spring: 9 units
All Semesters: 10 units                                                This course will survey the major organ systems in higher
A tutorial studio in which an Art student works individually on a      animals and humans, with an emphasis on cellular physiology and
self-generated project under the supervision of a School of Art        biochemistry. Current ideas of research and scientific
faculty member. Prior to enrolling in Independent Study, the           controversy will also be presented. This course is intended to
student must complete an "Independent Study Proposal" form             broaden students' exposure to biological systems.
(available in the bins on the 3rd floor of CFA) which is signed by     Prerequisites: 03121
the faculty member and the Assistant Head of the School of Art.
Prerequisite: Art Junior/Senior status and permission of               03-201     Undergraduate Colloquim for Sophomores
instructor.                                                            Fall: 1-3 units
                                                                       The purpose of this seminar series is to update biology
60-590     Internship                                                  undergraduates about university and departmental functions,
Fall and Spring: 1-9 units                                             seminars, etc. that are pertinent or useful. In addition, research
Art Internships are open to all BFA, BHA and BSA Art students.         talks by faculty and undergraduates will be used to introduce
Internships may take place with appropriate individuals or             students to the research being conducted in faculty laboratories.
organizations within or outside of Carnegie Mellone University.        Additional topics may include graduate and medical school
The requirements for an internship are in the School of Art            applications, career options, topics in the press, and important
"Undergraduate Handbook" (available at the School of Art               scientific discoveries.
website). Prior to being enrolled for an internship, students must
complete an Internship Proposal Form, which defines the goals of       03-202     Undergraduate Colloquium for Sophomores
the internship. This form must be signed by their site supervisor      Spring:   1-3 units
and approved by the Assistant Head of the School of Art. Forms
are available in the bins on the 3rd floor of CFA. Junior and Senior   03-210     Independent Study
Art majors only.                                                       Fall and Spring: Mini Session - 6 units
                                                                       Students will read papers from the original literature under the
                                                                       direction of a faculty member. Students will be required to
Biological     Sciences                                                demonstrate mastery of the readings by discussions with the
                                                                       sponsoring faculty member, oral presentations, or writing of one or
03-050    Study Abroad                                                 more papers summarizing and extending the information in the
Fall: 0 units                                                          readings. If appropriate, students may write a program(s) to
                                                                       satisfy this last requirement. A student may take this course only
03-051   Study Abroad                                                  once. Special permission required.
Spring: 0 units
                                                                       03-231     Biochemistry I
03-101    Biological Sciences First Year Seminars                      Fall: 9 units
Fall and Spring: Mini Session - 3 units                                This course provides an introduction to molecules and processes
Various seminars are offered that introduce first-year students to     found in living systems. Amino acids, sugars, lipids and
current topics of modern biology. These are mini courses that          nucleotides and their corresponding higher structures, the
meet for half a semester. Topics have included: Proteins in            proteins, polysaccharides, membranes and nucleic acids are
Disease, Genes and Diseases, Pills and Poisons, Curing Cancer,         studied. Kinetics and mechanisms of enzymes as well as
Organ Transplantation & Blood Substitutes, and Prions-Mad              elementary metabolic cycles and the enrgetics of biological
Cows and Englishman. Courses restricted to first year students in      systems are discussed.
the Mellon College of Science.                                         Prerequisites: 03121      Corequisites: 09-217
03-121     Modern Biology                                              03-232     Biochemistry I
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               Spring: 9 units
This is an introductory course that provides the basis for further     This course provides an introduction to the application of
studies in biochemistry, cell biology, genetics and molecular          biochemistry to biotechnology. The functional properties of amino
biology. This course emphasizes the chemical principles                acids, nucleotides, lipids, and sugars are presented. This is
underlying biological processes and cell structures as well as the     followed by a discussion of the structural and thermodynamic
analysis of genetics and heredity from a molecular perspective.        aspects of the organization of these molecules into higher-order
This is the introductory biology course for all science and non-       structures, such as proteins, nucleic acids, and membranes. The
science majors.                                                        kinetics and thermodynamics of protein-ligand interactions are
                                                                       discussed for non-cooperative, cooperative, and allosteric
03-122      Organismic Botany                                          binding events. The use of mechanistic and kinetic information in
Spring: 9 units                                                        enzyme characterization and drug discovery are discussed.
This course provides an integrated overview of botany at the level     Topics pertinent to biotechnology include: antibody production
of organism and above, including historical perspectives. It           and use, energy production in biochemical systems, expression of
provides an introduction to the subdisciplines of systematics,         recombinant proteins, and methods of protein purification and
evolution, plant geography, and ecology, and surveys the               characterization. The course is an alternate to 03-231.
anatomical, morphological, developmental, and environmental            Prerequisites: 09217        Corequisites: 09-106, 06-221
diversification of major groups within the plant kingdom.
Prerequisites: 03121                                                   03-240     Cell Biology
                                                                       Spring: 9 units
03-124    Modern Biology Laboratory                                    This course provides descriptive information and mechanistic
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               detail concerning key cellular processes in six areas: membrane
This laboratory is designed to introduce students to modern            function, protein targeting, signaling, cytoskeleton, cell division,
concepts in the biological sciences. The experiments illustrate        and cell interaction. An attempt is made to introduce the
many of the principles covered in 03-121 and 03-130.                   methodology that was used to obtain this information and to
Experimentation using living organisms and/or their tissues, cells     discuss how our understanding of these processes relates to the
or molecules is an essential component of this course. Special         treatment of human disease.
permission required.                                                   Prerequisites: 03121 and (03231 or 03232)
Corequisites: 03-121
                                                                       03-301    Undergraduate Colloquium for Juniors
03-125    Evolution and History of Life                                Fall: 1-3 units
Intermittent: 9 units
This course surveys the pattern and process of biological              03-302     Undergraduate Colloquium for Juniors
evolution. Major topics include: historical recognition of             Spring:   1-3 units
evolutionary pattern (biological diversity in geological time);
foundation theory of evolutionary process; relationships of the        03-310     Introduction to Computational Biology
major domains/kingdoms of life; early Earth and prebiotic              Spring: 9 units
evolution; origin of nucleic acids and self-replication; origin of     This course covers the application of computers to solve
prokaryotes; endosymbiosis and origin of the eukaryotic cell;          problems in biology and medicine. Since computers are
origin and evolution of protoctistans, fungi, plants, and animals;     increasingly used in biological research, the course is valuable
modern theory of evolutionary process, including microevolution,
3 6 8 Course Descriptions




for all biological sciences majors and interested students from      03-345     Experimental Cell and Developmental Biology
other departments. It is intended for students without computer      Spring: 12 units
programming experience (students with a desire to apply              This laboratory is designed to teach concepts and experimental
programming methods to these problems should take the more           methods in cell and developmental biology. Students work with a
advanced course 03-510, Computational Biology). Topics               variety of organisms to examine how cells traverse development
covered are computational molecular biology (analysis of protein     from rapidly dividing, undifferentiated cells, through cell
and nucleic acid sequences), biological modeling and simulation      commitment and the establishment of spatial and temporal
(including computer models of neuron behavior, biochemical           patterns of gene expression, to the specific characteristics and
kinetics, and simulation of mutation), and biological imaging.       responses of terminally differentiated cells. The course makes
Course work consists primarily of homework assignments making        extensive use of video microscopy with phase contrast, DIC and
use of software packages for these applications. Students may        fluorescence microscopes. Biochemical, immunological and
only use one of the following for credit, 03-310, 03-311, 03-510     molecular biological techniques are used to probe the molecules
or 03-710.                                                           and processes of cells undergoing development. Experimentation
Prerequisites: (21118 or 21112) AND 03121 AND (99101 or              using living organisms and/or their tissues, cells or molecules is
99102 or 99103)                                                      an essential component of this course.
                                                                     Prerequisites: (03231 or 03232) and 03240 and 03330 and
03-311      Introduction to Computational Molecular Biology          03343
Spring: Mini Session - 6 units
This course presents both the theoretical underpinnings of           03-350      Developmental Biology
computational methods used in modern molecular biology and           Fall: 9 units
practical training in use of these methods. It is intended for       Developmental biology is the study of how organisms arise from a
students without computer programming experience. Topics             single cell - the fertilized egg. The molecular pathways that
included are accessing Internet molecular biology resources,         control development also underlie many human diseases.
restriction enzyme analysis, finding protein coding regions (open    Developmental biology encompasses stem cell biology, cell-cell
reading frames), sequence alignment, homology searching, finding     signaling, regulation of gene expression, gene networks,
sequence features (e.g., promoters), and elementary protein          morphogenesis, and cell/tissue differentiation. This course
structure prediction. Course work consists primarily of homework     serves as an introduction to the major concepts, experimental
assignments making use of software packages for these                methodologies, research questions, and model organisms in
applications. Students may only use one of the following for         developmental biology.
credit, 03-310, 03-311, 03-510 or 03-710.                            Prerequisites: 03240
Prerequisites: 03121 and (99101 or 99102 or 99103)
                                                                     03-360    The Biology of the Brain
03-315     Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Neuroscience                Fall: 9 units
Spring: 9 units                                                      The goal of modern neuroscience is to understand the function of
The course is designed to introduce students to the fundamental      the central nervous system using a wide variety of techniques
principles of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its               and levels of analysis. This integrative field is actively engaged in
application in neuroscience. MRI is emerging as the preeminent       addressing questions ranging from the genetics and cell biology
method to obtain structural and functional information about the     of neurons to the perception and behavior of organisms. Topics
living human brain. This methodology has helped to revolutionize     covered in this course will include the evolution, development and
neuroscience and the study of human cognition. The specific          anatomy of the nervous system, the electrophysiology and cell
topics covered in this course will include: introduction to spin     biology of neurons, the function and plasticity of sensory and
gymnastics, survey of imaging methods, structural brain mapping,     motor systems and the neurobiology of brain disorders. This
functional MRI (fMRI), and MR spectroscopy (MRS).                    course will emphasize unanswered questions in neuroscience and
Approximately, one third of the course will be devoted to            focus on current experimental attempts to answer them.
introductory concepts of magnetic resonance, another third to the    Prerequisites: 03121
discussion of MRI methods, and the remaining third will cover a
broad range of neuroscience applications. Guest lectures will be     03-380     Virology
incorporated into the course from neuroscientists and                Fall: 9 units
psychologists who use MRI in their own research.                     The concepts and methods of virology are covered, with
Prerequisites: 03121 AND (21117 or 21121 or 21122)                   emphasis on animal viruses, within the broad framework of cell
                                                                     biology, genetics, molecular biology, immunology, pathology, and
03-330     Genetics                                                  epidemiology. The strategies that a variety of different DNA and
Fall: 9 units                                                        RNA viruses, including some new and emerging ones, use to
The mechanisms of transmission of inherited traits in viruses,       replicate and express their genomes during infection of host cells
bacteria, fungi, plants and animals are discussed. Molecular         will be examined. The effects that viruses inflict on these cells
mechanisms of gene expression and gene regulation are                will also be examined, as will some of the host and host cell
analyzed. Selected methods in molecular biology and their            responses generated by such virus-cell interactions, including
applications in genetic analysis, biotechnology, forensics,          interferon induction and oncogenic transformation. In addition, a
agriculture and medicine are presented. The coding capacity,         brief overview of procedures used for prevention and treatment of
genes and genomes of diverse organisms for which total DNA           viral diseases via vaccines and antiviral drugs, respectively, will
sequence information is available are discussed. Special topics in   be presented.
human genetics are considered, including the genetics of cancer.     Prerequisites: 03240       Corequisites: 03-330
Fundamental concepts in population genetics and evolution are
introduced.                                                          03-390     Molecular and Cellular Immunology
Prerequisites: 03231 or 03232                                        Spring: 9 units
                                                                     This course offers the student a comprehensive view of modern
03-343     Experimental Techniques in Molecular Biology              immunology at the molecular and cellular level. The first half of
Fall: 12 units                                                       the course presents the fundamentals of immunology, beginning
This laboratory course is designed to teach experimental             with innate immunity and followed by acquired immunity. Both the
methods of modern biology. Experiments in microbial genetics,        structure and function of important molecules in the immune
molecular biology and eukaryotic genetics are performed.             system, such as antibodies, major histocompatibility antigens,
Emphasis is placed on understanding and applying the biological      relevant receptors, complement, and cytokines are discussed.
principles of each experiment. This course is designed to be         Exploration of the development and function of both the humoral
taken during the junior year and is intended to prepare students     and the cellular immune responses conclude this portion of the
for undergraduate research. Experimentation using living             course. The second half of the course focuses on applied
organisms and/or their tissues, cells or molecules is an essential   immunology: hypersensitivity, autoimmunity, immunodeficiencies,
component of this course.                                            cancer immunology, infectious disease, vaccines, and
Prerequisites: (03231 or 03232) and 09222         Corequisites:      transplantation immunology. Student presentations at the end of
03-330                                                               the course facilitate exploration of additional topics in
                                                                     contemporary immunology.
03-344     Experimental Biochemistry                                 Prerequisites: (03231 or 03232) and 03240
Spring: 12 units
This course is designed to be taken as a sequel to 03-343.           03-401    Undergraduate Colloquium for Seniors
Experiments cover a variety of methods for investigating the         Fall: 1-3 units
structure and function of biological molecules. Experimental
methods with proteins, enzyme kinetics, lipids, spectroscopy, and    03-402     Undergraduate Colloquium for Seniors
isolation and quantization of biological molecules are covered.      Spring:   1-3 units
During several experiments, students design their own projects.
Experimentation using living organisms and/or their tissues, cells   03-410    Independent Study Biological Study
or molecules is an essential component of this course.               Fall and Spring: 3-9 units
Prerequisites: (03231 or 03232) and 03343
                                                                                                            Course Descriptions      369




03-411    Topics in Research                                         of scientific papers, and programming assignments. Students
Fall and Spring: 1-2 units                                           may only use one of the following for credit, 03-310, 03-311, 03-
During the year students attend and submit brief summaries of        510 or 03-710.
weekly seminars given by outside speakers or members of the          Prerequisites: 03121 AND (15200 or 15211)
Biology Department on current research topics in modern biology;
some seminars outside of the department may be substituted.          03-511     Computational Molecular Biology and Genomics
                                                                     Fall: 9 units
03-412    Topics in Research                                         An advanced introduction to computational molecular biology,
Spring: 1-2 units                                                    using an applied algorithms approach. The first part of the course
During the year students attend and submit brief summaries of        will cover established algorithmic methods, including pairwise
weekly seminars given by outside speakers or members of the          sequence alignment and dynamic programming, multiple
Biology Department on current research topics in modern biology.     sequence alignment, fast database search heuristics, hidden
Some seminars outside of the department may be substituted.          Markov models for molecular motifs and phylogeny
                                                                     reconstruction. The second part of the course will explore
03-439     Introduction to Biophysics                                emerging computational problems driven by the newest genomic
Fall: 9 units                                                        research. Course work includes four to six problem sets, one
This course develops the physical concepts that apply to the         midterm and final exam.
understanding of biological systems. The forces that play roles in   Prerequisites: (15211 and 03510) OR 15451
biological systems are discussed and the role of thermal energy
is especially emphasized. Topics discussed include protein           03-512     Computational Methods for Biological Modeling and
structure, helix-coil transitions, double layer potentials,          Simulation
membrane structure and transport, Nernst-Planck equations and        Spring: 9 units
electrochemical potential, molecular motors, and action              This course covers a variety of computational methods important
potentials and voltage sensitive channels. The capstone of the       for modeling and simulation of biological systems. It is intended
course is the study of the potassium channel in axons. The           for graduates and advanced undergraduates with either biological
treatment of biophysical phenomena and methods is based on           or computational backgrounds who are interested in developing
physical principles, which will be treated with appropriate          computer models and simulations of biological systems. The
mathematics when necessary.                                          course will emphasize practical algorithms and algorithm design
Prerequisites: 03121 and 09105 and 33111 and 33112                   methods drawn from various disciplines of computer science and
                                                                     applied mathematics that are useful in biological applications.
03-441     The Molecular Biology of Prokaryotes                      The general topics covered will be models for optimization
Spring: 9 units                                                      problems, simulation and sampling, and parameter tuning. Course
The course covers an introduction to the basic molecular             work will include problems sets with significant programming
techniques used in modern biology research. These are                components and independent or group final projects.
discussed against a background of the molecular and genetic          Prerequisites: 03510
analysis of prokaryotic microorganisms with particular attention
to certain selected topics. Among the topics covered are: the        03-513     Bioinformatics Data Integration Practicum
transcriptional and translational regulation of gene expression at   Spring: Mini Session - 6 units
the molecular level in Escherichia coli, the use of prokaryotic      This course will provide a practical experience in integration of
replicons in molecular cloning, and the principles of self-          bioinformatics data of diverse types in collaboration with a
assembly and catalyzed assembly of virus particles.                  pharmaceutical company or biotechnology company. At the
Prerequisites: (03231 or 03232) AND 03330                            beginning of the semester, students will be presented with a
                                                                     description of the problem and data sets. During the semester
03-442     Molecular Biology                                         students will work as part of independent teams to design,
Fall: 9 units                                                        implement and evaluate an appropriate data integration system
The structure and expression of eukaryotic genes are discussed,      (with the opportunity for interaction with the company developers
focusing on model systems from a variety of organisms including      for advice and feedback). The course grade will be based on an
yeast,flies, worms mice,humans,and plants. Topics discussed          oral presentation of the developed software system and a written
include (1)genomics,proteomics, and functional proteomics, (2)       report describing its development and evaluation. Selected
control of gene expression at the level of transcription of mRNA     students will have the opportunity to present their work to the
from DNA,splicing of pre-mRNA,export of spliced mRNA from the        company.
nucleus to the cytoplasm, and translation of mRNA, and               Prerequisites: (03310 or 03311 or 03510) AND 15211
(3)chromosome structure, including origins of replication,
centromeres, telomeres, transposons, and regulated                   03-534     Biological Imaging and Fluorescence Spectroscopy
chromosomal rearrangements.                                          Fall: 9 units
Prerequisites:                                                       This course covers principles and applications of optical methods
                                                                     in the study of structure and function in biological systems.
03-445     Undergraduate Research                                    Topics to be covered include: absorption and fluorescence
Fall and Spring: 1-18 units                                          spectroscopy; interaction of light with biological molecules, cells,
Students may investigate research problems under the                 and systems; design of fluorescent probes and optical biosensor
supervision of members of the faculty. Permission of a faculty       molecules; genetically expressible optical probes;
advisor required.                                                    photochemistry; optics and image formation; transmitted-light
                                                                     and fluorescence microscope systems; laser-based systems;
03-450      Cellular and Genetic Mechanisms of Development           scanning microscopes; electronic detectors and cameras: image
Spring: 9 units                                                      processing; multi-mode imaging systems; microscopy of living
The development of a single fertilized egg into a complex multi-     cells; and the optical detection of membrane potential, molecular
cellular organism is an amazing biological phenomenon that we        assembly, transcription, enzyme activity, and the action of
are only beginning to understand. This course will explore our       molecular motors. This course is particularly aimed at students in
current understanding of the cellular and genetic mechanism that     science and engineering interested in gaining in-depth knowledge
underlie this fundamental process. Focus will be on experimental     of modern light microscopy.
approaches taken in model systems (C. elegans, Drosophila,           Prerequisites: (03231 or 03232) and 03240 and 09218 and
mouse, etc.) to unravel the mysteries of development. Topics to      (09144 or 09214)
be covered will include, but not limited to, aspect of signal
transduction pathway and their consequences, cell cycle              03-545     Honors Research
regulation, and molecular control of differential gene expression    Fall and Spring: 1-9 units
as they relate to developmental processes using examples form        This semester of research consists primarily of research and
the primary literature. The course will be lecture based and         preparation of an acceptable written thesis. Oral presentation and
include student presentations of current topics from the             defense of the thesis research will be required. This course
literature.                                                          ordinarily will be taken in the second semester of the senior year.
Prerequisites: 03330 and 03350                                       Permission of the research advisor required.
                                                                     Prerequisites: 03330
03-510    Computational Biology
Spring: 12 units                                                     03-620      Techniques in Electron Microscopy
This course covers a range of applications of computers to solve     Spring: 9 units
problems in biology and medicine. Specific topics covered are        This course is designed to teach basic methods in transmission
computational molecular biology (analysis of protein and nucleic     electron microscopy to graduate and undergraduate students.
acid sequences), biological modeling and simulation (including       Sophomores with an interest in electron microscopy are
computer models of neuron behavior, biochemical kinetics, and        encouraged to enroll, and will have the option and opportunity to
simulation of mutation), and biological imaging. Course work will    utilize their skills in various laboratories during their junior or
include use of software packages for these applications, reading     senior year. The course will be offered once each year, during the
                                                                     spring semester. Course enrollment will be limited to 4-6
3 7 0 Course Descriptions




students. Preferen-tial enrollment will be given to graduate         03-730     Advanced Genetics
students and undergraduate students who have demonstrated a          Spring: 12 units
need for this technique in their research. The class will include    This course considers selected current topics in genetics at an
one hour of lecture and 4 hours of laboratory each week (some        advanced level. The emphasis is on classroom discussion of
additional laboratory time outside of the scheduled laboratory       research papers, supplemented with individual and group
time is required). Students will learn basic methods in specimen     exercises. Topics change yearly. Recent topics have included
preparation for both transmission and scanning electron              genome imprinting in mammals, chromatin boundaries and long
microscopy (fixation, embedding and ultramicrotomy, drying and       distance gene regulation, learning and memory in Drosophila,and
metal coating) and will be trained in the operation of both the      the kinetochore complex in yeast. Must obtain a minimum grade
Hitachi 7100 and 2460N electron microscopes. Lectures and            of B in 03-330 to take this course.
laboratories during the last few weeks of the semester will          Prerequisites: 03330 and 03441 AND (03442 or 03742)
introduce the students to special techniques (e.g.
immunoelectron microscopy , cryoultramicrotomy, freeze               03-738     Physical Biochemistry
substitution, variable pressure SEM, etc.) and will allow them to    Fall: 12 units
work with samples from their own research. Experimentation using     The physical properties of biological macromolecules and the
living organisms and/or their tissues, cells or molecules is an      methods used to analyze their structure and function are
essential component of this course.                                  discussed. Topics covered include: protein architecture, folding
                                                                     and molecular evolution; nucleic acid structure; introduction to
03-700     MS Thesis Research                                        structure determination by X-ray crystallography and NMR;
All Semesters: 3-36 units                                            biological spectroscopy with emphasis on the biological
An independent investigation on a project selected from a major      applications of absorption, fluorescence, NMR, and CD
area of research study with the advice and approval of the faculty   spectroscopies; the kinetics and thermodynamics of protein-
advisor. Required of students enrolled in the Master of Science      ligand interactions; enzyme catalysis; the use of hydrodynamics,
program.                                                             chromatography and electrophoresis in the characterization of
                                                                     biological macromolecules; and analysis of biological molecules
03-710      Computational Biology                                    at the single molecule level. One weekly session will be devoted
Spring: 12 units                                                     to the detailed analysis of related research publications.
This course covers a range of applications of computers to solve     Prerequisites: (03231 or 03232) and (09214 or 09345)
problems in biology and medicine. Specific topics covered are
computational molecular biology (analysis of protein and nucleic     03-740     Advanced Biochemistry
acid sequences), biological modeling and simulation (including       Spring: 12 units
computer models of neuron behavior, biochemical kinetics, and        This is a special topics course in which selected topics in
simulation of mutation), and biological imaging. Course work will    biochemistry will be analyzed in depth with emphasis on class
include use of software packages for these applications, reading     discussion of papers from the recent research literature. Topics
of scientific papers, and programming assignments. Students          change yearly. Recent topics have included single molecule
may only use one of the following for credit, 03-310, 03-311, 03-    analysis of catalysis and conformational changes; intrinsically
510 or 03-710.                                                       disordered proteins; cooperative interactions of aspartate
Prerequisites: 03121 and (15200 or 15211)                            transcarbamoylase; and the mechanism of ribosomal protein
                                                                     synthesis.
03-711     Computational Molecular Biology and Genomics              Prerequisites: 03438 or 03738
Fall: 12 units
An advanced introduction to computational molecular biology,         03-741     Advanced Cell Biology
using an applied algorithms approach. The first part of the course   Spring: 12 units
will cover established algorithmic methods, including pairwise       This course covers fourteen topics in which significant recent
sequence alignment and dynamic programming, multiple                 advances or controversies have been reported. For each topic
sequence alignment, fast database search heuristics, hidden          there is a background lecture by the instructor, student
Markov models for molecular motifs and phylogeny                     presentations of the relevant primary research articles and a
reconstruction. The second part of the course will explore           general class discussion. Example topics are: extracellular
emerging computational problems driven by the newest genomic         matrix control of normal and cancer cell cycles, force generating
research. Course work includes four to six problem sets, one         mechanisms in trans-membrane protein translocation, signal
midterm and final exam. A project based on recent results from       transduction control of cell motility, and a molecular mechanism
the genomics literature will be required of students taking 03-      for membrane fusion.
711.                                                                 Prerequisites: (03231 or 03232) and 03240
Prerequisites: (15211 and 03510) OR 15451
                                                                     03-742     Molecular Biology
03-712     Computational Methods for Biological Modeling and         Fall: 12 units
Simulation                                                           This course is an advanced section of 03-442. In addition to the
Spring: 12 units                                                     three lectures per week for 03-442, students attend a fourth
This course covers a variety of computational methods important      class, time TBD by the class each year. Each week we will
for modeling and simulation of biological systems. It is intended    discuss a paper from the literature, which complements and
for graduates and advanced undergraduates with either biological     extends the lecture material. We will learn and practice how to
or computational backgrounds who are interested in developing        read and critically evaluate papers efficiently and productively.
computer models and simulations of biological systems. The           Papers will include classics as well as brand new material,e.g.,
course will emphasize practical algorithms and algorithm design      research just published the week of class.
methods drawn from various disciplines of computer science and       Prerequisites: 03441
applied mathematics that are useful in biological applications.
The general topics covered will be models for optimization           03-744      Membrane Trafficking
problems, simulation and sampling, and parameter tuning. Course      Spring: 9 units
work will include problems sets with significant programming         While the focus of this course is to analyze membrane/protein
components and independent or group final projects.                  traffic along both the biosynthetic and endocyctic pathways, our
Prerequisites: 03510                                                 general goal is to teach students how to read and interpret the
                                                                     literature. In particular, we emphasize the conclusions and
03-713     Bioinformatics Data Integration Practicum                 discuss their validity. The course is updated each year to include
Spring: Mini Session - 6 units                                       topics in which new and interesting developments have occurred.
This course will provide a practical experience in integration of    Emphasis is placed on how membrane traffic is regulater and
bioinformatics data of diverse types in collaboration with a         where applicable how it is disrupted or subverted during disease
pharmaceutical company or biotechnology company. At the              processes. The course is of general interest to students, fellows,
beginning of the semester, students will be presented with a         and faculty interested in cell biology, immunology, neurobiology,
description of the problem and data sets. During the semester        pharmacology, and virology.
students will work as part of independent teams to design,           Prerequisites: 03240
implement and evaluate an appropriate data integration system
(with the opportunity for interaction with the company developers    03-751    Advanced Developmental Biology
for advice and feedback). The course grade will be based on an       Fall: 12 units
oral presentation of the developed software system and a written     This course examines current topics in developmental biology at
report describing its development and evaluation. Selected           an advanced level. The course is team-taught by faculty from
students will have the opportunity to present their work to the      Carnegie Mellon University, the University of Pittsburgh
company.                                                             Department of Biological Sciences, and the University of
Prerequisites: (03310 or 03311 or 03510) AND 15211                   Pittsburgh Medical School. Each year several areas of current
                                                                     research are examined. Previous topics have included pattern
                                                                     formation, molecular signaling pathways, morphogen gradients,
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions      371




cell movements, and stem cells. Emphasis is on critical reading         70-194    Publishing Management in the Information Age
of original research papers and classroom discussion, with              Spring: 9 units
supporting lectures by faculty.                                         The digital era is transforming the publishing industry. This
Prerequisites: 03350                                                    course addresses the opportunities brought about by digital
                                                                        technologies on both print and electronic publishing. The course
03-761      Neural Plasticity in Sensory and Motor Systems              focuses on the management of intellectual property, publishing
Spring: 9 units                                                         process, career opportunities, and publishing e-commerce.
Neural plasticity underlies the capacity of the central nervous         Lectures, guest speakers, field trips, and student business
system to encode new information, develop new abilities and             simulations help to integrate learning. Although the book
adapt to the environment. Plasticity is required for learning and is    publishing model is the focal point, this course presents
modulated during development and by disorders of the brain.             management principles that are applicable to all graphic media.
Recent advances in experimental methodology have led to new
insights on the biological mechanisms underlying neural                 70-201      Professional and Service Projects
plasticity. The topics if the papers chosen for review will center on   All Semesters: 9 units
recent experimental and theoretical studies of topics such as           This course consists of career-related and community service
synaptic plasticity, developmental and activity-dependent               activities in which the student participates over a period as long
changes in sensory and motor maps.                                      as four semesters. The student chooses activities posted on the
Prerequisites: 03360                                                    BA web site, each of which is assigned a certain number of points.
                                                                        A minimum number of points must be accumulated in order to
03-871      Structural Biophysics                                       pass the course, and the course grade depends on the number of
Fall: 12 units                                                          points accumulated above the minimum. Students may propose
This is an intermediate level course directed at providing a            projects or activities that are not posted. Students should not
comprehensive survey of the major biophysical techniques used           register for the course until the semester during which they
for characterizing the structure and dynamics of biological             expect to complete their activities. The course is open to all
macromolecules. Topics include optical spectroscopy,                    students.
fluorescence spectroscopy, Electron spin resonance, Nuclear
magnetic resonance, and X-ray diffraction. Sufficient theoretical       70-207    Probability and Statistics for Business Applications
information is provided such that the student will be able to           Fall: 9 units
critically read the current literature. Applications of these           Elementary ideas in probability, statistics and data analysis
techniques in the current literature are discussed in class.            presented in the context of their importance to modern business
                                                                        management.
Business      Administration                                            Prerequisites: 21120 or 21121
70-100     Introduction to Business                                     70-208     Regression Analysis
Fall: 9 units                                                           Spring: 9 units
This course provides an overview of the functional areas of             The theory and applications of multivariate regression and time
business and how they contribute to the management of a firm. It        series analysis, with particular emphasis on business
places business within the broader context of business history,         applications.
business ethics, and the role of business in various world              Prerequisites: (21121 or 21116 or 21112) and (36202 or
cultures. For first-year business majors only. Students may not         70207 or 36310 or 36220 or 36247) and (73100 or 73110)
receive credit for both 70-100 and 70-101.
                                                                        70-311    Organizational Behavior
70-101     Introduction to Business Management                          Fall and Spring: 9 units
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                This course examines the factors, which influence individual,
Through case studies and analyses of documents such as annual           group, and firm behavior in the context of the work place. Topics
reports, students gain an understanding of the business functions       covered include perception, group behavior, decision-making,
and of how business decisions are made. Functional areas                motivation, leadership, and organizational design and change.
examined include finance, marketing, accounting, organizational         Prerequisites: 76101
behavior and business strategy. BA majors may not take this
course without special permission. Students may not receive             70-332      Business, Society and Ethics
credit for both 70-100 and 70-101.                                      Fall and Spring: 9 units
                                                                        The course examines the political, social and legal environment
70-122     Introduction to Accounting                                   of the firm, within and outside the United States. Topics include
All Semesters: 9 units                                                  restrictive trade practices, laws and directors’ responsibilities
This course provides the knowledge and skills necessary for the         and liabilities, manufacturers’ responsibilities and liabilities,
student to understand financial statements and financial records        securities regulation, environmental protection, intellectual
and make use of the information for management and investment           property, labor unions, trade associations, employee rights and
decisions. Topics include an overview of financial statements and       duties, the attorney-client relationship, advertising and the
business decisions; the balance sheet, the income statement,            media, the role of regulatory agencies, multinational operations,
and the cash flow statement; sales revenue, receivables, and            basic ethical theories (Utilitarian, Kantian, Aristotelian), dealing
cash; cost of goods sold and inventory; long-lived assets and           with bribery and corruption, values in a business society, societal
depreciation, and amortization; current and long-term liabilities;      implications of business policies and corporate social
owners? equity; investments in other corporations; an                   responsibility.
introduction to financial statement analysis; and international         Prerequisites: 76101
issues dealing with financial statements.
                                                                        70-340     Business Communications
70-160     Graphic Media Processes                                      Fall and Spring: 9 units
Fall: 9 units                                                           Business Communications develops and sharpens your written,
This course provides a foundation for the study of graphic media        oral, and interpersonal communication, introducing you to
by investigating the processes and materials used in the                common forms of professional writing and speaking in specific
production of graphic media. Topics of investigation include:           business situations. The course explores crucial rhetorical
graphic media options, typography, photography, color                   issues that impact your ability to communicate and achieve your
reproduction, papermaking, ink systems, finishing techniques,           objectives as a business leader.
document security, digital printing, and electronic publishing.         Prerequisites: 76100 or 76101 or 76104 or 82085
70-161     Graphic Media Technologies                                   70-341      Organizational Communication
Spring: 9 units                                                         Fall: 9 units
. This course provides an in-depth review of the various                Much of the work in groups and organizations consists of
technologies used in the production of graphic media. Beginning         communication. You communicate to get information that will be
with a historical review of printing technologies, the course           the basis of decisions, to provide a vision for the people who work
examines the processes used for various graphic products. In            for and with you, to coordinate activity, and to sell yourself and
addition to the traditional printing technologies, emerging graphic     your work. The goal of this course is to identify sources of
technologies are examined. The course also examines the origins         communication problems within an organization and ways to
of photography, cinema, video, and the Internet and their               overcome them. To do this requires that we know how
applications in multi-media graphics today. (Prerequisite 70-           communication normally works, what parts are difficult, and how
160)                                                                    to fix it when it goes wrong. The focus of this course is on
Prerequisites:                                                          providing you with a broad understanding of the way
                                                                        communication operates within dyads, work groups, and
                                                                        organizations. This course is not a practicum in public speaking
                                                                        or writing, although you will get some experience writing, speaking
                                                                        and managing impressions. Rather the intent is to give you
3 7 2 Course Descriptions




theoretical and empirical underpinnings for the communication            70-365     International Trade and International Law
you will undoubtedly do when you return to work. Readings come           Fall: 9 units
from both the research and the managerial literatures. Among the         The course discusses the international legal system and laws
topics considered are managerial communication, persuasion and           that affect international trade. It covers the Foreign Corrupt
conformity, self presentation and person perception, social              Practices Act, treaties and concessions, shipping and customs,
networks. Cases and group projects give you an opportunity to            appointment of foreign sales agents, resolution of trade disputes,
apply what you've learned.                                               international mergers and joint ventures, international
Prerequisites: 36201 or 36207 or 36217 or 36220 or 36225 or              competition law, UN sales convention, international trade
36247 or 70207                                                           organizations (IMF, WTO, World Bank, etc.) , risk insurance,
                                                                         cultural factors, international E-Commerce and intellectual
70-342     Managing Across Cultures                                      property.
Spring: 9 units                                                          Prerequisites: 73100 or 73110
This course is designed for students who expect to do business in
other countries or work with people from other cultures. It              70-366    Intellectual Property and E-Commerce
provides an intellectual framework for understanding other               Spring: Mini Session - 6 units
cultures (and eventually one’s own), as well as detailed studies of      This course covers the basics of doing business on the internet
particular countries. It discusses how culture defines                   with emphasis on E-Commerce issues such as intellectual
organizations, contracts, personal relationships, attitudes toward       property, cybersquatting and commercial transactions.
authority, time and space, ethics, wealth, and subcultures, and
how these affect business. Student teams study a culture of their        70-371     Production/Operations Management
choice and make presentations, based on interviews and                   Fall and Spring: 9 units
literature research.                                                     This course is an introduction to production and operations
Prerequisites: 76101                                                     management that covers both manufacturing and services. It
                                                                         deals with strategic issues (design of flexible supply), planning
70-343     Interpersonal Communication                                   issues (capacity management), and operational issues (inventory
Spring: 9 units                                                          management). The linkage between strategy and tactics will be
This course examines various types of interpersonal                      emphasized. The students will learn concepts and tools that shall
communication usually found in business situations. Topics               help them to manage from the "boardroom" to the "toolroom".
covered will vary each semester, but can include business                Prerequisites: (21257 or 21292) and (70207 or 36202 or
etiquette, ethics in business, interviewing skills, leadership skills,   36310 or 36220 or 36247)
listening skills, how to run a successful meeting, intercultural
communications, motivating employees, negotiating, networking            70-381     Marketing I
in business, non-verbal communications, performance appraisals,          Fall and Spring: 9 units
power communication, telephone skills, and team/small group              An introduction to the nature and fundamentals of marketing.
communication. Co-curricular events will be required and may             Topics include an analysis of the factors influencing buyer
include conducting mock interviews, role playing business                behavior, marketing research, market segmentation, development
luncheons, and navigating business social events.                        of marketing strategies (new product, price, advertising and
Prerequisites: 70340                                                     distribution decisions), and international marketing.
                                                                         Prerequisites: 76101
70-345     Oral Communications
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                 70-391     Finance
In this course, students prepare, present, discuss, and critique         Fall and Spring: 9 units
the different oral presentations currently practiced in business.        The course examines the role of the financial manager in the
Topics include developing verbal and physical presence; planning         overall management and control of a firm. Stress is placed on the
presentations based on audience needs and expectations;                  use of analytical models for improving the decision-making
projecting personal credibility, professionalism, and appropriate        process. Both the short-term management of working capital and
emotional responses; and using various multi-media technology.           the long-term planning of capital structure and investment
Assignments and cases will cover informative and persuasive              strategy are covered.
presentations, which will vary from term to term and may include         Prerequisites: (70207 and 21257 and 70122) or (70207 and
talks such as formal public introductions; explanations of policy        21292 and 70122)
and/or procedures; employee training sessions; state-of-the-
company addresses; sales presentations; team-driven strategic            70-392     Financial Economics
plans; public interviews with a hostile press; and talks on other        Spring: 9 units
more free-ranging topics.                                                A rigorous quantitative course covering the economic
Prerequisites: 70340 or 73270                                            fundamentals of financial markets. The course covers individual
                                                                         decision making about saving and investment under uncertainty,
70-346     Written Communications                                        and the equilibrium determination of asset prices for both
Spring: 9 units                                                          complete- and incomplete-market settings. In addition, the
A course in the style and mechanics of composition. Written              course will cover topics in corporate financial decision making
Communications aims to increase your confidence and facility as          and the micro-structure of financial markets.
a professional writer. The course develops and sharpens your             Prerequisites: 73251 and 70207
knowledge of writing standards and techniques, patterns of
organization and development, strategies of structure and                70-393     Financial Analysis and Securities Trading
definition, principles of classical rhetoric and processes of            Fall: 9 units
revision. Through close reading, detailed language analysis, and         The Financial Analysis and Securities Trading (FAST) system is
repeated, guided practice in composition, Written                        an educational technology that teaches applied principles of
Communications prepares you for the writing you will do in your          financial economics using a sophisticated network of personal
professional career; the identification, construction and                computers and workstations. Students learn finance using both
exploration of issues and ideas, crafted with the best possible          real time data feeds as well as a simulated trading environment.
means of support and expression and the most effective means of          Prerequisites: 70391
persuasion, given your purpose and audience.
Prerequisites: 70340 and (76100 or 76101 or 76104)                       70-397     Venture Capital Investing
                                                                         Fall: 9 units
70-364     Business Law                                                  Angel investors and venture capitalists have become the most
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                 visible sources of investment in new businesses in the United
The course is a curvey of the major legal principles and                 States. This course examines the investment process from the
processes affecting business managers in the United States, with         viewpoint of the angel and venture investor, and provides the
some reference as well to the laws of other countries. The topics        students with a framework of their investment process. The
include contract law, product liability, business property,              course comprises four sections: investment criteria and
employment, coporation law, environmental law, consumer                  selection, due diligence, deal structure and valuation, and post
protection, issuance of securities, secured transactions,                investment management. Students will be expected, in a team
commercial paper, bankruptcy, corporate crimes, business torts,          setting, to move a potential investment through its diligence, deal
antitrust regulation, international trade, business ethics and           structure and valuation stages, and present investment
corporate social responsibility. The course draws examples from          recommendations. Guest speakers will supplement the course.
decided cases and from current business activities.                      Prerequisites: 70414 or 70415 or 70416 or 70420 or 70421
Prerequisites: 76101
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions     373




70-401     Management Game                                             The business plans include strategies for commercializing and
Spring: 12 units                                                       marketing their products and/or services, for building their
This is an applied strategy class that focuses on the                  management teams, and for financing their ventures and projects.
implementation of a strategy using a simulation as a framework.        The end objective is for the student teams to produce compelling
The course is designed to integrate the concepts and techniques        plans that will enable them to convince the outside world that
studied earlier in the curriculum, into a unified, general             their ventures and projects represent opportunities that are
management framework. The course has 3 main educational                viable with a substantial potential for success and with well
objectives: 1.) to give the student a dynamic competitive              understood and manageable risks. Students are encouraged to
environment in which to experiment, 2.) to teach strategic             participate in business plan competitions and to seek financing
planning as a process with an implementation focus, 3.) to learn       for their projects. The course exposes students to the nuances of
to cooperate within a high performance team. Students are              financing new ventures and getting them started legally.
divided into teams of 5 or 6 managers and given the task of            Prerequisite: 70-414 or 70-415 or 70-420 or 70-422 or 15-
operating a computer synthesized company for 3 simulated               390
years. At the end of each year, the manage students report to a        Prerequisites: 15390 or 70414 or 70415 or 70420 or 70421
board of directors who review performance, set compensation,
approve future plans and provide shareholder oversight. Students       70-417     Topics in Entrepreneurship
are graded based on metrics similar to real executives: 1.) ability    Fall and Spring: 9 units
to achieve objectives, 2.) value creation for shareholders, 3.)        This is an independent study course where students work on
creation of competitive advantage, 4.) accumulation of personal        “actual”/real-life entrepreneurial businesses. “Experiential
wealth.                                                                Entrepreneurship’ is a concept which was founded at CMU – and
Prerequisites: (70121 and 70371 and 70381 and 70391) or                has shown that students can have real insight and input into the
(70122 and 70371 and 70381 and 70391)                                  day to day issues surrounding local entrepreneurial ventures.
                                                                       Students work in very small groups (or one-on-one with the
70-414      Technology Based Entrepreneurship for CIT                  instructor) to study in depth particular entrepreneurial topics in
Fall: 9 units                                                          which they are interested. The ‘experiential’ side can include
This course is an Introduction to Entrepreneurship designed to         family business, intrapreneurial activities, CMU related
develop skills related to entrepreneurship and innovation for non-     businesses that are attempting to get ‘launched’ on campus, or
business undergraduate and graduate students. The course               the development of their mini-business plan into a full-blown
assumes no background courses in business and is appropriate           business plan.
for those who are interested in bringing innovations to market         Prerequisites:
either through new companies or existing companies. The course
provides an overview of entrepreneurship and innovation,               70-418      Financing Entrepreneurship Ventures
develops an entrepreneurial frame of mind, and provides a              Spring: 9 units
framework for learning the rudiments of how to generate and            This course follows the entrepreneur throughout the money-
evaluate ideas and opportunities. Students come up with or are         raising processfrom idea generation through receiving and
presented with potential ideas and learn how to develop these          analyzing a term sheet. The course is focused on four segments:
ideas into opportunities, and to explore their potential for           determining how much capital to raise, identifying sources of
becoming viable businesses. They learn how to do market                capital, convincing an investor to write a check, and determining
research, to develop go-to-market strategies, value propositions,      whether a deal is good or not. Guest entrepreneurs, venture
and to differentiate their products or services from potential         capitalists, and other professionals are invited to class to
competitors. The focus is on understanding and developing              discuss their perspectives on each stage of fundraising. This
strategies for approaching the key elements of the                     course emphasizes the financial component of the business plan
entrepreneurial process – opportunity, resources and team. The         and provides the student with the skills and tools required to build
course consists of a balance of lectures, case studies and             an effective financial operating model.
encounters with entrepreneurs, investors and business                  Prerequisites:
professionals. The students are exposed to financial and
intellectual property issues, and encounter a real world               70-424     Corporate Financial Reporting
perspective on entrepreneurship, innovation and leadership. The        Spring: 9 units
output of the course is a “mini-business plan” or venture              This course is designed help you understand the process of
opportunity screening document created by teams from the class         preparing and interpreting financial statements and their
that can be developed into a business plan in a subsequent             accompanying disclosures. The course is aimed at anyone whose
course entitled New Venture Creation or through independent            career might involve working with accounting data, and should be
study.                                                                 especially useful for those interested in consulting and financial
                                                                       analysis. Throughout the semester we will discuss the key
70-415     Introduction to Entrepreneurship                            disclosure rules in the United States, the communication
Fall: 9 units                                                          methods available to managers, managers’ incentives and ability
This course is an introduction to entrepreneurship designed to         to exert discretion over reported earnings, and the interplay
develop skills related to entrepreneurship and innovation for          between a company’s corporate strategy and its financial
business students. It is assumes that the student has taken            reporting policies and practices. The course revolves around a
background courses in business such as accounting and                  number of topics of recent interest to the business community
marketing, and is appropriate for those who are interested in          including the quality of earnings, mergers and acquisitions,
bringing innovations to market either through new companies or         purchased R&D, post employment benefits, executive
existing companies. The course provides an overview of                 compensation, and intangible assets.
entrepreneurship and innovation, develops an entrepreneurial           Prerequisites: 70122
frame of mind, and provides a framework for learning the
rudiments of how to generate and evaluate ideas and                    70-430     International Management
opportunities. Students come up with or are presented with             Spring: 9 units
potential ideas and learn how to develop these ideas into              This course is designed to familiarize the student with the
opportunities, and to explore their potential for becoming viable      problems and opportunities involved in operating a business that
businesses. They learn how to do market research, to develop go-       spans national borders. It addresses recent developments in
to-market strategies, value propositions, and to differentiate their   world trade, changes in international investment patterns, the
products or services from potential competitors. The focus is on       world financial environment, business policy and strategy for
understanding and developing strategies for approaching the key        firms competing in the global marketplace, and theory behind
elements of the entrepreneurial process – opportunity, resources       international business. Issues in managing cross-cultural
and team. The course consists of a balance of lectures, case           differences, global marketing, multinational finance, accounting,
studies and encounters with entrepreneurs, investors and               and taxation are also examined.
business professionals. The students are exposed to financial          Prerequisites:
and intellectual property issues, and encounter a real world
perspective on entrepreneurship, innovation and leadership. The        70-440     Corporate Strategy
output of the course is a “mini-business plan” or venture              Fall: 12 units
opportunity screening document created by teams from the class         This course is designed to provide the student with a general
that can be developed into a business plan in a subsequent             management perspective and an understanding of the total
course entitled New Venture Creation or through independent            business enterprise. It builds upon previous course work in
study.                                                                 functional areas and provides insights and analytical tools which
                                                                       a general manager should have in order to plan and implement
70-416    New Venture Creation                                         successful business strategy. The student will analyze complex
Spring: 9 units                                                        business problems and formulate realistic strategic solutions.
This course is designed to be a follow on to Introduction to           Emphasis is placed on the practical application of business
Entrepreneurship. Students working in teams develop and                theory by the student in his/her business career.
advance opportunities into coherent and persuasive business            Prerequisites: 70122 and 70371 and 70381 and 70391
plans that serve as roadmaps for building and their businesses.
3 7 4 Course Descriptions




70-451    Management Information Systems                              70-471     Logistics and Supply Chain Management
Fall: 9 units                                                         Spring: 9 units
The objectives of this course are to provide students with basic      This course shall highlight the architecture, processes and
knowledge of the technology used in computer-based information        drivers of performance of modern supply chains in various
systems and to enable them to acquire the skills for analyzing        industries. We will link the material and information flows and
how to manage this technology in business. There is a strong          discuss key business processes related to bridging the demand
emphasis on how to become both an intelligent user of information     and supply side. There is an extensive use of cases, computer
systems and also an effective participant in the design process of    models and emphasis on recent developments in the supply
these systems. Credit will not be allowed for both 70-451 and         chains of Fortune 500 firms. Industry experts will also share their
Information Systems, 88-200.                                          experiences and challenges.
Prerequisites: 15100 or 15111 or 15112 or 15120 or 15125 or           Prerequisites: 70371
15127
                                                                      70-480     International Marketing
70-453     Systems analysis and Design                                Spring: 9 units
Spring: 9 units                                                       This course is designed to provide students with a basic
This course is designed to provide students with a basic              understanding of global marketing opportunities, key issues, and
understanding of how to develop and implement computer-based          strategies. It introduces the main characteristics of international
management information systems. Students will be introduced to        markets and addresses the impact of global environmental
a variety of system development concepts and techniques. These        factors (economic, social, legal, and cultural) on marketing
can include traditional approaches such as top-down or                decisions such as market entry, product development, pricing,
structured analysis, problem definition, feasibility analysis,        promotion, and distribution. The objective of the course is to help
enterprise analysis, and data flow diagrams, as well as interactive   students acquire knowledge of major international marketing
and iterative development approaches such as prototyping and          concepts and develop cross-cultural sensitivities and skills that
object-oriented concepts and techniques. The course also              would enable them to identify, analyze, and solve international
explores topics related to successful implementation of systems       marketing problems.
such as testing strategies, project management, user oriented         Corequisites: 70-381
design and software maintenance. Students will work in teams to
analyze, design, and build a small information system.                70-481    Marketing Research
Prerequisites: 70451                                                  Spring: 9 units
                                                                      Marketing research is the process of acquiring, analyzing and
70-455    Information Resource Management                             presenting information used to make marketing decisions. The
Spring: 9 units                                                       beginning of the course describes the general process of
The objective of this course is to explore information resources      conducting marketing research. A significant portion of the
management issues from a managerial perspective. In this              course focuses on methods of acquiring marketing data through
course students learn how information resources can influence         surveys, experimentation, panels and secondary data sources.
and define corporate strategy, how to discover opportunities to       The remainder concerns methods of data analysis. In particular,
gain competitive advantages with information resources, and how       we learn the statistical techniques used to make sense of
managers control the development and use of such information          marketing data and to support marketing recommendations.
resources (covering topics such as end-user computing expert          Prerequisites: 70208 or 70381 or 73360
systems and privacy). Students also learn how to model and
analyze corporate information needs, how database management          70-483     Advertising and Marketing Communications
systems serve to support those needs, and how managers                Spring: 9 units
address significant issues concerning that support.                   A brand's first contact with the consumer is by Marketing
Prerequisites: 70451                                                  Communications. Whether by traditional advertising and sales
                                                                      promotion or by new media and approaches, the proliferation of
70-456     Telecommunication and Network Management                   marketing communications is impacting consumers, culture and
Fall: 9 units                                                         business performance and must be managed by marketers.
This course introduces students to telecommunication and              Integrated marketing communications campaigns are the best
computer network technologies. We discuss computer                    way to effectively build brands. This course covers the role and
telecommunications, local area networks and wide area networks.       execution of marketing communications within the context of
Topics include the ISO reference model; network architecture;         overall marketing strategy and in conjunction with other elements
data communications; local area networks; and ISDN. Students          of the marketing mix. Students acquire an understanding of
will develop a project to demonstrate impacts of                      marketing communications tools and apply them to a real client
telecommunication technology in business.                             situation acting as an advertising agency team through the
Prerequisites: 70451                                                  development and team presentation of an integrated marketing
                                                                      communications campaign.
70-459     Web Business Engineering                                   Prerequisites: 70381
Spring: 9 units
In this course students will learn how to set up a business on the    70-484      Direct Interactive Marketing
Internet (World Wide Web) and how to use the internet and other       Fall: 9 units
telecommunications technologies to tie businesses together to         Direct and Interactive Marketing is a fast growing discipline that
form a ?virtual business.?                                            is impacting and advancing the field of marketing in general. This
Prerequisites: 70451                                                  consumer marketing course develops direct marketing planning
                                                                      skills, explores the future of the field including how interactive
70-460    Mathematical Models for Consulting                          marketing is evolving with the internet, and offers students further
Fall: 9 units                                                         insight into marketing as a career field of choice. The course
This course introduces students to a wide variety of models and       incorporates cases, lectures adn a team project to provide a
techniques used by consultants and decision-support software. It      comprehensive understanding of the meaning, uses, and
covers applications of linear and integer programming, fuzzy logic    contribution of direct marketing to the firm and consumer.
and fuzzy control, neural networks, constraint programming,           Prerequisites: 70381
Bayesian networks, influence diagrams, analytical hierarchy
process, and data envelopment analysis. Such heuristic methods        70-485     Product Management
as tabu search, simulated annealing, genetic algorithms, learning     Spring: 9 units
based methods, asynchronous teams, and ant colonies are briefly       This course focuses on problems and strategies specific to
discussed.                                                            managing products and services. Emphasis primarily on the
Prerequisites: 21257 or 21292                                         design and marketing of new products and services. The
                                                                      objectives of the course are to acquaint students with the new
70-465     Information Technology Strategy                            product development process; to introduce students to the
Spring: 9 units                                                       concepts and techniques useful for making new product
Information Technology (IT) has fundamentally changed the ways        decisions; and to give students an opportunity to apply course
firms are managed and deal with their customers and business          concepts to the actual development of a new product or service
partners. This course focuses on how Information Technology can       by working on a comprehensive group project.
be used to create value or obtain a competitive advantage,            Prerequisites: 70381
providing an overview of fundamental strategy frameworks,
underlying technologies, and recent industry trends. The goal is      70-486    Pricing
to understand how Information Technology enables new                  Spring: 9 units
strategies and how existing strategies adapt to innovations in IT.    Determining the price of a product or service is one of the most
At the end of the course, students are expected to have an            important marketing decisions. It is also one of the most complex
understanding of how to strategically use Information Technology      and least understood aspects of marketing. While many
and to identify and critically evaluate important changes and         marketing activities are geared toward creating value for the
opportunities IT creates along the value chain.                       customer, sound pricing decisions are the fundamental tool for
Prerequisites: 70451
                                                                                                                 Course Descriptions      375




businesses to capture the value they create. In today’s                  70-502     Independent Study in Management
hypercompetitive environment, even slight errors in determining          All Semesters: 3-18 units
the best price can lead to large financial losses. This course           Students with a special interest in Management/Production not
draws on the fundamental disciplines of microeconomics,                  covered by a formal Business course may develop an
statistics and psychology to shed light on good pricing practice.        Independent Study Course in that area. Readings and work to be
It surveys some popular pricing practices, explores their pitfalls,      completed are by agreement between the student and an
and identifies the fallacies they are based on. The first part of the    individual faculty member. Enrollment by permission of the BA
course discusses the foundations for sound pricing decisions:            program.
costs, customer and competition. It then moves on to current
pricing strategies, tactics and their applications: pricing over the     70-503    Independent Study in Marketing
product life cycle; product line pricing; pricing through the            All Semesters: 3-18 units
marketing channel; price discrimination; two-part tariffs and            Students with a special interest in Marketing not covered by a
nonlinear pricing; price bundling; perceived value pricing; and          formal Business course may develop an Independent Study
competitive pricing. Finally, the course covers hot and state-of-        Course in that area. Readings and work to be completed are by
art pricing topics such as internet pricing, optimization and            agreement between the student and an individual faculty member.
dynamic pricing, international pricing, relationship pricing. The        Enrollment by permission of the BA Program.
institutional and legal environment and their impact on the firm's
pricing decision are also emphasized. Business cases, videos,            70-504     Independent Study in Organizational Behavior
guest speakers, games will be used to help students better               All Semesters: 3-18 units
master the course material                                               Students with a special interest in Organizational Behavior not
Prerequisites: (70381) and (73100 or 73110)                              covered by a formal Business course may develop an
                                                                         Independent Study Course in that area. Readings and work to be
70-492     Investment Analysis                                           completed are by agreement between the student and an
Spring: 9 units                                                          individual faculty member. Enrollment by permission of the BA
Students gain an understanding of financial theories through             Program.
learning the theory and development of basic computer programs
that can be applied in a real world environment. Typical projects        70-505    Independent Study in Finance
include obtaining the efficient frontier of a given set of securities;   All Semesters: 3-18 units
deciding on the optimal investment strategy for a given set of           Students with a special interest in Finance not covered by a
securities; calculating option prices using Black-Scholes and            formal Business course may develop an Independent Study
Binomial option pricing models.                                          Course in that area. Readings and work to be completed are by
Prerequisites: 70391                                                     agreement between the student and an individual faculty member.
                                                                         Enrollment by permission of the BA Program.
70-495    Corporate Finance
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                 70-506     Independent Study Management Information Systems
This course focuses on how firms make decisions on                       All Semesters: 3-18 units
investments, financing and dividend payout policies, as well as          Students with a special interest in Management Information
other advanced topics in finance.                                        Systems not covered by a formal Business course may develop
Prerequisites: 70391                                                     an Independent Study Course in that area. Readings and work to
                                                                         be completed are by agreement between the student and an
70-497      Options                                                      individual faculty member. Enrollment by permission of the BA
Fall: 9 units                                                            Program.
This course is designed to provide students with (a) the skills and
intuitive insights needed to identify and manage opportunities to        70-507     Independent Study in Business Communications
appropriately employ derivative securities in the conduct of their       All Semesters: 3-18 units
business either for gain or risk management, (b) a working               Students with a special interest in Business Communications not
knowledge of the mechanics of the futures, options and swap              covered by a formal Business course may develop an
markets and (c) a fundamental understanding of how derivative            Independent Study Course in that area. Readings and work to be
securities are priced.                                                   completed are by agreement between the student and an
Prerequisites: 70492                                                     individual faculty member. Enrollment by permission of the BA
                                                                         Program.
70-499    Internship
All Semesters: 1-18 units                                                70-520      Publicity and Public Relations
BA students are strongly encouraged to undertake internships.            Fall: 9 units
Students doing an internship of an academic nature do so under           The course examines the concepts, principles, and ethics
the supervision of a faculty member and receive a letter grade.          essential to the public relations profession. It discusses the
Non-academic internships are possible for pass-fail credit with          diverse areas of public relations, from publicity and special
the approval of the Department Director. Enrollment by                   events management to lobbying and fund raising. Through case
permission of the BA Program.                                            studies, students learn how to solve problems using time-tested
                                                                         public relations strategies. The course also examines the
70-500     Honors Thesis I                                               elements of successful publicity. Students learn the tools of
Fall and Spring: 3-18 units                                              publicity, including pitch letters, news releases, and tip sheets.
Business students with outstanding academic records may                  They also learn the basics of news writing, how to identify a news
undertake an Honors Thesis. The topic is of the student's choice         angle and how to write about it. Writing is an essential part of this
but must have some original aspect in the question being                 course and students are evaluated, in part, on their written work.
explored, the data set, or in the methods that are used. It must         Prerequisites: 76101 and 79104
also be of sufficient academic rigor to meet the approval of a
faculty advisor with expertise in the project's area. Students           70-635     Desktop Publishing
enroll each semester in a 9-unit independent study course with           Spring: 9 units
their faculty advisor for the project (70-500 in the fall and 70-        Starting in the mid 1980's, desktop publishing has transformed
501 in the spring). Students and their faculty advisor develop a         the way that graphic media is produced. It enabled non-
course description for the project and submit it for approval as         professionals with modest desktop equipment to produce files for
two 9-unit courses to the BA Director. Enrollment by permission          high quality graphic output. This course examines the methods
of the BA Program.                                                       and applications of desktop publishing from two perspectives:
                                                                         from a project management perspective, and from a hands-on
70-501     Honor Thesis II                                               production perspective. The topics covered include: the new
Spring: 3-18 units                                                       digital workflow, typography, file formats, trapping, software
Business students with outstanding academic records may                  applications, imposition, preflighing, output issues.
undertake an Honors Thesis. The topic is of the student's choice
but must have some original aspect in the question being                 70-637     Interactive Media Design Management
explored, the data set, or in the methods that are used. It must         Fall: 9 units
also be of sufficient academic rigor to meet the approval of a           Interactive media offers a powerful communication method by
faculty advisor with expertise in the project's area. Students           providing an immersive, self-guided multi-media environment.
enroll each semester in a 9-unit independent study course with           This lab-based course uses exercises in Macromedia Flash to
their faculty advisor for the project (70-500 in the fall and 70-        build animations that demonstrate the capabilities of interactive
501 in the spring). Students and their faculty advisor develop a         media. The course provides an introduction to project
course description for the project and submit it for approval as         management methods for interactive media Students learn how to
two 9-unit courses to the BA Director. Enrollment by permission          conceptualize, manage, and execute an interactive media project
of the BA Program.                                                       that combines text, illustrations, photographs, animations, sound,
                                                                         and video.
3 7 6 Course Descriptions




70-639     Advanced Interactive Media Management                       bioengineering, and progress toward their solution. Students have
Spring: 9 units                                                        the opportunity to visit state-of-the-art laboratories in such
This course extends the knowledge of Macromedia Flash learned          areas as bioimaging, musculoskeletal biomechanics, rapid
in 70-637. This project-based course relies heavily on Action          prototyping and manufacturing, and cardiac assist devices.
Scripting to make advanced interactive projects. (Prerequisite         Prerequisite or co-requisite: 42-101 Introduction to Biomedical
70-637)                                                                Engineering
Prerequisites: 70637                                                   Prerequisites: 42101

70-640     Emerging Graphics Technologies                              42-202      Physiology
Fall: 9 units                                                          Fall and Spring: 9 units
Recent developments impacting the graphic communications               This course is an introduction to human physiology and includes
industry are examined in this seminar course. Computer-to-plate        units on all major organ systems. Particular emphasis is given to
technology, database publishing, on-demand printing, digital           the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive,
printing, www publishing, e-paper and multi-media production are       excretory, and endocrine systems. Modules on molecular
among the topics under discussion.                                     physiology tissue engineering and physiological modeling are
                                                                       also included. Due to the close interrelationship between
70-641     Color Reproduction and Management                           structure and function in biological systems, each functional topic
Spring: 9 units                                                        will be introduced through a brief exploration of anatomical
In today’s business world, the accurate reproduction of color in       structure. Basic physical laws and principles will be explored as
various media is both a challenge and a necessity. This course         they relate to physiologic function. Prerequisite: 03-121 Modern
examines the issues related to color reproduction and the              Biology, or permission of instructor.
methods by which consistent color appearance can be maintained         Prerequisites:       Corequisites: 03-121
across a variety of traditional and electronic media. Topics
include: the perception and measurement of color; the capture,         42-203     Biomedical Engineering Laboratory
separation, and manipulation of color images, and color                Fall and Spring: 9 units
management techniques for a variety of media including print, the      This laboratory course is designed to provide students with the
WWW, and television.                                                   ability to make measurements on and interpret data from living
Prerequisites:                                                         systems. The experimental modules reinforce concepts from 42-
                                                                       101 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering and expose students
70-643 Publishing on the World Wide Web                                to four areas of biomedical engineering: bioimaging, biomaterials,
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               biomechanics, and cellular and molecular biotechnology. Several
In just over a decade, the World Wide Web has become an                cross-cutting modules are included as well. The course includes
essential venue for businesses. This course examines a variety         weekly lectures to complement the experimental component.
of topics related to web publishing including: the design and          Prerequisites: 42-101 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
usability of web sites, the appropriate use of file formats,           and 03-121 Modern Biology. Pre-medical students may
business practices across the web, the integration of other media,     substitute 03-124 Modern Biology Laboratory.
the increased use of mobile devices, strategies for search             Prerequisites:      Corequisites: 03-121, 42-101
engines, and others. Classroom instruction is supported by
laboratory exercises where students make and publish functional        42-300      Junior BME Research Project
and effective web pages.                                               Fall and Spring: 3-12 units
                                                                       Research projects for juniors under the direction of a regular or
70-650    Independent Study: Graphic Communications                    courtesy BME faculty member. Arrangements may also be made
Management                                                             via the Associate Head of BME for off-campus projects at local
All Semesters: 3-18 units                                              hospitals provided that a regular or courtesy BME faculty member
Students with a special interest in Graphic Media not covered by       agrees to serve as a co-advisor. The nature of the project, the
a formal Business course may develop an Independent Study              number of units and the criteria for grading are to be determined
Course in that area. Readings and work to be completed are by          between the student and the research advisor. The agreement
agreement between the student and an individual faculty member.        should be summarized in a one-age project description with sign-
Enrollment by permission of the BA Program.                            off by the research advisor and a copy sjbmitted for review and
                                                                       filing to the student's academic advisor. A final written report or
Biomedical       Engineering                                           oral presentation of the results is required. Units may vary from 3
                                                                       to 12 according to the expected time commitment.
42-101     Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
Fall and Spring: 12 units                                              42-311     Polymeric Biomaterials
This course will provide exposure to basic biology and                 Spring: 9 units
engineering problems associated with living systems and health         This introductory course will address basic and applied concepts
care delivery. Examples will be used to illustrate how basic           of polymers as biomaterials. The students will be exposed to both
concepts and tools of science & engineering can be brought to          fundamental synthetic mechanisms of polymers and their
bear in understanding, mimicking and utilizing biological              physical and chemical properties. Specific emphasis will be
processes. The course will focus on four areas: biotechnology,         placed on biodegradation mechanisms, mechanical properties
biomechanics, biomaterials and tissue engineering and                  and surface chemistry of polymeric materials. Cellular
bioimaging and will introduce the basic life sciences and              interactions with various surfaces and immunological responses
engineering concepts associated with these topics. Pre-requisite       will be covered. Applications of biomaterials to be discussed
OR co-requisite: 03-121 Modern Biology.                                include tissue engineering and artificial organs. Prerequisites:
Prerequisites:       Corequisites: 03-121                              None, but 09-105 Introduction to Modern Chemistry and 42-101
                                                                       Introduction to Biomedical Engineering will be useful. Also known
42-200     Sophomore BME Research Project                              as 27-311.
Fall and Spring: 3-12 units
Research projects for sophomores under the direction of a rgular       42-312     Metallic and Ceramic Biomaterials
or courtesy BME faculty member. Arrangements may also be               Fall: 9 units
made via the Associate Head of BME for off-campus projects at          The course addresses basic and applied concepts of metals and
local hospitals provided that a regular or courtesy BME faculty        ceramics as biomaterials. The students will be exposed to the
member agrees to serve as a co-advisor. The nature of the              principles, properties and applications of amorphous and
project, the number of units, and the criteria for grading are to be   crystalline inorganic and metallic systems for biological
determined between the student and the research advisor. The           applications. Specific emphasis will be placed on processing
agreement should be summarized in a one-page project                   biochemical activity, biodegradation mechanisms, and various
description with sign-off by the research advisor and a copy           properties relevant for biological response. Cellular interactions
submitted for review and filing to the student's academic advisor.     with various surfaces and immunological responses will also be
A final written report or oral presentation of the results is          covered. Applications of biomaterials to be discussed include
required. Units may vary from 3 to 12 according to the expected        tissue engineering, artificial implants and devices. Part I of this
time commitment.                                                       course is offered in the Spring and focuses on the principles,
                                                                       properties and applications of polymers as biomaterials.
42-201    Professional Issues in Biomedical Engineering                Prerequisites: None, but 09-105 Introduction to Modern
Fall and Spring: 3 units                                               Chemistry and 42-101 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
This course helps students learn to understand technical and           will be useful. 42-312 is also known as 27-511.
professional challenges biomedical engineers face. First, it
introduces students to applications of technology in medicine and      42-321    Cellular and Molecular Biotechnology
biology. Second, it provides an overview of professional topics        Spring: 9 units
involving bioethics, regulatory issues, communication skills,          This course will provide students with an introduction to
team work, and contemporary issues. Outside speakers describe          biotechnology in an engineering context. The focus will be on
real world problems and professional issues in biotechnology and       using microorganisms to prepare therapeutically and
                                                                       technologically relevant biochemicals. Topics to be covered
                                                                       include cellular and microbial metabolism, recombinant DNA
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions      377




methodologies, bioreactor design, protein separation and               and filing to the student's academic advisor. A final written report
purification, and systems approaches to biotechnology.                 or oral presentation of the results is required. Units may vary
Prerequisites: (42-203 Physiology OR 03-121 Modern Biology             from 3 to 12 according to the expected time commitment.
OR 03-232 Biochemistry) AND (06-262 Mathematical Methods
of Chemical Engineering OR 21-260 Differential Equations) OR           42-401     BME Design
permission of instructor.                                              Spring: 12 units
Prerequisites: 06262 and 42202                                         42-401 The Biomedical Engineering Design course focuses on
                                                                       integrated product development for biomedical products. Teams
42-334      Introduction to Computational Biology                      will consist of a variety of BME engineering students. The course
Spring: 9 units                                                        consists of four modules including identifying, understanding,
This course covers the application of computers to solve               conceptualizing and realizing a product opportunity. All products
problems in biology and medicine. Since computers are                  developed will respond to the needs of appropriate market
increasingly used in biological research, the course is valuable       segments; resulting products will be deemed useful, usable and
for all biological sciences majors and double majors in biomedical     desirable by those segments. Students will produce a form model,
engineering. It is intended for students without computer              functional prototype, marketing plan, and manufacturing plan of
programming experience (students with a desire to apply                their product. Pre-requisite: BME Double Major Senior status.
programming methods to these problems should take the more
advanced course 03-510, Computational Biology). Topics                 42-413     Biomaterial Interfaces
covered are computational molecular biology (analysis of protein       Spring: 12 units
and nucleic acid sequences), biological modeling and simulation        The topic for this spring's course will be Fundamentals and
(including computer models of neuron behavior, biochemical             Applications of Surfactants and Macromolecules at Interfaces.We
kinetics, and simulation of mutation), and biological imaging.         will talk about the interfacial physical chemistry of surfactants,
Course work consists primarily of homework assignments making          synthetic polymers and biopolymers including proteins and DNA.
use of software packages for these applications. Students may          Applications will be drawn from materials technology,
only use one of the following for credit: 42-334/03-310, 03-311,       pharmaceutical processing, and biotechnology. Students are
42-434/03-510 or 42-734/03-710. Prerequisites: (21-112                 welcome to take this course for credit or to sign up as an auditor.
Calculus II OR 21-118 Calculus of Approximation) AND 03-121            The latter choice might be suitable for those who have satisfied
Modern Biology AND (99-101 OR 99-102 OR 99-103                         their course requirements but are interested in learning more
Computing Skills Workshop).                                            about complex fluids or biointerfacial phenomena.
Prerequisites: (21118 or 21112) AND 03121 AND (99101 or                Prerequisites: 42202
99102 or 99103)
                                                                       42-419      Biomaterial/Host Interactions
42-341     Introduction to Biomechanics                                Fall: 12 units
Spring: 9 units                                                        The goal of this course is to provide students with hands-on
This course provides a general survey of the application of solid      experience in investigating host responses to materials. Implant
mechanics and rigid body dynamics to the study of the human            studies of tissue-engineering materials will be performed using
cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. The mechanical             animal models in a laboratory setting, and students will gain
properties and behavior of heart, blood vessel, bone, muscle and       experience in the analysis of host responses. Material
connective tissues are discussed and methods for the analysis of       biocompatibility and tissue regeneration will be addressed.
human motion are developed. Both analytic and experimental             Characterization techniques will include histology, real-time
results are presented through readings from reports in recent          polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescent staining.
journals and the relevance of these results to the solution of         Laboratory work will be complemented with lectures. Prerequisite:
unsolved problems is highlighted. The development of appropriate       senior standing in Biomedical Engineering, or consent of
models for particular problems is also considered. Pre-requisites:     instructor.
21-260 Differential Equations AND (24-262 Stress Analysis OR
12-331 Solid Mechanics OR equivalent). Useful, but not                 42-422     Bioprocess Design
required: 24-141 Statics and Dynamics AND 24-202 Mechanics             Spring: 9 units
of Deformable Solids.                                                  This course is designed to link concepts of cell culture,
Prerequisites: 21260 and 24262                                         bioseparations, formulation and delivery together for the
                                                                       commercial production and use of biologically-based
42-347      Rehabilitation Engineering                                 pharmaceuticals; products considered include proteins, nucleic
Fall: 12 units                                                         acids, and fermentation-derived fine chemicals. Associated
Rehabilitation Engineering involves the application of engineering     regulatory issues and biotech industry case studies are also
sciences to design, develop, adapt and apply assistive                 included. The format of the course is a mixture of equal parts
technologies to problems confronted by individuals with                lecture, open discussion and participant presentation. Course
disabilities in functional areas, such asmobility, communications,     work consists of team-oriented problem sets of an open-ended
hearing, vision, and cosnition, and in activities associated with      nature and individual-oriented industry case studies. The goals of
employment, independent living, education, and integration into        the course are to build an integrated, technical knowledge base of
the community. It differs from classical biomedical engineering by     the manufacture of biologically based pharmaceuticals and the
its focus on improving the quality of people's lives, rather than      U.S. biotechnology industry. Working knowledge of basic cell and
improving their medical treatment. This course will require            modern biology, biochemistry and differential equations/partial
participation in simulations of disabilities and projects to develop   differential equations is assumed. Prerequisite: 42-321 Cellular
new technologies. Pre-requisite: None, but 42-202 Physiology is        and Molecular Biotechnology OR (03-232 Biochemistry AND 06-
useful. Junior or Senior status or permission of instructor.           422 Chemical Reaction Engineering). (Renumbered from 42-622)
                                                                       Prerequisites: 06422 and 42321
42-377      Rehabilitation Engineering
Fall: 12 units                                                         42-424     Biological Transport
Rehabilitation engineering involves the application of engineering     Spring: 9 units
sciences to design, develop, adapt, and apply assistive                Analysis of transport phenomena in life processes on the
technologies to problems confronted by individuals with                molecular, cellular, organ and organism levels. Material covered:
disabilities in functional areas, such as mobility, communications,    Fick's Laws; electrolyte diffusion; coupled diffusion and chemical
hearing, vision, and cognition, and in activities associated with      reaction; membrane transport mechanisms; osmosis; Donnan
employment, independent living, education, and integration into        equilibrium; receptor-mediate binding; ultrafiltration and nephron
the community. It differs from classical biomedical engineering by     function; blood flow; pharmacokinetic modeling. Prerequisites:
its focus on improving the quality of people's lives, rather than      06-262 Mathematical Methods of Chemical Engineering OR 21-
improving their medical treatment. This course will require            260 Differential Equations. Useful, but not required: 06-261 Fluid
participation in simulations of disabilities and projects to develop   Mechanics, 12-355 Fluid Mechanics, or 24-231 Fluid
new technologies. No textbook is required. Prerequisite:               Mechanics. (Renumbered from 42-604, prerequisites modified.)
Physiology Prerequisite: Physiology                                    Prerequisites: 06262

42-400     Senior BME Research Project                                 42-431     Bioimaging
Fall and Spring: 3-18 units                                            Spring: 12 units
Research projects for seniors, under the direction of a regular or     The goals of this course are to provide students with the
courtesy BME faculty member. Arrangements may also be made             following: - The ability to use the mathematical techniques such
via the Associate Head of BME for off-campus projects at local         as linear algebra, Fourier theory and sampling in more advanced
hospitals provided that a regular or courtesy BME faculty member       signal processing settings. Fundamentals of multiresolution/
agrees to serve as a co-advisor. The nature of the project, the        wavelet techniques. - In-depth coverage of bioimaging
number of units and the criteria for grading are to be determined      applications, such as compression, denoising and others. Upon
between the student and the research advisor. The agreement            successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: -
should be summarized in a one-page project description with            Explain the importance and use of signal representations in
sign-off by the research advisor and a copy submitted for review       building more sophisticated signal processing tools, such as
3 7 8 Course Descriptions




wavelets. - Think in basic time-frequency terms. - Describe how        42-504     Special Topics
Fourier theory fits in a bigger picture of signal representations. -   Spring: 9 units
Use basic multirate building blocks, such as a two-channel filter      The topic for the spring's course is Fundamentals and
bank. - Characterize the discrete wavelet transform and its            Applications of Surfactants and Macromolecules at Interfaces.
variations. - Construct a time-frequency decomposition to fit the      We will talk about the interfacial physical chemistry of
signal you are given. - Explain how these tools are used in            surfactants, synthetic polymers and biopolymers including
various applications. - Apply these concepts to solve a practical      proteins and DNA. Applications will be drawn from materials
problem through an independent project. Prerequisites: 18-396.         technology, pharmaceutical processing, and biotechnology.
Corequisites: None Cross-listed courses: 18-496                        Students can take this course for credit or sign up as an audit.
Prerequisites: 42202                                                   The latter choice might be suitable for those who have satisfied
                                                                       their course requirements but are interested in learning more
42-434      Computational Biology                                      about complex fluids or bio-interfacial phenomena. (Cross-listed
Spring: 9 units                                                        course: 06-905)
This course covers a range of applications of computers to solve
problems in biology and medicine. Specific topics covered are          42-505     Special Topics: Introduction to Molecular and Cellular
computational molecular biology (analysis of protein and nucleic       Biotechnology
acid sequences), biological moderling and simulation (including        Fall: 9 units
computer models of neuron behavior, biochemical kinetics, and          This course will provide students with an introduction to
simulation of mutation), and biological imaging. Course work will      biotechnology in an engineering context. The focus will be on
include use of software packages for these applications, reading       using microorganisms to prepare therapeutically and
of scientific papers, and programming assignments. Students            technologically relevant biochemicals. Topics to be covered
may only use one of the following for credit: 42-334/03-310, 03-       include cellular and microbial metabolism, recombinant DNA
311, 42-434/03-510 or 42-734/03-710. Pre-requisites: 03-               methodologies, bioreactor design, protein separation and
121 Modern Biology and (15-200 Advanced Programming or 15-             purification, and systems approaches to biotechnology.
211 Fundamental Data Structures and Algorithms).
Prerequisites: 03121                                                   42-510     Introduction to Biomaterials I
                                                                       Spring: 9 units
42-441    Cardiovascular Biomechanics                                  This course will address basic and applied concepts of polymers
Fall: 9 units                                                          as biomaterials. The students will be exposed to both
This course covers the solid and fluid mechanics of the heart and      fundamental synthetic mechanisms of polymers and their
vascular system as well as the mechanics of medical devices            physical and chemical properties. Specific emphasis will be
used to assist or replace cardiovascular function. Prerequisite:       placed on biodegradation mechanisms, mechanical properties
42-341 Introduction to Biomechanics.                                   and surface chemistry of polymeric materials. Cellular
                                                                       interactions with various surfaces and immunological responses
42-444      Medical Devices                                            will be covered. The focus of 42-511 (27-511) Biomaterials,
Spring: 9 units                                                        taught in the Fall, will be on the principles, properties and
This course is an introduction to the engineering, clinical, legal     applications of ceramics and metals as biomaterials.
and regulatory aspects of medical device performance and failure.      Prerequisites: 09-105 Modern Chemistry and 09-217 Organic
Topics covered include phenomenological and mechanistic                Chemistry I. This course also known as 27-510.
descriptions of processes such as wear, corrosion fatigue,             Prerequisites: 09105 and 09217
fretting, in addition to the characterization of bone and other
biological materials as it relates to device performance               42-511     Biomaterials
requirements including biocompatibility. The course also involves      Fall: 9 units
case studies of orthopedic fixation devices and prostheses,            The course addresses basic and applied concepts of metals and
pacemakers, heart valves and artificial organs. A portion of the       ceramics as biomaterials. The students will be exposed to the
course is a final design project which involves the design of a new    principles, properties and applications of amorphous and
medical device or the redesign of an existing device.                  crystalline inorganic and metallic systems for biological
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Status. (Renumbered from 42-           applications. Specific emphasis will be placed on processing
644)                                                                   biochemical activity, biodegradation mechanisms, and various
                                                                       properties relevant for biological response. Cellular interactions
42-501    Special Topics                                               with various surfaces and immunological responses will also be
Fall: 9-12 units                                                       covered. Applications of biomaterials to be discussed include
42-501 Special Topics: Bone Tissue Regeneration Fall: 9 units          tissue engineering, artificial implants and devices. Part I of this
The course will include a description of the micro- and macro-         course is offered in the Spring and focuses on the principles,
anatomy of bone, its embryology, and wound healing. Traditional        properties and applications of polymers as biomaterials.
bone grafting materials will be discussed and reviewed and             Prerequisites: None, but 09-105 Introduction to Modern
presented with clinical challenges. In vitro methods and animal        Chemistry and 42-101 Introduction to Biomedical Engineering
wound models will be discussed for designing and developing            will be useful. Also known as 27-511.
bone regeneration therapies. Pertinent literature articles will be
reviewed and grant writing will be discussed, using the NIH R01        42-560      Undergraduate Projects
format. Prerequisites: 42-301 Physiology OR 42-735                     Fall and Spring: 3-12 units
Physiology, AND 03-121 Modern Biology OR 03-232                        Students elect to do a Biomedical Engineering project for credit
Biochemistry, OR permission of instructor                              either with a CMU faculty member, a faculty member of the
                                                                       University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, or researcher at a
42-502      Cellular Biomechanics                                      hospital. If the student does a project off-campus, the student
Spring: 9 units                                                        must have a Carnegie Mellon faculty member co-advising the
This course discusses how mechanical quantities and processes          project. Arrangements are made with Hilda Diamond, Associate
such as force, motion, and deformation influence cell behavior and     Director. Units vary from 9 units to 12 units.
function, with a focus on the connection between mechanics and
biochemistry. Specific topics include: (1) the role of stresses in     42-604     Biological Transport
the cytoskeleton dynamics as related to cell growth, spreading,        Spring: 9 units
motility, and adhesion; (2) the generation of force and motion by      Analysis of transport phenomena in life processes on the
moot molecules; (3) stretch-activated ion channels; (4) protein        molecular, cellular, organ, and organism levels. Material covered:
and DNA deformation; (5) mechanochemical coupling in signal            Fick's Laws; electrolyte diffusion; coupled diffusion and chemical
transduction; (6) protein trafficking and secretion; and (7) the       reaction; membrane transport mechanisms; osmosis; Donnan
effects of mechanical forces on gene expression. Emphasis is           equilibrium; receptor-mediated binding; lateral diffusion in
placed on the biomechanics issues at the cellular and molecular        membranes and reduction of dimensionality; ultra filtration and
levels; their clinical and engineering implications are elucidated.    nephron function; compartmental modeling; pharmacokinetics.
Also known as 24-759.                                                  Prerequisites: Ordinary differential equations.

42-503     Advanced Bioimaging                                         42-621     Biotechnology and Environmental Processes
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               Fall: 9 units
This course will cover state-of-the art signal processing              This course has two sections: The first half of the course covers
techniques, especially those based on wavelets and related             microbial physiology and metabolism, fermentation and
developments. Wavelets unite brilliant theory, efficient algorithms    restoration, metabolic regulation, bioconversions, recombinant
and successful applications. The stress will be on biomedical and      DNA methodology and gene cloning. The second half of the
communications systems. The students will be expected to               course covers separation and purification, kinetcs, and design of
complete an independent project during the course.                     biological reactors, mass transfer limitations within cell
Prerequisites: 18-791 Digital Signal Processing, or permission of      suspensions, and control of fermentation processes.
the instructor. Also known as 18-797.                                  Prerequisites: 03-121 Modern Biology OR 03-231/03-232
                                                                       Biochemistry OR permission of instructor.
                                                                                                             Course Descriptions      379




42-622      Bioprocess Design                                         42-731     Advanced Bioimaging
Spring: 9 units                                                       Fall: 12 units
This course is designed to link concepts of cell culture,             The goals of this course are to provide students with the
bioseparations, formulation and delivery together for the             following: the ability to use mathematical techniques such as
commercial production and use of biologically-based                   linear algebra. Fourier theory and sampling in more advanced
pharmaceuticals; products considered include proteins, nucleic        signal processing settings; fundamentals of multiresolution and
acids, and fermentation-derived fine chemicals. Associated            wavelet techniques; and in-depth coverage of some bioimaging
regulatory issues and biotech industry case studies are also          applications such as compression and denoising. Upon
included. The format of the course is a mixture of equal parts        successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:
lecture, open discussion, and participant presentation. Course        explain the importance and use of signal representations in
work consists of team-oriented problem sets of an open-ended          building more sophisticated signal processing tools, such as
nature and indivudual-oriented industry case studies. The goals       wavelets; think in basic time-frequency terms; describe how
of the course work are to build an integrated technical knowledge     Fourier theory fits in a bigger picture of signal representations;
base of the manufacture of biologically based pharmaceuticals         use basic multirate building blocks, such as a two-channel filter
and U.S. biotechnology industry. Working knowledge of cell            bank; characterize the discrete wavelet transform and its
culture and modern biology, biochemistry and differential             variations; construct a time-frequency decomposition to fit a
equations is assumed. Pre-requisite: 42-621/06-621                    given signal; explain how these tools are used in various
Biotechnology and Environmental Processes or permission of            applications; and apply these concepts to solve a practical
instructor. Useful, but not required, background in 03-231            bioimaging problem through an independent project. Pre-
Biochemistry I.                                                       requisite: 18-791, or permission of instructor. (Also known as
                                                                      18-799)
42-644      Medical Devices
Spring: 9-12 units                                                    42-735      Medical Image Analysis
This course is an introduction to the engineering, clinical, legal    Spring: 12 units
and regulatory aspects of medical device performance and failure.     The fundamentals of computational medical image analysis will be
Topics covered include phenomenological and mechanistic               explored, leading to current research in applying geometry and
descriptions of processes such as wear, corrosion fatigue,            statistics to segmentation, registration, visualization, and image
fretting, in addition to the characterization of bone and other       understanding. Student will develop practical experience through
biological materials as it relates to device performance              projects using the National Library of Medicine Insight Toolkit
requirements including biocompatibility. The course also involves     (ITK), a new software library developed by a consortium of
case studies of orthopedic fixation devices and prostheses,           institutions including CMU. In addition to image analysis, the
pacemakers, heart valves and artificial organs. A portion of the      course will describe the major medical imaging modalities and
course is a final design project which involves the design of a new   include interaction with practicing radiologists at UPMC.
medical device or the redesign of an existing device. Pre-            Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, knowledge of C++,
requisites: Junior or Senior status.                                  vector calculus and basic probability. (Also known as 16-725)

42-651      Air Quality Engineering                                   42-801    Biomedical Engineering Seminar
Fall: 9 units                                                         Fall and Spring: 0 units
This course covers the problems and methodologies of                  The Graduate Seminar is required each semester for all students
environmental management. We study air pollution,                     in residence. It provides opportunities to learn about research in
characterization of pollutant sources, behavior of aerosol and        various and related fields being conducted at other universities
gaseous pollutants in the atmosphere, micrometeorology as it          and in industry. All graduate students must register for this
relates to pollutant transport, human health effects focusing on      course during each semester of full-time study. Attendance is
the respiratory systems, methods of air pollutant measurement,        mandatory.
statistical treatment of data, and regulation of air pollutants
including procedures by which regulatory agencies develop and         42-882    Directed Study
enforce standards. Prerequisite: 12-330, or equivalent.               All Semesters: 9-48 units
Prerequisites: 12330                                                  Students work with a faculty member affiliated with the Program at
                                                                      the University. Emphasizing resourcefulness and initiative, the
42-652     Introduction to Biomechanics                               students with their advisors evolve a project with both research
Spring: 9 units                                                       and development aspects. Pre-requisite: Consent of advisor.
This course provides a general survey of the application of solid     Variable units.
mechanics and rigid body dynamics to the study of the human
cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems. The mechanical              FA
                                                                      C FA   Interdisciplinary
properties and behavior of heart, blood vessel, bone, muscle and
connective tissues are discussed and methods for the analysis of      62-141     Black and White Photography I
human motion are developed. Both analytic and experimental            All Semesters: 9 units
results are presented through readings from reports in recent         This course introduces students to the basics of black and white
journals and the relevance of these results to the solution of        photography through an understanding of camera operation, film
unsolved problems is highlighted. The development of appropriate      exposure and darkroom technique. Seeing photographically, as
models for particular problems is also considered. Prerequisites:     well as the craft of photography is emphasized. The course
21-260 Differential Equations; 24-263 Mechanics of Materials          concentrates on photography as a fine art: what is unique to it
OR permission of instructor. Useful, but not required: 24-141         and the concerns that transfer to other visual arts, such as
Statics and Dynamics and 24-202 Mechanics of Deformable               composition, tonal values, etc. The course aims to equip students
Solids. Course offered if a minimum of students sign up for the       with an understanding of the formal issues and the expressive
course.                                                               potentials of the medium. The course is composed of student
Prerequisites: 21260                                                  presentations, class discussions, shooting assignments,
                                                                      darkroom sessions and class critiques. Students are graded on
42-723     Biological Processes in Environmental Systems              their participation in the class, attendance, the quality of their
Spring: 12 units                                                      ongoing assignments and their final projects. Lab fee ($70) and
42-723 is a 12 credit course that presents the theory of              35mm manual camera required. Each student is responsible for
microbiological processes relevant to environmental systems.          the cost of paper and film. No prerequisites. Course is by special
Fundamental microbiology, kinetics of suspended=growth and            permission. Please contact Emily Rafalak at
fixed film systems, and processes in environmental biotechnology      emilyg@andrew.cmu.edu.
are the major topics. The microbiological theory presented is
applicable to biological processesin engineered and natural           62-162     Introduction to Digital Photography
systems. The major applications discussed in this course focus        All Semesters: 10 units
on pollution prevention and waste water treatment including:          Students will learn the basics of using a digital and hybrid
activated sludge, biofilm processes, tertiary nutrient removal and    traditional/digital workflow to create photographic images.
methanogenesis. While applications in this course focus on            Students will use digital methods of image capture as well as
traditional environmental engineering and wastewater treatment,       traditional film photography to create images. Students will learn
the fundamental model development for suspended and attached          the basics of how to use Adobe PhotoShop as a way to
growth is directly applicable to large scale bioprocesses in many     manipulate digital photographic images. Students will also learn
fields. The textbook is Rittmann and McCarty (2001). If you have      how to make high quality digital prints of their work. The class will
any questions or want more details, please feel free to contact Dr.   focus equally on the technical aspects of how to work digitally and
Jeanne VanBriesen (jeanne@andrew.cmu.edu) Also known as 12-           on the aesthetic value of the images that are created. Previous
723.                                                                  photographic experience is beneficial, though not required.
                                                                      Special permission required.
3 8 0 Course Descriptions




62-163      Input/Output: Digital Art & Image                         whose art is based in science as well as to the work of scientists
Spring: 9 units                                                       who use visual data to inform their scientific work. Students have
Through course projects, students will explore image                  the opportunity to experiment creatively with scientific media
construction and manipulation as translated through the               such as electron and video-probe microscopy.
computer. Students will engage readings, research, gallery visits,
visiting artists and lectures; these will provide an historical and   62-381     Color Photography and Digital Output
critical context for looking at and making artwork that uses          Intermittent: 10 units
photographic, digital and print processes. While image-capture,       In this course students will combine both traditional practices in
software and printing techniques will be addressed, the course will   color photography (shooting film) with more progressive methods
emphasize a conceptual approach to projects. Students should be       (digital output). Students will gain an understanding of color
familiar with the basic operations of the Macintosh. Lab fee: $100    theory and aesthetical direction, while better defining their
                                                                      individual voices. In the end, students will have a well executed
62-190      BHA/BSA Integrative Seminar                               body of work, finely printed, using Adobe PhotoShop and high-end
Fall: 9 units                                                         digital output devices. Prerequisite: 62141. Special permission
This course is designed to create an environment for                  only. Contact Emily Rafalak at emilyg@andrew.cmu.edu
interdisciplinary learning and collaboration for students in the      Prerequisites:       Corequisites: 62-141
Bachelor of Humanities and Arts (BHA) and Bachelor of Science
and Arts (BSA) degree programs. It provides a forum for BHA and       62-390     BHA/BSA Undergraduate Research Project
BSA freshmen and sophomores to discuss their own projects and         All Semesters: 3,6,9,12 units
begin collaboration with other students. The course includes          The BHA/BSA Undergraduate Research Project is for Bachelor of
guest presentations, discussions, slide/video presentations and       Humanities and Arts (BHA) and Bachelor of Science and Arts
reading assignments.                                                  (BSA) students who want to work on a self-designed project with
                                                                      the one-to-one guidance of a faculty advisor. The project should
62-218     Sparta, Greece: Inquiry and Vision                         be interdisciplinary in nature, and can be a scholarly and/or
Intermittent: Mini Session - 6 units                                  creative endeavor. The project may take the form of a written
Sparta, Greece: Inquiry and Vision is an introduction to Greek        thesis, a compilation of creative works, an outreach project, etc.
language and culture. This course will include a series of guest      The project topic must be pre-approved by the faculty member
presenters, discussions, reading assignments and a field trip to      who agrees to supervise the project and assign a letter grade for
St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Cathedral in Pittsburgh. This course      the course. Projects are to be completed in one semester, and
will provide a forum for students to interact with each other in      may be worth 3, 6, 9, or 12 units of academic credit. To register,
preparation for two-week summer study course in Sparta, Greece.       students must submit an "Undergraduate Research Project
This course is open to all students - participation in summer         Proposal Form" signed by both the student and the faculty
study is not a requirement. Instr. Maurides                           advisor, along with a proposal, to the Associate Director of BHA
                                                                      and BSA Programs.
62-241     Black and White Photography II
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 62-400      BHA/BSA Semester Senior Project
A continuation of topics explored in Black and White Photography      All Semesters: 9 units
I with an emphasis on aesthetic development and image                 The BHA/BSA Senior Project allows Bachelor of Humanities and
evaluation. Alternate individual tutorial/classroom demonstration     Arts (BHA) and Bachelor of Science and Arts (BSA) students the
and group critique structure. Students will gain experience with a    opportunity to weave together the interdisciplinary elements of
variety of formats; experimental methods and media will be            their curricula into an integrated project. The Senior Project
encouraged. Folio or equivalent required by end of the semester.      should reflect the student's interdisciplinary vision in the arts and
Prerequisites: Black and White Photography I 62-141 or consent        humanities or arts and sciences. The creation and completion of
of instructor. Lab Fee $70. Special Permission only. Contact          such a project can be an important integrative and fulfilling
Emily Rafalak at emilyg@andrew.cmu.edu                                capstone for BHA and BSA students. Senior Projects are
Prerequisites: 62141                                                  semester-long or year-long (9 units for one semester; 18 units
                                                                      for two semesters), and are structured as independent studies
62-325     View Camera                                                under the supervision of a single faculty member or a small
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 committee of faculty from the areas relevant to the project. To
The nature of a 4x5" view camera alters both the process of           register, the student must submit a "Senior Project Proposal
making a photograph and the qualities of the resulting image. The     Form" signed by the student and faculty advisor, along with a
slow, even cumbersome, process of photographing with a large          proposal, to the Director of BHA and BSA Programs for final
format camera encourages a methodical, studied approach. The          approval.
larger negative size and the ability to control the exposure and
development of each sheet of film make possible an image of           62-590     BHA/BSA Internship
extraordinary clarity and detail. Through a series of exercises       All Semesters: 3,6,9,12 units
followed by a self-selected project, students in this class will      An internship is a supervised professional work experience with
learn the technical aspects, and master the use of, the view          clear links to a student's academic goals. BHA and BSA students
camera. Topics include: perspective and focal plane control,          may choose to complete a BHA/BSA internship for elective credit
bellows extension factor, and basic B&W sheet film handling and       with appropriate individuals or organizations within or outside of
processing. Students should enter this course already                 Carnegie Mellon University. Junior and senior BHA and BSA
possessing a working knowledge of photographic processing and         students in good academic standing are eligible to receive
printing. Prerequisites: 62141 and any 200 level photo course.        academic credit for one internship. Grading is pass/fail only. Prior
Special permission only: Contact Emily Rafalak at                     to enrolling in an internship, the student must have a "BHA/BSA
emilyg@andrew.cmu.edu.                                                Internship Proposal Form" signed by their site supervisor and
Prerequisites: 62141                                                  approved by the Associate Director of the BHA and BSA
                                                                      Programs.
62-337     Studio Lighting
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 CIT    Interdisciplinary
This course provides a working knowledge of studio based lighting
techniques. Students will create photographs using artificial light   39-100      Special Topics: WHAT IS ENGINEERING?
- both ?hot? lights and electronic flash units. Assignments will      Fall: 9 units
include table-top/still life and portraiture. Students can use all    What is Engineering? In today’s world, we are so used to
format cameras to complete assignments, but class instruction         technology, helping us yet giving rise to complex problems, our
will emphasize the use of 4X5 cameras that are available to all       friend and yet sometimes our challenge in preserving all that is
studio lighting students. To successfully complete assignments        human. This course is an introduction to all students about what
students will be required to purchase paper, film, and 4X5            engineers do and how they do it. It is about the culture, the
polaroid. The class may visit off-campus galleries and museums,       thinking, the creativity and more than anything else, the doing
and will invite photographers for special presentations. Grading is   which is at the heart of engineering. On a more pragmatic level,
based on attendance, assignment critiques, and the final portfolio.   our world of ever-increasing technological complexity demands
Special Permission only.                                              that everyone is to some extent familiar with things technical.
Corequisites: 62-241, 62-141                                          William A. Wulf, President of the National Academy of
                                                                      Engineering, has said that a public that is technologically less
62-358     Art and Biology                                            than literate and unable to understand technical decisions is left
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 to trust that good decisions will be made on their behalf. We invite
This studio-laboratory hybrid course explores the fusion of art       you to take this course to get a feeling for what engineers
and biology. It is an opportunity for students interested in          experience in their work and bring out the creativity in each of
interdisciplinary concepts to work both in a fine arts environment    you. The goal of this course is to help Carnegie Mellon students
and a biological laboratory. In addition to art-science projects,     of all disciplines understand the role and impact of engineering in
the course includes lectures, discussions, and media                  modern society and participate in the excitement of engineering.
presentations. Students are introduced both to the work of artists    Demonstrations and hands-on projects will give students the
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions      381




experience of what engineers do. After completing this course you      role of visuals, specifically Power Point slides, will be explored in
will have a better understanding of the contributions of               depth. Each student will present one individual presentation on
engineering to our society, how engineers see and think about the      their engineering courses and one team presentation on their
world, what the “big issues” for engineers are, what’s involved in     major department. Students will also critique student
the different fields of engineering, and the tools engineers use.      presentations of their classmates and tapes of presentations of
The multi-disciplinary and collaborative nature of almost all          previous semesters. A writen mid-term examination will be
engineering work will be stressed. 39-100 is open to first through     included. 4 units
third year students in all majors except engineering.
Prerequisites: None.                                                   39-390     Cit Co-Op
                                                                       All Semesters: 0-3 units
39-101     CIT First-Year Seminar                                      The college of engineering at Carnegie Mellon considers
Fall: 0 units                                                          experiential learning opportunities important educational options
39-101 CIT First-Year Seminar Fall 0 Unit Seminar course for           for its undergraduate students. One such option is cooperative
CIT first-year students to introduce the college, university and       education, which provides a student with an extended period of
the field of engineering. Each session will present different          exposure with a company. Therefore projects can be of significant
disciplines or aspects of engineering, illustrating the creativity,    depth in experience. To participate, students must complete a
innovation, and responsibilities of a professional engineer. The       CIT Co-op Approval form (located in Scaife Hall 110) and submit
course will also educate students about the CMU resources              for approval. Students must possess at least junior status and
available to make their engineering education a success.               have an overall grade point average of 3.0 or above. All co-ops
Prerequisite: First-year status in CIT or permission of instructor.    must be approximately 8 months in uninterrupted length. If the
                                                                       co-op is approved, the CIT Undergraduate Studies Office will add
39-200     Business for Engineers                                      the course to the student's schedule, and the student will be
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               assessed tuition for 0-3 units. Upon completion of the co-op
This course is intended to prepare CIT graduates for the fast          experience, students must submit a 1-2 page report of their work
paced world of modern industry. There have been paradigm shifts        experience, and a 1-2 page evaluation from the company
that complicate career selection and compound the difficulty of        supervisor to the CIT Undergraduate Office. If the reports are
becoming a productive member of an organization. Graduates of a        approved, a "P" grade will be assigned. International students
technical program can benefit from an understanding of modern          should also be authorized by the Office ofInternational Education
business concepts when they begin their careers. The content of        (OIE). More information regarding CPT is available on OIE's
this course will include both specific financial analysis topics and   website.
certain business administration topics such as program
management, entrepreneurship and ethics. Students will become          39-405     Engineering Design: The Creation of Products and
familiar with analyzing financial statements, stock market reports     Process
and stock options while developing their verbal and written            Fall: 12 units
presentation skills.                                                   Introduction of concepts, methods and tools for successful
                                                                       engineering design, providing a fundamental understanding of the
39-250     CIT Undergraduate Projects                                  design process. Emphasis on the interdisciplinary nature of the
Fall: 0-18 units                                                       design process and on design methods applicable to a broad
This course number is to be used for Fall CIT freshman research        range of engineering disciplines. Major topics: the design
projects only. Student must complete a CIT Undergraduate               process, current industrial practices, design activities and
Project Approval form (located in Scaife Hall 110) and submit for      problem-solving techniques, problem representations, design
approval. The form must include a complete description and a           management and computer-based design environments.
signature approval from the research advisor/instructor. If the        Individual or group projects on selected aspects of the design
project is approved, the CIT Undergraduate Studies Office will         process.
add the course to the student's fall schedule.
                                                                       39-499       Summer Curricular Practical Training
39-251      CIT Undergraduate Projects                                 Summer: 3 units
Spring: 0-18 units                                                     The college of engineering at Carnegie Mellon considers
This course number is to be used for Spring CIT freshman               experiential learning opportunities important educational options
research projects only. Student must complete a CIT                    for its undergraduate students. One such option is an internship,
Undergraduate Project Approval form (located in Scaife Hall 110)       normally completed during the summer. Students do not need to
and submit for approval. The form must include a complete              officially register for an internship unless they want it listed on
description and a signature approval from the research advisor/        their official transcripts. CIT students interested in registering
instructor. If the project is approved, the CIT Undergraduate          their internship for course credit on their transcript may enroll in
Studies Office will add the course to the student's fall schedule.     this course. To do so, students must complete a CIT Internship
                                                                       form (located in Scaife Hall 110) and submit for approval. The
39-278      Introduction to Engineering Reports                        CIT Undergraduate Studies Office will add the course to the
Fall: Mini Session - 5 units                                           student's schedule, and the student will be assessed tuition for 3
This course focuses exclusively on writing technical reports for       units. Upon completion of the internship, students must submit a
engineering situations. The course emphasizes the principles of        1-2 page report of their work experience, and a 1-2 page
clear, direct, and well-organized technical writing as well as a       evaluation from the company supervisor to the CIT
review of key grammatical and syntactical constructs.                  Undergraduate Office. After the reports has been reviewed and
Recognition of a report's purpose and its intended audience is         approved, a "P" grade will be assigned. This process should be
paramount It covers six types of engineering reports: 1.               used by international students interested in Curricular Practical
Research Plan 2. Progress Report 3. Lab Report 4. Instructions         Training (CPT) or by any other engineering undergraduate wishing
5. Technical Description (Team Report) 6. Process Explanation          to have their internship experience reflected on their official
The course will stress adherence to standard formats and the           University transcript. International students should also be
practicality of report writing by encouraging students to write        authorized by the Office of International Education (OIE). More
about labs, experiments, and contents of their engineering             information regarding CPT is available on OIE's website.
courses. Each student will submit three reports--two individual
reports: a Research Plan and an end of course Progress Report,         39-500     Honors Research Project
and a team report: a short Technical Description. Students will        All Semesters: 1-36 units
also receive instruction in the fundamentals of document design        This course, open by invitation only, will provide the opportunity
to most effectively present their reports. Grammar quizzes and a       for close interaction with a faculty member through independent
brief mid-term exam will also help determine the final grade. 5        research in a number of disciplinary and interdisciplinary areas.
units
                                                                       39-600     Integrated Product Development
39-279     Introduction to Engineering Presentation                    Fall: 12 units
Fall: Mini Session - 4 units                                           The IPD course focuses on team-based integrated product
This course aims at the basics of constructing and presenting          development among engineering, business, and design
clear, well organized, and well delivered technical presentations.     disciplines. The course is open to seniors and graduate students
This course splits its emphasis between Structuring Contents           in engineering, industrial and communication design, and MBA
and Elements of Delivery. Structuring Contents will stress             students. The course generally has about a dozen students from
adherence to the standard organization of Introduction, Body, and      each discipline. The course consists of four modules including
Summary. It will also highlight the importance of adapting content     identifying, understanding, conceptualizing and introducing a
to a speaker's purposes and audience. The Elements of Delivery         product opportunity. In recent years we have partnered with
will examine the nuances of physical and vocal delivery. Physical      industrial sponsors to address a customer opportunity, resulting
elements such as posture, gestures, eye contact, expressions,          in patent applications. The emphasis in the course is on the early,
body language and the handling of visuals will be discussed in         "fuzzy" stage of product development. The course gives structure
depth. Vocal delivery and its categories of volume, rate of            to these stages and helps direct the process to be more efficient
speech, range, and articulation will also be probed. Finally, the      downstream. Students are expected to produce four phase written
3 8 2 Course Descriptions




and oral reports. At the end of the semester the team will develop    programs. Advanced Placement Computing Courses cannot be
a form prototype, function prototype, marketing plan and              credited/substituted for this requirement.
manufacturing plan for the product.This course has gained an
international reputation as a leading course in new product           99-103     Computing Skills Workshop
development. Course admission by permission of professor only;        Fall and Spring: Mini Session - 3 units
all students will be waitlisted until admission decisions are made.   Computing Skills Workshop (CSW) is a 3-unit required class that
Students should contact the professor for an application for the      ALL incoming undergraduate students take when they arrive on
course.                                                               campus. The course is comprised of mostly Carnegie Mellon
                                                                      specific information and helps students understand what
39-606     Engineering Product Design Projects                        resources are available to them and what responsibilities they
Spring: 12 units                                                      have as a user in our computing community. Class is held twice/
In this project course students form interdisciplinary teams, each    week for 50 min for 1/2 of the semester. There is very little work
of whose goal is the design of a product. Industry and government     required outside of class, so students are expected to attend all
(often local) help us to define projects of real interest to them.    classes. This course is only offered during the Fall and Spring
They also help with their time and financial support. While           semesters. There are no test-out opportunities or summer
projects typically run for two semesters, students can take the       programs. Advanced Placement Computing Courses cannot be
course for one or two semesters, as their schedules allow.            credited/substituted for this requirement.
Students must consider many issues for their products -- What
are the product opportunities? What makes their product special?      99-200     Tutoring, Mentoring and Role Modeling--A Community
How must it look and feel? Is it technically legitimate? Can it be    Service Course
manufactured economically? How should it be marketed?                 Spring: 6 units
                                                                      This course has service, intellectual, and personal goals. Its
39-647     Special Topics in Design                                   service goal is to provide effective tutors, mentors, and role
All Semesters: 3-18 units                                             models to local public school children. Students meet for class
This course is to be use for Interdisciplinary Engineering Design     once/week and tutor 2 hours per week, in a time slot of your
Independent Study. It can be added by permission only through         choosing, usually through the East End Tutoring Program (http://
collaboration with the student, Independent Study project advisor,    www.andrew.cmu.edu/~eastend/). To promote your effectiveness,
and the CIT Dean's Office.                                            the course covers topics of tutoring (making tutoring interesting
                                                                      and creative, focusing on meta-learning strategies and study
39-648     Rapid Design and Prototyping of Computer Science           skills); mentoring (exploring multiple mentoring models and the
Spring: 12 units                                                      mutual benefits of a mentoring relationship); and informed
This course deals with rapid prototyping, manufacture, and            citizenship (gaining a broader understanding of the issues that
applications of a new generation of wearable computers, with          urban kids face, exploring how public policies affect the
head-mounted display. The design of wearable computers is a           disparities between urban and suburban school student
multidisciplinary process including: Electronic design,               performance). Tutors learn that they can be effective in helping
mechanical design, software development, and human-computer           younger students, and that it is personally rewarding to do so.
interaction. Two classes of wearable computers will be further        Tutors also often express that it is refreshing to step outside the
developed: embedded, custom designed VuMan series, and                grind of Carnegie Mellon life and do something worthwhile in the
general purpose Navigator series. Electronic design includes the      community.
custom designed computer board, electronic interfacing, and
power supply. Industrial designers and mechanical engineers           99-250     Seminar for Peer Tutors
team to design and manufacture with in-house facilities a variety     Fall and Spring: 4.5 units
of conformable/lightweight housings. A software development           The purpose of this training course is to provide undergraduates
environment and user interface builders support software and          with the knowledge and skills necessary to become peer tutors.
application development. Current applications include: Global         Students will be exposed to the goals and objectives of the
Position Sensing, Hypertext documents, speech recognition,            program and will gain the knowledge and experience necessary to
wireless communications, and digital imaging.                         become an effective peer tutor. Peer helpers will gain experience
                                                                      in group dynamics, communication skills, study strategies,
39-650     CIT Special Topics                                         referral resources, leadership, and creating a supportive learning
Fall: 9-12 units                                                      environment. Teaching practice is an integral part of the training
This is a project-oriented course with emphasis on the analysis       program. Students must complete an application in person or
and design of sensor networks. Topics include problem definition,     electronically (http://acad-dev.mac.cc.cmu.edu/acad-dev/
requirements analysis, design, and deployment. Particular             jobs.htm) and then be interviewed by the instructor(s) to
attention will be paid to: the management of the strategic and        determine if the student possesses the basic qualifications.
operational impacts of a systems project, systematic and
structured methodologies used for system analysis, and the            99-251     Seminar for Supplemental Instruction
evolutionary and reliability needs of a deployed sensor network.      Fall and Spring: 4.5 units
Currently available sensor networks will be overviewed along with     The purpose of this training course is to provide undergraduates
the CMU-developed critter sensor network. This course is open         with the knowledge and skills necessary to become supplemental
to any student. Prior exposure to computers including a first         instruction (SI) leaders. Students will be exposed to the goals
programming course is important.                                      and objectives of the program and will gain the knowledge and
                                                                      experience necessary to become an effective SI leader. SI
Carnegie Mellon University-Wide Studies                               leaders will gain experience in group dynamics, communication
                                                                      skills, study strategies, referral resources, leadership, and
99-101     Computing Skills Workshop                                  creating a supportive learning environment. Teaching practice is
Fall and Spring: Mini Session - 3 units                               an integral part of the training program. Students must complete
Computing Skills Workshop (CSW) is a 3-unit required class that       an application in person or electronically (http://acad-
ALL incoming undergraduate students take when they arrive on          dev.mac.cc.cmu.edu/acad-dev/jobs.htm) and then be interviewed
campus. The course is comprised of mostly Carnegie Mellon             by the instructor/s to determine if the student possesses the
specific information and helps students understand what               basic qualifications.
resources are available to them and what responsibilities they
have as a user in our computing community. Class is held twice/       99-252     Seminar for Academic Counseling
week for 50 min for 1/2 of the semester. There is very little work    Fall and Spring: 4.5 units
required outside of class, so students are expected to attend all     The purpose of this training course is to provide undergraduates
classes. This course is only offered during the Fall and Spring       with the knowledge and skills necessary to become peer
semesters. There are no test-out opportunities or summer              academic counselors (AC's). Students will be exposed to the
programs. Advanced Placement Computing Courses cannot be              goals and objectives of the program and will gain the knowledge
credited/substituted for this requirement.                            and experience necessary to become an effective peer academic
                                                                      counselor. AC's will gain experience in group dynamics,
99-102     Computing Skills Workshop                                  communication skills, study strategies, referral resources,
Fall and Spring: Mini Session - 3 units                               leadership, and creating a supportive learning environment.
Computing Skills Workshop (CSW) is a 3-unit required class that       Teaching practice is an integral part of the training program.
ALL incoming undergraduate students take when they arrive on          Students must complete an application in person or electronically
campus. The course is comprised of mostly Carnegie Mellon             (http://acad-dev.mac.cc.cmu.edu/acad-dev/jobs.htm) and then
specific information and helps students understand what               be interviewed by the instructor/s to determine if the student
resources are available to them and what responsibilities they        possesses the basic qualifications.
have as a user in our computing community. Class is held twice/
week for 50 min for 1/2 of the semester. There is very little work    99-451    Fluency and Communication Skills for Nonnative
required outside of class, so students are expected to attend all     Speakers of English
classes. This course is only offered during the Fall and Spring       All Semesters: Mini Session -    3 units
semesters. There are no test-out opportunities or summer              This course is designed to help graduate students who are non-
                                                                      native speakers of English gain the skills needed to work as
                                                                      Teaching Assistants. The focus will be two-fold: 1) students will
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions      383




have the opportunity to develop robust teaching fluency, and 2)
they will gain a better understanding of the culture of the            64-302      CAS Fall Fellow
American classroom, their role as teacher, and lean how                Intermittent: 9 units
"teaching" and "learning" are defined in the US academy. We will       Title: Formation and Locations of Modern Korean Society and
make extensive use of interactive discussions, video modeling,         Culture Instructor: Soyang Park, PhD. This course examines the
teaching demonstrations, readings, and practice lessons to help        rapid transformation that Modern Korean society and culture have
students develop the ability to communicate as teachers. Each          undergone since the end of the 19th century. Located between old
student will be required to be videotaped teaching two sample          and new Asian empires such as China and Japan, while later
lessons to the class, and then meet individually with the              succumbing to a United States-led hegemonic order in East Asia,
instructor to review the tapes. Prerequisite: permission from the      South Korea’s modern history is characterized by its experience
Intercultural Communication Center (ICC).                              of colonization, decolonization, the Korean War, territorial division,
                                                                       military authoritarianism, rapid industrialization, the anti-
99-452     Language and Culture for Teaching                           authoritarian minjung (or grassroots) dissident movement, and
All Semesters: Mini Session -     3 units                              the formation of a dynamic post-minjung civil society. The course
The goal of this course is to strengthen the oral communication        provides an in-depth analysis of significant issues, including the
skills of graduate non-native speakers of English so that they can     so-called ‘Military Comfort Women’ taken by the Japanese army
communicate more succesfully in academic, professional and             during the Second World War, the Kwangju Massacre, contentious
multicultural environments. Classroom activities focus on              US-Korean relations, South Korea‘s emerging democracy,
developing robust fluency and help students develop an                 emigration, and the “Korean Wave” phenomenon as shown by the
awareness of various communicative styles and cultural                 success of the Korean film and cultural industry that has swept
assumptions. The in-class learning activities include videotaped,      through Asia and beyond since 1997. Through the analysis of
prepared speeches, discussions and pronunciation practice. We          diverse materials such as art works, poetry, testimonies,
also examine language-learning techniques so that students can         memoirs, and intellectual history, the course will investigate the
become more informed, self-paced learners. Prerequisite:               significant roles and locations of culture, arts and ideas in this
Permission from the Intercultural Communication Center (ICC).          historical transformation and their differential power to mark the
                                                                       historical time and space of a society.
Center for the Arts in Society
                                                                       64-450     Hitchcock and His Films
64-100      Critical Histories of the Arts                             Intermittent: 6 units
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               Examines the continued importance of one of cinema's greatest
Instructor: Ting Chang, PhD. Considers diverse forms of the            directors. In addition to a brief overview of his life, the course
creative, performing and literary arts throughout history and the      explores Hitchchock's use of the camera to explore his idea of
world. Addresses how the arts influence and overlap one another        "pure cinema" and its connection to psychological and moral
in relation to broader cultural and social institutions and            issues. The course also analyzes how audience-centered his
processes. Examines the intersection and impact of historical          films are,and the high degree of audience manipulation Hitchcock
movements and creative traditions, connecting them to present          sustains in his films. Films include "The Lodger," "39 Steps,"
practices. Engages with concepts, theories, and modes of thought       "Shadow of a Doubt," "Notorious," "Rope," "Strangers on a Train,"
in a critical analysis of the production and interpretation of the     "Rear Window," "Vertigo," "North by Northwest," "Psycho," "The
arts across temporal, geographical and cultural contexts.              Birds," and "Frenzy."
64-300     CAS Fall Fellow                                             Chemical       Engineering
Intermittent: 9 units
Title: Imaging the City Instructor: Carl DiSalvo, PhD. The phrase      06-100     Introduction to Chemical Engineering
"Imaging the City" broadly refers to the use of visual means to        Fall and Spring: 12 units
represent and envision the human experience of and interaction         We equip students with creative engineering problem-solving
with the urban environment. In this course we will examine             techniques and fundamental chemical engineering material
practices and theories of "Imaging the City" drawing on diverse        balance skills. Lectures, laboratory experiments, and recitation
discourses including art, urban planning and design, architecture,     sessions are designed to provide coordinated training and
human geography, science & technology studies, urban studies,          experience in data analysis, material property estimation for
and critical theory. A specific emphasis of this class will be to      single- and multi-phase systems, basic process flowsheet,
examine how emerging modes and technologies of capturing,              reactive and non-reactive mass balances, problem solving
constructing, and sharing images of the city change, or might          strategies and tools, and team dynamics. The course is targeted
change, how we envision the urban environment and how we use           for CIT First Year students.
images of the city for civic expression, representation, and           Corequisites: 21-120, 09-105
action. In this course we will ask questions such as: What
constitutes an image and the city? How are images of the city          06-200     Sophomore Research Project
activated toward social and political ends? and How do new             Fall and Spring: 3-12 units
images of the city made possible by emerging technologies              Research projects under the direction of the Chemical
change the practice of imaging the city and what now constitutes       Engineering faculty. The nature of the project, the number of units,
the urban 'seen'? Central to this course will be investigating how     and the criteria for grading are to be determined between the
theories of urban experience, technological developments, and          student and the faculty supervisor. The agreement should then be
social and political agendas co-mingle in the aesthetic practices      summarized in a one-page project description for review by the
of imaging the city.                                                   faculty advisor of the student. A final written report or an oral
                                                                       presentation of the results is required.
64-301      CAS Fall Fellow
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  06-221     Thermodynamics
Title: Poetry and Performance Instructor: Susan Somers-Willett,        Fall: 9 units
PhD. From the bards to the beatniks, performance has been an           This course introduces students to the process thermodynamics
important part of how poets write, read, and are received by public    of single component systems. Topics include equilibrium and
audiences. However, the majority of literary criticism considers       thermodynamic state variables; heat and work; conservation of
poetry as merely a textual entity. Is our experience of a poem         energy and the first law of thermodynamics; entropy balances and
ever just textual? How do our understandings of poetry expand          the second law of thermodynamics; reversibility; free energies;
when we consider orality and performance as important aspects of       interconversion of heat and work via engines, refrigeration and
a poem? How do we distinguish a poetry reading from a                  power cycles; absolute temperature and the third law of
"performance?" How are traditional notions of poetry transformed       thermodynamics; equations of state; principle of corresponding
by current aesthetic movements and cultural practices such as          states; thermodynamic property relationships; changes of state;
hip-hop, spoken word, and poetry slams, and how is such verse          phase equilibrium and stability in single component systems;
informed by identity and social politics? In this course, we           vapor pressure and phase transition.
consider the functions of textuality, orality, and performativity in   Prerequisites: 06100 and 33106
the work of twentieth-century and contemporary American poets
as well as the social functions of verse in various periods in         06-222    Sophomore Chemical Engineering Seminar
American history. To facilitate our discussion of these issues, we     Fall: 1 units
will read essays and poetry by a wide variety of authors. In           This course provides an overview of the chemical engineering
addition to writing two papers on original topics, you will also be    profession. It discusses the rationale for the curriculum, career
required to attend at least two performance poetry events outside      paths, resume writing, written communication skills, and ethics,
of class and write an analysis of each. Later in the semester, you     and also involves a project on the use and manufacture of
will perform a poem for the class and write about your reflections     chemicals.
on this experience. Dramatic or creative writing experience is not
required of students; rather, you will put what you’ve learned         06-261    Fluid Mechanics
about poetry in performance into action in this final assignment,      Spring: 9 units
and it will be expected that students with a range of different        The principles of fluid mechanics as applied to engineering,
backgrounds will approach the assignment from various
perspectives.
3 8 4 Course Descriptions




including unit operations, are discussed; examples include flow in     fluid flow and heat and mass transfer. Oral and written reports are
conduits, process equipment, and commercial pipes, flow around         required.
submerged objects, and flow measurement. Microscopic mass              Prerequisites: 06261 and 06323
and momentum balances are described, including the continuity
and Navier-Stokes equations, and modern solution techniques            06-400     Senior Research Project
will be explored. Microscopic flow structures will be determined       Fall and Spring: 3-36 units
for flow visualization. Boundary layer theory, turbulence, and non-    Research projects under the direction of the Chemical
Newtonian fluids are also discussed. A case-study project based        Engineering faculty. The nature of the project, the number of units,
on new technological advancements is also required.                    and the criteria for grading are to be determined between the
Prerequisites: 06100 and 21259          Corequisites: 06-262           student and the faculty supervisor. The agreement should then be
                                                                       summarized in a one-page project description for review by the
06-262    Mathematical Methods of Chemical Engineering                 faculty advisor of the student. A final written report or an oral
Spring: 12 units                                                       presentation of the results is required.
Mathematical techniques are presented as tools for modeling and
solving engineering problems. Modeling of steady-state mass and        06-421     Chemical Process Systems Design
energy balance problems using linear and matrix algebra,               Fall: 12 units
including Gaussian elimination, decomposition, and iterative           Screening of processing alternatives. Computational strategies
techniques. Modeling of unsteady-state engineering problems            for preliminary material and energy balances in large chemical
using linear and nonlinear differential equations. Analytical          processes. Preliminary sizing of process equipment. Cost
techniques, including Laplace transforms, and numerical                estimation and evaluation for chemical plants. Strategies for
techniques for the solution of first-and higher-order differential     synthesizing energy networks and separation sequences.
equations and systems of differential equations arising in             Preliminary design of a large industrial project.
engineering models. Finally, the modeling of processes affected        Prerequisites: 06321       Corequisites: 06-422
by chance and subject to experimental error; statistical and
regression techniques within the context of experimental design        06-422     Chemical Reaction Engineering
and analysis of experimental data.                                     Fall: 9 units
Prerequisites: 06221 and 21122                                         Fundamental concepts in the kinetic modeling of chemical
                                                                       reactions, the treatment and analysis of rate data. Multiple
06-300     Junior Research Project                                     reactions and reaction mechanisms. Analysis and design of ideal
Fall and Spring: 3-12 units                                            and non-ideal reactor systems. Energy effects and mass transfer
Research projects under the direction of the Chemical                  in reactor systems. Introductory principles in heterogeneous
Engineering faculty. The nature of the project, the number of units,   catalysis.
and the criteria for grading are to be determined between the          Prerequisites: 09347
student and the faculty supervisor. The agreement should then be
summarized in a one-page project description for review by the         06-423     Unit Operations Laboratory
faculty advisor of the student. A final written report or an oral      Fall: 9 units
presentation of the results is required.                               A series of open-ended laboratory projects illustrate the
                                                                       principles of unit operations and process control. Experiments are
06-321    Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics                          designed to be relevant to current industrial, environmental, and
Fall: 9 units                                                          safety practices. Examples include distilling mixtures, such as
The objective of this course is to cover principles and solution       ethanol and water; removing pollutants from stack gasses;
techniques for phase and chemical equilibria in multicomponent         controlling pH in tank systems with flow; testing mixture
systems. Topics include thermodynamic properties of ideal and          explosion properties; operating liquid-liquid extraction systems,
non-ideal mixtures; criteria for equilibrium; chemical potential,      such as ethanol and water; designing reactors based on the
fugacity and activity coefficients; flash calculations; Gibbs          reaction kinetics of ethane hydrogenolysis; and separating
energy minimization; thermodynamics of chemical reactions              oxygen and nitrogen in air using a hollow-fiber membrane. Oral
including equilibrium conversions.                                     and written reports are required.
Prerequisites: 06221                                                   Prerequisites: 06361 and 06362

06-322     Junior Chemical Engineering Seminar                         06-426      Experimental Colloid Surface Science
Fall: 2 units                                                          Fall: 9 units
This course discusses career choices for chemical engineers,           Laboratory exercises will deal with preparation and stabilization of
professional practice, including alternate career paths, global        colloids, flocculation, micellar aggregates, surface tension,
industry, and graduate studies. It also emphasizes writing,            contact angle, spreading and adsorption. Basic concepts will be
interview skills, and oral presentations. Safety, environmental and    related to practical problems of wetting, lubrication, foaming,
ethical issues are illustrated in projects and via invited lectures.   adhesion, coatings and corrosion.
                                                                       Corequisites: 06-607, 09-221
06-323     Heat and Mass Transfer
Fall: 9 units                                                          06-461    Process Design Project
This course presents the fundamentals of heat and mass transfer,       Spring: Mini Session - 6 units
including steady-state and transient heat conduction and               Computer-aided design of a large industrial project involving
molecular diffusion, convection of heat and mass, and thermal          synthesis of process, energy and material balances and
radiation, with application to heat and mass transfer processes.       economic evaluation. An extensive report on the project must be
Development of dimensionless quantities for engineering analysis       submitted.
is emphasized.                                                         Prerequisites: 06421
Prerequisites: 06262 or 21260
                                                                       06-462    Economics and Optimization
06-361      Unit Operations of Chemical Engineering                    Spring: Mini Session - 6 units
Spring: 9 units                                                        Formulation and solution of mathematical optimization problems
This course comprises many of the standard operations in               with and without constraints. Objective functions are based on
chemical plants such as gas absorption, heat exchange,                 economics or functional specifications. Both discrete and
distillation and extraction. The design and operation of these         continuous variables are considered.
devices is emphasized. A project dealing with a novel unit             Corequisites: 06-461
operation is also investigated.
Prerequisites: 06321 and 06323                                         06-466     Experimental Polymer Science
                                                                       Spring: 9 units
06-362    Chemicial Engineering Process Control                        Macromolecular behavior in bulk and in solution will be explored
Spring: 9 units                                                        in experiments on tensile strength, elasticity, swelling of
This course presents basic concepts of process dynamics and            networks, solution viscosity, melt flow, and polymerization
feedback control. Included are selection of measurements and           reactions. Particular reference will be made to aspects affecting
manipulated variables, definition of transfer functions, creation of   production and fabrication of polymeric materials.
block diagrams and closed loop configurations. The course also         Prerequisites: 09221 and (06609 or 09509)
covers concepts of open loop and closed loop stability, and tuning
of PID controllers.                                                    06-606    Computational Methods for Large Scale Process Design
Prerequisites: 06262                                                   & Analysis
                                                                       Spring: 9 units
06-363     Transport Process Laboratory                                This course deals with the underlying computer-aided design
Spring: 6 units                                                        techniques for steady-state and dynamic simulation, numerical
Develop skills for proposing, designing, planning, implementing,       solution and decomposition strategies for large systems of
interpreting, and communicating the results of experiments in          sparse nonlinear algebraic equations, stiff ordinary differential
                                                                       equations, strategies for mixed algebraic/differential systems and
                                                                                                             Course Descriptions     385




computer architectures for flowsheeting systems.                      biological reactors, mass transfer limitations within cell
Prerequisites: 06262 and 06361                                        suspensions, and control of fermentation processes. Lectures will
                                                                      cover aspects of accuracy and resolution, relative merits and
06-607     Physical Chemistry of Colloids and Surfaces                limitations, selection criteria, and typical practical applications
All Semesters: 9 units                                                for these devices. Several laboratory demonstrations will be
Thermodynamics of surfaces; adsorption at gas, liquid, and solid      provided. Each student will be expected to submit a project report
interfaces; capillarity; wetting, spreading, lubrication and          on a topic assigned in the beginning of the course.
adhesion; properties of monolayers and thin films; preparation        Prerequisites: 03231 and 06262
and characterization of colloids; colloidal stability, flocculation
kinetics, micelles, electrokinetic phenomena and emulsions.           06-622     Bioprocess Design
Prerequisites: 06221 and 09347                                        Fall and Spring: 9 units
                                                                      This course is designed to link concepts of cell culture,
06-608    Safety Issues in Science and Engineering Practice           bioseparations, formulation and delivery together for the
Fall: 3 units                                                         commercial production and use of biologically-based
Exposes the students to personal safety issues encountered in         pharmaceuticals; products considered include proteins, nucleic
normal science and engineering practice. Topics covered include       acids, and fermentation-derived fine chemicals. Associated
mechanical, electrical, chemical, radiation, and biological           regulatory issues and biotech industry case studies are also
hazards, to provide an awareness of these hazards and                 included. A fair knowledge of cell culture and fermentation
appropriate action to be taken in the event of an accident.           operations is assumed.
                                                                      Prerequisites: 06621 or 42621
06-609     Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules
Fall: 9 units                                                         06-630      Atomospheric Chemistry, Air Pollution and Global
This course develops fundamental principles of polymer science.       Change
Emphasis is placed on physio-chemical concepts associated with        Fall and Spring: 12 units
the macromolecular nature of polymeric materials. Engineering         Principles necessary to understand the atmospheric behavior of
aspects of the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of        air pollutants in urban, regional, and global scales are the
these materials are discussed in relation to molecular structure.     subjects of this course. Key topics include atmospheric gas-,
Topics include an introduction to polymer science and a general       aqueous-, and aerosol-phase chemistry; removal processes and
discussion of commercially important polymers; molecular              residence times; aerosol physics; pollutant effects on visibility
weight; condensation and addition synthesis mechanisms with           and the energy balance of the planet; mathematical modeling of
emphasis on molecular weight distribution; solution                   air pollution. The student finishing the course will understand the
thermodynamics and molecular conformation; rubber elasticity;         fundamentals of atmospheric chemistry and physics and their
and the rheological and mechanical properties of polymeric            relationship to urban, regional, and global pollution problems.
systems. Students not having the prerequisite listed may seek         Students not having the prerequisites listed may seek permission
permission of the instructor.                                         of the instructor.
Prerequisites: 09347                                                  Prerequisites: 06262 and 09105

06-610     Rheology and Structure of Complex Fluids                   06-640     Principles and Applications of Molecular Simulation
Fall: 9 units                                                         Fall and Spring: 9 units
This course will cover the basic concepts of rheology and             This course will introduce modern concepts and methods for
mechanical behavior of fluid systems. Both the experimental and       simulating physical and thermodynamics properties of materials
theoretical aspects of rehology will be discussed. The basic          from atomic-scales, with special emphasis on the gas and liquid
forces influencing complex fluid rheology and rheology will be        states. Strengths and limitations of molecular simulation methods
outlined and discussed; including excluded volume, van der            will be discussed. Topics will include basic statistical mechanics,
Waals, electrostatic and other interactions. Methods of               interatomic potentials, Molecular Dynamics methods, Monte
characterizing structure will be covered including scattering         Carlo methods, computation of phase coexistence curves, and
techniques, optical polarimetry and microscopy. Examples will         Brownian Dynamics.
focus on several types of complex fluids including polymer            Prerequisites: 06262 and 06321
solutions and melts, gelling systems, suspensions and self-
assembling fluids.                                                    Civil & Environmental Engineering
Prerequisites: 06609 or 09509
                                                                      12-090     Technology and the Environment
06-619     Semiconductor Processing Technology                        Spring and Summer: 9 units
Spring: 9 units                                                       Technical elective for undergraduate, non-engineering majors.
This is an introductory course to the physical and chemical           Overview of major environmental issues and concerns associated
concepts involved in integrated circuit processing. The material      with modern technology. Topics in the course include automobiles
focuses on basic principles in chemical reaction engineering and      and associated air emissions and fuel consumption, information
how they can be applied to integrated circuit process engineering.    technology and electricity usage, electricity generation and
Students not having the prerequisites listed may seek permission      alternative sources to reduce air emissions and wastes, CFCs
of the instructor.                                                    and their influence on the ozone layer, and various issues related
Prerequisites: 06422 and 09347                                        to land use patterns such as agriculture and infrastructure.
                                                                      Methods for using technology to improve environmental
06-620     Global Atmospheric Chemistry: Fundamentals and Data        conditions also discussed. Within this framework the course aims
Analysis Methods                                                      to build fundamental problem solving skills, basic familiarity with
Spring: 9 units                                                       engineering calculations, and understanding of everyday
This course will explore global atmospheric chemistry through a       environmental issues. The overall purpose is to instill an
series of case studies: Stratospheric Ozone, Global Methane and       appreciation of the complexity of issues and viewpoints
OH, and Urban and Regional Ozone. Each case will begin with a         surrounding technology development and associated
description of the chemistry and atmospheric physics                  environmental impacts.
fundamental to the particular problem. Students will formulate
testable mathematical models incorporating that chemistry and         12-100     Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering
physics, turning then to existing atmospheric data sets to test       Fall and Spring: 12 units
current understanding. The emphasis of this course is to develop      Introduction to selected subfields in the discipline, such as
an understanding of how to pose a testable hypotheses in a            structural engineering, construction project management, and
complex chemical environment such as the atmosphere, validate         environmental engineering. Problem-solving exercises apply
or refute those hypotheses, and then by extension predict how the     fundamental concepts from these subfields to integrate the steps
system will respond to perturbations. A particular objective is to    of analysis, synthesis, and evaluation through individual
explore how to extend this methodology from the stratosphere          homework assignments and group projects that require attention
and background troposphere (the first two cases), where it has        to a broad range of issues. The course also exposes the students
been applied with success, to the much more complicated               to issues related to engineering practice such as working in
problem of urban and regional air quality. Students not having the    teams, scheduling, evaluating risk and making ethical decisions.
prerequisites listed may seek permission of the instructor.           In addition to regular lectures and project exercises, the course
Prerequisites: 06262 and 09105                                        includes guest speakers and class demonstrations. 3 hrs., rec., 1
                                                                      hr. lab. Co-requisites: 21-120, 33-106.
06-621     Biotechnology and Environmental Processes                  Prerequisites:       Corequisites: 21-120, 33-106
Fall: 9 units
First half of the course: microbial physiology and metabolism,        12-235     Statics
fermentations and respiration, metabolic regulation,                  Spring: 9 units
bioconversions, recombinant DNA methodology and gene cloning.         Introduction to vector mechanics; equivalent systems of forces;
Second half: separation and purification, kinetics and design of      equilibrium of rigid bodies; free body diagram; distributed forces,
                                                                      hydrostatic forces, effective forces, centroids; applications to
3 8 6 Course Descriptions




simple statically determinate trusses, beams, frames, cables and
other physical systems; friction. 3 hrs. rec. Corequisites: 12-         12-355     Fluid Mechanics
100, 21-122, 33-106                                                     Spring: 9 units
Prerequisites:       Corequisites: 21-122, 12-100, 33-106               Fluid characteristics; continuity, momentum and energy
                                                                        equations; dynamic similitude; laminar and turbulent boundary
12-251    Introduction to Environmental Engineering                     layers; flow in pipes; lift and drag on immersed bodies; open
Fall: 9 units                                                           channel flow. Corequisites: 21-260, 21-259
Provides a scientific and engineering basis for understanding           Corequisites: 21-260, 21-259
environmental issues and problems. Introduces material and
energy balances for tracking substances in the atmosphere,              12-356    Fluid Mechanics Lab
surface and ground waters, and soil systems. Pertinent                  Spring: 3 units
environmental laws are described, simple quantitative                   Fluid properties: density, specific gravity, viscosity; fluid
engineering models are developed, and qualitative descriptions of       characteristics; continuity, conservation of energy; fluid
environmental engineering control technologies are                      behavior: center of pressure, pipe flow, open-channel flow.
presented.3hrs. rec. Prerequisities: 06-101 or 12-100                   Laboratory experiments illustrating basic principles. 1 hr. lab.
Prerequisites: 06101 or 12100                                           Corequsities: 12-355
                                                                        Corequisites: 12-355
12-252    Introduction Environment Engineering Lab
Fall: 3 units                                                           12-358    Materials Lab
(Required for CEE students, not for others) Laboratory and field        Fall: Mini Session - 3 units
experiments that illustrate the basic principles of environmental       Examination of materials properties and behavior of concrete,
engineering. 1 hr. lab. Corequisities 12-251                            masonry, and timber. 2 hr. lab Prerequisites: 27-357
Corequisites: 12-251
                                                                        12-401     Civil & Environmental Engineering Design
12-271    Introduction to Computer Applications in Civil &              Fall: 15 units
Environmental Engineering                                               Methodology for formulating and solving design problems,
Fall: 9 units                                                           characterized by incomplete specifications, open-ended solution
Introduction to the use of computer-based applications in civil         space, and partial evaluations. The methodology is illustrated and
engineering, using generic tools such as spread-sheets, equation        applied in the context of realistic design problems drawn from
solvers and computer graphics. Discussion of the role of                civil and environmental engineering. Design projects performed
computer-based methods in civil engineering practice. 3 hrs. rec.       by teams, emphasizing collaborative problem-solving and
Prerequisites: 21-120 and 33-106                                        preparation of written and oral reports. 2 hrs. rec., 2 hrs. lab.
Prerequisites: 21115 and 21116 and 33106                                Prerequisite: Senior Standing in Civil and Environmental
                                                                        Engineering or instructor approval for Design Minors.
12-301      CEE Projects
Fall: 12 units                                                          12-411     Engineering Economics
Basic elements of civil and environmental engineering projects,         Fall: Mini Session - 6 units
from project conception through design, to implementation and           Basic concepts of economic analysis and evaluation of
operation. Project components are explored through formal               alternative engineering projects for capital investment.
instruction combined with analysis of actual engineering projects       Consideration of time value of money and common merit
and student team activities. The course is intended to develop          measures such as net present value and internal rate of return.
skills and understanding related to the application of engineering      Selection of independent projects and mutually exclusive
and science principles, approximations, empiricism, and                 proposals, using various methods of analysis. Capital budgeting
experience to engineering projects; basic theory and practice of        and project financing. Influence of price level changes,
design; the importance and challenge of team efforts and effective      depreciation and taxation on choice of alternatives. Uncertainty
communication; and the utility of measurements, modeling,               and risk in operation and financing. Important factors affecting
visualization, quality control, and engineering graphics. 4 hrs. rec.   investment decisions for private and public projects. 3 hrs. rec.
Prerequisites: 12-235 and 12-251 and 12-271                             Prerequsite: 21-115 or 21-116 and Senior Standing in Civil and
Prerequisites: 12235 and 12251 and 12271                                Environmental Engineering
                                                                        Prerequisites: 21115 and 21116
12-331     Solid Mechanics
Fall: 9 units                                                           12-604     Special Topics: Transportation Engineering
Analysis of deformable bodies incorporating concepts of stress,         Spring: 9 units
strain, mechanical properties of materials, and geometric               Introduction to traffic engineering and highway design providing
compatibility. Response under axial loads, torsion, bending,            practical experience that can be used directly in the workforce.
transverse shear, and combined loadings. Stress and strain              Course material will provide a solid foundation in preparing for the
transformations and Mohr's circles, deflections of beams and            Professional Engineer exam. The course incorporates the “soft”
shafts, buckling of columns.Prerequisities: 12-235 Corequisites:        side of transportation engineering with tasks such as traffic
21-259                                                                  analyses and traffic studies and the “hard” side of transportation
Prerequisites: 12235      Corequisites: 21-259                          engineering including traffic signal design, signing design,
                                                                        pavement marking design, maintenance and protection of traffic
12-332    Solid Mechanics Lab                                           during construction design, and highway design.
Fall: 3 units
Analysis of stress-strain relationships, torsion of solid shafts,       12-605     Design and Construction
deformation due to bending, deformations in three dimensions,           Spring: 9 units
Mohr?s circle representation of stress and strain, buckling of          Introduction to steel, concrete, wood, and masonry construction
slender columns. Laboratory experiments and reports associated          methods and material selection; integration of design and
with theoretical concepts. 1 hr. lab. Prerequisities: 12-335            constructability criteria; conformance of designs to applicable
Corequsition: 12-331                                                    building and fire codes; preparation of plans and specifications;
Prerequisites: 12235       Corequisites: 12-331                         laboratory demonstration and experiments. 2 hrs. rec., 2 hrs. lab.
                                                                        Prerequisities: 12-331 or permission of the instructor.
12-335     Soil Mechanics                                               Corequisites: 12-331
Spring: 9 units
Sampling, testing and identification of soils. Physical, chemical       12-611     Project Management Construction
and hydraulic characteristics. Stress-strain-strength                   Fall: 9 units
relationships for soils. Permeability, seepage, consolidation, and      Introduction to construction project management from owner?s
shear strength, with applications to deformation and stability          perspective in organizing planning, design, construction and
problems, including earth dams, foundations, retaining walls,           operation as an integrated process. Examination of labor
slopes and landfills. 3 hrs. rec. Prerequisites: 12-331                 productivity, material management and equipment utilization.
Corequisities 12-355                                                    Cost estimation and financing of constructed facilities.
Prerequisites: 12331        Corequisites: 12-355                        Contracting, construction planning and fundamental scheduling
                                                                        procedures. Cost control, monitoring and accounting for
12-336     Soil Mechanics and Materials Laboratory                      construction. 3 hrs. rec. Co-requisite: 36-220 or equivalent.
Spring: 3 units                                                         Prerequisites: 36211
Examination of material properties and behavior of soils.
Experiments include soil classification, permeability, compaction,      12-631     Structural Design
consolidation and strength tests. 1 hr. lab. Prerequisities: 09-        Spring: 12 units
105, 12-331 and 33-107                                                  Design of structural members for bending moment, shear force,
Prerequisites: 09105 and 12331 and 33107                                axial force, and combined axial force and bending. Reinforced
                                                                        concrete, structural steel, and composite beam construction are
                                                                        considered. Buckling effects in columns, beams and local plate
                                                                        segments are treated. Serviceability limits such as deflection and
                                                                        cracking are addressed. Design projects include the
                                                                                                             Course Descriptions     387




determination of loads and the selection of system geometry.          Chemistry
Prerequisites: 12331 and 12358 and 27357
                                                                      09-101     Introduction to Experimental Chemistry
12-635      Structural Analysis                                       Fall and Spring: Mini Session - 3 units
Fall: 9 units                                                         This is a seven week chemistry laboratory course that is
Matrix Algebra. Introduction to the Stiffness Method - spring         designed to introduce students to some basic laboratory skills,
element, direct stiffness method, stiffness assembly, boundary        techniques, and equipment commonly used in experimental
conditions, potential energy approach; one-dimensional                chemical investigations. The experiments will apply concepts in
governing equations for heat flow, axial bar, transversely loaded     organic synthesis, quantitative analysis using visible
spring, diffusion, electric current, laminar pipe flow; truss         spectrophotometry, kinetics, acid-base chemistry,
analysis; beam analysis; frame and grid analysis, arbitrarily         thermochemistry, transition metal chemistry, chromatography,
oriented beam in space, substructure analysis; plane stress and       and protein biochemistry. 1 hr. lec., 3 hrs. lab.
plane strain analysis, equations of elasticity, constant strain
triangle, body and surface forces, linear strain triangle;            09-102     Special Topics
axisymmetric elements; isoparametric formulation, bar element,        Spring: Mini Session - 3 units
rectangular elements, Gaussian quadrature, high order shape           A selection of mini-courses offered to introduce first-year
functions.                                                            students to special topics in modern chemistry. The courses
Prerequisites: 12331                                                  meet for half a semester and may include some hands-on
                                                                      laboratory and computer experiences. Topics vary, but have
12-636     Geotechnical Engineering                                   included: Forensic Chemistry in the Criminal Justice System,
Spring: 9 units                                                       Macromeolecules for Nanotechnology, Popularization of Science
Emphasis is on three major components of geotechnical                 Through Books, Plays and Film, Kaboom and Other Approaches
engineering: (1) planning and design of exploration programs,         to Teaching Science, Dating Using Radioactivity and Computer
interpretation of field and laboratory test data for use in           Molecular Modeling. Enrollment limited to first-year MCS and
geotechnical site characterization; (2) problem definition (e.g.,     SHS students.
slope stability, settlement analysis, etc.) and development of
idealized analytical models; and (3) applications of analytical and   09-103      Atoms, Molecules and Chemical Change
numerical methods, particularly computer methods, applied to          Fall: 9 units
analysis and design. 3 hrs. rec.                                      This is a one-semester introductory college level course
Prerequisites: 12335                                                  designed for non-science majors who have had a high school
                                                                      course in chemistry. Objectives are to provide students with an
12-651     Air Quality Engineering                                    understanding of basic chemical principles and to show how these
Fall: 9 units                                                         are applied in so many different and practical applications. Major
Problems and methodologies for studies of environmental               topics include: measurements, matter, atomic theory and the
management, with an emphasis on air pollution. Key topics             Periodic Table, chemical bonding, stoichiometry and chemical
include sources of pollutants, focusing on combustion chemistry       reactions, properties of aqueous solutions, states of matter
for a hydrocarbon fuel; behavior of gaseous and particulate           (solids, liquids and gases), and acid-base chemistry. Additional
pollutants in the atmosphere including the role of meteorology        topics may include: chemical equilibrium, thermochemistry,
and the use of dispersion equations; effects of pollutants on         reaction rates, and nuclear chemistry. Students should gain
human health and global climate; and procedures by which air          confidence in applying scientific reasoning concepts to situations
pollution standards are developed and enforced by regulatory          beyond the course. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
agencies. Statistical treatment of data is included at several
places in the course. 3 hrs. rec. Prerequisites: 12-251, 12-355       09-104      Fundamental Aspects of Organic Chemistry and
Co-requisite: 36-220                                                  Biochemistry
Prerequisites: 12251 and 12355 and 36211                              Spring: 9 units
                                                                      This course, which includes demonstrations and "hands-on"
12-655     Water Quality Engineering                                  activities, is designed to engage non-majors in the fascination of
Fall: 9 units                                                         chemistry. It is not essential that a student has completed 09-
An introduction to the fundamentals and engineering aspects of        103 in order to take this course. The lecture part of this course
water quality. Basic principles of water chemistry; physical,         will include wide ranging science topics designed to put the world
chemical and biological phenomena affecting water quality; and        of chemistry in perspective. After achieving a competency in
application of these concepts to a description of water quality       fundamentals we proceed to systematically survey the important
changes that may occur in treatment processes and in natural-         topics of synthesis, structure and mechanism in organic
water environments including water and wastewater treatment           chemistry. With these insights we finally confront the important
systems and groundwater. 3 hrs. rec. Prerequisites: 09-105, 12-       biological molecules including DNA. While it is useful to have
251 Co-requisite: 12-355.                                             occasional "pop quizzes" the course will not include formal
Prerequisites: 09105 and 12251         Corequisites: 12-355           exams. assessment will be largely based upon attendance, "pop
                                                                      quizzes" ,papers and slide sets. The paper/slide part of the
12-656     Water Quality Engineering Lab                              course requires each student to successfully pursue independent
Spring: Mini Session - 3 units                                        investigations of the literature. Each of the required three papers
Examination of water quality using titrimetric, spectrometric,        will include a 15 minute slide or overhead presentation. The
potentiometric and reductive/oxidative techniques. Illustration of    papers and slide sets, will be submitted in both hard copy and
principles of dilute aqueous chemistry and processes for affecting    electronic attachment form. Initially a preliminary presentation
water quality. 2 hrs. lab.                                            will announce the individual choice of topics. Deadlines for
Corequisites: 12-655                                                  submission of papers/slides will be given at the first meeting. 3
                                                                      hrs lec.,1 hr rec.
12-657     Water Resources Engineering
Spring: 9 units                                                       09-105     Introduction to Modern Chemistry I
Principles and applications of open channel flow. Hydrology of        Fall and Spring: 10 units
surface and ground water sources and the estimation of water          This course begins with a very brief survey of some fundamental
requirements. Planning and design of water distribution and           principles of chemistry and a presentation of chemically
wastewater and storm water collection systems. 3 hrs. rec.            interesting applications and sophisticated problems. These will
Prerequisites: 12251       Corequisites: 12-355                       form the basis for introducing the relationships between the
                                                                      structure of molecules and their chemical properties and
12-658     Hyraulic Structures                                        behavior. The subject matter will include principles of atomic
Spring: 9 units                                                       structure, chemical bonding, intermolecular interactions and
Theory and practice of design or riverine and coastal structures,     molecular structures of organic and inorganic compounds
including dams, levees, bridge piers, culverts, jetties and groins,   including some transition metal complexes. Relevant examples
seawalls, bulkheads, breakwaters, marinas, and harbors. Key           will be drawn from such areas as environmental, materials, and
related concepts from surface and ground water hydrology, and         biological chemistry. 3 hrs. lec, 2 hrs. rec.
wave mechanics. 3 hrs. rec.
Corequisites: 12-355                                                  09-106    Modern Chemistry II
                                                                      Fall and Spring: 10 units
12-659      Special Topics: Matlab                                    The course provides an introduction to some basic concepts of
Fall: Mini Session - 6 units                                          chemical equilibria and thermodynamics. Topics may include gas
This mini course is designed to be a practical introduction to        phase equilibria, acid-base chemistry, solubilities, oxidation-
engineering scientific computation. The topics of this class will     reduction reactions, enthalpy, entropy, free energy, colligative
include basic matrix computation, solving ordinary and partial        properties and electrochemistry. Chemical kinetics is introduced
differential equations, solving systems of linear equations,          to complement the study of thermodynamics. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs.
computing eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and basic signal              rec.
processing and neural network techniques. Throughout the              Prerequisites: 09105 or 09107
course, these scientific computation tools will be demonstrated
using interactive scientific software called MATLAB.
3 8 8 Course Descriptions




09-107      Honors Chemistry: Fundamental Concepts and                assemblies. Readings from monographs and classroom lectures
Applications                                                          by the instructor will cover this material. Students will then begin
Fall: 10 units                                                        to read about applications of supramolecular chemistry from the
Honors Chemistry is an introductory course that teaches the           scientific literature, learning to compare articles, to evaluate the
foundations of Modern Chemistry and applies them to current           quality of the data and interpretations reached by the authors, to
scientific issues, such as Green Chemistry, Biotechnology and         use the knowledge gained from these readings and discussions to
Materials Science. Topics include modern theories of bonding,         predict the outcomes of related experiments, and to ultimately be
organization of atoms, molecular interactions, biochemistry and       able to design their own experiments to answer research
transition metal chemistry. Enrollment is limited to first-year       questions. Meeting hours set by instructor, enrollment limited
students, with priority given to those in MCS. 3 hrs. lec., 2 hrs.    with priority given to sophomore chemistry majors.
rec.                                                                  Prerequisites: 09217          Corequisites: 09-218

09-201      Undergraduate Seminar I                                   09-221      Laboratory I: Introduction to Chemical Analysis
Fall: 1 units                                                         Fall and Spring: 12 units
Issues and topics of importance to beginning chemistry majors         This course is the first in a sequence of four laboratory courses
are discussed in this course. It provides a general introduction to   on experimental aspects of chemistry. The experimental work
the facilities, faculty and programs of the Department of             emphasizes the techniques of quantitative chemical analysis.
Chemistry and introduces students to career and research              Included are projects dealing with a variety of intrumental and wet
opportunities in the field of chemistry. Enrollment limited to        chemical techniques. The course is project-oriented with the
students majoring in chemistry. 1 hr.                                 experiments becoming more complex, requiring greater student
                                                                      input into the experimental design as the semester progresses. A
09-202     Undergraduate Seminar II                                   mixture of individual and team experiments are conducted during
Spring: 1 units                                                       the semester. In addition to techniques, safety, written and oral
Issues and topics focused on laboratory safety are discussed in       communication skills, and effective teamwork are emphasized. 2
this class. The topics are selected to supplement information         hrs. lec., 6 hrs. lab.
covered in 09-221, Labortaory I. This course is intended to           Prerequisites: 09106
provide the necessary safety training for students wishing to
undertake undergraduate research projects in the laboratory and       09-222      Laboratory II: Organic Synthesis and Analysis
is taught in collaboration with the Office of Environmental Health    Spring: 12 units
and Safety. Enrollment is limited to chemistry majors. 1 hr.          This second course in the laboratory sequence introduces some
                                                                      important laboratory methods for synthesis and purification of
09-204    Issues in Chemistry                                         organic compounds, as well as practical applications of
Spring: 3 units                                                       spectroscopy and chromatography for characterization of organic
This course uses current issues in chemistry such as                  compounds. Use of the chemical literature is included. 2 hrs. lec.,
environmental and ethical topics as a vehicle for developing          6 hrs. lab.
writing and speaking skills. Enrollment is restricted students        Prerequisites: 09217 and 09221        Corequisites: 09-218
majoring in chemistry. 1 hr. lec.
                                                                      09-231      Mathematical Methods for Chemists
09-214     Physical Chemistry                                         Fall: 9 units
Spring: 9 units                                                       This course covers mathematical techniques that are important
This is a one-semester course intended primarily for students         in the chemical sciences. The techniques will be covered in the
majoring in Biological Sciences, students pursuing a B.A. degree      context of chemical phenomena, and combine topics from 3-
program in Chemistry, and students in the B.S.A. program with a       dimensional calculus, differential equations, linear algebra and
concentration in chemistry. The course focuses on                     statistics. This course does not count towards the minor in
thermodynamics, transport and reaction rates and their                chemistry. 3 hrs. lec.
application to chemical and biological systems. Emphasis is           Prerequisites: 09106 and (21122 or 21123)
given to attaining a good fundamental understanding of entropy
and free energy. This is more a concepts than skills building         09-301     Undergraduate Seminar III
course. Topics include applications of thermodynamics to              Fall: 1 units
chemical and biochemical equilibria, electrochemistry, solutions,     Students attend seminars on current topics in chemistry.
and chemical kinetics. 3 hrs. lec.                                    Students are sent a menu of choices for each week of the
Prerequisites: 09106 and 21118 and 33111 and (09105 or                semester and may select topics of interest. Enrollment is
09107)                                                                restricted to students majoring in chemistry. 1 hr.

09-217      Organic Chemistry I                                       09-302     Undergraduate Seminar IV
Fall: 9 units                                                         Spring: 1 units
This course presents an overview of structure and bonding as it       Students attend seminars presented by senior chemistry majors.
pertains to organic molecules. Selected topics include:               Presentations are evaluated and students become familiar with
introduction to functional group chemistry, stereochemistry,          special topics in chemistry. Some pointers on how to organize and
conformational analysis, reaction mechanisms and use of               present an effective seminar on a topic in chemistry are given.
retrosynthetic analysis in the development of multistep               The courses establish what should be included in a good seminar.
syntheses. Methods for structure determination of organic             These seminar courses are required for chemistry majors. If a
compounds by modern spectroscopic techniques are introduced.          schedule conflict exists, students may, with permission of the
3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.                                               instructor, attend other chemistry seminars or make other
Prerequisites: 09105 or 09107                                         arrangements to fulfill the requirement. 1 hr.

09-218      Organic Chemistry II                                      09-321     Molecular Design and Synthesis
Spring: 9 units                                                       Fall: 12 units
This course further develops many of the concepts introduced in       This third course in the laboratory sequence is an advanced
Organic Chemistry I, 09-217. Emphasis is placed on the                synthesis course that covers a variety of synthetic methods for
utilization of reaction mechanisms for understanding the outcome      preparation of organic, inorganic, or organometallic compounds.
of chemical transformations, and the employment of a wide             Methods for isolation, purification, and characterization of
variety of functional groups and reaction types in the synthesis of   compounds are integrated into the experiments. Synthetic
organic molecules. Also included in the course will be special        strategy is introduced by means of a design project that involves
topics selected from the following; polymers and advanced             use of the literature. 2 hrs. lec., 6 hrs. lab.
materials, biomolecules such as carbohydrates, proteins and           Prerequisites: 09218 and 09222
nucleic acids, and drug design. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
Prerequisites: 09217                                                  09-322      Laboratory IV: Molecular Spectroscopy and Dynamics
                                                                      Spring: 12 units
09-220     Supramolecular Chemistry                                   This laboratory course is devoted to physical chemistry
Spring: Mini Session - 3 units                                        experiments, which involve the use of modern spectroscopic
Supramolecular chemistry involves the use of noncovalent              instrumentation to probe the optical and magnetic properties of
bonding interactions to assemble molecules into stable, well-         molecules. The experiments include the use of high-resolution
defined structures. This course will provide students with an         infrared, laser Raman, NMR, EPR, fluorescence, and UV-visible
introduction to this exciting field of research, which is finding     spectroscopies. Additional experiments demonstrate methods for
increasing applications in the biological and materials sciences,     measuring enzyme-catalyzed reaction rate constants, and the
nanotechnology and medicine. Students will be introduced to           use of scanning probe microscopy for imaging and
essential background concepts such as types of noncovalent            characterization of biological macromolecules.Throughout the
bonding and strategies for the design of supramolecular               course the students will learn how to use computer algebra
                                                                      packages for rigorous data analysis and modeling and will develop
                                                                      the skills in basic electronics, and vacuum techniques. 2 hrs. lec.,
                                                                      6 hrs. lab.
                                                                                                                Course Descriptions     389




Prerequisites: 09221 and 09331 and 09344             Corequisites:        Prerequisites: (06151 or 06221) AND (06155 or 06262) AND
09-345                                                                    (09105 or 09107)

09-331     Modern Analytical Instrumentation                              09-348     Inorganic Chemistry
Fall: 9 units                                                             Spring: 10 units
This course will cover all aspects of analytical instrumentation          The focus of this class is understanding the properties of the
and its application to problems in materials, environmental, and          elements and of the inorganic compounds. The electronic
biological chemistry. Topics covered will include mass                    structure of elements is discussed as the basis for the element's
spectrometry, optical spectroscopies and NMR. In addition, the            organization in the Periodic Table and for their properties. The
course will emphasize how to select an analytical method                  systematic chemistry of main group elements and of transition
appropriate to the problem at hand, how to optimize the signal to         metals is presented. The number of inorganic compounds is
noise obtained by a measurement, and the quantitative analysis            extremely large and their properties are extremely diverse.
of experimental data. Some basic electronics will be covered as           Therefore in this course, the presentation of physical and
well. 3 hrs. lec.                                                         chemical properties of inorganic compounds is based upon the
Prerequisites: 09221 and 09222         Corequisites: 09-344               observation of the trends in the respective properties and the
                                                                          relation between these trends and the place of the elements in the
09-341     The Color of Minerals and Inorganic Pigments                   Periodic Table. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
Intermittent: 9 units                                                     Prerequisites: 09106
The color of minerals is a property easily noticeable by the expert
and the casual viewer alike, and has made minerals attractive to          09-401     Undergraduate Seminar V
people for millennia. Artists in particular have made use of              Fall: 1 units
minerals to create inorganic pigments which formed the bulk of            Students attend seminars on current topics in chemistry.
the artistic palette until the industrial revolution. Historically, the   Students are sent a menu of choices for each week of the
craft of painting was closely linked to the practice of pigment           semester and may select topics of interest. Enrollment is
manufacture, with painters procuring their materials in raw form          restricted to students majoring in chemistry. 1 hr.
directly from the chemist/apothecary, and often performing
themselves the final purification and grinding of the minerals into       09-402      Undergraduate Seminar VI
pigments. With the advent of mass-produced and marketed art               Fall and Spring: 3 units
materials in the nineteenth century, the distance between chemist         Students enrolled in this course present a 20 - 30 minute oral
and artist increased until the two worlds have little to do with one      report on a current topic in chemistry. This may be from the
another. This class aims to reconnect the two disciplines for a           student's research work or a special chemistry topic of general
study of their common ground: particularly the color of minerals.         interest. Presentations or papers prepared for other courses are
This color is underscored by inorganic chemistry, which governs           not acceptable. Thoroughness in the use of the chemical
the formation and properties of minerals. Students will learn about       literature is emphasized. The use of presentation aids such as
the origin of the color of minerals with primary focus on colors          PowerPoint is encouraged. Other students in the class submit
that originate from electronic transitions and will work                  written evaluations of the presentation. A seminar presentation is
collaboratively on hands-on laboratory research projects that             required of all chemistry majors. No exceptions possible.
involve the synthesis, characterization, and use of inorganic             Enrollment is limited to students majoring in chemistry. 1 hr.
pigments. Students will interact with the scientists of the Hillman
Hall of Minerals and Gems of the Carnegie Museum of Natural               09-441     Nuclear and Radiochemistry
History and of the Artist's Materials Center of Carnegie Mellon. A        Intermittent: 9 units
series of researchers who work at the boundary between art and            This course is designed for upper level science and engineering
chemistry will give guest lectures. This is a project course open         students, and provides an introduction to the fundamentals and
to majors in chemistry and art. The course and its projects are           applications of nuclear phenomena. Among the topics discussed
designed to expand the expertise of students in both disciplines,         are the systematics of stable and unstable nuclei, nature and
while exposing them to the methods, demands, and aims of the              energetics of radioactivity, detection and measurement of nuclear
other. 2 hrs. lec, 3 hrs lab                                              radiation, tracer techniques in chemical applications, nuclear
Prerequisites: 09348 and 09221                                            processes as chemical probes, and nuclear energy. (Graduate
                                                                          Course: 12 units, 09-732)
09-344     Physical Chemistry (Quantum): Microscopic Principles           Prerequisites: 09345
of Physical Chemistry
Fall: 9 units                                                             09-445      Undergraduate Research
The measurement and theoretical description of the properties of          Fall and Spring: 3-18 units
atoms and molecules are presented. The elementary principles of           Properly qualified students may undertake research projects
quantum chemistry are developed. The many types of                        under the direction of members of the faculty, normally 6 to 12
spectroscopy used to study atoms and molecules are described.             hrs/week. A written, detailed report describing the project and
Methods of atomic structure determination are discussed. The              results is required. Course may be taken only with the consent of
structure and properties of solids are also presented. The basic          a faculty research advisor in chemistry or on occasion in another
results of statistical chemistry are outlined and a brief connection      department provided that the project is chemical in nature and
to thermodynamics is made. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.                        with permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The
Prerequisites: (09105 or 09107) and (21259 or 09231)                      number of units taken generally corresponds to the actual number
                                                                          of hours the student actually spends in the lab doing research
09-345     Physical Chemistry (Thermo): Macroscopic Principles            during the week. Maximum number of units taken per semester is
of Physical Chemistry                                                     18.
Spring: 9 units
The measurement and theoretical descriptions of the equilibrium           09-455     Honors Thesis
properties of chemical systems are presented. Chemical                    Fall and Spring: 6,15 units
thermodynamics is introduced at the upper division level. The             Students enrolled in the departmental honors program are
phases of matter are discussed. The quantitative treatment of             required to enroll in this course to complete the honors degree
mixtures is developed. The detailed description of chemical               requirements. A thesis written in an acceptable style describing
equilibrium is elaborated. The measurement and theoretical                an original research project, and a successful oral defense of the
description of the nonequilibrium properties of chemical systems          thesis topic before an Honors Committee are required. Limited to
are presented. Elementary transport properties are introduced.            students accepted into the honors program. (B.S. Honors
The principles of classical chemical kinetics are developed in            candidates normally enroll for 6 units; B.S./M.S. candidates enroll
great detail. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.                                     for 15 units.)
Prerequisites: 09106 and (21259 or 09231)
                                                                          09-502     Organic Polymer Chemistry
09-347     Advanced Physical Chemistry                                    Spring: 9 units
Fall: 12 units                                                            A study of the synthesis and reactions of high polymers.
A course of study designed to provide the microscopic basis of            Emphasis is on practical polymer preparation and on the
concepts encountered in the field of chemical engineering. The            fundamental kinetics and mechanisms of polymerization
properties of macroscopic materials are calculated in terms of the        reactions. Topics include: relationship of synthesis and structure,
microscopic properties of atoms and molecules. Both classical             step-growth polymerization, chain-growth polymerization via
and quantum approaches are employed. The thermodynamic                    radical, ionic and coordination intermediates, copolymerization,
properties are developed in terms of the chemical potentials of           discussions of specialty polymers and reactions of polymers.
the constituent particles. The transport properties are calculated        (Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-741)
using molecular dynamics and Brownian dynamics. Classical                 Prerequisites: 09218
chemical kinetics is fully developed and applied to complex
reactions. Rate constants are calculated for simple reactions in          09-509    Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules
gases and solutions. The course is limited to chemical                    Fall: 9 units
engineering majors. 5 hrs. lec.                                           This course develops fundamental principles of polymer science.
                                                                          Emphasis is placed on physio-chemical concepts associated with
                                                                          the macromolecular nature of polymeric materials. Engineering
                                                                          aspects of the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of
3 9 0 Course Descriptions




these materials are discussed in relation to chain microstructure.    graduate level course (09-719) will be required to write and
Topics include an introduction to polymer science and a general       present an original research proposal, in addition to the homework
discussion of commercially important polymers; molecular              assignments, midterm, and final exam that are required for the
weight; condensation and addition synthesis mechanisms with           undergraduate course. (Graduate Course: 12 units 09-719) 3
emphasis on molecular weight distribution; solution                   hrs. lec.
thermodynamics and molecular conformation; rubber elasticity;         Prerequisites: 09218
and the rheological and mechanical properties of polymeric
systems. (This course is also listed as 06-609. Graduate              09-520     Global Atmospheric Chemistry: Fundamentals and Data
Course: 12 units, 09-715) 3 hrs. lec.                                 Analysis Methods
Prerequisites: 09345 or 09347                                         Fall: 9 units
                                                                      This course will explore global atmospheric chemistry through a
09-510     Introduction to Green Chemistry                            series of case studies: Stratospheric Ozone, Global Methane and
Spring: 9 units                                                       OH, and Urban and Regional Ozone. Each case will begin with a
The new field of Green chemistry focuses upon the reduction and       description of the chemistry and atmospheric physics
elmination of hazards from chemical products and processes.           fundamental to the particular problem. Students will formulate
Sustainabilty ethics will be introduced and discussed--these are      testable mathematical models incorporating that chemistry and
central to all sustainabiity related education. The "principles of    physics, turning then to existing atmospheric data sets to test
green chemistry" will be presented and analyzed. The chemical         current understanding. The emphasis of this course is to develop
nature and action of certain pollutants of the atmosphere, land,      an understanding of how to pose a testable hypotheses in a
and water, will be highlighted along with prospects for their         complex chemical environment such as the atmosphere, validate
minimization, and approaches for their eradication. Particular        or refute those hypotheses, and then by extension predict how the
attention will be paid to sources of and potential replacements for   system will respond to perturbations. A particular objective is to
persistent bioaccumulative pollutants. A historical and technical     explore how to extend this methodology from the stratosphere
analysis of costs to society of hazards and bad management            and background troposphere (the first two cases), where it has
practices associated with the lead and chlorine industries will be    been applied with success, to the much more complicated
presented in detail. The recently discovered mechanism of             problem of urban and regional air quality. (This course is also
toxicity called "endocrine disruption" will be introduced and its     listed as 06-620.)
vast implications for the design of chemical products and             Prerequisites: 21260 or 09231        Corequisites: 09-347, 09-
processes will be explored: a resulting concept is that chemists      344
need to learn how to protect the health of babies in the design and
development of chemical products and processes as a critical          09-521     Bioinorganic Chemistry
element of developing the technological dimension of a                Intermittent: 9 units
sustainable civilization. A new platform oxidation technology with    The course addresses the basis for the selection and regulation
potential to reduce toxic effluents in multiple industrial sectors    of metal atoms and ligand systems and their interactions with
will be examined by students in a laboratory setting: this            their corresponding protein environments. The chemistry of
technology has been invented at Carnegie Mellon. A significant        catalytic processes in metalloenzymes, and atom transfer and
effort has been made by the instructor to produce a course            electron transport in metalloproteins will be reviewed. The array
suitable for an interdisciplinary audience. This course is            of physical methods required for study will be introduced, with
recommended for students in the junior and senior year.               application toward the determination of electronic and molecule
(Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-710)                                   structure and enzymatic mechanisms. (Graduate Course: 12
Prerequisites: 09218 and 09348                                        units, 09-721)
                                                                      Prerequisites: 09344 and 09348
09-514      Advanced Organic Chemistry
Spring: 9 units                                                       09-522     Oxidation and Inorganic Chemistry
This course will examine the following advanced topics in organic     Intermittent: 9 units
chemistry: orbital interactions as applied to structure and           The roles of metal complexes in chemical and biochemical
reactivity, conformational analysis, computational methods,           oxidations will be presented. Special attention is given to
structure elucidation by NMR and IR spectroscopy, reaction            processes involving the activation of molecular oxygen and
mechanisms and special topics of current interest such as             hydrogen peroxide by metal complexes and metalloenzymes from
electron transfer and recently developed synthetic methods.           a mechanistic viewpoint. Much attention is devoted to kinetic
Problem solving will be emphasized, especially with respect to        methods of investigation of homogeneous reactions and
orbital interactions, NMR spectroscopy and reaction                   mechanisms of oxidative catalysis. Redox properties and
mechanisms. Individual projects in computational chemistry will       electronic structures of metal complexes will be reviewed. The
also be undertaken.                                                   relationships between electronic structures, catalytic properties,
                                                                      and oxidation reactivity of biologically relevant metal complexes
09-517      Organotransition Metal Chemistry                          will be provided. Mechanistic pathways of oxidation by
Fall: 9 units                                                         peroxidases, cytochrome P-450, and other metalloenzymes will
The first half of this course focuses on the fundamentals of          be described. (Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-722)
structure and bonding in organotransition metal complexes and         Prerequisites: 09348
how the results can be used to explain, and predict, chemical
reactivity. The latter half of the course covers applications, and    09-525      Transition Metal Chemistry
more specifically, homogeneous catalysts for industrial               Intermittent: 9 units
processes and organic synthesis. (Graduate Course: 12 units,          This class covers fundamental concepts in Transition Metal
09-717)                                                               Chemistry, including coordination numbers and stereochemistry,
Prerequisites: 09348                                                  electronic structure, physical properties, and aspects of chemical
                                                                      reactivity of transition elements and their complexes. Point group
09-518     Bioorganic Chemistry: Nucleic Acids and                    theory is used to link the geometric and electronic structures of
Carbohydrates                                                         high symmetry coordination compounds. Analysis of the
Fall: 9 units                                                         electronic structure of low symmetry coordination complexes is
This course will introduce students to new developments in            based on the Angular Overlap Model. In chosing coordination
chemistry and biology, with emphasis on synthetic and functional      complexes that are discussed in class, special emphasis is given
aspects of nucleic acids and carbohydrates, and their                 to those that are relevant for the fields of research of students
applications. Later in the course, students will get to explore       enrolled in the class, such as supramolecular chemistry,
some of the ongoing research in functional genomics. Students         molecular materials, and metal-based catalysis. The choice and
will be required to keep abreast of the current literature, and       relevance of modern questions posed by researchers in these
homework will be assigned on a regular basis. The homework            fields is discussed, as are modern methods and techniques used
assignments will require data interpretation and experimental         to answer the questions. Students learn in this course how to use
design. (Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-718) 3 hrs. lec.               the Cambridge Crystallographic Database, a repository of
Prerequisites: 09217 and 09218                                        structural data for more than 200,000 compounds that contain at
                                                                      least one carbon atom, and how to use Mathematica to answer
09-519     Bioorganic Chemistry: Peptides, Proteins and               chemical problems. No prior knowledge of this software is
Combinatorial Chemistry                                               required. (Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-725) 3 hrs. lec.
Spring: 9 units                                                       Prerequisites: 09348
This course will introduce students to new developments in
chemistry and biology, with emphasis on synthetic and functional      09-541     Spectroscopy
aspects of proteins, peptides and small molecules. Basic              Intermittent: 9 units
concepts of bioorganic chemistry will be presented in the context     This course emphasizes the use of modern optical methods in the
of the current literature and students will have the opportunity to   study of molecular properties and reactivity. Basic topics such as
learn about the experimental methods that are used. An                the use of group theory in the analysis of vibrational and
introduction to combinatorial chemistry in the context of drug        electronic spectra are covered in detail. In addition, recently
design will also be presented. Students will be required to keep      developed techniques such as time-resolved and nonlinear
abreast of the current literature, and homework will be assigned      spectroscopies are discussed as are applications of optical
on a regular basis. The homework assignments will require data
interpretation and experimental design. Students enrolled in the
                                                                                                             Course Descriptions      391




methods to problems in chemistry, biology and materials science.      molecules to antibodies will be presented, while various detection
(Graduate Course: 12 units, 09-841)                                   modes, including fluorescence, gravimetric and colorimetric, that
Prerequisites: 09344 and 09345                                        illustrate different signaling elements will be discussed and
                                                                      compared. Issues to be addressed include sensitivity, selectivity
09-543     Mass Spectrometry: Fundamentals, Instrumentation           and efficiency. Each sensor will be analyzed in terms of the
and Techniques                                                        physical chemistry, organic chemistry and/or biochemistry
Intermittent: Mini Session - 6 units                                  underlying its function.
This course is intended for students interested in understanding
fundamentals, instrumentation and techniques used in mass             09-711     Physical Organic Chemistry
spectrometry(MS). The operating principles of various ion             Intermittent: 12 units
sources (EI, CI, ESI and MALDI), mass analyzers (magnetic,            The study of the structure and reactivity of organic molecules
quadrupole, time-of-flight, ion traps) and detectors are covered.     from a physical and theoretical standpoint. Introduction to
Applications are focused in the areas of small molecule,              molecular orbital theory and the study of mechanisms in
proteomics and polymer characterization. Protein identification,      pericyclic, electron-transfer, photochemical and heterolytic
peptide sequencing, polymer polydispersity and end group              reactions by the use of physical methods such as kinetics,
determination are covered. Hyphenated techniques such as GC/          isotope effects, substituent effects and spectroscopic methods.
MS, LC/MS, and LC/QTOF MS are covered. Various MS scan
modes (i.e., SIM, SRM, MS/MS) and basic spectrum interpretation       09-712    Synthetic Organic Chemistry
are covered. Students are exposed to QET and RRKM theory and          Intermittent: 12 units
select gas phase reactions. The lecture is supplemented with the      General synthetic strategies are discussed with a focus on C-C
use of the "Virtual Mass Spectrometry Laboratory" Internet tool,      bond formation, functional group transformations, unnatural
remote control of mass spectrometers and laboratory. 3 hrs. lec.,     products and mechanisms.
1.5 hrs. lab.
Prerequisites: 09214 or 09345 or 33341                                09-720     Physical Inorganic Chemistry
                                                                      Intermittent: 12 units
09-545     Rheology and Structure of Complex Fluids                   This course develops principles of magnetochemistry and
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 inorganic spectroscopy. Electronic absorption, magnetic circular
A survey of the mechanical properties of polymeric materials in       dichroism, resonance raman, NMR, EPR, Mossbauer,
their many forms: melt, rubber, glass, crystalline, solution,         magnetization and x-ray methods will be introduced with
mixtures, and composites with other materials. The dependence         application toward the determination of electronic structures of
on structure of viscosity, viscoelasticity, and plasticity failure.   transition metal complexes.
The role of rheological properties in characterization, testing,
fabrication, and use of polymeric materials. (Graduate Course: 12     09-723     Proximal Probe Techniques: New Tools for Nanoscience
units, 09-745)                                                        & Nanotechnology
Prerequisites: (09344 or 09347) AND (09509 or 06609)                  Intermittent: 12 units
                                                                      Proximal probe techniques are revolutionizing physical and
09-560     Molecular Modeling and Computational Chemistry             biological sciences, owing to their ability to explore and
Fall: 12 units                                                        manipulate matter at the nanoscale, and to operate in various
Computer modeling is playing an increasingly important role in        environments (including liquids). Proximal probe techniques rely
chemical, biological and materials research. This course provides     on the use of nanoscale probes, positioned and scanned in the
an overview of computational chemistry techniques including           immediate vicinity of the material surface. Their development is
molecular mechanics, molecular dynamics, electronic structure         often viewed as a first step towards nanotechnology, since they
theory and continuum medium approaches. Sufficient theoretical        demonstrate the feasibility of building purposeful structures one
background is provided for students to understand the uses and        atom or one (macro)molecule at a time. This course is designed
limitations of each technique. An integral part of the course is      for the students of chemistry, biology physics and engineering,
hands on experience with state-of-the-art computational               who are interested in the fundamentals of proximal probe
chemistry tools running on graphics workstations. 3 hrs. lec.         techniques and in their applications in various areas, converging
Prerequisites: (15113 or 15200) and 09344 and 09345                   into a rapidly developing, interdisciplinary field of nanoscience. It
                                                                      will provide physical background of such basic techniques as
09-604    Introduction to Chemical Kinetics                           Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Scanning Tunneling Microscopy
Spring: Mini Session - 6 units                                        (STM), and Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy (NSOM) and
Rate laws and reaction mechanisms. Solving kinetics problems          of their variants. Throughout the course, the working "virtual
using the Laplace transform method. Transient and steady-state        AFM" computer model will be assembled in classroom by each
methods. Potential energy surfaces and reaction paths. Basic          student and then used extensively to gain thorough
concepts of statistical mechanics and theories of reaction rates.     understanding of AFM operation principles. Particular emphasis
Bimolecular and unimolecular reactions. Reactions in solution.        will be placed on modes of operation facilitating chemical contrast
                                                                      and contrast based on other material properties. (No prior
09-611     Chemical Thermodynamics                                    experience with computer programming required).
Fall: Mini Session - 6 units
A focused course on chemical thermodynamics. The basic                Computer       Science
thermodynamic functions will be introduced and discussed. The
formal basis for thermochemistry will be presented. Single            15-050    Study Abroad
component phase equilibrium will be considered. The                   All Semesters: 0 units
thermodynamic basis of solutions will be developed and applied to     Students who are interested in studying abroad should first
separation methods. The fundamental basis of chemical                 contact the Office of International Education. More information on
equilibrium will be developed and applied to a wide variety of        Study Abroad is available on OIE's Study Abroad page and at the
reactions. Finally, a few special topics such as self-assembled       CS Undergraduate Office.
systems will be presented.
                                                                      15-075     Computer Science Co-Op
09-612     Introduction to Quantum Chemistry                          All Semesters: 0-3 units
Spring: Mini Session - 6 units                                        Students who are interested in a Co-Op experience with an
Introduction to quantum principles. The main topics to be             external employer typically do so in their Junior year. A Co-Op is
covered include Schroedinger equation, particle in a box, the         distinguished from a summer internship in that it encompasses a
harmonic oscillator, and rigid rotor. Applications to vibrational,    summer and a contiguous semester, either Spring-Summer or
electronic, and NMR spectroscopy. Topics in perturbation theory       Summer-Fall. A list of companies who are interested in hiring Co-
and time-dependent quantum theory are introduced as well.             Op students is available from the SCS Career Consultant at the
                                                                      Career Center. More information on the Computer Science Co-Op
09-702     Statistical Mechanics and Dynamics                         program is available at the CS Undergraduate Office.
Intermittent: 12 units
Application of statistical mechanics to chemical systems.             15-090     Computer Science Practicum
Calculation of thermodynamic functions, phase transitions and         All Semesters: 3 units
chemical equilibrium. Calculation of transport properties of gases    This course is for international students who are interested in
and liquids. Elementary theory of chemical kinetics.                  working for Curricular Practical Training (CPT). Such students
                                                                      interested in CPT must first be authorized by the Office of
09-705     Chemosensors and Biosensors                                International Education before being able to enroll in the
Intermittent: 12 units                                                Practicum course. More information on CPT is available on OIE's
Chemosensors and biosensors rely on "recognition" and                 Foreign Student Employment page and at the CS Undergraduate
"signaling" elements to transduce a molecular-scale binding           Office.
event into an observable signal. Students in this course will be
introduced to current research and technology for detecting           15-100    Introductory/Intermediate Programming
chemical and biological analytes in a variety of contexts,            All Semesters: 10 units
including environmental testing, biological probing and medical       An introduction to the process of program design and analysis
diagnostics. Recognition elements ranging from small organic
3 9 2 Course Descriptions




using the Java programming language for students who have NO          compilers, networks, operating systems, and computer
prior programming experience. Topics to be covered include basic      architecture, where a deeper understanding of systems-level
data types and their operators, I/O, control structures (selection,   issues is required. Topics covered include: machine-level code
loops), classes (including methods and fields), arrays, and simple    and its generation by optimizing compilers, performance
sorting and searching algorithms. Students with prior                 evaluation and optimization, computer arithmetic, memory
programming experience are strongly encouraged to take 15-            organization and management, networking technology and
111. If you've taken a programming course in a language other         protocols, and supporting concurrent computation.
than Java and have used functions, loops, and arrays, you should      Prerequisites: 15113 and 15211
NOT enroll in 15-100 and instead enroll in 15-111. NOTE:
students who receive a grade of C or less in 15-100 should            15-221     Technical Communication for Computer Scientists
discuss whether they are adequately prepared for 15-200 with          Fall and Spring: 9 units
their academic advisor.                                               The course is designed for sophomore computer science majors
                                                                      to improve their abilities in practical, professional
15-111     Intermediate/Advanced Programming                          communications (both written and oral). It aims to help students
All Semesters: 10 units                                               compose clear, concise technical writings and oral presentations
An introduction to the process of program design and analysis         for multi-level audiences. Assignments include technical
using the Java programming language for students with some            definitions, descriptions, instructions, process explanations,
prior programming experience (functions, loops, and arrays) in a      abstracts, memos, and research reports. Assignments may
language other than Java. Topics to be covered include an             incorporate recent computer science research at Carnegie
overview of fundamental programming concepts using Java as            Mellon, projects in related technical courses, and professional
well as object-oriented programming techniques, data                  case studies.
aggregates, data structures (e.g., linked lists, stacks, queues,      Prerequisites: 76101
trees, and graphs), and an introduction to the analysis of
algorithms that operate on those data structures. This course,        15-251     Great Theoretical Ideas in Computer Science
along with 21-127, serves as a prerequisite for 15-211. NOTE:         Fall and Spring: 12 units
students who receive a grade of C or less in 15-111 should            This course is about how to use theoretical ideas to formulate and
discuss whether they are adequately prepared for 15-211 with          solve problems in computer science. It integrates mathematical
their academic advisor.                                               material with general problem solving techniques and computer
                                                                      science applications. Examples are drawn from Algorithms,
15-113     Systems Skills in C                                        Complexity Theory, Game Theory, Probability Theory, Graph
All Semesters: Mini Session -     6 units                             Theory, Automata Theory, Algebra, Cryptography, and
This course is designed to provide a substantial exposure to the      Combinatorics. Assignments involve both mathematical proofs
C programming language and the Unix programming environment           and programming. As of the Spring, 2007 semester, this course
(gcc) for students with prior programming experience but minimal      will be renumbered 15-210.
exposure to C. Topics to be covered include arrays, structs and       Prerequisites: (15100 or 15111) and 21127
unions, dynamic memory allocation (malloc and free), pointers
and pointer arithmetic. This course, along with 15-211, serves as     15-312     Foundations of Programming Languages
the prerequisite for 15-213. As of Spring, 20067, this course will    Fall and Spring: 12 units
be replaced by 15-123, a full-semester course.                        This course discusses in depth many of the concepts underlying
Prerequisites: 15111 or 15200                                         the design, definition, implementation, and use of modern
                                                                      programming languages. Formal approaches to defining the
15-200      Advanced Programming/Practicum                            syntax and semantics are used to describe the fundamental
All Semesters: 9 units                                                concepts underlying programming languages. A variety of
This course assumes prior programming experience in Java (at          programming paradigms are covered such as imperative,
the level of 15-100) and is designed to expand students'              functional, logic, and concurrent programming. In addition to the
knowledge of computer science and sharpen their programming           formal studies, experience with programming in the languages is
skills through the implementation of a large project. The course      used to illustrate how different design goals can lead to radically
extends object-oriented programming techniques begun in 15-           different languages and models of computation.
100 and covers data aggregates, data structures (e.g., linked         Prerequisites: 15212
lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs), and an introduction to
the analysis of algorithms that operate on those data structures.     15-317      Constructive Logic
The course is currently taught in Java and, along with 21-127,        Spring: 9 units
serves as a prerequisite for 15-211. NOTE: students who               This multidisciplinary junior-level course is designed to provide a
receive a grade of C or less in 15-200 should discuss whether         thorough introduction to modern constructive logic, its roots in
they are adequately prepared for 15-211 with their academic           philosophy, its numerous applications in computer science, and
advisor.                                                              its mathematical properties. Some of the topics to be covered are
Prerequisites: 15100                                                  intuitionistic logic, inductive definitions, functional programming,
                                                                      type theory, realizability, connections between classical and
15-211     Fundamental Data Structures and Algorithms                 constructive logic, decidable classes. This course counts as a
All Semesters: 12 units                                               Fundamentals course in the Computer Science major.
Fundamental programming concepts are presented together with          Prerequisites: 15212
supporting theoretical foundations and practical applications.
This course emphasizes the practical application of techniques        15-354     Computational Discrete Mathematics
for writing and analyzing programs: data abstraction, program         Fall: 12 units
verification, and performance analysis. These techniques are          This course is about the computational aspects of some of the
applied in the design and analysis of fundamental algorithms and      standard concepts of discrete mathematics (relations, functions,
data structures. The course is currently taught in Java.              logic, graphs, algebra, automata), with emphasis on efficient
Prerequisites: (15111 or 15200) and 21127                             algorithms. We begin with a brief introduction to computability and
                                                                      computational complexity. Other topics include: iteration, orbits
15-212      Principles of Programming                                 and fixed points, order and equivalence relations, propositional
Fall and Spring: 12 units                                             logic and satisfiability testing, finite fields and shift register
This course presents principles and techniques of programming,        sequences, finite state machines, and cellular automata.
focusing on sophisticated methods for specifying, constructing,       Computational support for some of the material is available in the
and reasoning about computer programs. Via features of a high-        form of a Mathematica package.
level functional programming language (currently ML), this course     Prerequisites: 15251
concretely illustrates mechanisms for building user-defined data
types, including recursive and polymorphic types, and infinite        15-355     Modern Computer Algebra
data structures such as streams; for building higher-order control    Fall: 9 units
constructs such as first-class functions and continuations; and       The goal of this course is to investigate the relationship between
for building large programs using advanced module composition.        algebra and computation. The course is designed to expose
It also introduces the use of formal methods for specifying and       students to algorithms used for symbolic computation, as well as
verifying programs.                                                   to the concepts from modern algebra which are applied to the
Prerequisites: 15211                                                  development of these algorithms. This course provides a hands-
                                                                      on introduction to many of the most important ideas used in
15-213     Introduction to Computer Systems                           symbolic mathematical computation, which involves solving
Fall and Spring: 12 units                                             system of polynomial equations (via Groebner bases), analytic
This course provides a programmer's view of how computer              integration, and solving linear difference equations. Throughout
systems execute programs, store information, and communicate.         the course the computer algebra system Mathematica will be
It enables students to become more effective programmers,             used for computation.
especially in dealing with issues of performance, portability and     Prerequisites: 15251
robustness. It also serves as a foundation for courses on
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions     393




                                                                       Spring: 9 units
15-359      Special Topic: Probability and Computing                   Computers are used to synthesize sound, process signals, and
Spring: 12 units                                                       compose music. Personal computers have replaced studios full of
Probability theory has become indispensable in computer                sound recording and processing equipment, completing a
science. In areas such as artificial intelligence and computer         revolution that began with recording and electronics. In this
science theory, probabilistic methods and ideas based on               course, students will learn the fundamentals of digital audio, basic
randomization are central. In other areas such as networks and         sound synthesis algorithms, and techniques for digital audio
systems, probability is becoming an increasingly useful                effects and processing. Students will apply their knowledge in
framework for handling uncertainty and modeling the patterns of        programming assignments using a very high-level programming
data that occur in complex systems. This course gives an               language for sound synthesis and composition. In a final project,
introduction to probability as it is used in computer science          students will demonstrate their mastery of tools and techniques
theory and practice, drawing on applications and current research      through music composition or by the implementation of a
developments as motivation and context. Topics include                 significant sound-processing technique.
combinatorial probability and random graphs, heavy tail                Prerequisites: 15100
distributions, concentration inequalities, various randomized
algorithms, sampling random variables and computer simulation,         15-397     Special Topic: Web Application Development
and Markov chains and their many applications, from Web search         Spring: 12 units
engines to models of network protocols. The course will assume         This course will introduce concepts in programming web
familiarity with basic calculus and linear algebra.                    application servers. We will study of the fundamental architectural
Prerequisites: 15211 and 15251                                         elements of programming web sites that produce content
                                                                       dynamically. The primary technology introduced will be Java
15-381      Artificial Intelligence: Representation and Problem        Servlets and Java Server Pages (JSPs), but we will also cover the
Solving                                                                related topics as necessary so that students may build
Spring: 9 units                                                        significant applications. Such topics include: HTTP, HTML, XML,
This course is about the theory and practice of Artificial             JavaBeans, Design Patterns (Abstract Factories), Tag Libraries
Intelligence. We will study modern techniques for computers to         (JSTL), Relational Databases (MySQL/JDBC), Security (SSL),
represent task-relevant information and make intelligent (i.e.         Web Services (SOAP/WSDL/UDDI), the Frameworks (Struts), and
satisficing or optimal) decisions towards the achievement of           Active Server Pages (ASP/ASP.NET). Several tools and software
goals. The search and problem solving methods are applicable           packages will be demonstrated. Students will be required to
throughout a large range of industrial, civil, medical, financial,     create and demonstrate their own web applications. They may
robotic, and information systems. We will investigate questions        use the software demonstrated in class or similar software
about AI systems such as: how to represent knowledge, how to           packages with permission of the professor. Grading will be based
effectively generate appropriate sequences of actions and how to       on these student projects. Notes: Students are required to
search among alternatives to find optimal or near-optimal              provide their own computer hardware for this course. Student
solutions. We will also explore how to deal with uncertainty in the    hardware must run an up-to-date version of the following
world, how to learn from experience, and how to learn decision         operating systems: Windows, MAC OS X, Linux. Student
rules from data. We expect that by the end of the course students      hardware must have at least 256 MB of memory. Student
will have a thorough understanding of the algorithmic foundations      hardware must have at least 500 MB of *free* disk to devote to
of AI, how probability and AI are closely interrelated, and how        this course as you will need to install an update-to-date versions
automated agents learn. We also expect students to acquire a           of Java, Java Web Development, and database software. This
strong appreciation of the big-picture aspects of developing fully     course has several cross listings: *Two 12 unit listings run for
autonomous intelligent agents. Other lectures will introduce           the full semester: 15-397/15-637. Undergraduate students
additional aspects of AI, including natural language processing,       register for 15-397. Masters students register for 15-637. The
web-based search engines, industrial applications, autonomous          full semester course includes a project component that is the
robotics, and economic/game-theoretic decision making.                 primary focus of the second half. *Two 6 unit listings run only for
Prerequisites: 15212                                                   Mini 3: 46-864/17-660. Tepper Masters students in the
                                                                       Technology Leadership Program register for 46-864. Masters
15-384    Robotic Manipulation                                         students from other programs may register for 17-660 if they
Fall: 12 units                                                         wish to only take the non-project part of the course during Mini 3.
Foundations and principles of robotic manipulation. Topics include     Prerequisites: 15212
computational models of objects and motion, the mechanics of
robotic manipulators, the structure of manipulator control             15-410     Operating System Design and Implementation
systems, planning and programming of robot actions.                    Fall and Spring: 12 units
Prerequisites: (15111 or 15200) and (18202 or 21241 or                 Operating System Design and Implementation is a rigorous
24311)                                                                 hands-on introduction to the principles and practice of operating
                                                                       systems. The core experience is writing a small Unix-inspired OS
15-385      Computer Vision                                            kernel, in C with some x86 assembly language, which runs on a
Spring: 9 units                                                        PC hardware simulator (and on actual PC hardware if you wish).
An introduction to the science and engineering of computer             Work is done in two-person teams, and team programming skills
vision, i.e. the analysis of the patterns in visual images with the    (source control, modularity, documentation) are emphasized. The
view to understanding the objects and processes in the world that      size and scope of the programming assignments typically result
generate them. Major topics include feature extraction, image          in students significantly developing their design, implementation,
representation, edge detection, grouping, discrimination,              and debugging abilities. Core concepts include the process
inference of depth and shape, learning, classification, recognition,   model, virtual memory, threads, synchronization, and deadlock;
tracking, and active vision. The emphasis is on the learning of        the course also surveys higher-level OS topics including file
fundamental mathematical concepts and techniques and applying          systems, interprocess communication, networking, and security.
them to solve real vision problems. The discussion will be guided      (Graduate) students who have not satisfied the prerequisite at
by comparison with human and animal vision from psychological          Carnegie Mellon are strongly cautioned - to enter the class you
and biological perspectives. Students will learn to think              must be able to write a storage allocator in C, use a debugger,
mathematically and develop skills in translating ideas and             understand 2's-complement arithmetic, and translate between C
mathematical thoughts into Matlab programs to solve real vision        and x86 assembly language. The instructor may require you to
problems.                                                              complete a skills assessment exercise before the first week of
Prerequisites: 15113 and (18202 or 21241)                              the semester in order to remain registered in the class.
                                                                       Prerequisites: 15213 or 15395
15-391    Technology Consulting in the Community
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               15-411     Compiler Design
In this course, the student develops technical consulting and          Fall: 12 units
management skills while collaborating on site with a community         This course covers the design and implementation of compiler
leader of a non-profit community organization. This service-           and run-time systems for high-level languages, and examines the
learning course de-emphasizes coding, asking the student               interaction between language design, compiler design, and run-
instead to analyze a complex organization, then design and             time organization. Topics covered include syntactic and lexical
implement a work plan that will expand the organization's              analysis, handling of user-defined types and type-checking,
capacity to use information technology. Throughout the semester,       context analysis, code generation and optimization, and memory
students develop a consulting report. They learn how to use this       management and run-time organization.
working document to collaborate with others and to think through       Prerequisites: 15213 or 15312
and communicate a strategic technology plan. Students also
experience how urban community organizations function, seeing          15-412    Operating System Practicum
the valuable benefits these organizations provide to society.          Fall: 9,12 units
Prerequisites: 15111 or 15200                                          The goal of this class is for students to acquire hands-on
                                                                       experience with operating-system code as it is developed and
15-392    Special Topic: Introduction to Computer Music                deployed in the real world. Groups of two to four students will
3 9 4 Course Descriptions




select, build, install, and become familiar with an open-source        overview of electronic payment solutions and a discussion of Web
operating system project; propose a significant extension or           privacy (e.g. P3P) Part III - This third part of the course is a
upgrade to that project; and develop a production-quality              series of 4 or 5 lectures that look at Mobile Commerce, revisiting
implementation meeting the coding standards of that project.           many of the issues covered earlier in the course and looking at
Unless infeasible, the results will be submitted to the project for    what happens when one tries to support Web Commerce on
inclusion in the code base. Variations on this theme are possible      mobile devices such as cell phones or PDAs.
at the discretion of the instructor. For example, it may be possible   Prerequisites: 15212
to work within the context of a non-operating-system software
infrastructure project (window system, web server, or embedded         15-441     Computer Networks
network device kernel) or to extend a 15-410 student kernel. In        Fall and Spring: 12 units
some situations students may work alone. Group membership and          This is an introductory course about computer networks. The
unit count (9 units versus 12) will be decided by the third week of    emphasis will be on the basic performance and engineering
the semester. Contributing to a real-world project will involve        tradeoffs in the design and implementation of computer networks.
engaging in some mixture of messy, potentially open-ended              Students will learn not only what computer networks are and how
activities such as: learning a revision control system, writing a      they work today, but also why they are designed the way they are
short design document, creating and updating a simple project          and how they are likely to evolve in the future. We will draw
plan, participating in an informal code review, synthesizing           examples primarily from the Internet. Topics to be covered
scattered information about hardware and software, classifying         include: LAN, congestion/flow/error control, routing, addressing,
and/or reading large amounts of code written by various people         naming, multicasting, switching, internetworking, quality of
over a long period of time, etc.                                       service, and network security. There will be both written and
Prerequisites: 15410                                                   programming assignments, and a substantial project involving the
                                                                       design and implementation of a complete protocol stack.
15-414     Bug Catching: Automated Program Verification and            Prerequisites: 15213 or 15395
Testing
Fall: 9 units                                                          15-451     Algorithm Design and Analysis
Many CS and ECE students will be developing software and               Fall and Spring: 12 units
hardware that must be ultra reliable at some point in their            This course is about the design and analysis of algorithms. We
careers. Logical errors in such designs can be costly, even life       study specific algorithms for a variety of problems, as well as
threatening. There have already been a number of well publicized       general design and analysis techniques. Specific topics include
errors like the Intel Pentium floating point error and the Arian 5     searching, sorting, algorithms for graph problems, efficient data
crash. In this course we will study tools for finding and preventing   structures, lower bounds and NP-completeness. A variety of
logical errors. Three types of tools will be studied: automated        other topics may be covered at the discretion of the instructor.
theorem proving, state exploration techniques like model               These include parallel algorithms, randomized algorithms,
checking and tools based on static program analysis. Although          geometric algorithms, low level techniques for efficient
students will learn the theoretical basis for such tools, the          programming, cryptography, and cryptographic protocols.
emphasis will be on actually using them on real examples. This         Prerequisites: 15212 and (15351 or 15354 or 15355 or 21301
course can be used to satisfy the Fundamentals of Algorithms           or 21373 or 21484)
requirement for the Computer Science major.
Prerequisites: 15211 and 15251                                         15-453    Formal Languages and Automata
                                                                       Spring: 9 units
15-415     Database Applications                                       An introduction to the fundamental ideas and models underlying
Fall and Spring: 12 units                                              computing: finite automata, regular sets, pushdown automata,
This course covers the fundamental topics for Database                 context-free grammars, Turing machines, undecidability, and
Management Systems: Database System Architectural                      complexity theory.
Principles (ACID properties; data abstraction; external,               Prerequisites: 15212 and (15351 or 15354 or 15355 or 21301
conceptual, and internal schemata; data independence; data             or 21373 or 21484)
definition and data manipulation languages), Data models (entity-
relationship and relational data models; data structures, integrity    15-462    Computer Graphics
constraints, and operations for each data model; relational query      Fall and Spring: 12 units
languages: SQL, algebra, calculus), Theory of database design          This course provides a comprehensive introduction to computer
(functional dependencies; normal forms; dependency                     graphics modeling, animation, and rendering. Topics covered
preservation; information loss), Query Optimization (equivalence       include basic image processing, geometric transformations,
of expressions, algebraic manipulation; optimization of selections     geometric modeling of curves and surfaces, animation, 3-D
and joins), Storage Strategies (indices, B-trees, hashing), Query      viewing, visibility algorithms, shading, and ray tracing.
Processing (execution of sort, join, and aggregation operators),       Prerequisites: (15213 and 21241 and 21259) or (15213 and
and Transaction Processing (recovery and concurrency control).         18202)
Prerequisites: 15212
                                                                       15-463     Computational Photography
15-418     Parallel Computer Architecture and Programming              Fall: 12 units
Spring: 12 units                                                       Computational Photography is an emerging new field created by
The fundamental principles and engineering tradeoffs involved in       the convergence of computer graphics, computer vision and
designing modern parallel computers, as well as the programming        photography. Its role is to overcome the limitations of the
techniques to effectively utilize these machines. Topics include       traditional camera by using computational techniques to produce
naming shared data, synchronizing threads, and the latency and         a richer, more vivid, perhaps more perceptually meaningful
bandwidth associated with communication. Case studies on               representation of our visual world. The aim of this advanced
shared-memory, message-passing, data-parallel and dataflow             undergraduate course is to study ways in which samples from the
machines will be used to illustrate these techniques and               real world (images and video) can be used to generate compelling
tradeoffs. Programming assignments will be performed on one or         computer graphics imagery. We will learn how to acquire,
more commercial multiprocessors, and there will be a significant       represent, and render scenes from digitized photographs. Several
course project.                                                        popular image-based algorithms will be presented, with an
Prerequisites: 15213 or 18347                                          emphasis on using these techniques to build practical systems.
                                                                       This hands-on emphasis will be reflected in the programming
15-421      Web Commerce, Security and Privacy                         assignments, in which students will have the opportunity to
Fall: 12 units                                                         acquire their own images of indoor and outdoor scenes and
Overview: Over the past ten years, the Web has become an               develop the image analysis and synthesis tools needed to render
integral part of our daily life, whether at home or at work. This      and view the scenes on the computer.
course provides students with an overview of the technologies          Prerequisites: (15213 and 21241 and 21259) or (15213 and
and practices associated with Internet Commerce, including             18202)
issues of security and privacy. Part I - We will start by trying to
understand what eCommerce is, looking at both business-to-             15-464     Technical Animation
consumer and business-to-business usage scenarios. We will             Fall: 12 units
examine the different stages of electronic commerce, from the          This course introduces techniques for computer animation such
identification of buyers and sellers, to the selection of goods,       as keyframing, procedural methods, motion capture, and
negotiation, sale, payment, delivery and post-sale activities and      simulation. The course also includes a brief overview of story-
examine how new Internet technologies and practices can help           boarding, scene composition, lighting and sound track generation.
add value at each step. In the process, we will look at a variety of   The second half of the course will explore current research topics
technologies such as Web search technologies, personalization,         in computer animation such as dynamic simulation of flexible and
collaborative filtering, data mining, auctions, P2P technologies,      rigid objects,automatically generated control systems, and
Web Services, agent technologies and the Semantic Web. Part II         evolution of behaviors. The course should be appropriate for
- This section of the course covers Web security issues,               graduate students in all areas and for advanced undergraduates.
including overviews of symmetric and asymmetric key                    Prerequisites: 15462
cryptography and PKI. This part of the course also includes an
                                                                       15-465    Animation Art and Technology
                                                                                                             Course Descriptions     395




Spring: 12 units                                                      a number of Matlab programming and mathematical exercises to
This class will explore ways in which the production of animation     consolidate their learning, participate in the analysis of real
can incorporate enhancements such as motion capture and the           neuronal data. No prior background in biology is assumed. A
modification of algorithms in combination with the objective of       graduate option of the course is offered concurrently to graduate
artistic expression or content development. Students will work on     students from all disciplines in science and engineering, including
projects in cross-disciplinary teams. This is a cross-listed class    psychology and computational biology.
between Art and Computer Science. It will use two different           Prerequisites: 15113 and (18202 or 21241)
clusters for production work in Maya. The first class will meet in
CFA room 303.                                                         15-519    Independent Study in Programming Systems
Prerequisites: 15462                                                  Fall and Spring: 3-36 units

15-466     Computer Game Programming                                  15-529    Independent Study in Human-Computer Interaction
Spring: 12 units                                                      Fall and Spring: 3-36 units
This course will cover tools and techniques for programming
interactive games and virtual reality simulations. The course will    15-539    Independent Study in Computer Science Pedagogy
focus primarily on programming aspects, including event loops         Fall and Spring: 3-18 units
and execution threads, graphics and animation in 2D and 3D,
terrain/background representation, collision detection and            15-549    Independent Study in Computer Systems
physically-based modeling, game AI, and multi-user games and          Fall and Spring: 3-18 units
networking. Although this course has a heavy programming focus,
other topics briefly covered will include the history of computer/    15-559    Independent Study in Theoretical Computer Science
video game technology, game genres and design principles, and         Fall and Spring: 3-36 units
the social impact of games. Students will design and program
their own games or virtual reality simulations as individual class    15-569    Independent Study in Graphics
projects using OpenGL and other standard APIs commonly used           Fall and Spring: 3-36 units
in game programming.
                                                                      15-579    Independent Study in Robotics
15-482    Human Language Technologies                                 Fall and Spring: 3-36 units
Fall: 12 units
During the last decade computers have begun to understand             15-589    Independent Study in Artificial Intelligence
human languages. Web search engines, language analysis                Fall and Spring: 3-36 units
programs, machine translation systems, speech recognition, and
speech synthesis are used every day by tens of millions of people     15-599    Undergraduate Thesis Research
in a wide range of situations and applications. This course covers    Fall and Spring: 0-18 units
the fundamental statistical and symbolic algorithms that enable       Available only to students registered in the CS Senior Research
computers to work with human language, from text processing to        Thesis Program. More information is available at the CS
understanding speech and language. It provides detailed               Undergraduate Office.
coverage of current techniques, their successes, their limitations,
and current research directions. Homework assignments give            15-681     Artificial Intelligence: Machine Learning
hands-on experience with four different language technologies,        Fall: 12 units
using Internet Movie Database (IMDB) data. Students write             Machine Learning is concerned with computer programs that
programs that answer questions about movies using information         automatically improve their performance through experience (e.g.,
obtained from a search engine or a structured database,               programs that learn to spot high-risk medical patients, recognize
automatically select good translations of French movie titles, and    human faces, detect credit card fraud, and drive autonomous
read movie information in computer-generated voices that sound        robots). This course covers the theory and practical algorithms
as natural as possible.                                               for machine learning from a variety of perspectives. We cover
Prerequisites: 15212                                                  topics such as datamining, decision tree learning, neural network
                                                                      learning, statistical learning methods, genetic algorithms,
15-485      Computational Perception and Scene Analysis               Bayesian learning methods, explanation-based learning, and
Spring: 9 units                                                       reinforcement learning. The course covers theoretical concepts
The goal of this course is to teach how to reason scientifically      such as inductive bias, the PAC learning framework, minimum
about problems and issues in perceptual cognition, how to extract     description length principle, and Occam's Razor. Short
the essential computational properties of those abstract ideas,       programming assignments include hands-on experiments with
and finally how to convert these into explicit mathematical           various learning algorithms. Typical assignments include neural
models and computational algorithms. The course teaches               network learning for face recognition, and decision tree learning
advanced aspects of perception, scene analysis, and recognition       from databases of credit records.
in both the visual and auditory modalities, concentrating on those    Prerequisites: 15211
aspects that allow us and animals to behave in natural, complex
environments. Both the experimental approaches of scientific          Design
disciplines and the computational approaches of engineering
disciplines are emphasized. Each topic in the course begins by        51-101     Design Studio I
studying the ethology of natural behaviors, analyzing and             Fall: 9 units
decomposing these to identify the essential components that are       This studio course introduces students to the fundamentals of
required for the total behavior in a natural environment. This        two- and three-dimensional design. Through a wide range of
aspect of the course follows the lines of scientific reasoning and    exercises and projects students explore what it means to
key experiemental results that lead to our current understanding      communicate with form and images. The course will cover the use
of the important computational problems in perception and scene       of visual and physical elements in design, with emphasis placed
analysis. The course then surveys the most important solutions        on idea and form development, visual organization, construction,
to these problems, focusing on the idealizations and                  understanding materials, and considering how people draw
simplifications that are sensory coding, perceptual invariance,       meaning from form.
spatial vision and sound localization, visual and auditory scene
segmentation, many aspects of attention, and the basics of            51-102     Design Studio II
objects and speech recognition.                                       Spring: 9 units
Prerequisites: 15385 or 85370                                         This course is designed to provide a series of experiences that
                                                                      prepare students for a major in Industrial or Communication
15-490     Special Topic: Computational Neuroscience                  Design. Through the exploration of form and content students
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 begin to develop their abilities to design in more complex social
An introduction to computational neuroscience, i.e. the               situations. This course seeks to develop perceptual and
application of computational and mathematical concepts and            expressive abilities that allow for thorough interpretation of
techniques to the study of the brain. Students will learn the         design problems. Students work as individuals and as members of
fundamentals of signals and systems, pattern analysis,                teams to develop an understanding of design process. Student
probability theory and information theories and apply these           evaluation is based on faculty critique of projects at different
techniques to study how the real nervous systems compute,             stages of development in a studio setting, with the participation of
communicate and learn at many levels, from synapses to                students.
neurons, from neuronal populations to systems. Topics include         Prerequisites: 51101
basic anatomy and physiology of neurons and the mammalian
nervous systems, biophysics of single neurons, excitable              51-121    Design Drawing I
membranes and cable equation, encoding and decoding of                Fall: 9 units
information in single neurons and neuronal ensembles, neural          Drawing is an essential tool that designers use to communicate,
adaptation and learning, signal detection and reconstruction,         develop, and test their ideas. This basic drawing course is
distributed and hierarchical computations. Concrete examples          designed to introduce students to a variety of drawing approaches
will be drawn from visual and motor systems and studied from          related to the design process. Students learn methods of
both biological and computational perspectives. Students will do      representation, communication, idea generation, and form
3 9 6 Course Descriptions




development. A sequential approach to the understanding of             philosophies, and technologies that have shaped typography. The
structure, form, space and the effects of light through the use of     course will also include a demonstration of letterpress operation
line ,tone and texture will be stressed. Students will be introduced   in the Design Department?s Lab Press and a guided visit to the
to a variety of simple drawing media. Drawing in this context is       Hunt Library?s Rare Book Room.
viewed as a means of design thinking, with emphasis placed on          Prerequisites: 51102
the analysis and interpretation of existing man-made and organic
forms. Demonstrations and group and individual critiques               51-202      Intermediate Typography
augment concepts presented in class.                                   Spring: 9 units
                                                                       The theme of this course is the integration of type and image. The
51-122     Design Drawing II                                           primary goal of the projects is how to achieve a harmonious and
Spring: 9 units                                                        effective interplay of typography and imagery to express meaning.
This course introduces drawing systems and diagrammatic                Through a confident use of grids, color, images, type, and visual
conventions while further developing the principles covered in         hierarchy, students will explore a variety of solutions to design
Design Drawing I. Exploration, analysis, refinement and                problems that require both expressiveness as well as an
communication of design concepts are the main issues covered           understanding of the practical uses of communication design.
in this course. Perspective systems and diagramming are used to        With an emphasis on formal and semantic issues, assignments
understand, communicate and express various forms of                   will demonstrate how typography, photography, and other forms of
information. Projects reinforce freehand sketching and provide the     image making may be combined to shape the form and content of
basis for introduction to more complex drawing media.                  communication.
Demonstrations and group and individual critiques reinforce            Prerequisites: 51201
concepts presented in class.
Prerequisites: 51121                                                   51-203     Communication Design Computer Lab
                                                                       Fall: 3 units
51-132      Introduction to Photographic Design                        This new sophomore level Communication Design course
Spring: 9 units                                                        introduces students to the rich and diverse process of making
Introduction to photography for designers through digital              images. Communication Design faculty will each work with
photography. Using a digital camera, students learn how to extend      students on short projects over the course of the semester.
their ?seeing? with the camera, both in the world and in a shooting    Students will make images working with different means and
studio. Through shooting assignments in the world we will see how      technologies such as mark-making, working with found images
photography is another means of image-making for designers who         and different materials, computer and hand-generated drawing,
need to know how to read photographs as well as how to make            and the camera.
them. In the shooting studio, students will learn basic
documentation skills and how to make digital portfolios of their       51-211    Generation of Form: Industrial Design I
two-dimensional and three-dimensional work. In addition to             Fall: 9 units
making photographs, we will look at different kinds of existing        Generation of Form is the first studio for students in the industrial
photographic imagery, e.g. documentary, advertising, scientific,       design program. Students explore product aesthetics and basic
fine art-to gain an overview of the medium and learn how               formal issues as they pertain to industrial design. This course
photographs effectively communicate information. Shooting              integrates the principles of three dimensional design, drawing and
assignments in and out of the studio, critiques, and library           prototyping as they apply to the generation of product form.
research. Required for all design majors; lab fee; digital camera      Emphasis is placed on issues that dictate the form of products
necessary.                                                             and their creation. Students develop basic prototyping,
Prerequisites: 51101                                                   conceptual drawing, and presentation skills for the purpose of
                                                                       exploring, analyzing, refining and communicating design
51-171     Human Experience in Design                                  concepts. Required of ID students; lab fee.
Fall: 9 units                                                          Prerequisites: 51102
This course introduces the central theme of design and the
design professions: the importance of human beings in all              51-212    Meaning of Forms: ID Studio II
aspects of design thinking and practice. We will begin by              Spring: 9 units
exploring design and the human dimension, discussing the nature        This studio course introduces students to semantic and symbolic
of human beings and their physical, psychological, and spiritual or    aspects of industrial design. Several projects are given and
cultural needs. Then, we will consider the role of human beings in     students are required to develop studies that express the
the design process, exploring how designers respond to human           functional and cultural meanings of products. Students use
needs and issues of value. Finally, we will discuss the scope of       various methods of conceptual sketching, detailed
design in our personal, social, and cultural environment,              documentation, and prototyping; lab fee.
observing how thoroughly design has permeated our lives through        Prerequisites: 51211
images, physical objects, services, and environmental systems,
extending even to a profound impact on the ecological system of        51-222     Color and Communication
the planet. This is the first course in the Design Studies             Spring: 9 units
sequence of the department. Lectures, discussions, and written         As a communication tool, color can signal, enhance, and speak in
assignments, with readings and extensive visual materials.             ways that type and images cannot. Combined with type and
Required for all design majors.                                        images, color can contribute to the persuasive and
                                                                       communicative force of design. Beginning with a perceptual
51-174     History of Objects & Images                                 understanding of color, this course will explore the many ways
Spring: 9 units                                                        that color communicates. Students will work with traditional
History of Objects and Images The History of Objects and               materials and tools as well as computers to understand the
Images serves as an introduction to art and design history. The        strengths and limitations of each, comparing their similarities and
course exposes students to a diverse, global range of visual and       differences in the context of theoretical and applied projects.
material culture from prehistoric times through the eighteenth-        Prerequisites: 51201 or 51211
century. It is not intended to give a chronological overview but
rather to familiarize students with various ways in which people       51-224     Digital Pre-Press Production
have designed and made their world. The course draws from many         Spring: 9 units
disciplines including anthropology, archaeology, fine and              A lecture/lab exploration of the processes and materials of the
decorative art history, architectural history, and cultural studies.   printing industry as they support and condition the work of the
Topics for the course include communication, transportation,           communication designer. The role of electronic publishing tools in
privacy, shelter, storage, comfort, iconography, art, clothing,        the preparation of finished art will be emphasized. Field trips to a
furniture, architecture, and landscape.                                printer and an electronic pre-press facility, as well as guest
                                                                       lectures from industry, keep this course up-to-date; lab fee.
51-201     Basic Typography Communication Design I
Fall: 9 units                                                          51-227     Marks, Signs and Communications
This is the first studio for students in the communication design      Intermittent: 9 units
program. Students explore the fundamental principles of                In this studio course you will design a variety of marks ranging
typography, where type is regarded as an image that serves a           from trademarks, (logos), logotypes, icons, wayfinding devices
variety of communicative purposes. Projects allow students to          and potential symbols. You will be exposed to many examples of
explore issues of form and meaning, hierarchy, legibility and          marks for reference, acquire an understanding of the design
readability, structure and composition, and the design process.        process and develop the confidence of how marks fit into a
While typography is a highly focused branch of communication           communication strategy. Prerequisites: 51-121 & 51-122; or
design, this introduction to type as image serves to open a path       permission of the instructor.
for students to study all facets of communication design in
subsequent courses. Students use both traditional materials and
design tools as well as computers. Special tutorials provide basic
instruction in software such as InDesign and Adobe Illustrator. In
addition, we will also discuss some of the key figures,
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions     397




51-229       Digital Photographic Imaging                              Fall: 9 units
Fall: 9 units                                                          A one-semester course that introduces non-majors to the field of
This course is a Communication Design sophomore requirement.           communication design. Through studio projects, lectures, and
Students will explore conventional and digital means of image          demonstrations, students become familiar with the visual and
making. Students will gain in-depth exposure to digital                verbal language of communication designers, the design process,
manipulation through Adobe Photoshop as well as developing skill       and the communicative value of world and image. Macintosh
sets concerning digital input and output. The techniques learned       proficiency required.
will facilitate students' delivery of content in their images.
Instructor permission required for non CD sophomores.                  51-262     Communication Design Fundamentals
                                                                       Spring and Summer: 9 units
51-231     Calligraphy I                                               A one-semester course that introduces non-majors to the field of
All Semesters: 9 units                                                 communication design. Through studio projects, lectures, and
Working with pure unadorned Roman letterforms, this course will        demonstrations, students become familiar with the visual and
introduce the student to the theory and practice of hand-              verbal language of communication designers, the design process,
generated letters, employing a variety of mark-making tools. This      and the communicative value of world and image. Macintosh
course provides an in-depth understanding of the basic principles      proficiency required.
and techniques of the art of formal writing. Rhythm, texture and
composition are achieved through routine, elementary exercises         51-263     Industrial Design Fundamentals
using geometric forms, demanding concentration and manual              Fall: 9 units
discipline with the development of hand-eye coordination. The          A one-semester course that introduces non-majors to product
function, use, and harmonious sequencing of letterforms will be        development from the industrial designer?s point of view. Through
taught through weekly projects. Awareness of rhythm, texture and       studio projects, lectures, and discussions, students will gain
letterform structure are achieved through routine exercises.           experience in visualizing a product for mass production. Case
Drills, demonstrations, discussions, individual and class critiques    histories and the analysis of existing products will supplement
are on-going. Additional related topics and activities introduced      hands-on experience in developing product concepts.
in class include Books: binding and design. Brief introduction to
the historical development of our Western alphabet through film,       51-265     Black and White Photography I
slides, demonstrations, with discussion of twentieth-century type      Summer: 9 units
designs. Letter vocabulary, paleography, monoprints, words and         Introduction to the methods and practices of black and white
punctuation. Classical page design. Publications past and              photography, including darkroom practices. 35mm camera
present. Calligraphy?s role in design today. Thinking with hands       required; lab fee.
and eyes, the manual placement and spacing of letters practiced
in this course awakens sensitivity and judgment in the designer.       51-271      Design History I
                                                                       Fall: 9 units
51-232      Calligraphy II                                             This course provides an overview of design history from 1850 to
All Semesters: 9 units                                                 1950, the critical period for the formation and development of
Continuation of Introduction to Calligraphy I. Advanced problems       design and the design professions. There are three primary goals.
in calligraphy and lettering. New hands are introduced, to be          The first is to provide an understanding of the role that design has
decided by student and instructor.                                     played in the evolution of the competitive free market system at
Prerequisites: 51231                                                   national and global levels. The second goal is to demonstrate how
                                                                       design emerged as a powerful tool for corporate and cultural
51-241    How People Work                                              identity in this period. The third goal is to develop an
Fall: 9 units                                                          understanding of some of the basic influences on the formation of
51241 How People Work: Human Factors (ID/CD Lab I) This                design theory and practice in the twentieth century. This is
course is a general introduction to the field of human-centered        accomplished through the presentation and discussion of primary
design and applied human factors. It centers on the                    economic and cultural forces, philosophical ideas, artistic and
understanding of physical, cognitive, and emotional human needs        social movements, and significant individuals and artifacts that
and desires, including methods employed to acquire this                represent the period. The course traces both the chronological
information and translate it into useful criteria for the design and   and the contextual development of design, providing students
evaluation of products. Lecture, discussion, lab exercises, and        with an understanding of design as an evolving concept.
projects are employed. Required of all sophomore design
students. Prerequisite: professional program status Fall: 9.0          51-274     Design and Social Change
units                                                                  Spring: 9 units
                                                                       In this course we will examine the important relationships of
51-242     How Things Work: Mechanics and Electronics                  history, culture, policies and the environment in communication
Spring: 9 units                                                        design and industrial design. Conversely we will study the ways in
This course investigates the basic principles of mechanics and         which design can affect our culture and environment, both
electronics. Through the combination of lectures, investigations,      positively and negatively. Topics include: sustainability, universal
and lab experiments, students develop simplified representations       design, system thinking and system visualization. While various
of complex systems. The skills of freehand drawing, mechanical         cultures will be acknowledged and discussed, the major emphasis
drawing and three-dimensional models are employed and                  will be on Western culture. Through lectures, videos, reading and
developed during the project sequence. Required of ID students.        projects, students will develop their ability to incorporate
Prerequisites: 51211                                                   historical context and consideration of potential consequences
                                                                       into their design process. Required of all design sophomores. No
51-243     Prototyping                                                 pre-requisites.
Fall: Mini Session - 4.5 units
A half-semester laboratory mini-course introducing a range of          51-301      Advanced Typography CD III
materials, methods, and workshop techniques by which designers         Fall: 9 units
prototype designs in three dimensions. Basic competence in shop        This course develops advanced skills in typography and
techniques is established by bringing to realization a series of       communication design, including the study of type and motion.
simple artifacts. Studio and model shop tools are required; lab        Students learn to conceptualize and visualize more complex
fee.                                                                   bodies of information for a variety of communicative purposes.
                                                                       Projects encourage students to develop a deeper understanding
51-246    Photo Documentation                                          of the expressive potential of type and image and to develop
Spring: Mini Session - 4.5 units                                       critical and creative thinking skills with which to assess the
This course teaches Industrial Design students basic lighting          effectiveness of their own work and that of their peers. Course
and camera techniques for documenting three dimensional design         objectives are to encourage an active exchange of ideas and
work digitally. Required for all ID students.                          information which allow students to develop the ability to clearly
                                                                       articulate their ideas and thought processes in relation to their
51-251     Digital Prototyping                                         work. This leads to a more focused method for developing and
Fall: Mini Session - 4.5 units                                         expressing ideas effectively.
A half-semester laboratory mini-course introducing 3D modeling         Prerequisites: 51202
software. Course Structure Each class meeting will consist of an
introduction to and demonstration of specific aspects and              51-302     Typography IV
functions of SolidWorks. At the end of each class session, work        Spring: 9 units
related to the covered topic(s) will be assigned for completion by     The world is complex, and we have made it so. This course is a
the next class meeting. This course is a requirement for all ID        creative venture that deals with complexity, in particular the
majors.                                                                complexity of visual information that surrounds us in our daily
                                                                       lives. From train schedules to tax forms to the user guide for a
51-261    Communication Design Fundamentals                            VCR, humans have created a typographic labyrinth within which
                                                                       we are often lost. This course deals with the basic principle that
3 9 8 Course Descriptions




communication designers employ when they represent complex             Intermittent: 9 units
information, making it visible and accessible. Assignments are         An advanced photo-imaging course to further develop proficiency
specific, but their lessons are fundamental, providing students        in making and understanding photographs in the context of
with conceptual and visual tools that will help to solve any           communication design. Photography will be seen as a medium of
information design problem.                                            communication through which personal aesthetics and individual
Prerequisites: 51301                                                   style are expressed. We will work in a variety of photo-image
                                                                       forms, including traditional black and white, altered, and digital.
51-311     Product Design ID III                                       We will also explore different formats for presenting photographs,
Fall: 9 units                                                          including book, collage, sequence. In addition, we will examine
Course projects are chosen to give students an opportunity to          photography from the nineteenth century to the present to
use their creative, technical and theoretical skills in a business     understand how the medium has evolved and how individuals
application. The primary emphasis is on the use of a systematic        have used photography for personal expression. Extensive
process for the design and development of products that are            shooting and darkroom work, library research. 35mm camera
useful, usable, desirable and feasible. Attention is also given to     necessary; lab fee.
designers' interaction with engineering, marketing, and other          Prerequisites: 51221 and 51221
professionals who influence the product development process.
Studio, model shop tools and a digital camera are required; lab        51-322     Visualizing the Global Footprint
fee.                                                                   Intermittent: 9 units
Prerequisites: 51212                                                   Visualizing the Global Footprint The School of Design and the
                                                                       College of Humanities and Social Science, in conjunction with the
51-312     Products in Systems: ID IV                                  Steinbrenner Institute for Environmental Education and Research,
Spring: 9 units                                                        will work to design a series of interventions to educate college
This course introduces the themes of product planning and the          students both nationally and internationally, to better understand
development of products within systems and as systems. The             their role in preserving the earth's natural resources. Our goal is
projects are broad in scope and require students to develop            to create a set of tools that will allow a better understanding of
products that reflect an understanding of the entire development       the factors that influence mankind's impact on the globe as
cycle. Tools and skills for the studio and model shop are required;    defined by and demonstrated in the Living Planet Report 2004
lab fee.                                                               (World Wildlife Fund). Our product should help college students
Prerequisites: 51311                                                   better understand the environmental consequences of various
                                                                       everyday life choices and behaviors. Additionally, the product
51-315     Digital Imaging                                             must be a place where educational modules are made available to
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  help inform the users about behaviors that impact the
The objective of this course will be to provide students with a        environment and how one might begin to adopt more positive
practical, technical and theoretical foundation in digital imaging.    behaviors without negatively affecting their lifestyles. One of our
The primary software for this course will be Adobe Photoshop,          greatest challenges will be to design something that can be
with which students will explore construction, combination,            universally understood around the world.
manipulation, input, and output of photographs as a means of           Prerequisites: 51301
image creation. Through student project critique and other
discussion, we will also consider the aesthetic and political          51-323      Drawing and Communication
implications of the emergence of this and other new electronic         Intermittent: 9 units
imaging technologies.                                                  This course explores drawing as a means of communicating and
                                                                       expressing ideas. We will explore drawing by hand, but there will
51-316      Designing Spaces                                           be some integration of other imaging technologies. Themes will
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  center around objects, people, and places in various contexts.
Stop. Look around you. Where are you and what are you doing?           Emphasis is placed on individual interpretation and exploration of
Are you in a lecture hall? A gallery? The check-out line at the        the assigned projects. Each project has several components that
"O"? How does the layout of the space support the activity that's      cause the student to generate and develop ideas as they work
supposed to happen there? How big is the space, and how is it          towards more refined images. Specific conceptual and technical
proportioned? If you added ten feet to the ceiling height, how         skills will be discussed both individually and in groups as
would it change the way it feels? Look down at your feet. What         students examine the relationship between images and meaning.
material are you standing on? Does it feel soft beneath your feet?     Prerequisites: 51122
How does it affect the sound quality of the room? Imagine it as a
bright orange surface. What if the walls were rough instead of         51-324     Basic Prototyping Methods for CD
smooth-how would they catch the light differently? Does the            Spring: Mini Session - 4.5 units
sunlight come into the space, casting shadows? Or it the light         A half-semester laboratory mini-course introducing a range of
primarily artificial, and what are the fixtures like? What, in sum,    materials, methods, and workshop techniques by which designers
does it feel like to be in this space and what are the elements that   prototype designs in three dimensions. Basic competence in shop
define it? This course will present you with the opportunity to        techniques is established by bringing to realization a series of
consider some of these questions, and will allow you to look at        simple artifacts. Studio and model shop tools are required; lab
spatial issues from your perspective as a designer. The semester       fee.
will be divided into sections exploring issues such as program,        Prerequisites: 51201
site, structure, material, and light, and each section will be
supported by a series of exercises, lectures, and short projects.      51-325     Signs/Symbols/Marks
Designing Spaces should be of particular interest to those             Intermittent: 9 units
interested in pursuing exhibit design, interior design, and            This course focuses on the formal development of pictorial signs
wayfinding design, but it may also be useful simply as a way of        (icons, symbols, marks, etc.) either as individual elements or as
expanding your design framework. This course is open to junior         families and systems of compatible forms. Through a variety of
and senior ID and CD students, and has no prerequisites                projects, students will employ an analytical process,which
                                                                       includes research, observation, idea generation, development,
51-318     From Marks to Trademarks                                    selection, and refinement of images. We will explore the personal,
Intermittent: Mini Session -    4.5 units                              social, and cultural messages that such images carry. There will
FROM MARKS TO TRADEMARKS The structure of the class will               be applications in two- and three-dimensional formats.
proceed historically from antiquity to today with mini                 Prerequisites: 51202
presentations of mark categories that will provide a grounding for
each student who will research and explore a particular category,      51-326      Documenting the Visual
understanding their historical role and projecting their presence,     Intermittent: 9 units
into contemporary culture. Each student will share their research      A critical look at documentary photography. We will examine 19th
work with the rest of their peers during each of the class sessions    and especially 20th century images to see how photographers
for discussion and feedback. This will help build many                 have shaped and extended a tradition that continues into the
connections between subject areas as well as enrich the entire         present. We will discuss theoretical issues?e.g. how cultural
subject of marks. Each student will produce a (written & designed)     context influences the making and understanding of photographs;
project, with visuals, that demonstrates their work. The class will    how photographers use both conscious as well as unconscious
conclude with each student giving a mini presentation of their         strategies in image-making; how documentary images take
project. Every student is expected to be a proactive member of         different forms-ranging from seemingly literal and objective
the class, contributing to the discussions and content. If time        descriptions, to intensely personal statements, to images
permits, guest experts will be invited to contribute. Goal: To gain    coupled with text. In exploring these issues, we will look at a
an understanding of the significant historical path from the           variety of image-types: family and candid photos, company and
earliest mark making to the role of trademarks in communication        advertising photos, political and humanistic or social photo-
design and contemporary society. Class limit: 10                       essays. Extensive visual materials, readings, written and optional
                                                                       photo assignments. Intended for students majoring in the
51-321    Photography and Communications                               Department of Design or the Department of English, or by
                                                                       permission of the instructor.

                                                                       51-327    Introducation to Web Design
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions      399




Intermittent: 9 units                                                  selectivity in framing the subject; the reasons for making
Intro to Web Design is an HTML and Web Design fundamentals             documentary photographs; the intended audience for
class, covering topics ranging from the necessary design               documentary photography; and the appropriate final display of the
elements to create a strong site to the coding skills necessary to     photographs?should they be on museum walls, are they effective
produce it. Exploring navigational elements and usability along        as printed pieces, and are they accessible to and/or have the
with grids, typography, images, and color through several studio       approval of the subject? Extensive shooting and darkroom work,
projects will help develop the necessary skills required to design     library research. Prerequisite: black and white darkroom 51-221,
and build useful web sites. No previous HTML coding or design          or by the permission of the instructor.
experince is required. Pre-req: Design junior status or permission
of the instructor.                                                     51-341    How Things are Made
                                                                       Fall: 9 units
51-330     Photo Book Design                                           This course introduces students to the alternatives of materials
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  and manufacturing processes that are considered in product
The Photo Book Photographs are often made into books. In this          design and development. Through the combination of lecture,
course, students will make photographs with the intention of           demonstrations and field trips students learn the advantages and
presenting them as a book. We will deal with theme and content,        disadvantages of various materials and processes, and how to
image sequence and size, and the use of text with image. In            choose and specify them in a particular product application.
addition to making their own, students will look at historical and     Required of ID students.
contemporary photo books to see how the rich tradition of photo
book has evolved through time and continues today. For                 51-342     How People Work with Things
Communication Design majors, or by the permission of the               Spring: 9 units
instructor. Extensive shooting and darkroom work, library              This course presents an opportunity to experience and
research. Prerequisite: black and white darkroom 51-221.               understand the human centered research and design process
                                                                       through a self-defined project. Projects follow a common
51-331      Advanced Calligraphy I                                     sequence of exploratory human and product research, concept
All Semesters: 9 units                                                 generation using participatory and co-design methods, and user
Continued study in the discipline of calligraphy. (Meets with          feedback to evaluate emerging design concepts, as they are
Introduction to Calligraphy I.) Two directions may be taken. (1)       refined. Course format includes lecture, discussion, lab
Enlarging the student?s repertoire of scripts, contemporary or         exercises, interim presentations, a final presentation and
traditional, for use in limited areas of work such as book or          thorough documentation of the research and design process.
display work. (2) Concentrating on more intensive problem              Open to all juniors and seniors in Design. All others will be
solving using a limited repertoire of scripts such as Roman, Italic,   waitlisted and admitted by permission of the instructor.
Sans Serif.
Prerequisites: 51232                                                   51-343     Product Morphology
                                                                       Intermittent: 9 units
51-332     Advanced Calligraphy II                                     "Morphology" refers to the the systematic study of form;
All Semesters: 9 units                                                 "Product" means that we will be studying the form of products, as
Continued study in the discipline of calligraphy. (Meets with          compared to buildings or rocks, for example. This course provides
Introduction to Calligraphy II.) Advanced problems or new              ID students an opportunity to develop their form vocabulary and
direction determined by student and instructor.                        form sophistication beyond the sophomore year. This course will
Prerequisites: 51331                                                   require a lot of drawing, modeling, and other kinds of visual
                                                                       studies, focusing on what makes a superior product form...issues
51-334      Experimental Packaging                                     of form language, visual and tactile usability, expression and
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  emotion, cultural appropriateness. There will be little time put into
EXPERIMENTAL PACKAGING This course will explore a range of             solving the engineering or marketing aspects of products.
materials that contain, support and deliver an appropriate             Instead, students should be prepared to spend many hours in
message about the product. Some materials support the contents         form variation and revision.
better than others. Some packaging is made up of "layers" of           Prerequisites: 51243 or 51324
materials, some for protection, some to express the value of the
product. Some products are associated with the materials used in       51-344    Advanced Digital Prototyping
their packaging. Some materials are used in the package because        Spring: Mini Session - 6 units
they protect the product better than others, while some display it     This course is an advanced course using SolidWorks computer
better at the point of sale. Some materials permit the product to      modeling. It is a prerequisite for Production Prototyping.
be seen by the buyer, while others cloak it in mystery. Some           Prerequisites: 51211
products require closed containers because the contents are
liquids or lack a fixed shape or solid form. Many materials have       51-346    Production Prototyping
unique textures and cry out to be touched or handled, while some       Spring: Mini Session - 6 units
are slick and metallic. Branding and labeling of the packages will     This course is the 2nd half of Advanced Digital Prototyping, using
fit the individual packaging concept thus grounding it as a            your work in SolidWorks to produce hard models.
package. Taking Prototyping Methods, (mini 1st half of Spring          Prerequisites: 51341
term on Friday AM; taught by Tom Merriman), or having taken it
previously, is a requirement to use the shop. Although some            51-349     Visual Notation, Journal
desktop modeling will be used, exploring various materials for         Intermittent: Mini Session -     4.5 units
packaging can only be accomplished in the shop with the vast           Visual Notation, Journal 51-349 A1 1st mini This course is
array of power and hand tools available. This course is open for       about keeping a daily visual journal. The importance of its use will
both Communication Design and Industrial Design students. A            be placed on ways of seeing, ordering, discovering and making
50% mix of both majors is desirable.                                   relationships while involved in the process of visualizing,
                                                                       exploring and recording. We will use a variety of drawing media;
51-335    Mapping and Diagraming                                       some that may be new to you and through experimentation we’ll
Fall: 9 units                                                          look at the impact media has on your image making process. We
This course explores the different ways in which we communicate        will examine a variety of subjects both man made and natural,
complex information, through maps and diagrams. Students will          large and small. One major goal of the course is to have you see
design maps and diagrams using subject matter of their choice.         the journal as not just a compilation of notations but as a
                                                                       comprehensive tool for visual thought and expression. We will
51-336    Web Design Practicum                                         also examine journals done by a variety of designers, architects
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  and artists and discuss how making visual assessments
Web Design Practicum All you need to know to set up your web-          condition the way we think and see the world. Consistent with the
based portfolio, including basic HTML, image prep, tabeling            credits given for this courses a total of 5-6 hours of work, both in
structures, template strategies, directory maintainance and style      and out of class will be expected each week. Your journal will be
sheets. Intended for design majors only.                               turned in for evaluation the last day of class.

51-338     Documentary Photography                                     51-350      Visualization
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  Intermittent: 9 units
Documentary Photography: the Social and Built Landscape                Visualization This course introduces methodologies for
Documentary photography explores issues, often social,                 visualizing, recording and presenting ideas. With an emphasis on
humanistic and/or political, in man-made culture. This course          creating visual narratives, students will 1. engage in activites of
examines the work of many major nineteenth and twentieth               field notation, journaling, storyboarding, and “hot-house”
century documentarians while students photographically                 conceptualization; 2. gain exposure to advanced rendering
investigate their own topics. Among the many ethical areas of a        techniques using markers, chalk pastels, and adobe illustrator/
documentarian1s concern, the course examines (through looking          photoshop; 3. appreciate the qualities and differences of idea,
at the documentary tradition and through the student1s own work)       concept and presentation sketching; and 4. integrate these
the following: the photographer1s relationship to the subject; the     methodologies of visualization to develop a flexible structure for
choices involved in representing the subject; the act of
4 0 0 Course Descriptions




their design portfolios to communicate their body of work in a
public forum. Roughly 8 weeks will be devoted to developing,            51-383      Conceptual Models
drawing and illustrating ideas with the remainder of the semester       Intermittent: Mini Session -   4.5 units
focusing on presentating these ideas through portfolio                  Conceptual Models and Design Implications The challenge in
construction. Prerequisite: 51-121, 51-122                              human-centered design is not in conducting appropriate research,
                                                                        but in making the leap from research findings to design
51-351     Drawing, Expression and Communication                        implications. Creating a model is often an important step toward
Intermittent: Mini Session -     4.5 units                              creating consensus or a driving concept when working with
Drawing, Expression and Communication 51-351 A2 2nd mini                multidisciplinary development teams. In this mini we will focus on
This course explores the use of drawing as a means of visualizing,      one of the most challenging aspects of the design process. We
communicating and expressing form, space and ideas and as               will quickly develop a “hunt statement”, conduct discovery stage
such is seen as a fundamental activity used to develop visual           immersive research and use our findings to develop conceptual
thought in the design process. Weekly themes will be introduced,        models and design implications. This course is open to upper
along with presentation and accompanying questions that require         level students in Design, HCI, BHA, engineering and graduate
responses through the generation and development of work done           business students.
primarily through freehand drawing. Specific conceptual and
technical skills will be discussed both individually and in groups      51-387     Interactive Learning Tools
with emphasis placed on individual interpretation and exploration       Intermittent: Mini Session -    4.5 units
of the assignments with the goal of developing visual fluency. A        As we learn to read and write sentences, stories or even poetry
part of the course will be spent looking at how designers have          we are explicitly taught how to construct an expression.
used drawing in the design process at various times through             Unfortunately in most schools, we learn very little about the
history and within a variety of contexts. Emphasis is placed on         "clothes" words wear. As designers we know that form is content
draftsmanship and more on the role drawing may play in the              too. We look beyond the letters to the letterforms. The goal of this
complex process of visual thinking and notation. Consistent with        mini is to develop an interface that enables our target audience to
the credits allocated to this course a total of 5 hours of work, both   learn how the forms of words reflect the content too and how to
in and outside of class, will be expected each week. A portfolio of     use that form to enhance meaning. An interactive learning
work will be expected the last day of class.                            environment is one that supports structured interaction between
                                                                        communities of learners. In this mini we will conduct exploratory
51-353    Writing & Photography: Magazine Writing & Journalism          research and use our findings to develop prototypes for a learning
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   environment for writing that includes form as an explicit part of
Revealing Place: Photographers and Writers Working Together 9           the composition. --- The course should only be open to
units Instructors: Jane McCafferty, English Department; Charlee         undergrads and grads with experience in interaction design or
Brodsky, School of Design Writers and photographers have                permission of the instructor.
worked together throughout the 20'th and into the 21'st century
to produce powerful documents. We are interested in how                 51-396     Redefining the Portfolio
photographs and words describe people and places, and the               Intermittent: Mini Session -     4.5 units
dialogue that happens when words and images come together.              Redefining the Portfolio The portfolio is a document that provides
Students will work individually and in teams, doing field research      a personal narrative of a designer’s work, process, and approach
in the community as photographers and writers. Students will            to solving problems. These artifacts are in effect, an evolving
respond to a variety of short assignments along with a semester-        collection of our best work, yet present numerous challenges
long project. Course is open to Design and English juniors,             when trying to craft a cohesive and succinct presentation about
seniors and grad students by instructor's permission                    our style, approach, and outlook on design and the world. In this
                                                                        course, we will discuss strategies for aligning the content and
51-371     Learning to Look                                             structure of your printed portfolio to provide a platform from which
Intermittent: Mini Session -    4.5 units                               to present yourself as a designer.
Topics courses address important themes in the history, theory,
and criticism of design. Offerings vary from year to year. Lectures     51-399    Junior Independent Study
and discussions. Extensive readings. No prerequisites.                  All Semesters: 3-12 units
                                                                        Guidelines for independent study in the Design office. Proposals
51-374     Understanding Perception through Design                      must be approved by faculty before registration.
Spring: 9 units
51374 Understanding Perception through Design This course               51-403      Senior Project: Interaction Design
emphasizes audience expectations, also known as schemas, as a           Fall: 12 units
major influence on the artifacts we produce. For example, we read       The senior year offers Design majors the opportunity to explore a
marble Corinthian columns as an entrance to a courthouse rather         variety of advanced topics through project-oriented courses.
than to a home. The manner we use to communicate, either                These project courses typically require an integration of skills
following or deviating from expectations, affects the way people        and knowledge gained throughout the entire design program.
perceive and process the information we present. Through                Senior projects are often funded by outside companies or
lectures, discussions, readings, and projects, we will study the        organizations, providing real world clients. This project highlights
use of schemas in both print and digital mediums, closely               the role that visual interface designers play in the multi-
examining information structures. We will also explore the bearing      disciplinary attempt to bridge the gap between functionality and
of expectations on the types of interactions and experiences we         usability and to introduce students to some of the unique
produce, answering the question, ?Can information become                challenges of designing within the realm of a digital, interactive
concrete and experiential versus abstract and readerly?                 medium.

51-379     Emotion and Reason in Design                                 51-404     Senior Project: Interaction Design
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   Spring: 12 units
51379 & 51779 Emotion & Reason in Design Emotion plays an               This is the spring offering of 51-403.
important role in all forms of design, yet emotion is difficult to
describe and analyze. The goal of this course is to study emotion       51-405     Senior Project: Communication Design
in a different way. Instead of locating emotion in the responses of     Fall: 12 units
an audience, we will try to locate emotion or emotional expression      The senior year offers Design majors the opportunity to explore a
within the design itself. Assignments will involve extensive            variety of advanced topics through project-oriented courses.
reading. This course will be conducted as a research seminar,           These project courses typically require an integration of skills
with each student preparing a paper on a subject of personal            and knowledge gained throughout the entire design program.
interest in design.                                                     Senior projects are often funded by outside companies or
                                                                        organizations, providing real world clients. This project varies
51-380     Dignity, Design and Action                                   from one semester to the next, providing various opportunities in
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   areas such as exhibit design, branding, and web design.
Dignity, Design and Action How would we design to help people
realize their dignity and rights as human beings? To answer this        51-406     Senior Project: Communication Design
question, we will explore what human dignity is, how to design for      Spring: 12 units
it and why action is significant to the achievement of this end.        This is the spring offering of 51-405
Drawing from prominent work in the fields of anthropology,
psychology, philosophy, and design studies, the class will develop      51-407    Senior Project: Product Design
a definition of human dignity, explore ways it has or has not been      Fall: 12 units
designed for in the past, and propose future possibilities with this    The senior year offers Design majors the opportunity to explore a
new theme in mind. Please join us if you are a junior, senior or        variety of advanced topics through project-oriented courses.
graduate student, like to speak-up in class, and want to challenge      These project courses typically require an integration of skills
your understanding of design and process. Class size: limit 10          and knowledge gained throughout the entire design program.
people
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions      401




Senior projects are often funded by outside companies or               establish brand strategies and determine the markets that they
organizations, providing real world clients. This project focuses      want to compete in. The second level will look at how companies
on new product development.                                            develop overall product lines that express corporate brand and
                                                                       then also connect with consumers in product markets. The third
51-408     Senior Project: Environmental Design                        level is the planning of specific product programs. The course will
Spring: 12 units                                                       began as a seminar discussion of case studies and evolve into
This is the spring offering of 51-409                                  team research on the development of a product strategy using an
                                                                       actual company’s brand identity. This course is for seniors or
51-409     Senior Project: Environmental Design                        graduate students in design, BHA and engineering, and graduate
Fall: 12 units                                                         business students.
The senior year offers Design majors the opportunity to explore a
variety of advanced topics through project-oriented courses.           51-451    Fundamentals of Joinery & Furniture Design
These project courses typically require an integration of skills       Fall: 9 units
and knowledge gained throughout the entire design program.             Intensive introduction to traditional joinery techniques and the
Senior projects are often funded by outside companies or               properties of wood through the use of textbook studies and lab
organizations, providing real world clients. This project involves     experiments. Emphasis placed on how these techniques and
the design of a space, both indoors and outdoors, navigation of        properties influence design decisions. Students will learn how to
the space, and use of the space. Projects could include signage,       set up, sharpen and use traditional hand powered tools. This
exhibit design, navigation and wayfinding, furnishings within a        acquired knowledge will be applied in the design and realization of
space, or even park design.                                            a piece of wooden furniture. Limited enrollment. Lab fee and
                                                                       material purchases required.
51-414      Senior Project Integrated Product Development              Prerequisites: 51243
Spring: 12 units
This course provides an integrated perspective on the many             51-452     Furniture Design II
processes by which new products are designed, manufactured,            Spring: 9 units
and marketed. Under the direction of faculty from Design,              A continuation of 51-451, this course explores a much broader
Engineering, and Industrial Administration, students will work         range of issues related to furniture design. Students will identify
together in interdisciplinary groups on the development of real        and define in a proposal the area of furniture design they intend to
products. In addition to the product development project, the          investigate and then produce one or more furniture pieces
course includes lectures on innovation strategy, opportunity           developed from their findings. Materials and processes applied to
identification, designing products, object representation and          the project are limited only by the resources the student can
manufacturability rules, computer-assisted design and                  bring to bear. Assigned readings and a series of in-class
prototyping, concept testing and protocol analysis, redesign           discussions will focus on the influence of workmanship in design,
issues, market testing, manufacturing and production, and              and on how the behavior of the user is influenced by the form or
product introduction and management. Open to graduate and              esthetic language of the artifact. Lab fee & material purchases
senior-level engineering students, industrial administration           required.
students, and design students.                                         Prerequisites: 51451

51-421     Introduction to Interaction & Visual Interface              51-453     Applied User Research
Fall: 9 units                                                          Mini Session - 4.5 units
This course highlights the role that visual interface designers        This course is an opportunity for students to study how user
play in the multi-disciplinary attempt to bridge the gap between       research applies to concrete design projects in an organizational
functionality and usability and to introduce sutdents to some of       context. We will study three different design projects that pursue
the unique challenges of designing within the realm of a digital,      a human-centered design approach: The Domestic Mail Manual
interactive medium.                                                    (DMM) Transformation Project by the United States Postal
                                                                       Service, the Australian Taxation Project by the Australian Tax
51-422     Visual Interface                                            Office, and the Income Tax Form Redesign by the Internal
Spring: 9 units                                                        Revenue Service of the United States. Students will trace the role
Intended for HCI double majors, this is the spring offering of 51-     of user research in each case. The class will take the format of a
421 Introduction to visual interface design. This course               seminar with lectures, presentations and readings. Together with
highlights the role that visual interface designers play in the        actual samples from the three case studies, they will provide a
multi-disciplinary attempt to bridge the gap between functionality     background for rich discussions. Students will walk away with
and usability and to introduce students to some of the unique          three key insights into applied user research: They will
challenges of designing within the realm of a digital, interactive     understand how user research applies to a complex system, such
medium.                                                                as an organization. Simultaneously, students will gain an
                                                                       understanding of the opportunities and the potential pitfalls that
51-425     Letterpress and Bookbinding                                 arise when co-designing with a client. Finally, By studying the
Fall and Spring: 3-12 units                                            design process and the artifacts that were developed by these
This course provides opportunities to work on an antique               three projects, the contribution of user research in designing
letterpress and learn the fine art of bookbinding. Emphasis is         interactions of individuals with organizations, the effect of user
placed on good craftmanship, while allowing students to work on        research on an organization and the role of user research
individual projects as well as a group project.                        organizational change will become evident. Open to graduate and
                                                                       advanced undergraduate students in design. Because of the
51-427     Time Motion and Communication                               nature of the projects and the organizations involved, this course
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  may also be of interest to students with a background in
In the digital medium, we are no longer limited to static forms for    organizational behavior, management and public policy.
expressing information. This digital studio course explores the
use of kinetic forms - visual forms expressed over time - to           51-471     Practicing Design
understand their unique qualities in communication design.             Fall: 9 units
                                                                       This is a lecture course covering all aspects of design practice.
51-433     Advanced Interaction & Visual Interface                     Students learn to formulate a plan for professional practice,
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  market creative services, manage projects, and understand the
An interface is the link between a user and a product that             legal and ethical issues associated with design practice. This
communicates how a product will be used and creates an                 course will also address the changing role of the design
experience for the people who will use it. Interaction design is the   professions. Visiting professionals, case studies, and
process of creating and defining product behavior, encompassing        supplementary readings provide resources for class discussion.
both usability and aesthetic dimensions of an artifact, service, or    This course is required for all senior design majors.
environment. In this course, we will explore issues that pertain to
the design of interfaces that activate vision, hearing and touch,      51-472     Globalization and Design
with a focus on a variety of design principles, information            Intermittent: Mini Session -   4.5 units
hierarchy and navigation, multi-modal information presentation,        This mini course explores the various ways that designers,
user-product interactions, and how these elements become part          engineers and marketing interact and plan products on a global
of a larger design process. Students will develop a process for        level. Designers must often plan for products that will be sold in
creating interface designs that can be reapplied in future             markets around the world. As a result of global markets, design
contexts.                                                              teams must conduct user research on markets in several
Prerequisites: 51421                                                   countries simultaneously. Product programs often require the
                                                                       coordination of designers and other disciplines from around the
51-441    Product Planning & Development                               world. Designers must integrate global manufacturing and
Fall: Mini Session - 4.5 units
Product Planning and Development The course will explore
examples of case studies of product planning strategy from
several levels. The first level will explore how companies
4 0 2 Course Descriptions




assembly and plan for global distribution of products.                    Craft fundamentals in preparation for scene study. The beginning
Globalization has required designers to think and work in new             development of the students creative resources.
ways. Case studies discussed in a seminar format and research             Prerequisites: 54101
into successes and failures of global product programs will be the
two primary methods used in the class. This course is for upper           54-103      Speech I
level design majors, and masters students in design, engineering          Fall: 6 units
and business.                                                             (Speaking Voice) The First Year students are introduced to
                                                                          concepts of vocal support and are encouraged to develop a
51-479      Design Methods: Analysis and Creativity                       process which will allow them to communicate on stage with open,
Intermittent: 9 units                                                     free sound. Their regular warm-up sessions demonstrate the
Design Methods: Analysis and Creativity Most designers                    possibilities of full-range and strength. The voice work is
recognize that “process” is an important part of professional             designed to allow for creative and personal approach to text.
practice, yet the “methods” that try to capture design process are        (Speech & Phonetics) The speech work introduces students to
varied and often conflicting. The goal of this course is to explore       the phonetic alphabet, isolating each sound and acquainting the
design methods and their supporting techniques, seeking a better          students with a symbol for each vowel, diphthong and consonant,
understanding of the pattern of inquiry upon which they are based.        a process which will enable them to identify each for particular
The course will include a close reading of works in the “design           work to strengthen the production of sounds and/or personal
methods movement” of the 1960s and 1970s. This movement                   corrective work. The process helps the student actors to
rightly occupies a central place in the development of design             eliminate regional characteristics. Both areas of voice and
methods and methodology in the twentieth century. It is at times          speech approach the application of these beginning techniques to
insightful, at other times confusing and dissatisfying.                   prose and poetic texts.
Nonetheless, it is essential to understand what was attempted
and actually accomplished by individuals such as Bruce Archer,            54-104      Speech I
John Chris Jones, Horst Rittel, and Christopher Alexander. Our            Spring: 6 units
current understanding of design methods, including the new forms          (Speaking Voice) The First Year students are introduced to
of user research, is grounded on their work.                              concepts of vocal support and are encouraged to develop a
                                                                          process which will allow them to communicate on stage with open,
51-481      Visualizing Stories                                           free sound. Their regular warm-up sessions demonstrate the
Intermittent: Mini Session -      4.5 units                               possibilities of full-range and strength. The voice work is
Students This course is open to HCI and Design graduate                   designed to allow for creative and personal approach to text.
students and senior-level Design students. Students need a                (Speech & Phonetics) The speech work introduces students to
basic knowledge of communication and interaction design.                  the phonetic alphabet, isolating each sound and acquainting the
Experience with interactive prototyping, digital video editing, and       students with a symbol for each vowel, diphthong and consonant,
graphic layout are encouraged but not required. Course                    a process which will enable them to identify each for particular
Description When viewers watch a TV news story, they never see            work to strengthen the production of sounds and/or personal
the whole story. Instead they see, a short synopsis of the back-          corrective work. The process helps the student actors to
story, a quick update of the latest findings, and speculations on         eliminate regional characteristics. Both areas of voice and
the future outcome. Will he be found guilty? Will she be re-              speech approach the application of these beginning techniques to
elected? Will the hurricane damage more property than last time?          prose and poetic texts.
What viewers never get from TV news is a complete view of how a
story evolves over time from beginning to end. In this project            54-105     Voice I
course students will work in small teams to develop visualizations        Fall: 5 units
of both individual current news stories as well as the evolution of       This course introduces basic concepts and practice related to
these stories over time. Working with a small set of CNN video            voice usage for actors. Principles of healthy, expressive and
clips, students will produce both static and interactive                  dynamic voice use will be explored and how to maintain healthy
visualizations that offer insights into the story that a traditional      voice usage in demanding performance situations. The Linklater
linear video broadcast can never provide. In much the same way            work adapted by Feindel and its application to text and acting
Minard's map on Napolean's march to Moscow captures an entire             principles make up the core aspects of the course, including
story in a single image, students will work to reveal the relevant        basic principles of the Alexander Technique. Voice and its
features that best communicate both what is happening in the              relation to other areas such as psychology, spirituality,
individual news story as well as the larger story evolving over           community and science are also introduced.
many weeks.
                                                                          54-106     Voice I
51-488     Design, Management and Organizational Change                   Spring: 6 units
Intermittent: 9 units                                                     Prerequisite, Voice 1 Fall Semester This is a continuation of
Design, Management, and Organizational Behavior 51-488/51-                Voice 1, fall semester. The course covers the strengthening of
788 The goal of this course is to help Design students better             resonators, combined with Shakespeare and writing exercises.
understand how organizations affect the practice of design and, in        Students develop a foundation in basic warm up principles and
turn, how the practice of design and affect organizational life.          practice as part of an actor’s preparation for stage and media
Topics covered will include the history and theory of management,         performance. Introduction to basic Alexander principles
some of the current practices of management that have direct              continues. The exploration of Voice as it relates to other areas is
bearing on design (such as strategic planning), and some of the           also part of the semester work.
central concepts of organizational theory that will help students
learn to interpret and work within organizations. Pre-requisites:         54-107     Movement I
this course is intended primarily for design graduate students,           Fall: 4 units
with a few seats reserved for undergraduate Design majors. Non-           This first semester of Movement concentrates primarily on
Design majors must obtain the instructor’s permission to register         developing the students' awareness of physical messages, how
for this course.                                                          much their movement can add or distract in a scene. First, we
                                                                          look at what they bring to the situation, their personal physical
51-499    Senior Independent Study                                        habits and we begin the corrective work to rid them of these
All Semesters: 3-12 units                                                 unconscious tics and introduce them to balanced alignment.
Guidelines for independent study in the Design Office. Proposals          Through a series of non-verbal improvisations, they begin to see
must be approved by faculty before pre-registration.                      that the body can reflect a complex inner life, subtle changes in
                                                                          environment, shifts in status and relationship, history and hidden
Drama                                                                     agendas. By stripping away the verbal, they begin to make
                                                                          physical choices that aid the character and scene. The other
54-101      Acting I                                                      components of the first semester address spatial relationships,
Fall: 9 units                                                             movement on a stage, rhythm and spontaneity.
A knowledge and beginning understanding of the components of
acting. Basic exercises, improvisations and prepared work in              54-108     Movement I
relaxation, concentration, imagination, communication. The                Spring: 4 units
ability to create the reality of a given situation in theatrical terms.   The second semester of Movement deals more specifically with
Craft fundamentals in preparation for scene study. The beginning          the movement corrective work, incorporates exercises to achieve
development of the students creative resources.                           isolation, control strength, balance and explores specific
                                                                          movement techniques. Non-verbal improvisations lead into
54-102      Acting I                                                      animal movement work, to coincide with the animal project in First
Spring: 12 units                                                          Year Acting. This is followed with mime techniques, both for the
A knowledge and beginning understanding of the components of              ability to handle imaginary objects and for a physical
acting. Basic exercises, improvisations and prepared work in              understanding of what the body does during various activities
relaxation, concentration, imagination, communication. The                (analysis of movement), as well as aiding in visualization,
ability to create the reality of a given situation in theatrical terms.   concentration, focus and specificity. Pantomime Blanche
                                                                          introduces them to a highly disciplined, purely physical form and
                                                                                                            Course Descriptions     403




gives students the opportunity to apply techniques in this           54-160   Run Crew
distinctive style.                                                   Spring: 6 units
                                                                     Hands on experience in most aspects of building and running a
54-109    Dramaturgy I                                               production.
Fall: 9, 15 units
One semester only with crew. Freshman level but open to any          54-161     Production Preparation I
student in the university.                                           Fall: 6 units
                                                                     Basic Introduction and practice, through preparation and crew
54-111     Text                                                      assignments, in building and handling scenery, costumes, props,
Spring: Mini Session - 2 units                                       and lighting.
This class is in conjunction with Acting I in the School of Drama.
The actor/director learns how to investigate the written text and    54-162     Production Preparation I
translates it actively for performance.                              Spring: 9 units
                                                                     Basic Introduction and practice, through preparation and crew
54-121     Introduction to Directing                                 assignments, in building and handling scenery, costumes, props,
Fall: 9 units                                                        and lighting.
An interdisciplinary exploration of the directors art through the
study of modern art movements. Students will be required to do       54-163      Introduction to Production
extensive research on one specific movement i.e. Surrealism or       Fall: 6 units
abstract expressionism, and create a performance piece based         The producing of modern theatrical productions involves the
on the visual and social elements of that particular movement.       participation of professionals in a wide range of disciplines.
                                                                     Introduction to Production provides students with insights and
54-122    Directing I                                                first hand experience participating in the physical production of
Spring: 9 units                                                      theatre. The skills learned here provide an invaluable foundation
A continuation of the previous semester focusing on Music and        and context for future production work and are, of course, useful in
Dance of the twentieth century and how they influence the            their own right. Includes participation in School of Drama
directors art.                                                       productions on shop, install, and run crews.
Prerequisites: 54121
                                                                     54-164      Introduction to Production
54-123     Dance I                                                   Spring: 3, 6 units
Fall: 5 units                                                        Participation in School of Drama productions on shop, install, and
Sec A - Classical technique (Ballet) is used to for proper body      run crews. Pre-requisites/Co-requesites: 54-163 or instructor’s
alignment, placement, and muscular strength using basic,             permission
elementary and intermediate vocabulary. Course closed: Only for      Prerequisites: 54163
Music Theatre majors in Drama. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor                                                           54-165     Introduction to Sound Design for Theatre I
                                                                     Fall: 6 units
54-124    Dance I                                                    Studies in the principles and basic theories of sound design from
Spring: 5 units                                                      technical and aesthetic standpoints. Course work includes
Sec A - Classical technique (Ballet) is used to for proper body      instruction in the use of simple and sophisticated sound systems
alignment, placement, and muscular strength using basic,             and the practical planning of sound plots.
elementary and intermediate vocabulary. Prerequisite: 54-123
and Permission of instructor                                         54-166     Introduction to Sound Design for Theatre
                                                                     Spring: 6 units
54-125     Music Skills I                                            Studies in the principles and basic theories of sound design from
Fall: 2 units                                                        technical and aesthetic standpoints. Course work includes
The students explore the basics of music theory, which includes      instruction in the use of simple and sophisticated sound systems
intervals, rhythm, notation and musical vocabulary. Emphasis is      and the practical planning of sound plots.
on acquiring these basic skills through sight singing.
                                                                     54-169    Studiocraft
54-126     Music Skills II                                           Fall: 13 units
Spring: 6 units
The students explore the basics of music theory, which includes      54-171     Basic Design
intervals, rhythm, notation and musical vocabulary. Emphasis is      Fall: 6 units
on acquiring these basic skills through sight singing.               A year-long studio course exploring the principles and elements
                                                                     of design and research in discreet exercises and projects first
54-151    Stagecraft                                                 semester. Second semester focuses on the theatrical design
Fall: 15 units                                                       process and each of the disciplines with projects in scene,
An introduction to the tools of lighting that will serve as the      costume, lighting, and sound design as well as a strong
foundation for all lighting design and technical lighting courses.   component in drawing. Reports throughout the year expose the
Students are prepared in the skills necessary for crew and safe      students to designers theatres and artists of note in the world.
work practices including: the hang and focus of lighting             This section is concurrent with Drafting and Figure Drawing
instruments, basic electricity and wiring, dimmers and the           sections. PRE-REQUISITE: Declared Design/PTM focus in the
operation of lighting consoles. Students will also learn the roles   School of Drama FOR: First Year Undergraduate Students
and responsibilities of each member of the lighting team involved
in a production.                                                     54-172     Basic Design
                                                                     Spring: 6 units
54-152    Scenery Stagecraft                                         A year-long studio course exploring the principles and elements
Spring: 6 units                                                      of design and research in discreet exercises and projects first
This is a hands-on class in basic shop construction techniques.      semester. Second semester focuses on the theatrical design
Upon completion of this course, students should be familiar with     process and each of the disciplines with projects in scene,
shop safety procedures and practices, safe and proper tool use,      costume, lighting, and sound design as well as a strong
proper use of fasteners, and basic rigging skills, lecture/lab       component in drawing. Reports throughout the year expose the
format.                                                              students to designers theatres and artists of note in the world.
                                                                     This section is concurrent with Drafting and Figure Drawing
54-153     Costume Stagecraft                                        sections. PRE-REQUISITE: Declared Design/PTM focus in the
Fall: Mini Session - 3 units                                         School of Drama FOR: First Year Undergraduate Students
This course deals with the costume approach to a production,
including such elements as the figure and the actor, how fabric      54-177     Foundations of Drama I
works with the figure, how the figure may be improved or altered     Fall: 6 units
and the psychology of costuming. Topics that present more            In Foundations I: Antiquity, we will examine the prehistoric
hands-on work include an approach to patterning, the machinery       origins of dramatic art and query its use as a means of bridging
used for costumes and the craft orient elements that might be        the gulf that separates the material world from the cosmic
involved.                                                            universe of myth, magic, and spirituality. We will examine in broad
                                                                     detail the practice of drama in ancient societies, notably the
54-159    Run Crew                                                   Indian and Egyptian, before examining the precedents of Attic
Fall: 4 units                                                        Tragedy and the Athenian Drama Festival. Along the way, we will
Hands on experience in most aspects of building and running a        closely examine how the politics of the Athenian Golden Age
production.                                                          affected its playwriting, with a special emphasis this year on the
                                                                     social-consciousness applications of Old Comedy.
4 0 4 Course Descriptions



                                                                         54-196     Advanced Screenwriting
54-178     Foundations of Drama II                                       Spring: 9 units
Spring: 6 units                                                          54196 Advanced Screenwriting This course is designed to give
In Foundations II: Early Modern, we engage the so-called “Dark           writers a variety of tools they can use in rewriting both on a
Ages” and question the extent and causes of the “death” of               current project and in the future. There will films to watch and
dramatic art in Europe, as well as its resurrection in the bosom of      anlayze. Either a first draft or and rewritten version of a full length
the medieval Church. We then examine the facts and myths of the          screenplay is to be completed by the end of the semester. By
Renaissance, and note the transmission of humanist drama                 permission only.
following the Fall of Constantinople in 1453. In this unit, we pay
particular attention to the Italian Renaissance, the Spanish             54-201     Acting II
Golden Age, the English Renaissance, and the Japanese                    Fall: 12 units
Classical period.                                                        Scene study: the fundamental techniques needed to participate in
Prerequisites: 54177                                                     the developing conflict within the imaginary world. Character
                                                                         building through unfamiliar behavior and beliefs; relationships;
54-187     Introduction to Playwriting                                   language. Spring semester: The use of classical texts and
Fall: 9 units                                                            ensemble playing. The deepening of the actors inner resources to
Students will be introduced to the major components of writing for       be supported by the craft techniques.
the stage, including dramatic action, character and dialogue.            Prerequisites: 54101 and 54102
Exercises designed to familiarize students with the tools
available to the playwright -- and to connect each student with          54-202     Acting II
the wellspring of his or her own creativity -- will be assigned each     Spring: 12 units
week. Readings of exercises and works-in-progress will take              Scene study: the fundamental techniques needed to participate in
place on a weekly basis. In addition to reading each other's work,       the developing conflict within the imaginary world. Character
members of the class will also serve as the first test audience for      building through unfamiliar behavior and beliefs; relationships;
your colleagues. Students will be expected to discuss their              language. Spring semester: The use of classical texts and
reaction to each exercise that is read. The final project for the        ensemble playing. The deepening of the actors inner resources to
course will be the completion of the first draft of a one-act play. It   be supported by the craft techniques.
is possible that one-act scripts may grow out of assigned                Prerequisites: 54201
exercises.
                                                                         54-203     Voice and Speech II
54-188     Introduction to Playwriting                                   Fall: 6 units
Spring: 9 units                                                          The actors take a more concentrated approach to elevated text.
Students will be introduced to the major components of writing for       The course focuses on the effective production of classical text.
the stage, including dramatic action, character and dialogue.            The warm up sessions are geared towards preparing the student
Exercises designed to familiarize students with the tools                actors for the extravagant language from Shakespeare?s plays
available to the playwright -- and to connect each student with          and sonnets. Meter, imagery and further specific text work is also
the wellspring of his or her own creativity -- will be assigned each     employed to encourage each student to find clear shape in the
week. Readings of exercises and works-in-progress will take              work. A repertoire of at least five classical monologues will come
place on a weekly basis. In addition to reading each other's work,       from the course work.
members of the class will also serve as the first test audience for
your colleagues. Students will be expected to discuss their              54-204     Voice and Speech II
reaction to each exercise that is read. The final project for the        Spring: 6 units
course will be the completion of the first draft of a one-act play. It   The actors take a more concentrated approach to elevated text.
is possible that one-act scripts may grow out of assigned                The course focuses on the effective production of classical text.
exercises.                                                               The warm up sessions are geared towards preparing the student
                                                                         actors for the extravagant language from Shakespeare?s plays
54-189      Advanced Playwriting                                         and sonnets. Meter, imagery and further specific text work is also
Fall: 9 units                                                            employed to encourage each student to find clear shape in the
This course is intended to continue the process of familiarizing         work. A repertoire of at least five classical monologues will come
students with the basic components of dramatic writing, paying           from the course work.
particular attention to the most basic building block of all
effective plays -- dramatic action. We will also focus on the            54-207      Movement II
development of an effective structure for a full-length play, and on     Fall: 3-4 units
finding theatrical conventions which both suit the story and make        This entire term focuses on the Neutral Mask, a completely non-
it live on stage. In order to work with these concepts, students         verbal masked movement form, through which students search for
write a play featuring an historical character -- someone who has        a neutral base, both physically and psychologically, a place of
done something noteworthy. Therefore, the elements of the story          complete presence in the present. The mask allows them to
will already be on the record; it will be the student's job to select    uncover all that is emotional in the body; the “baggage” carried
which aspects of this person's life should be depicted on stage,         from role to role, and provides techniques to free them from these
and to structure these scenes so that, taken together, they create       limitations. Identifications with other forms of energy, the four
a coherent narrative. A complete first draft of a full-length play       elements, seasons, materials, colors and plant life give students
based on this historical character is due on the last day of class.      new insights into the process of character development. The
Prerequisites: 54187                                                     Neutral Mask work is immediately reinforced with applications to
                                                                         their scene work in Acting class.
54-190      Advanced Playwriting                                         Prerequisites: 54107
Spring: 9 units
This course is intended to continue the process of familiarizing         54-208     Movement II
students with the basic components of dramatic writing, paying           Spring: 3 units
particular attention to the most basic building block of all             This term is divided between two classic physical forms:
effective plays -- dramatic action. We will also focus on the            Commedia dell’Arte and Clowns. In the first half of the semester
development of an effective structure for a full-length play, and on     students wear the half-masks of the archetypal Commedia
finding theatrical conventions which both suit the story and make        characters (Harlequin, Pantalone, et al), to learn their psychology
it live on stage. In order to work with these concepts, students         and physicality, improvise on historical and contemporary
write a play featuring an historical character -- someone who has        scenarios, and apply Commedia technique to modern comedy.
done something noteworthy. Therefore, the elements of the story          Commedia dell’Arte gives them the tools to tackle physical
will already be on the record; it will be the student's job to select    comedy from any era, past or present. In the second half of the
which aspects of this person's life should be depicted on stage,         term students discover their personal Clowns. This clown has
and to structure these scenes so that, taken together, they create       nothing to do with the American Barnum & Bailey Circus clown;
a coherent narrative. A complete first draft of a full-length play       this is not a character or caricature, but rather a revelation of the
based on this historical character is due on the last day of class.      clown each student hides under the mask of adulthood.
                                                                         Discovering this clown gives them all a way to laugh at
54-191     Acting for Non-Majors                                         themselves, to uncover what makes each individual uniquely
Fall: 9 units                                                            funny; it also lets them see how we only laugh at truth and in the
This class is designed for non-acting majors and introduces the          personal material lies universal humor. Inside this freedom is the
student to the basic principles of acting, character study and           technique to know what’s funny and why, and the ability to apply
improvisation. One semester course.                                      these rules in comedy.
                                                                         Prerequisites: 54108
54-192     Acting for Non-Majors
Spring: 9 units                                                          54-210   Text Analysis
This class is designed for non-acting majors and introduces the          Spring: 6 units
student to the basic principles of acting, character study and
improvisation. One semester course.                                      54-211    Actor Dance II
                                                                         Fall: 3 units
                                                                         Fall – 3 units A class, which uses basic, fundamental vocabulary
                                                                         from Classical technique (Ballet) to train the body in proper
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions      405




alignment, placement, and muscular strength. Course closed:            directors art. Pre-requisite: 54-121
Only for Acting majors in Drama. Prerequisite: Permission of
instructor                                                             54-223      Dance II
                                                                       Fall: 1-3 units
54-212      Actor Dance II                                             Fall 1-3 units Sec A – Ballet – 3 units – Continuing to build on
Spring: 3 units                                                        proper alignment, placement and muscularity while increasing the
Spring – 3 units Continue with Classical technique (Ballet) for        dance vocabulary. Prerequisite: 54-123 and 54-124 and
proper body alignment, placement, and muscular strength using          permission of instructor Sec B – Jazz – 2 units – A class to
basic and elementary vocabulary including a unit of social dance       technically train the body in a variety of contemporary Jazz
i.e. waltz, polka, foxtrot, and tango. Prerequisite: 54-211 and        styles, i.e. Latin, Blues, Lyric, African, using body isolations and
permission of instructor                                               rhythmic patterns. Prerequisite: 54-123 and 54-124 and
                                                                       permission of instructor Sec C – Tap – 2 units – A class to
54-213     Singing for Actors II                                       technically train the body in a variety of percussive rhythmic
Fall: 3 units                                                          patterns. Prerequisite: 54-123 and 54-124 and permission of
The students have a class voice experience which includes a            instructor
physical and vocal warm-up and discussion and practice of              Prerequisites: 54123 and 54124
healthy singing technique. There is group and individual rehearsal
of potential audition and performance material. Toward the end of      54-224      Dance II
the term, there are weekly opportunities to perform in public, thus    Spring: 1-3 units
preparing for auditions.                                               Spring 1-3 units Sec A – Ballet – 3 units – Continuing to build on
                                                                       proper alignment, placement and muscularity while increasing the
54-214     Singing for Actors                                          dance vocabulary. Prerequisite: 54-223 and permission of
Spring: 3 units                                                        instructor Sec B – Jazz – 2 units – A class to technically train
The students have a class voice experience which includes a            the body in a variety of contemporary styles, i.e. Latin, Blues,
physical and vocal warm-up and discussion and practice of              Lyric, African, using body isolations and rhythmic patterns.
healthy singing technique. There is group and individual rehearsal     Prerequisite: 54-223 and permission of instructor Sec C – Tap –
of potential audition and performance material. Toward the end of      2 units – A class to technically train the body in a variety of
the term, there are weekly opportunities to perform in public, thus    percussive rhythmic patterns. Prerequisite: 54-223 and
preparing for auditions.                                               permission of instructor
                                                                       Prerequisites: 54223
54-215     2nd Year Acting Lab: Forms and Formats
Fall: 4 units                                                          54-226     Acting a Song
This is a two-semester course for 3rd-Year Directors & 2nd-Year        Spring: 6 units
Actors concerning the application of fundamental staging & work        Mines the personal life experience to bridge the gap between the
script tools & fundamental acting tools in directing divergent         Performer and the Song Lyric. Exercises are designed to break
dramatic Forms (Realistic Drama, Shaw Comedy, Farce,                   down internal blocks built by the expectation of Technical
Shakespeare, Dialectical Theatre, The Ten-Minute Play) in              Perfection. The visceral is valued over the intellectual when
various theatrical Formats including proscenium, three-quarter,        approaching the Song Material. The students are exposed to
thrust, & arena. Goals include: to encourage understanding &           groups of composers divided into units including Gershwin, Porter,
cooperation between disciplines; to develop expertise &                Rogers and Hammerstein, Bernstein, Coleman, Sondheim to the
confidence in preparation & rehearsal; to learn to play on the         present composers. Each student prepares and performs the
team with actors & designers; to develop a directorial vision          given songs and receives critique and instruction from each of the
toward giving the particular play’s Content illuminating Form.         music and the acting teachers.
There is a video project at top of second semester, & public
performances at end of each semester.                                  54-231    Design for the Stage
                                                                       Fall: 6-9 units
54-216     2nd Year Acting Lab: Forms and Formats                      This course introduces the student to developing a visual idea
Spring: 4 units                                                        from a text.
This is a two-semester course for 3rd-Year Directors & 2nd-Year
Actors concerning the application of fundamental staging & work        54-232     Design for the Stage
script tools & fundamental acting tools in directing divergent         Spring: 9 units
dramatic Forms (Realistic Drama, Shaw Comedy, Farce,                   This course deals with the fundamental needs and responsibilities
Shakespeare, Dialectical Theatre, The Ten-Minute Play) in              of the scenic and costume designer. Emphasis is on the
various theatrical Formats including proscenium, three-quarter,        development of ideas based on a dramatic text. Students are
thrust, & arena. Goals include: to encourage understanding &           asked to interpret a text and create a visual statement based on
cooperation between disciplines; to develop expertise &                that interpretation through the design process. Studio work is
confidence in preparation & rehearsal; to learn to play on the         included in the course work.
team with actors & designers; to develop a directorial vision
toward giving the particular play’s Content illuminating Form.         54-233    Acting For Directors
There is a video project at top of second semester, & public           Fall: 9 units
performances at end of each semester.
                                                                       54-234   Acting For Directors
54-219      Music Theatre Ensemble Singing                             Spring: 9 units
Fall: 4 units
The students are exposed to many music scores of the basic             54-237     Introduction to Scene Painting
choral and musical theatre literature. The students learn this         Fall: 6 units
repertory, reinforcing the principals of music theory learned in the   This is a studio course in the foundations of scenic painting for
first year.                                                            theater and related fields. Students will complete projects that
                                                                       address the following topics: preparation of and paint techniques
54-221     Directing II                                                for both soft goods and hard covered surfaces, drawing and
Fall: 6,9 units                                                        painting to scale, representing textures in both 2 and 3
THE FUNDAMENTALS OF DIRECTING: This is a Fall-semester                 dimensions, and color mixing. Subject matter changes often and
course for 2nd-year students of all options introducing the            may include: architecture, natural and man-made textures,
fundamentals of the director’s craft: text analysis; the work script   drapery, interior/exterior scenes, human figure, still life objects.
with column method & blocking notation; determining the purpose
of the writing; the concept of Action & Change (beats &                54-238     Introduction to Scene Painting
transitions); practical use of the Six Aristotelian Elements of        Spring: 6 units
Drama; Genre & Style; the Dramatic Question; Levels in the             This is a studio course in the foundations of scenic painting for
Creative Process; Visual Vocabulary & Staging Tools including          theater and related fields. Students will complete projects that
planes, levels, values of stage space, body positions;                 address the following topics: preparation of and paint techniques
composition; picturization; emphasis; & movement; entrances &          for both soft goods and hard covered surfaces, drawing and
exits; the ground plan. Work includes unscripted exercises, then       painting to scale, representing textures in both 2 and 3
scripted exercises on an open stage & then within a detailed           dimensions, and color mixing. Subject matter changes often and
ground plan. Additional goals: to work in a professional manner;       may include: architecture, natural and man-made textures,
to value preparation, analysis & organization.                         drapery, interior/ exterior scenes, human figure, still life objects.

54-222    Directing II                                                 54-239     History of Architecture and Decor
Spring: 9 units                                                        Fall: 4,6 units
A continuation of the previous semester focusing on Music and          This slide/lecture course is a survey of architecture, interiors and
Dance of the twentieth century and how they influence the              furniture from ancient Egypt to the beginnings of the 20th
                                                                       Century.

                                                                       54-240    History of Architecture and Decor
4 0 6 Course Descriptions




Spring: 4,6 units                                                      Participation in School of Drama productions, usually on shop
This slide/lecture course is a survey of architecture, interiors and   fabrication or theatre installation crews. Some participants will fill
furniture from ancient Egypt to the beginnings of the 20th             assistant supervisor positions for other students filling creative
Century.                                                               or production roles. Pre-requisites/Co-requesites: Introduction
                                                                       to Production or instructors permission.
54-241     Improv Class                                                Prerequisites: 54163 and 54164
Fall: 4 units
This course for Sophomore Actors not only sharpens their skills        54-262      Production Preparation II
as ensemble performers, but also allows for more playfulness,          Spring: 9 units
creativity and exploration, cultivating risk-taking and a certain      Participation in School of Drama productions, usually on shop
abandon. Divided into two separate sections, the course                fabrication or theatre installation crews. Some participants will fill
concentrates on non-verbal, psychological improv to help the           assistant supervisor positions for other students filling creative
student actor achieve a kind of physical truth and spontaneity,        or production roles. Pre-requisites/Co-requesites: Introduction
while becoming aware of the importance of the body in conveying        to Production or instructors permission.
information; the second half is devoted entirely to comedy improv      Prerequisites: 54163 and 54164
and may culminate in an original comedy improv show in the UC
lobby.                                                                 54-263     Introduction to Welding Processes
                                                                       Fall: 4 units
54-242     Improvisation                                               An introduction to the four most common metal joining processes,
Spring: 4 units                                                        including Oxyfuel processes (welding, brazing, braze welding, and
This course for second year (Sophomore) Actors not only                bending), SMAW (stick), GMAW (MIG), and GTAW (TIG). Welding
sharpens their skills as ensemble performers, but also allows for      safety, equipment setup and basic welding techniques will be
more playfulness, creativity and exploration, cultivating risk-        covered.
taking and a certain abandon. Divided into two separate sections,
the course concentrates one full semester on non-verbal                54-264    Welding
psychological improv to help the student actor achieve a kind of       Spring: 4 units
physical truth and spontaneity, while becoming aware of the            An introduction to the four most common metal joining processes,
importance of the body in conveying information; the second            including Oxyfuel processes (welding, brazing, braze welding, and
semester is devoted entirely to comedy improv and culminates in        bending), SMAW (stick), GMAW (MIG), and GTAW (TIG). Welding
an original comedy improv show in the UC lobby.                        safety, equipment setup and basic welding techniques will be
                                                                       covered.
54-245      History of Clothing
Fall: 4,6 units                                                        54-267    Sound Design I
FOR: All Students, Drama Students have priority This year-long         Fall: 9 units
course traces the development of garments of the Western World         Continuation of 54165; two consecutive semesters. Emphasis on
from Egypt to the beginning of the 20th Century. The shapes of         developing a theatrical design process through script analysis
the various elements are considered as well as the way they are        and exploration of the creative application of studio techniques.
worn, how they affect the body and the society from which they         Weekly or biweekly projects and assignments on School of Drama
spring. A course that involves lectures, slides, research projects,    productions.
quizzes and exams, the time line continues through the year.
Second semester can be taken separately with permission of the         54-268    Sound Design I
instructor. Normally 6 units, a 4 unit option without research         Spring: 9 units
projects is available for non-majors. PRE-REQUISITES: None             Continuation of 54166; two consecutive semesters. Emphasis on
                                                                       developing a theatrical design process through script analysis
54-246      History of Clothing                                        and exploration of the creative application of studio techniques.
Spring: 4,6 units                                                      Weekly or biweekly projects and assignments on School of Drama
FOR: All Students, Drama Students have priority This year-long         productions.
course traces the development of garments of the Western World
from Egypt to the beginning of the 20th Century. The shapes of         54-269     Photoshop/Dreamweaver
the various elements are considered as well as the way they are        Spring: 6 units
worn, how they affect the body and the society from which they         This course is an introduction to the computer aided drafting
spring. A course that involves lectures, slides, research projects,    program AutoCAD 2004. Principally the course presents how to
quizzes and exams, the time line continues through the year.           operate the program in general. However, whenever possible,
Second semester can be taken separately with permission of the         classroom examples and assignments are tailored to theatre
instructor. Normally 6 units, a 4 unit option without research         design and production applications. Emphasis is placed on 2-D
projects is available for non-majors. PRE-REQUISITES: None             drafting, to build the skills that a student will use on production
                                                                       assignments here at the School of Drama. Time permitting, the
54-247    Dramatugy II: Forms and Formats                              course will move on to an introduction of 3-D modeling with
Fall: 9 units                                                          AutoCAD. Pre-requisites/Co-requesites: Media Studio (Drafting)
Meets with Directing III.                                              or instructor’s permission
                                                                       Prerequisites: 54171 and 54172
54-248   Dramaturgy II
Spring: 9 units                                                        54-270      Computer Applications AutoCAD
Meets with Directing III.                                              Fall: 6 units
                                                                       An in-depth study of Computer-Aided Design and Drafting for the
54-251     Introduction to Lighting Design                             theatre as well as an examination of applications for modeling,
Fall: 6 units                                                          rendering, animation, imaging and simulation. Particular emphasis
Students explore the physical properties of light in various design    in the fall is on AutoCAD while the spring portion of the class
applications and develop a process of storytelling that involves       examines several different software packages.
analysis, research, exploration, questioning, problem solving and
implementation of a successful design product.                         54-271     Standard Scenery Construction
Prerequisites: 54151                                                   Fall: 6 units
                                                                       Required for all sophomore Design and PTM students. This class
54-252     Introduction to Lighting Design                             establishes a set of standards for theatrical construction
Spring: 6 units                                                        consistent with modern regional and commercial shop standards.
Students explore the physical properties of light in various design    Drafting is a pre-requisite, and upon completion of this course,
applications and develop a process of storytelling that involves       students are qualified to produce shop drawings of standard
analysis, research, exploration, questioning, problem solving and      scenic elements.
implementation of a successful design product.
Prerequisites: 54251                                                   54-273     Technical Direction
                                                                       Fall: 9 units
54-257    Directing: Production II                                     This course is an exploration of techniques and practices of the
Fall: 6 units                                                          Technical Director. The class has three main components:
Assignments as stage manager or assistant director for the             classroom presentation of School of Drama production technical
Studio and Kresge Theatres.                                            direction process, classroom lectures centering on TD process,
                                                                       and project work. Over the course of the semester, students will
54-258   Directing: Production II                                      work on two productions as paper projects. This is an opportunity
Spring: 6 units                                                        to have a somewhat less stressful pass through a show,
Assignments as stage manager or assistant director for the Rauh        completing estimates, schedules, and drawings designed to help
Studio and Chosky Theatres.                                            establish a professional foundation for the student as a technical
                                                                       director. All of the course components run concurrently. Pre-
54-259    Production Preparation II                                    requisites/Co-requesites: Standard Scenic Construction &
Fall: 6,9 units                                                        Production Planning or Instructors Permission
                                                                                                             Course Descriptions     407




Prerequisites: 54271 and 54279                                         Spring: 6 units
                                                                       This course is designed for mentors to teach children at the 5th
54-277     Stage Management I                                          grade level to speak in a clear, efficient and pleasing manner with
Fall: 6 units                                                          self-confidence. The children will also be able to understand the
This class introduces the student to the work of a stage manager       relationship between sound and speech; realize the differences
on a theatrical production. Students learn the functions and           between American English speech and spelling; relate symbols of
responsibilities of the stage manager. Also covered: blocking          IPA to phonemes we use in speech; improve their articulation of
notation, cue organization, rehearsal reports and AEA rules and        Vowels, Consonants and Diphthongs; discover the musical
regulations.                                                           patterns their voices can make; follow directions and drills to
                                                                       learn to discriminate between correct and incorrect productions of
54-278     Stage Management                                            Vowels, Consonants and Diphthongs; develop the techniques for
Spring: 4 units                                                        memorization of challenging poetry and participate in a
This class introduces the student to the work of a stage manager       presentation for family and friends using the skills they have
on a theatrical production. Students learn the functions and           learned.
responsibilities of the stage manager. Also covered: blocking
notation, cue organization, rehearsal reports and AEA rules and        54-294     Make-Up
regulations.                                                           Spring: 2 units
                                                                       MAKE UP FOR ACTORS PRE-REQUISITES: School of Drama
54-279     Production Planning and Organization                        Student FOR: School of Drama Students with priority given to
Fall: 9 units                                                          Actors and Costume Design majors DESCRIPTION: Basic
This course presents the processes used by technical managers          techniques of stage make-up and their adaptation to theatrical
to plan productions. Emphasis in this presentation is placed on        styles. MAKE UP FOR DESIGNERS PRE-REQUISITES: Declared
the structure and practice of the regional theatre. Information is     major in Costume Design FOR: Graduate and Undergraduate
presented on the staffing of production departments and the            Costume Design majors DESCRIPTION: This course teaches
responsibilities of those staff members with regard to production      designers the basic approach and processes used in designing
planning. After establishing a basis for discussing planning tasks     makeup for theatrical production. It covers techniques of stage
within the frame of the regional theatre, the class will look at how   make-up application and the adaptation of theatrical styles as
these tasks transfer and are impacted by factors in other parts of     related to design.
the industry. Instructor’s permission
                                                                       54-299     Special Topics in Playwriting
54-281     Foundations of Drama III                                    Intermittent: 9 units
Fall: 6 units                                                          This course allows students to expand their knowledge of basic
In Foundations III: Enlightenment, we trace the developments of        playwriting principles as they refine existing scripts, taking
the drama through French Neo-Classicism, examining the                 material composed in Advanced Playwriting and working through
controversy of le Cid, German Romanticism and Weimar                   several new drafts. Students learn how to enrich their characters,
Classicism, and the transformations of American theatre from the       amplify dramatic tension and create structures that build toward
colonial period to the end of the 19th century. Touching on the        an explosive climax. Work on student compositions is coupled
English Restoration, we also look at the rise of non-mainstream        with in-depth structural analysis of both classical and
theatrical entertainment, such as museum shows, Mardi Gras,            contemporary plays from the existing repertoire.
minstrelsy, freak shows, and the performances of the Dia de los        Prerequisites: 54189
Muertos.
                                                                       54-300     Advanced Studies in Playwriting
54-282     Foundations of Drama IV                                     Intermittent: 9 units
Spring: 6 units                                                        This course allows students to expand their knowledge of basic
In Foundations IV: Contemporary, we examine the foundations of         playwriting principles as they refine existing scripts, taking
Realism with plays by Ibsen and O’Neill, and deeply engage the         material composed in Advanced Playwriting and working through
counter-movement of the European avant-garde of Marinetti and          several new drafts. Students learn how to enrich their characters,
Brecht. Working deeply with Brook’s The Empty Space, we also           amplify dramatic tension and create structures that build toward
examine the rise of filmmaking, the impact of the Federal Theatre      an explosive climax. Work on student compositions is coupled
Project on American drama, and the writings of Williams and            with in-depth structural analysis of both classical and
Miller. We end the course with a look at the revolutionary theatre     contemporary plays from the existing repertoire.
of the US and Europe since 1975, and inquire deeply into the
current position of theatre artists in the vast stream of theatre      54-301      Acting III
history.                                                               Fall: 10 units
                                                                       This is a two-semester course in Acting for Third-Year Actors &
54-289     Speech and Theatre Community Outreach                       MTs who will explore performance within directed structure in
Fall: 9 units                                                          various non-Fourth-Wall forms of Theatre including: Greek
Students will develop a process of teaching theatre to middle          Tragedy, the Greek Chorus, Moliere Comedy & Brecht. This is not
school children. Elementary school children will work with drama       a course that will aspire to provide any “correct” way to play
students from several disciplines in a mentoring relationship and      various “styles”. Rather, it is a course in which to acquire new
learn that theatre is a collaborative experience. The result will be   tools & perspectives when working in new theatrical worlds. Goals
joint artistic performances at CMU. The Children's Heritage            include: to find the appropriate level of external expression to
Theatre will present classic text as well as newly scripted plays      meet the demands of the particular text & its directed world, & to
based on myths and fairy tales from international cultures.            “fill the Form” believably & passionately; to make active choices
                                                                       within a directed framework; to learn to work within industry
54-290     Speech and Theatre Community Outreach                       standards; to learn the nature of the actor’s “homework” in a
All Semesters: 9 units                                                 directed framework; to include the Audience in the work.
Students will develop a process of teaching theatre to middle          Prerequisites: 54201 and 54202
school children. Elementary school children will work with drama
students from several disciplines in a mentoring relationship and      54-302      Acting III
learn that theatre is a collaborative experience. The result will be   Spring: 12 units
joint artistic performances at CMU. The Children's Heritage            This is a two-semester course in Acting for Third-Year Actors &
Theatre will present classic text as well as newly scripted plays      MTs who will explore performance within directed structure in
based on myths and fairy tales from international cultures.            various non-Fourth-Wall forms of Theatre including: Greek
                                                                       Tragedy, the Greek Chorus, Moliere Comedy & Brecht. This is not
54-291     Speech and Phonetics Instruction and Outreach I             a course that will aspire to provide any “correct” way to play
Fall: 6 units                                                          various “styles”. Rather, it is a course in which to acquire new
This course is designed for mentors to teach children at the 5th       tools & perspectives when working in new theatrical worlds. Goals
grade level to speak in a clear, efficient and pleasing manner with    include: to find the appropriate level of external expression to
self-confidence. The children will also be able to understand the      meet the demands of the particular text & its directed world, & to
relationship between sound and speech; realize the differences         “fill the Form” believably & passionately; to make active choices
between American English speech and spelling; relate symbols of        within a directed framework; to learn to work within industry
IPA to phonemes we use in speech; improve their articulation of        standards; to learn the nature of the actor’s “homework” in a
Vowels, Consonants and Diphthongs; discover the musical                directed framework; to include the Audience in the work.
patterns their voices can make; follow directions and drills to        Prerequisites: 54301
learn to discriminate between correct and incorrect productions of
Vowels, Consonants and Diphthongs; develop the techniques for          54-303     Speech III
memorization of challenging poetry.                                    Fall: 6 units
                                                                       (Voice) The actors continue to strengthen their vocal techniques
54-292    Speech and Phonetics Instruction and Outreach II             with voice classes, which become specific in their purpose and
                                                                       require the students to become responsible for their own
4 0 8 Course Descriptions




preparation process. The class also focuses on particular               the principles and techniques developed in the classroom.
performance challenges in private tutorial work. (Dialects &
Accents) Dialects and accents class meets twice weekly in order         54-313     Junior Auditioning
to build a repertoire of ten American, British, Irish dialects and/or   Fall: 4 units
European accents. Each actor also develops an independent               This is a one-semester elective course for Junior Actors & MTs in
project in order to discover a process of research for additional       the fundamentals of the Audition process. Goals include: to learn
dialects he/she may encounter in the professional world.                the givens of the Audition process including determining the parts
                                                                        of the process over which the actor does & does not have control;
54-304     Speech III                                                   to learn how to shape an effective Audition; to learn to present
Spring: 6 units                                                         oneself in a professional manner; to learn how to choose Audition
(Voice) The actors continue to strengthen their vocal techniques        pieces that work for the specific individual; to learn how to
with voice classes, which become specific in their purpose and          contrast Audition pieces; to learn how to handle cold readings.
require the students to become responsible for their own                Important: All showings are to be presented as if for an actual
preparation process. The class also focuses on particular               Audition -- that is, as if for auditors who do not know you.
performance challenges in private tutorial work. (Dialects &
Accents) Dialects and accents class meets twice weekly in order         54-315     Directing III: Forms and Formats
to build a repertoire of ten American, British, Irish dialects and/or   Fall: 12 units
European accents. Each actor also develops an independent               This is a two-semester course for 3rd-Year Directors & 2nd-Year
project in order to discover a process of research for additional       Actors concerning the application of fundamental staging & work
dialects he/she may encounter in the professional world.                script tools & fundamental acting tools in directing divergent
                                                                        dramatic Forms (Realistic Drama, Shaw Comedy, Farce,
54-305      Voice III                                                   Shakespeare, Dialectical Theatre, The Ten-Minute Play) in
Fall: 5 units                                                           various theatrical Formats including proscenium, three-quarter,
This course builds on the previous voice and speech courses in          thrust, & arena. Goals include: to encourage understanding &
the first and second year of the acting program. The goal is to         cooperation between disciplines; to develop expertise &
further build on voice practice in all aspects of performance. The      confidence in preparation & rehearsal; to learn to play on the
Fitzmaurice work is introduced and students develop both group          team with actors & designers; to develop a directorial vision
and personal warm up practices. Students receive both group and         toward giving the particular play’s Content illuminating Form.
individual instruction in integrating voice and Alexander               There is a video project at top of second semester, & public
principles with text and performance challenges.                        performances at end of each semester.

54-306     Voice III                                                    54-316     Directing III: Forms and Formats
Spring: 3 units                                                         Spring: 12 units
This course builds on Voice 111 Fall semester, which is a               This is a two-semester course for 3rd-Year Directors & 2nd-Year
prerequisite of the course. Students delve into more personal           Actors concerning the application of fundamental staging & work
aspects of voice through original writing projects. Students            script tools & fundamental acting tools in directing divergent
develop independent research projects to explore Voice and its          dramatic Forms (Realistic Drama, Shaw Comedy, Farce,
relation to broader areas such as science and psychology. Along         Shakespeare, Dialectical Theatre, The Ten-Minute Play) in
with writing projects, the course includes continued attention to       various theatrical Formats including proscenium, three-quarter,
vocal development as it integrates with all aspects of                  thrust, & arena. Goals include: to encourage understanding &
performance.                                                            cooperation between disciplines; to develop expertise &
                                                                        confidence in preparation & rehearsal; to learn to play on the
54-307     Movement III                                                 team with actors & designers; to develop a directorial vision
Fall: 4 units                                                           toward giving the particular play’s Content illuminating Form.
The third year of Movement can include in-depth studies of              There is a video project at top of second semester, & public
various physical theatre styles, the synthesis of movement and          performances at end of each semester.
text, and the creation of some original movement-theatre work.
Physical vocabulary continues to increase.                              54-317     Singing for Actors III
                                                                        Fall: 3 units
54-308     Movement III                                                 The students have a class voice experience which includes a
All Semesters: 4 units                                                  physical and vocal warm-up and discussion and practice of
The third year of Movement can include in-depth studies of              healthy singing technique. There is group and individual rehearsal
various physical theatre styles, the synthesis of movement and          of potential audition and performance material. Toward the end of
text, and the creation of some original movement-theatre work.          the term, there are weekly opportunities to perform in public, thus
Physical vocabulary continues to increase.                              preparing for auditions.

54-309     Theatre Lab                                                  54-318     Singing for Actors III
Fall: 9 units                                                           Spring: 3 units
This is a two-semester class which teaches the collaborative            The students have a class voice experience which includes a
process of theatre -- including the role of the living dramatic         physical and vocal warm-up and discussion and practice of
writer. New scripts are written by graduate dramatic writers, then      healthy singing technique. There is group and individual rehearsal
developed and realized by senior actors and by graduate and             of potential audition and performance material. Toward the end of
undergraduate directors. This work results in 10-minute play            the term, there are weekly opportunities to perform in public, thus
scripts, one acts, monologue dramas, and the texts for the MFA          preparing for auditions.
Thesis Productions. This class is co-taught by the Dramatic             Prerequisites: 54207 and 54208
Writing, Acting and Directing Options.
                                                                        54-319     Cabaret
54-310     Theatre Lab                                                  Fall: 6 units
Spring: 9 units                                                         The Art of Cabaret: Explores the use of Stories and Song to
This is a two-semester class which teaches the collaborative            communicate life experiences within an intimate setting, breaking
process of theatre -- including the role of the living dramatic         down the invisible fourth wall for honest communication. The
writer. New scripts are written by graduate dramatic writers, then      course includes a section on the use of the microphone for
developed and realized by senior actors and by graduate and             singers. This Study produces two Cabarets containing Material on
undergraduate directors. This work results in 10-minute play            a chosen Theme to provide hands-on Song Expression in a public
scripts, one acts, monologue dramas, and the texts for the MFA          forum.
Thesis Productions. This class is co-taught by the Dramatic             Prerequisites: 54220
Writing, Acting and Directing Options.
                                                                        54-320    Music Theatre Scenes
54-311      Rehearsal & Performance                                     Spring: 4 units
Fall: 16 units                                                          Study of the marriage of spoken and sung text- i.e the marriage of
Performance training through projects at different levels of            drama and music. Class study includes Scenes extracted from
difficulty and staging, directed by students and presented in the       the Musical Theatre canon, including Scenes from a variety of
studio theatre. The actor has the opportunity to put into practice      styles and eras. The class explores how the Singing Actor seques
with his/her peers, in a creative and experimental atmosphere,          from speech to music, thus strengthening the scene through the
the principles and techniques developed in the classroom.               emotional flight music brings to the script.

54-312      Rehearsal & Performance                                     54-322    Directing III Seminar
Spring: 12 units                                                        Spring: 4 units
Performance training through projects at different levels of            This two-semester class for 3rd-Year Directors is directly related
difficulty and staging, directed by students and presented in the       to the work in Directing 3/Acting Lab 2. The Seminar consists of
studio theatre. The actor has the opportunity to put into practice      organizational meetings, lectures & discussions relevant to the
with his/her peers, in a creative and experimental atmosphere,
                                                                                                            Course Descriptions      409




current class work -- such as ground planning, rehearsal
organization, vision, genre differentiation, new formats, working    54-334   Production Management I
with actors, etc.                                                    Spring: 6 units

54-323     Dance III                                                 54-337      Advanced Scene Painting
Fall: 1-3 units                                                      Fall: 4 units
Fall 1-3 units Sec A – Ballet – 3 units – A class aimed at           This is a year long course designed to explore more complex
developing greater technical strength, dexterity and flexibility.    scene painting problems with an emphasis on professional
Prerequisite: 54-224 and permission of instructor Sec B – Jazz –     standards. Projects in the first semester will address such topics
2 units – A class to expand the versatility to master changes in     as: translucency, trop l'oiel, aging techniques, signage,
dynamics, direction and rhythm using a variety of contemporary       perspective, and working 3 dimensionally. Adequate mastery of
Jazz styles. Prerequisite: 54-224 and permission of instructor       skills in the first semester will permit more freedom in the second
Sec C – Tap – 2 units – A class to expand vocabulary, precision      semester to do independent projects or group projects for public
of sound and tempo changes. Prerequisite: 54-224 and                 display.
permission of instructor.                                            Prerequisites: 54237 and 54238
Prerequisites: 54223 and 54224
                                                                     54-338      Advanced Scene Painting
54-324     Dance III                                                 Spring: 6 units
Spring: 1-3 units                                                    This is a year long course designed to explore more complex
Spring 1-3 units Sec A – Ballet – 3 units – A class aimed at         scene painting problems with an emphasis on professional
developing greater technical strength, dexterity and flexibility.    standards. Projects in the first semester will address such topics
Prerequisite: 54-323 and permission of instructor Sec B – Jazz –     as: translucency, tromp i'oiel, aging techniques, signage,
2 units – A class to expand the versatility to master changes in     perspective, and working 3 dimensionally. Adequate mastery of
dynamics, direction and rhythm using a variety of contemporary       skills in the first semester will permit more freedom in the second
Jazz styles. Prerequisite: 54-323 and permission of instructor       semester to do independent projects or group projects for public
Sec C – Tap – 2 units – A class to expand vocabulary, precision      display.
of sound and tempo changes. Prerequisite: 54-323 and                 Prerequisites: 54237 and 54238 and 54337
permission of instructor.
Prerequisites: 54323                                                 54-339   Stage Management Seminar
                                                                     All Semesters: 3 units
54-325     Actor Dance III
Fall: 3 units                                                        54-340   Stage Management Seminar
Fall – 3 units A class which uses basic and fundamental              Spring: 3 units
contemporary Jazz styles, i.e. Latin, Blues, Lyric, African, to
technically train the body using isolations and rhythmic patterns.   54-341     Costume Design I
Prerequisite: 54-211 and 54-212 and permission of instructor         Fall: 9 units
                                                                     A two semester course that engages students with Paul Tazewell,
54-326     Actor Dance III                                           Susan Tsu and guest designers. Tsu teaches first semester.
Spring: 3 units                                                      Principals and elements of design including color theory are
Spring - 3 units Continue with basic and fundamental                 examined in discreet costume projects. Strong process
contemporary Jazz styles, i.e. Latin, Blues, Lyric, African, to      orientation. Television Workshop with CMU alumni annually. Final
technically train the body using isolations and rhythmic patterns.   project covers play analysis, research, emotional response,
Prerequisite: 54-325 and permission of instructor                    deconstruction of script, character analysis, awareness of all
                                                                     design disciplines, drawing, painting, swatching, and spec sheets.
54-329     Introduction to Stage Management                          Students may participate in Design Workshops such as the
Fall: 6 units                                                        annual Dance/Light/Costume production design. PRE-
A course designed to introduce junior actors to the basic            REQUISITES: Drawing For The Theatrical Designer, Figure
fundamentals and techniques of the singing voice. Application of     Drawing, FOR: First year graduate costume majors and upper
these skills are then applied to singing repertoire that may be      level undergraduates with declared majors. Non-major Design,
suitable for future auditions. A public final project will be        PTM and Drama students and all others by Instructor Approval
presented at the end of the semester: Each participant will          only.
present a memorized song, and sing with the entire group.            Prerequisites: 54245 and 54347

54-330     Introduction to Stage Management                          54-342     Costume Design I
Spring: 6 units                                                      Spring: 9 units
This course is intended to provide students an opening to the        The second semester of a two semester course that engages
knowledge and skills of the professional stage manager. It will      students with Paul Tazewell, Susan Tsu and guest designers.
also illuminate the qualities of a good stage manager specific to    Tazewell teaches second semester which further emphasizes the
personality and human interaction. Within this course we will        use of design principles and techniques to communicate and
examine the role of the stage manager throughout the full scope      express character, mood, and style in support of the written text.
of creating a production, including preparatory work, rehearsal      Figure drawing and painting techniques are incorporated with
period, technical rehearsal, performance and closing.                studies on a basic approach to the figure and how it is costumed
                                                                     to suit the production. Emphasis is placed on interpretation,
54-331     Scene Design I                                            director-designer communication and the design process.
Fall: 9 units                                                        Students may participate in Design Workshops such as the
Students will spend the year in an exciting and intensive            annual television project produced at Pittsburgh’s Public
exploration of the process of Scene Design as well as an             Television station WQED and the collaborative Dance/Light/
examination of the nature of creativity and storytelling. Students   Costume production design. PRE-REQUISITES: Drawing For The
will also engage extensively in the skills a professional Scene      Theatrical Designer, Figure Drawing FOR: First year graduate
Designer requires, such as drafting, drawing, model making,          costume majors and upper level undergraduates with declared
painting and general collaborative skills. Students will be          majors. Non-major Design, PTM and Drama students and all
expected to deal with in-depth research, scriptual examinations,     others by Instructor Approval only.
careful arrangements of space, composition and groundplan,           Prerequisites: 54246 and 54348
conceptual structure, real life obstacles and the elements of a
successful final project. By the end of this course, students will   54-343      Costume Construction I
have improved their overall design skills, have some projects        Fall: 6 units
they can include in their portfolio and have created new routes      FOR: First Year Grads unless otherwise exempted, Sophomore
toward their creativity.                                             Undergrads This hands on practical application course is a study
                                                                     of primary construction principals with emphasis on the
54-332     Scene Design I                                            development of patterns from the basic costume shapes through
Spring: 6,9 units                                                    history. Primary shapes first semester include men’s and women’s
Studies in problems of design and the use of the design              multi-piece bodices, historic sleeve shapes, breeches and skirts.
imagination through assignments in various styles and periods;       The ability to look at a picture and interpret it to create the shape
practice in the use of research techniques of rendering, and the     in fabric is stressed. Second semester, draping, boots and
preparation of designer elevations. Basic design techniques.         millinery are explored with some garments patterned for
Groundplans, rough models, basic drawing skills. Concentration       departmental productions. Techniques for communicating with the
on the design process and the director-designer relationship.        designer and fitting the actor are developed. PRE-
                                                                     REQUISITES:None
54-333    Production Management I
Fall: 6 units
4 1 0 Course Descriptions




                                                                        specifically developed for the theater technician. This course
54-344      Costume Construction I                                      teaches the process of Allowable Stress Design for the
Spring: 6 units                                                         engineering of scenic structures in wood and steel.
FOR: First Year Grads unless otherwise exempted, Sophomore
Undergrads This hands on practical application course is a study        54-354    Structural Design II
of primary construction principals with emphasis on the                 Spring: 9 units
development of patterns from the basic costume shapes through           Required for all senior undergraduate Technical Direction
history. Primary shapes first semester include men’s and women’s        students. Upon completion of this two-semester sequence,
multi-piece bodices, historic sleeve shapes, breeches and skirts.       students are familiar with beam and column design/specification,
The ability to look at a picture and interpret it to create the shape   truss design, tensile systems and structural connections.
in fabric is stressed. Second semester, draping, boots and              Prerequisites: 54353
millinery are explored with some garments patterned for
departmental productions. Techniques for communicating with the         54-357    Directing: Production III
designer and fitting the actor are developed. PRE-                      Fall: 10 units
REQUISITES:None                                                         Assignments as stage manager or assistant director for the
                                                                        Studio and Kresge Theatres.
54-347     Figure Drawing
Fall: 4 units                                                           54-358   Directing: Production III
PRE-REQUISITES: If taking Figure Drawing II, both semesters             Spring: 10 units
of Figure Drawing I FOR: Costume Majors have priority, then             Assignments as stage manager or assistant director for the Rauh
Design Majors. First experience should be in Zamborsky section.         Studio and Chosky Theatres.
DESCRIPTION: This year-long course explores the realistic and
expressive depiction of the human form primarily in two                 54-359    Stage Management 2
dimensional media. Working primarily from the live model,               Fall: 4 units
exercises will be undertaken that address gesture, proportion,
movement, anatomy and structure, composition and expressive             54-361      Production Preparation III
form. Students will experience a variety of media and formal            Fall: 12 units
approaches to the figure, working from nude, draped, and clothed        Participation in School of Drama productions, usually as
male and female models. A primary goal of the class is to develop       assistant supervisor positions for other students filling creative
the ability to create the human figure from imagination, based on       or production roles or in the actual supervisory roles. Pre-
intensive empirical study of the forms and structures of the            requisites/Co-requesites: 54-259 & 54-262
human body from life. Although most of the work takes place in          Prerequisites: 54259 and 54262
class, some outside study is required.
                                                                        54-362      Production Preparation III
54-348     Figure Drawing                                               Spring: 12 units
Spring: 4 units                                                         Participation in School of Drama productions, usually as
PRE-REQUISITES: If taking Figure Drawing II, both semesters             assistant supervisor positions for other students filling creative
of Figure Drawing I FOR: Costume Majors have priority, then             or production roles or in the actual supervisory roles. Pre-
Design Majors. First experience should be in Zamborsky section.         requisites/Co-requesites: 54-259 & 54-262
DESCRIPTION: This year-long course explores the realistic and           Prerequisites: 54259 and 54262
expressive depiction of the human form primarily in two
dimensional media. Working primarily from the live model,               54-365    Machine Design I
exercises will be undertaken that address gesture, proportion,          Fall: 9 units
movement, anatomy and structure, composition and expressive             Required for all senior undergraduate Technical Direction
form. Students will experience a variety of media and formal            students. In this course, concepts from Physics of Stage
approaches to the figure, working from nude, draped, and clothed        Machinery are applied to the specification, selection, design and
male and female models. A primary goal of the class is to develop       assembly of real-world mechanical components for the realization
the ability to create the human figure from imagination, based on       of winches, turntables, wagons and lifts for theatrical use.
intensive empirical study of the forms and structures of the            Prerequisites: 54366 and 54378
human body from life. Although most of the work takes place in
class, some outside study is required.                                  54-366     Physics of Stage Machinery
                                                                        Spring: 9 units
54-349     Automated Lighting Technology                                Required for all junior undergraduate PTM students. This is a one-
Fall: 6 units                                                           semester pure Physics class designed to give theater
Students are exposed to a range of automated lighting equipment         technicians a base knowledge of Newtonian Physics, a pre-
and develop skills in the implementation of them in a production        requisite for later courses in Machine Design. For this course, I
situation. Programming of automated fixtures on a variety of            have obtained special permission to use an unpublished text by
consoles is emphasized. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of        Alan Hendrickson of the Yale University school of Drama.
Intro to Lighting Permission of Instructor Co-requisites: Lighting
Design I                                                                54-367     Lighting Design Skills
Prerequisites: 54351 and 54352                                          Fall: 6 units
                                                                        Students will concentrate on developing the skills necessary for
54-350    Pre-visualization Lighting Software                           lighting designers to successfully implement their designs in the
Spring: 6 units                                                         theatre. Content includes communication, CAD programs,
Students become familiar with pre-visualization software                paperwork, focusing the show, programming conventional and
programs as a tool for problem solving design issues and                moving light consoles, cue writing and expectations and
communicating design intent. Programs include WYSIWYG and               responsibilities of the design assistant.
Martin Show Designer.                                                   Prerequisites: 54251 and 54252
Prerequisites: 54349
                                                                        54-368     Production Electrics
54-351     Lighting Design I                                            Spring: 6 units
Fall: 9 units                                                           Class content includes practical skills in lighting and electrical
The student’s ability to analyze and translate information in the       theory and practice as it pertains to entertainment lighting as well
script to descriptive stage pictures is developed in a more in-         as development of managerial techniques used by Production
depth process. Verbal, written and visual communication of ideas        Electricians in the industry. Students completing the class
is emphasized and explored through texts and lab work. Issues of        satisfactorily will be prepared for Master Electrician assignments
collaboration with the director and other members of the design         on School of Drama productions as well as similar positions
team are discussed as part of the design process.                       outside of the School. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of
Prerequisites: 54252                                                    fall semester of Intro to Lighting Permission of Instructor Co-
                                                                        requisites: Intro to Lighting (if sequence not completed)
54-352     Lighting Design I                                            Prerequisites: 54251
Spring: 9 units
The student’s ability to analyze and translate information in the       54-371     Directing 3 Seminar
script to descriptive stage pictures is developed in a more in-         Fall: 4 units
depth process. Verbal, written and visual communication of ideas        This two-semester class for 3rd-Year Directors is directly related
is emphasized and explored through texts and lab work. Issues of        to the work in Directing 3/Acting Lab 2. The Seminar consists of
collaboration with the director and other members of the design         organizational meetings, lectures & discussions relevant to the
team are discussed as part of the design process.                       current class work -- such as ground planning, rehearsal
Prerequisites: 54351                                                    organization, vision, genre differentiation, new formats, working

54-353    Structural Design I
Fall: 9 units
Required for all senior undergraduate Technical Direction
students. A concentrated training in Structural Design
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions      411




with actors, etc.                                                      joint artistic performances at CMU. The Children's Heritage
                                                                       Theatre will present classic text as well as newly scripted plays
54-376     Rigging Seminar                                             based on myths and fairy tales from international cultures.
Spring: 6 units
This course is a survey of the techniques and practices of             54-390     Speech and Theatre Community Outreach
theatrical rigging. The course has two main components:                Spring: 9 units
permanently installed rigging systems typically found in theatres,     Students will develop a process of teaching theatre to middle
and background and technical information concerning the                school children. Elementary school children will work with drama
components typically used for stage rigging. Discussion topics         students from several disciplines in a mentoring relationship and
include selection criteria for line, hardware, and terminations        learn that theatre is a collaborative experience. The result will be
stressing entertainment industry standards, workplace safety and       joint artistic performances at CMU. The Children's Heritage
common industry misconceptions. Time permitting the course will        Theatre will present classic text as well as newly scripted plays
shift from a general discussion of components to their assembly        based on myths and fairy tales from international cultures.
into custom rigging systems & solutions. Pre-requisites/Co-
requesites: Introduction To Production or instructor’s permission      54-393     Speech and Phonetics Instruction and Outreach I
Prerequisites: 54163 and 54164                                         Fall: 6 units
                                                                       This course is designed for mentors to teach children at the 5th
54-378     Technical Design I                                          grade level to speak in a clear, efficient and pleasing manner with
Spring: 12 units                                                       self-confidence. The children will also be able to understand the
This course is an exploration of techniques and practices of           relationship between sound and speech; realize the differences
Technical Designers. The class has four main components: an            between American English speech and spelling; relate symbols of
exploration of the types of strategies used by Technical               IPA to phonemes we use in speech; improve their articulation of
Designers to arrive at solutions, building an expert vocabulary for    Vowels, Consonants and Diphthongs; discover the musical
discussion of technical design issues, development of actual           patterns their voices can make; follow directions and drills to
technical solutions, on paper, in discussion, and in the shop,         learn to discriminate between correct and incorrect productions of
discussion of any pertinent technical issues for any of the school     Vowels, Consonants and Diphthongs; develop the techniques for
productions while in development. Pre-requisites/Co-requesites:        memorization of challenging poetry.
Technical Direction or instructor’s permission
Prerequisites: 54273                                                   54-394     Speech and Phonetics Instruction and Outreach II
                                                                       Spring: 9 units
54-380    Music Reading for Drama Technicians                          This course is designed for mentors to teach children at the 5th
Spring: 3 units                                                        grade level to speak in a clear, efficient and pleasing manner with
This class gives the basics of music theory, musical terminology       self-confidence. The children will also be able to understand the
and score reading. Students focus on the difference in various         relationship between sound and speech; realize the differences
musical scores, ie. piano/vocal, full, hand written scores.            between American English speech and spelling; relate symbols of
Students are guided in classroom listening which a wide variety of     IPA to phonemes we use in speech; improve their articulation of
music including, opera, musical theatre, ballet, and choral/           Vowels, Consonants and Diphthongs; discover the musical
orchestra works.                                                       patterns their voices can make; follow directions and drills to
                                                                       learn to discriminate between correct and incorrect productions of
54-381     History of Drama                                            Vowels, Consonants and Diphthongs; develop the techniques for
Fall: Mini Session - 3 units                                           memorization of challenging poetry and participate in a
History of Drama minis. These are eight-week Junior/Senior level       presentation for family and friends using the skills they have
dramatic literature courses, meeting twice weekly, based around a      learned.
single period, author, genre, or "theme". A typical theme might be
Drama and Science, Aggressive Comedy; Dialectics and Drama;            54-395    Internship
The Rebel in Drama; Greek drama; Arabic drama; non-realist             Fall: 6-36 units
drama, and so on. The intention is that often very heterogenous
plays can be grouped together to reveal both comparisons and           54-396     Internship
contrasts in dramatic methods. At the conclusion of the course         Spring:   2-36 units
students write a paper on its main themes.
                                                                       54-401      Camera Lab
54-382     History of Drama II                                         Fall: 4-6 units
Spring: Mini Session - 3 units                                         This is a year long course required for senior undergraduate
History of Drama minis. These are eight-week Junior/Senior level       directing and acting majors and second year graduate directors.
dramatic literature courses, meeting twice weekly, based around a      The students are introduced to some fundamental ideas about
single period, author, genre, or "theme". A typical theme might be     story telling with a camera. The students learn and practice both
Drama and Science, Aggressive Comedy; Dialectics and Drama;            single and multi-camera techniques. There are a series of
The Rebel in Drama; Greek drama; Arabic drama; non-realist             projects for the students to encounter and practice acting,
drama, and so on. The intention is that often very heterogenous        directing, and designing for the camera.
plays can be grouped together to reveal both comparisons and
contrasts in dramatic methods. At the conclusion of the course         54-402    Camera Lab
students write a paper on its main themes.                             Spring: 6 units
                                                                       Advanced scene study: selectivity, clarity; the honing of
54-383    Critical Writing                                             performance techniques. Professional requirements, the practical
Fall: 4 units                                                          extension of the training. Audition and T.V. techniques.
A writing intensive course which focuses on developing skills for      Preparation for a New York presentation at the end of the Spring
the analysis and criticism of drama and performance.                   semester.

54-384    Critical Writing                                             54-403     Voice and Speech IV
Spring: 4 units                                                        Fall: 6 units
A writing intensive course which focuses on developing skills for      (Voice) The senior actors continue to strengthen their voice work
the analysis and criticism of drama and performance.                   with individualized voice classes and tutorials. The voice work
                                                                       often addresses particular issues, which these actors encounter
54-387   Dramaturgy : Production III                                   in the mainstage productions. Students also re-visit classical
Fall: 10 units                                                         text work and build on their sophomore year preparation with
Working as a production dramaturg for a senior thesis or grad          additional Shakespeare material. The pieces are prepared as
show or as an assistant dramaturg for a season show in junior          professional audition selections in this work. (Voice-Over Acting)
year.                                                                  A commercial aspect of the voice work is introduced, developed
                                                                       and marketed in the Voice-Over Acting class. The course
54-388   Dramaturgy: Production III                                    presents information which is then applied to narrating radio and
Spring: 10 units                                                       television commercials, industrials, feature-length animations,
Working as a production dramaturg for a senior thesis or grad          books on tape, CD-ROM videos, computer software programs,
show or as an assistant dramaturg for a season show in junior          etc. Texts are developed for two demo tapes, which are prepared
year.                                                                  in class and readied for a professional studio-taping session.

54-389     Speech and Theatre Community Outreach                       54-404    Voiceover
Fall: 9 units                                                          Spring: 6 units
Students will develop a process of teaching theatre to middle          (Voice) The senior actors continue to strengthen their voice work
school children. Elementary school children will work with drama
students from several disciplines in a mentoring relationship and
learn that theatre is a collaborative experience. The result will be
4 1 2 Course Descriptions




with individualized voice classes and tutorials. The voice work        productions. Putting into practice the techniques acquired over
often addresses particular issues, which these actors encounter        the years of training and exploring the development of a
in the mainstage productions. Students also re-visit classical         performance played before the public over two weeks.
text work and build on their sophomore year preparation with
additional Shakespeare material. The pieces are prepared as            54-412     Rehearsal & Performance
professional audition selections in this work. (Voice-Over Acting)     Spring: 12 units
A commercial aspect of the voice work is introduced, developed         Participation outside of class requirements in departmental
and marketed in the Voice-Over Acting class. The course                productions. Putting into practice the techniques acquired over
presents information which is then applied to narrating radio and      the years of training and exploring the development of a
television commercials, industrials, feature-length animations,        performance played before the public over two weeks.
books on tape, CD-ROM videos, computer software programs,
etc. Texts are developed for two demo tapes, which are prepared        54-413     Showcase
in class and readied for a professional studio-taping session.         Fall: 4 units
                                                                       Senior acting class for actors and Mt's who are in good standing
54-405     Graduate Directing                                          and in position to graduate in the Spring. Preparation for the New
Fall: 6 units                                                          York and Los Angeles Showcase presentations.
Graduate Directing is a semester long course for first and second
year graduate direcors and senior actors entitled "Classics in         54-414     Showcase
another time and place". It explores the techniques as well as the     Spring: 9 units
variety of challenges the director and the actor deal with when        This is a one-semester elective course for Junior Actors & MTs in
they do transplant the original setting of a well known classical      the fundamentals of the Audition process. Goals include: to learn
play into a radically different time frame or place of action.         the givens of the Audition process including determining the parts
                                                                       of the process over which the actor does & does not have control;
54-406     Graduate Directing                                          to learn how to shape an effective Audition; to learn to present
Spring: 6 units                                                        oneself in a professional manner; to learn how to choose Audition
Graduate Directing is a semester long course for first and second      pieces that work for the specific individual; to learn how to
year graduate direcors and senior actors entitled "Classics in         contrast Audition pieces; to learn how to handle cold readings.
another time and place". It explores the techniques as well as the     Important: All showings are to be presented as if for an actual
variety of challenges the director and the actor deal with when        Audition -- that is, as if for auditors who do not know you.
they do transplant the original setting of a well known classical
play into a radically different time frame or place of action.         54-415     MT Coaching
                                                                       Fall: 2 units
54-407     Movement IV                                                 Each week the students have a private 30 minutes session in
Fall: 2-4 units                                                        which they learn and polish assigned songs. It is important to
Movement IV is a cross-option course, wherein sophomore                insure that the audition repertory notebook is complete and
Designers build masks for the Senior Actors to use in the              diverse. New material is researched and learned. Preparation is
creation of a movement/mask piece based on a classic text.             made for 16-bar and whole songs for auditions.
(Examples: HEDDA GABLER, CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF,
DRACULA, CYRANO). The course gives Senior Actors an                    54-416     MT Coaching
opportunity to create an original ensemble performance piece,          Spring: 6 units
bringing over 30 masks to life, using skills learned in the previous   Each week the students have a private 30 minutes session in
classes in mask work (Neutral Mask, Commedia dell’Arte,                which they learn and polish assigned songs. It is important to
character and larval masks). Due to the necessity of working as        insure that the audition repertory notebook is complete and
an ensemble in the creation of this piece, the students must work      diverse. New material is researched and learned. Preparation is
together in various roles: as actors, of course, but also as           made for 16-bar and whole songs for auditions.
directors, writers, dramaturgs and stage managers; this course
offers a rare chance for students to experiment with actor-created     54-422     Directing IV
theatre, as well as, because it is cross-option, an opportunity for    Spring: 4 units
actors and designers to work together to create masks which are        Encounter major 20th century theatrical and dramatic
able to be brought to life through movement, that are comfortable,     movements. Specific concentration on directorial innovations in
offer enough visibility, are secure during activity, etc. – a unique   the last half of the 20th century
learning laboratory for designers and actors to interact involving
both artistic and practical issues related to the creation and use     54-423      Dance IV
of these masks as theatrical metaphor.                                 Fall: 1-3 units
Prerequisites: 54307 and 54308                                         Fall 1-3 units Sec A – Ballet – 2 units – A class aimed at
                                                                       developing and honing intermediate, advance vocabulary and
54-408     Movement IV                                                 artistry. Prerequisite: 54-324 and permission of instructor Sec B
Spring: 4 units                                                        – Broadway Styles – 2 units – A practical study of American
In the Senior year, students may study stage combat, including         Musical Theatre dance utilizing choreographic elements from the
hand-to-hand, quarterstaff, and single rapier, leading to scene        repertoire of master choreographers, Fosse, Robbins, Bennett,
work incorporating these skills. Other studies might include           DeMille and examines styles from the 20’s, 30’s 40’s, 50’s and
dramatic acrobatics, circus skills, and Eastern disciplines such       60’s. Prerequisite: 54-324 and permission of instructor Sec C –
as yoga, Tai Chi, etc. Focus on personal physical style;               Tap – 2 units – A class to challenge the ability to master
application of movement training on the mainstage in                   advanced repertoire at a consistent professional level.
performance.                                                           Prerequisite: 54-324 and permission of instructor
                                                                       Prerequisites: 54323 and 54324
54-409     Theatre Lab
Fall: 4,9 units                                                        54-424      Dance IV
This is a two-semester class which teaches the collaborative           Spring: 1-3 units
process of theatre -- including the role of the living dramatic        Spring 1-3 units Sec A – Ballet – 2 units – A class aimed at
writer. New scripts are written by graduate dramatic writers, then     developing and honing intermediate, advance vocabulary and
developed and realized by senior actors and by graduate and            artistry. Prerequisite: 54-423 and permission of instructor Sec B
undergraduate directors. This work results in 10-minute play           – Broadway Styles – 2 units – A practical study of American
scripts, one acts, monologue dramas, and the texts for the MFA         Musical Theatre dance utilizing choreographic elements from the
Thesis Productions. This class is co-taught by the Dramatic            repertoire of master choreographers, Fosse, Robbins, Bennett,
Writing, Acting and Directing Options.                                 DeMille and examines styles from the 20’s, 30’s 40’s, 50’s and
                                                                       60’s. Prerequisite: 54-423 and permission of instructor Sec C –
54-410     Theatre Lab                                                 Tap – 2 units – A class to challenge the ability to master
Spring: 9 units                                                        advanced repertoire at a consistent professional level.
This is a two-semester class which teaches the collaborative           Prerequisite: 54-423 and permission of instructor
process of theatre -- including the role of the living dramatic        Prerequisites: 54423
writer. New scripts are written by graduate dramatic writers, then
developed and realized by senior actors and by graduate and            54-431     Scene Design II
undergraduate directors. This work results in 10-minute play           Fall: 9 units
scripts, one acts, monologue dramas, and the texts for the MFA         The first semester of a full-year investigation of the processes,
Thesis Productions. This class is co-taught by the Dramatic            challenges and techniques that support the design development
Writing, Acting and Directing Options.                                 of scenic environments for live-performance and camera-based
                                                                       industries. Assignments of both produced and theoretical
54-411     Rehearsal & Performance                                     projects are evaluated through text analysis and pragmatic
Fall: 25 units                                                         problem-solving. Disciplines of conceptualization, collaboration
Participation outside of class requirements in departmental            and communication are explored and engaged. Prerequisite: 54-
                                                                       331 & 54-332
                                                                       Prerequisites: 54331

                                                                       54-432    Scene Design II
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions      413




Spring: 9 units                                                        for 1 or 2 semesters, starting either Fall or Spring PRE-
The second semester of a full-year investigation of the                REQUISITES: Both semesters of Costume Construction I
processes, challenges and techniques that support the design           Prerequisites: 54343 and 54344
development of scenic environments for live-performance and
camera-based industries. Assignments of both produced and              54-444     Costume Construction II
theoretical projects are evaluated through text analysis and           Spring: 6 units
pragmatic problem-solving. Disciplines of conceptualization,           FOR: All Costume Majors have priority Advanced problems in
collaboration and communication are explored and engaged.              costume building and pattern development are individually
Prerequisite: 54-431                                                   assigned to strengthen the skills of the student. Projects may be
                                                                       drawn from actual designs for productions if the challenge is
54-433     Producing for TV and Film                                   suitable for the student’s development. This course may be taken
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               for 1 or 2 semesters, starting either Fall or Spring PRE-
The course will examine the responsibilities of a producer in a        REQUISITES: Both semesters of Costume Construction I
variety of production situations: working with a client, a staff       Prerequisites: 54343 and 54344
producer at a television station, an entrepreneur or an
independent producer. Students will be required to produce             54-445     Business Practices for Designers
commercials, corporate material, documentaries and dramatic            Fall: Mini Session - 3 units
pieces.                                                                A brief introduction for design-oriented pre-professionals to the
                                                                       issues, challenges and conventionally-held practices of
54-437    Acting IV                                                    responsible self-employment. Specific issues and problem-
Fall: 4-6 units                                                        solving skills will be introduced through lectures, discussions and
An integration of training and craft approaches related to the         handouts. No testing or project work outside of class is
rehearsal process featuring a comprehensive approach to text.          anticipated for the successful completion of this course.
Students will also examine their propensities and limitations in       Prerequisite: open to Seniors only
order to expand their emotional physical vocal and intellectual
range.                                                                 54-447     Figure Drawing
                                                                       Fall: 4 units
54-438    Acting IV                                                    PRE-REQUISITES: If taking Figure Drawing II, both semesters
Spring: 9 units                                                        of Figure Drawing I FOR: Costume Majors have priority, then
An integration of training and craft approaches related to the         Design Majors. First experience should be in Zamborsky section.
rehearsal process featuring a comprehensive approach to text.          DESCRIPTION: This year-long course explores the realistic and
Students will also examine their propensities and limitations in       expressive depiction of the human form primarily in two
order to expand their emotional physical vocal and intellectual        dimensional media. Working primarily from the live model,
range.                                                                 exercises will be undertaken that address gesture, proportion,
                                                                       movement, anatomy and structure, composition and expressive
54-439    Stage Management Seminar                                     form. Students will experience a variety of media and formal
Fall: 3 units                                                          approaches to the figure, working from nude, draped, and clothed
                                                                       male and female models. A primary goal of the class is to develop
54-440   Stage Management Seminar                                      the ability to create the human figure from imagination, based on
Spring: 3 units                                                        intensive empirical study of the forms and structures of the
                                                                       human body from life. Although most of the work takes place in
54-441     Costume Design II                                           class, some outside study is required.
Fall: 9 units
A two-semester course that engages students with Paul Tazewell,        54-448     Figure Drawing
Susan Tsu and guest designers. Paul Tazewell teaches first             Spring: 4 units
semester which focuses on an exploration of pragmatic solutions        PRE-REQUISITES: If taking Figure Drawing II, both semesters
in design development. Disciplines of collaboration,                   of Figure Drawing I FOR: Costume Majors have priority, then
conceptualization and communication as the fundamentals of             Design Majors. First experience should be in Zamborsky section.
successful professional development are explored, discussed and        DESCRIPTION: This year-long course explores the realistic and
evaluated within the context of class projects and departmental        expressive depiction of the human form primarily in two
production assignments. Projects will emphasize problem-solving        dimensional media. Working primarily from the live model,
goals in text analysis, research, the selection of period detail and   exercises will be undertaken that address gesture, proportion,
project organization, as well as graphic skills development and        movement, anatomy and structure, composition and expressive
refinement. This upper level course exposes students to a range        form. Students will experience a variety of media and formal
of genres that includes theatre, film, opera, the annual television    approaches to the figure, working from nude, draped, and clothed
projects including the Television Workshop with CMU alumni and         male and female models. A primary goal of the class is to develop
the short made for television plays produced at Pittsburgh’s           the ability to create the human figure from imagination, based on
Public Television station WQED, as well as the collaborative           intensive empirical study of the forms and structures of the
Dance/Light/Costume production design. PRE-REQUISITES:                 human body from life. Although most of the work takes place in
Costume Design I, Drawing For The Theatrical Designer, Figure          class, some outside study is required.
Drawing, History of Clothing. FOR: Second year graduate
costume majors and upper level undergraduates with declared            54-451     Lighting Design II
majors.                                                                Fall: 9 units
Prerequisites: 54245 and 54341 and 54347                               Students explore design in different genres that include opera,
                                                                       dance, large scale live entertainment events, television and
54-442      Costume Design II                                          architectural lighting. Focus is also given to preparation in the
Spring: 9 units                                                        business aspects of developing a professional career.
The second semester of a two-semester course that engages              Prerequisites: 54349 and 54350 and 54352
students with Paul Tazewell, Susan Tsu, guest designers and
directors. Taught by Tsu, the beginning of the semester                54-452     Lighting Design II
culminates the annual collaborative Dance/Light/Costume                Spring: 9 units
production design. Fabric identification is studied early in the       Students explore design in different genres that include opera,
semester. Created to augment the experience of students who are        dance, large scale live entertainment events, television and
already designing School of Drama productions, this course is          architectural lighting. Focus is also given to preparation in the
tailored every year to develop student’s existing design               business aspects of developing a professional career.
sensibilities and skills, build their portfolios and deepen the        Prerequisites: 54451
exploration of their individual voices as artists. Students receive
career counseling and mentorship on the preparation of their           54-453     Production Management Workshop I
portfolios, resumes and cover letters for professional interviews.     Fall: 3 units
PRE-REQUISITES: Costume Design I, first semester of                    Investigates the organization, planning and interpersonal skills
Costume Design II, Drawing For The Theatrical Designer, Figure         required to successfully manage a live theatrical production.
Drawing, History of Clothing. FOR: Second year graduate                Topics covered include: Budgeting, Scheduling, Communication,
costume majors and upper level undergraduates with declared            Job Descriptions, Reporting and Project Management. Permission
majors.                                                                of instructor required.
Prerequisites: 54246 and 54448
                                                                       54-456     Production Management Workshop
54-443     Costume Construction II                                     Spring: 3 units
Fall: 6 units                                                          Investigates the organization, planning and interpersonal skills
FOR: All Costume Majors have priority Advanced problems in             required to successfully manage a live theatrical production.
costume building and pattern development are individually              Topics covered include: Budgeting, Scheduling, Communication,
assigned to strengthen the skills of the student. Projects may be      Job Descriptions, Reporting and Project Management. Permission
drawn from actual designs for productions if the challenge is          of instructor required.
suitable for the student’s development. This course may be taken
4 1 4 Course Descriptions




54-457     Directing: Production IV                                      54-488    Dramaturgy: Production IV
Fall: 12 units                                                           Spring: 12 units
SENIOR DIRECTING PROJECT: This is a 90-minute, public,                   Thesis hours and program assistance in senior year.
fully-designed presentation directed by a 4th-Year Directing
student with the following goals: to publicly realize a playwright’s     54-489     Dramaturgy: Internship
purpose for a live audience; to tell an entire theatrical story with a   Fall: 9 units
beginning, progression & ending; to work as a team with actors &         Professional internship or acting as production dramaturg for a
design team to shape a cohesive & coherent theatrical                    fully-resourced season shows.
presentation; to extend practical understanding of Theatre as a
collaborative process; to synthesize & apply prior studies at            54-490     Dramaturgy: Internship
Carnegie Mellon                                                          Spring: 9 units
                                                                         Professional internship or acting as production dramaturg for a
54-458     Directing: Production IV                                      fully-resourced season shows.
Spring: 10 units
SENIOR DIRECTING PROJECT: This is a 90-minute, public,                   54-491    Theatre Studies Thesis
fully-designed presentation directed by a 4th-Year Directing             Fall: 9 units
student with the following goals: to publicly realize a playwright’s
purpose for a live audience; to tell an entire theatrical story with a   54-492     Theatre Studies Thesis
beginning, progression & ending; to work as a team with actors &         Spring:   6-9 units
design team to shape a cohesive & coherent theatrical
presentation; to extend practical understanding of Theatre as a          54-493    Business of Acting
collaborative process; to synthesize & apply prior studies at            Fall: 4 units
Carnegie Mellon                                                          The course introduces the (advanced) actor to various aspects of
                                                                         the professional world. Emphasis is placed on the audition and
54-461      Production Preparation IV                                    interview process for casting directors, talent agents and
Fall: 15 units                                                           personal managers. Each student will present either an individual
Participation in School of Drama productions, usually in                 or small group project chosen from a wide ranging list of topics
supervisory roles in design or production. Pre-requisites/Co-            which include performers unions, various production contracts,
requesites: 54-361 & 362                                                 New York and regional theater season,s professional publications
Prerequisites: 54361 and 54362                                           and web sites. Occasional tests are administered on the subject
                                                                         of current Broadway and Off-Broadway seasons.
54-462      Production Preparation IV
Spring: 15 units                                                         54-494    Business of Acting
Participation in School of Drama productions, usually in                 Spring: 3 units
supervisory roles in design or production. Pre-requisites/Co-            The course introduces the (advanced) actor to various aspects of
requesites: 54-361 & 362                                                 the professional world. Emphasis is placed on the audition and
Prerequisites: 54361 and 54362                                           interview process for casting directors, talent agents and
                                                                         personal managers. Each student will present either an individual
54-475    Theatre Management                                             or small group project chosen from a wide ranging list of topics
Fall: 6 units                                                            which include performers unions, various production contracts,
Survey of management practices and principles as applied to the          New York and regional theater season,s professional publications
performing arts. Investigation of selected problems typical of           and web sites. Occasional tests are administered on the subject
those facing the arts administrator.                                     of current Broadway and Off-Broadway seasons.
                                                                         Prerequisites: 54301 and 54302
54-477     Technical Design II
Fall: 9 units                                                            54-495    Internship
Required for all senior undergraduate Technical Direction                Fall: 9-36 units
students. This “capstone” course is the second semester of a             Assignment to professional theatre organizations designed to
sequence requiring application of concepts from earlier courses          meet the professional needs of advanced-standing students. By
including Standard Scenery Construction, Production Planning,            permission of the Head of the Department.
Structural Design, Stage Machinery Design and Technical Design
1. This is a project-based course requiring weekly presentation of       54-496    Internship
solutions to various “unusual” technical challenges, drawn from          Spring: 9-36 units
actual production experiences. Thorough documentation (shop              Assignment to professional theatre organizations designed to
drawings, budgets, build schedules, etc.) is a requirement for           meet the professional needs of advanced-standing students. By
each project.                                                            permission of the Head of the Department.
Prerequisites: 54378
                                                                         54-500     Voice Lab
54-480    Music Reading for Drama Technicians                            Fall and Spring: 5 units
Spring: 3 units                                                          Singing Voice based on speech-level and classical singing
This class gives the basics of music theory, musical terminology         techniques, required of all Musical Theatre Majors Lessons are
and score reading. Students focus on the difference in various           private, for the duration of one hour per week. Voice Lab combines
musical scores, ie. piano/vocal, full, hand written scores.              all students of Musical Theatre in a one-hour performance class,
Students are guided in classroom listening which a wide variety of       where repertoire is performed for faculty and students alike.
music including, opera, musical theatre, ballet, and choral/             Training is progressive, with each semester building on the vocal
orchestra works.                                                         mastery achieved from the previous semester. Repertoire spans
                                                                         from classical to rock, but with an emphasis on songs extracted
54-483     Speech and Theatre Community Outreach                         from the American Musical Canon.
Fall: 9 units
Students will develop a process of teaching theatre to middle            54-507     So You Want To Make A Movie
school children. Elementary school children will work with drama         Fall: 6 units
students from several disciplines in a mentoring relationship and        This is a two semester course. The goal of the course will be to
learn that theatre is a collaborative experience. The result will be     provide students with the confidence, skill, and experience
joint artistic performances at CMU. The Children's Heritage              needed to produce a visually interesting, well-told story. Students
Theatre will present classic text as well as newly scripted plays        must be committed to developing self-discipline and a
based on myths and fairy tales from international cultures.              professional work ethic, in addition to improving techniques and
                                                                         situations that expand their creative vision. Equal emphasis will
54-484     Speech and Theatre Community Outreach                         be placed on the creative and managerial aspects of producing.
Spring: 9 units                                                          Students learn to enhance and develop artistic skill and judgment
Students will develop a process of teaching theatre to middle            as well as acquire a sound background in business fundamentals
school children. Elementary school children will work with drama         essential for successful producing. They will be required to take a
students from several disciplines in a mentoring relationship and        story from initial idea, through treatment, to producing a finished
learn that theatre is a collaborative experience. The result will be     script. Using professional and student projects as models, the
joint artistic performances at CMU. The Children's Heritage              course develops and advances students’ techniques in pre-
Theatre will present classic text as well as newly scripted plays        production, production, and post-production problem-solving.
based on myths and fairy tales from international cultures.              Topics included in discussion will be studio vs location shooting,
                                                                         legal and ethical issues, research, script development, talent
54-487    Dramaturgy: Production IV                                      selection, details of the pre-production process, and editing. Each
Fall: 12 units                                                           student will produce a five minute video during the Fall semester
Thesis hours and program assistance in senior year.                      and a long form of not more than thirty minutes in duration during
                                                                         the Spring semester. Presentation materials include an oral pitch,
                                                                         a written treatment, and script. In order to reinforce the
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions      415




invaluable experience of the collaborative process, students will      formula, (3) Fourier Analysis, including orthogonality of sinusoids,
be encouraged to form production teams. Students will be               trigonometric and exponential forms of Fourier series, Fourier
encouraged to apply for University Grants to cover some cost of        integrals and Fourier transforms, (4) Linear, Constant-Coefficient
production (tape stock, special equipment needs, special post-         Differential Equations, including complex exponential solutions to
production effects [if required], entry fees to competitions,          homogeneous equations and particular solutions with polynomial
postage etc.) In addition to scheduled classroom time, a               and sinusoidal driving functions described by phasors, (5)
considerable time commitment will be required. The faculty             Difference Equations, with emphasis upon their relationship to
mentor will meet for one-on-one consultations, supportive              differential equations, and (6) Linear Algebra and Matrices,
discussions and recommendations throughout the production              including matrix arithmetic, linear systems of equations and
proces                                                                 Gaussian elimination, vector spaces and rank of matrices, matrix
Prerequisites: 54433 and 54733 and 54833                               inverses and determinants, eigenvalue problems and their
                                                                       relationship to systems of homogeneous differential equations. 4
54-508     So You Want to Make A Movie                                 hrs. lec., 1hr. rec.
Spring: 9 units                                                        Prerequisites: 21122 or 21118 or 21123
(will meet Wednesdays 5:30 pm-7:30 pm and as scheduled) The
foundation developed in the Fall semester will be expanded. Using      18-220     Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering
the script developed in the Falls semester, each student will          Fall and Spring: 12 units
produce a long form of not more than thirty minutes in duration        This course covers fundamental topics that are common to a wide
during the Spring semester. Presentation materials include a final,    variety of electrical engineering devices and systems. The topics
polished script, production schedule, shooting schedule, and           include circuit analysis techniques, passive and active
budget. Production teams established in the Fall semester will         components modeling, operational amplifiers, energy storage
participate in the collaborative process. In addition to scheduled     elements, power analysis, time-response of first- and second-
classroom time, a considerable time commitment will be required.       order systems, sinusoidal steady-state response, frequency
The faculty mentor will also meet for one-on-one consultations,        domain analysis, and filters. Other topics may include: diodes
supportive discussions and recommendations throughout the              and transistors, basic noise analysis, transformers, pole-zero
production process to review and evaluate project development.         plotting and analysis in the complex plane. The laboratories are
Prerequisites: 54507                                                   designed to give students the opportunity to build and operate
                                                                       circuits that address specific concepts covered in the lectures,
54-517    Director's Colloquium                                        including circuit and component modeling, amplifiers, filters, and
Fall: 1 units                                                          signal detection & processing. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec., 3 hrs. lab.
                                                                       Prerequisites: 18100       Corequisites: 18-202
54-518   Director's Colloquium
Spring: 1 units                                                        18-231    Sophomore Projects
                                                                       Fall: 1-18 units
Electrical & Computer Engineering                                      Experience in planning and conduct of independent engineering
                                                                       research, development or design projects, usually in concert with
18-100     Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering         the research interests and programs of individual faculty
Fall and Spring: 12 units                                              members. Prerequisite: sophomore standing in Electrical and
The goals of this freshman engineering course are: to introduce        Computer Engineering.
basic concepts in electrical and computer engineering in an
integrated manner; to motivate basic concepts in the context of        18-232    Sophomore Projects
real applications; to illustrate a logical way of thinking about       Spring: 3-18 units
problems and their solutions; and to convey the excitement of the      Experience in planning and conduct of independent engineering
profession. These goals are attained through analysis,                 research, development or design projects, usually in concert with
construction and testing of an electromechanical system (e.g., a       the research interests and programs of individual faculty
robot) that incorporates concepts from a broad range of areas          members. Prerequisite: sophomore standing in Electrical and
within Electrical and Computer Engineering. Some of the specific       Computer Engineering.
topics that will be covered include system decomposition, ideal
and real sources, Kirchhoff’s Current and Voltage Laws, Ohm’s          18-240      Fundamentals of Computer Engineering
Law, piecewise linear modeling of nonlinear circuit elements,          Fall and Spring: 12 units
Ideal Op-Amp characteristics, combinational logic circuits,            This course introduces basic issues in design and verification of
Karnaugh Maps, Flip-Flops, sequential logic circuits, and finite       modern digital systems. Topics include: Boolean algebra, digital
state machines. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec., 3 hr. lab.                    number systems and computer arithmetic, combinational logic
Corequisites: 21-120                                                   design and simplification, sequential logic design and
                                                                       optimization, register-transfer design of digital systems, basic
18-200     Emerging Trends in Electrical and Computer                  processor organization and instruction set issues, assembly
Engineering                                                            language programming and debugging, and a hardware description
Fall: 1 units                                                          language. Emphasis is on the fundamentals: the levels of
This class consists of a series of individual lectures given by        abstraction and hardware description language methods that
different faculty members and distinguished alumni. The lectures       allow designers to cope with hugely complex systems, and
are designed to serve the following purposes: 1) provide students      connections to practical hardware implementation problems.
a good understanding of our curriculum structure and the courses       Students will use computer-aided digital design software and
in each of our five principle subject areas; 2) introduce to           actual hardware implementation laboratories to learn about real
students the emerging trends in electrical and computer                digital systems. 3 hr. lec., 1 hr. rec., 3 hr. lab.
engineering and the relevance of our courses; 3) present to            Prerequisites: 18100         Corequisites: 21-127
students our faculty’s research fields; 4) discuss basic learning
and working ethics; 5) prepare students career-making skills; 6)       18-300      Fundamentals of Electromagnetics
introduce new undergraduate courses and research opportunities.        All Semesters: 12 units
The class will contain 12 lectures from faculty members, 2             This course introduces electromagnetic principles and describes
lectures on learning and working ethics, and 2 lectures from our       ways in which those principles are applied in engineering devices
alumni. Students are required to attend each lecture. An award for     and systems. Topics include: vector calculus as a mathematical
the best lecturer, selected by students, will be given at the end of   foundation for field descriptions, Maxwell’s equations in integral
the semester. 1 credit, 1 hr per week, pass/fail, required to          and differential forms with associated boundary conditions as
graduate. Sophomore standing required.                                 descriptions of all electromagnetic principles, quasistatic electric
Prerequisites: 18100                                                   fields in free space and in materials, superposition for known
                                                                       charge sources, conduction and polarization, resistance and
18-202     Mathematical Foundations of Electrical Engineering          capacitance, charge relaxation, analytic and numerical methods
Fall and Spring: 12 units                                              for electric field boundary value problems, quasistatic magnetic
This course covers topics from engineering mathematics that            fields in free space and in materials, superposition for known
serve as foundations for descriptions of electrical engineering        current sources, magnetization, inductance, magnetic diffusion,
devices and systems. It is the corequisite mathematics course          and analytic and numerical methods for magnetic field boundary
for 18-220, Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering. The topics         value problems. 4 hrs. lec. Prerequisite: 18-220 or equivalent.
include: (1) MATLAB as a robust computational tool, used to            Prerequisites: 18220
reinforce, enrich and integrate ideas throughout the course,
including software exercises and projects in combination with          18-303     Engineering Electromagnetics
homework assignments, (2) Complex Analysis, including                  Spring: 12 units
rectangular and polar representations in the complex plane with        This course introduces electromagnetic principles and describes
associated forms of complex arithmetic, powers, roots and              ways in which those principles are applied in engineering devices
complex logarithms, complex differentiation, analytic functions        and systems. Topics include: Review of mathematical
and Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex Taylor series, complex           foundations, Static electric and magnetic fields in free space and
exponential, sinusoidal and hyperbolic functions, and Euler's          in materials, Maxwell’s equations in integral and differential forms,
4 1 6 Course Descriptions




boundary conditions and potential functions, Uniform plane waves       Experience in planning and conduct of independent engineering
in free space and in materials, Transients and sinusoidal steady       research, development or design projects, usually in concert with
state on 2-conductor transmission lines, Modes in conducting           the research interests and programs of individual faculty
and dielectric waveguides, Radiation and antennas. 4 hrs. lec. and     members. Prerequisite: junior standing in Electrical and
1.5 hr. rec.                                                           Computer Engineering
Prerequisites: 18220
                                                                       18-340       Digital Computation
18-310     Fundamentals of Semiconductor Devices                       Spring: 12 units
Spring: 12 units                                                       In this course we will explore the techniques for designing high-
This course will replace 18311, starting in the Spring 2005            performance digital circuits for computation along with methods
semester. In this course you will receive an introduction to the       for evaluating their properties. We begin by quickly reviewing
operation and fabrication of the most important semiconductor          number systems and digital arithmetic along with basic arithmetic
devices used in integrated circuit technology together with device     circuits such as ripple-carry adders. We then focus on formal
design and layout. At the end of the course you will have a basic      techniques and theory for analyzing the functionality, timing,
understanding of pn diodes, bipolar transistors, and MOSFETs as        power consumption, and chip area properties of these basic
well as some light emitting and light detecting devices such as        circuits and ones yet to be presented. From there, we move to
photodiodes, LEDs and solar cells. You will also receive an            more complex adders (carry-lookahead, carry-skip,
introduction to the fundamental concepts of semiconductor              carry_bypass, Wallace trees, and hybrid techniques) and
physics such as doping, electron and hole transport, and band          multipliers (sequential, array, Booth, and others) along with
diagrams. In the laboratory you will learn how to lay out both         various divider circuits. Floating point units are then built upon
bipolar and MOS devices and you will design small (2-3                 the concepts introduced for adder, multipliers, and dividers.
transistor) circuits. The laboratory portion of the course             Finally, we will investigate the design and implementation of
emphasizes the relation between device design and layout and           digital filter circuits. For each circuit introduced, we will develop
circuit performance. You will also experimentally evaluate the         techniques for evaluating their functionality, their speed, power
operation of amplifier and gate circuits fabricated with discrete      consumption, and silicon area requirements. In addition, we will
devices. This course will give you an excellent understanding of       utilize various CAD tools to design and evaluate most of the
the operation and fabrication of the devices which is necessary        computation circuits discussed. After successful completion of
for high-performance analog and digital circuit design. 3 hrs. lec.,   the course, students will not only have an understanding of
3 hrs. lab. (Note: the prerequisite is typically waived for MSE        complex computation circuits, but subtle concepts that include
students who intend to pursue the Electronic Materials Minor).         hazards, metastability, false paths, inertial delay, sticky bits,
Prerequisites: 18220                                                   clock skew/jitter, dynamic and static sensitization, and many
                                                                       others. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.
18-316     Introduction to Data Storage Systems Technology             Prerequisites: 18240
Fall: 12 units
This course teaches the fundamentals of magnetic and optical           18-341     Logic Design Using Simulation, Synthesis, and
recording technology as used in data storage systems, audio and        Verification Techniques
video recording. It begins with a treatment of systems                 All Semesters: 12 units
considerations, including data rate, storage capacity, and formats     The design of digital integrated circuits has grown in complexity
of various tape and disk systems. It then moves on to treat the        to where computer-aided design tools are required for designers
details of the writing and readback processes including                to work in an economically productive manner. This course is a
descriptions of the heads and media. The concepts in magnetic          study of the techniques of designing the register-transfer and
materials and electromagnetics required to understand these            logic levels of complex digital systems using simulation,
devices are also covered. Lectures and problem sets are                synthesis, and verification tools. Topics will include memory, bus
supplemented by six laboratories in which students record,             and communication system interfacing, asynchronous state
readback, analyze actual signals, and operate magnetic and             machines, discrete-event simulation, fault models and test
magnetoresistive devices. 3.0 hrs. lec., 3.0 hrs. lab (meets six       generation, debugging and testbench strategies, and assertion-
times).                                                                based verification. Design examples will be drawn from memory
Prerequisites: 18220 and 33107                                         systems, bus and communication interfaces, and computation
                                                                       systems, emphasizing how these systems are designed and
18-321     Analysis and Design of Analog Circuits                      debugged, and how their functionality can be verified. A modern
Spring: 12 units                                                       hardware description language, such as SystemVerilog, will serve
The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to the          as the basis for uniting these topics. Quizzes, homeworks and
fundamentals of the analysis and design of basic analog circuits.      design projects will serve to exercise these topics.
Topics to be covered include: operational amplifier design, basic      Prerequisite(s): 18-240
amplifier feedback theory, frequency stability and compensation,       Prerequisites: 18240
dc bias calculations and circuits, MOSFET and BJT large- and
small-signal device models, small-signal gain and frequency            18-342     Fundamentals of Embedded Systems
response characteristics of amplifiers, large-signal                   Fall: 12 units
characteristics and nonidealities. In the hardware laboratory the      This practical, hands-on course introduces students to the basic
student will gain experience designing, building, and                  building-blocks and the underlying scientific principles of
characterizing analog circuits. The students will also learn how to    embedded systems. The course covers both the hardware and
use the SPICE circuit simulation program to compare actual and         software aspects of embedded procesor architectures, along with
simulated performance. The analysis and design of analog               operating system fundamentals, such as virtual memory,
circuits incorporating both Bipolar and CMOS technologies will be      concurrency, task scheduling and synchronization. Through a
considered. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec., 3 hrs. lab.                       series of laboratory projects involving state-of-the-art
Prerequisites: 18220                                                   processors, students will learn to understand implementation
                                                                       details and to write assembly-language and C programs that
18-322      Analysis and Design of Digital Circuits                    implement core embedded OS functionality, and that control/
Fall: 12 units                                                         debug features such as timers, interrupts, serial communications,
This course is intended to provide the electrical and computer         flash memory, device drivers and other components used in
engineering student with a familiarity to and an understanding of      typical embedded applications. Relevant topics, such as
the analytical and computer skills required for the analysis,          optimization, profiling, digital signal processing, feedback control,
computer simulation, design, and computer-aided physical layout        real-time operating systems and embedded middleware, will also
of digital integrated circuits. This course is preparatory for study   be discussed. This course is intended for INI students.
in the fields of Very Large Scale Integrated (VLSI) circuits and       Prerequisites: 18240
Computer-Aided Design techniques. The lab focuses on the
systematic analysis and design of digital integrated circuits in       18-345     Introduction to Telecommunication Networks
CMOS technology using CADENCE Design Systems software                  Fall: 12 units
tools.                                                                 This course introduces the fundamental concepts of
Prerequisites: 18220 and 18240                                         telecommunication networks. Underlying engineering principles of
                                                                       telephone networks, computer networks and integrated digital
18-331    Junior Projects                                              networks are discussed. Topics in the course include: telephone
Fall: 1-18 units                                                       and data networks overview; OSI layers; data link protocol; flow
Experience in planning and conduct of independent engineering          control, congestion control, routing; local area networks
research, development or design projects, usually in concert with      (Ethernet, Token Ring and FDDI); transport layer; introduction to
the research interests and programs of individual faculty              high-speed networks; performance evaluation techniques. 4 hrs.
members. Prerequisite: junior standing in Electrical and               lec.
Computer Engineering                                                   Prerequisites: 15113 and 18240 and 36217

18-332     Junior Projects                                             18-348    Embedded Systems Engineering
Spring:   3-18 units                                                   Fall: 12 units
                                                                                                            Course Descriptions     417




18-348 Embedded Systems Engineering Embedded computing               most courses in communications, signal processing and control
applications far outnumber desktop computers, with billions of       systems. The objective of this course is to provide students with
microcontrollers produced worldwide each year. Embedded              an integrated understanding of the relationships between
systems vary tremendously, from the single 8-bit processor in a      mathematical tools and properties of real signals and systems.
thermostat, to high performance processors in a digital camera,      This is accomplished by motivating lectures and recitation
to dozens of networked processors in an automobile. Despite this     problems using demonstrations and laboratory assignments
diversity of applications, there are core technology and system-     which cover such topics as radio transmission and reception,
level skills needed by any embedded system designer that form        audio synthesizers, CDs, image processing, and prosthetic
the content of this course. Topics typically covered include         devices. In the course of the semester, students are introduced
embedded computing platforms (hardware, microcontroller              to industry-standard computing and simulation tools that will be
instruction sets, software); interacting with the external world     used in subsequent courses. Continuous and discrete-time
(analog I/O, control); system-level engineering (design cycle,       signals and systems are treated in a unified manner through the
architectural patterns); real-time operation (timers, interrupts,    concept of sampling. The course covers the basic concepts and
concurrency); constraints and optimization (economics, power,        tools needed to perform time and transform domain analyses of
size, speed); and a survey of techniques important for building      signals and linear time-invariant systems, including: unit impulse
systems that work in the real world (debug, test, robust design,     response and convolution; Fourier transforms and filtering;
dependability, ethical/societal issues). Weekly hands-on             Laplace transforms, feedback and stability; and a brief
experiences with embedded hardware and software will be used to      introduction to z-transforms in the context of digital filtering.
reinforce core skills. 4 hrs. lec.; lab; Prerequisites: 18-240 and   Prerequisites: 18202 and 18220
15-213.
Prerequisites: 15213 and 18240                                       18-410      Physical Sensors, Transducers and Instrumentation
                                                                     Spring: 12 units
18-349     Embedded Real-Time Systems                                While modern electronic circuits have become largely digital, the
Fall: 12 units                                                       physical world, and consequently, the electronic interface to the
This practical, hands-on course introduces the various building      physical world remains fundamentally analog. Therefore, sensors,
blocks and underlying scientific and engineering principles behind   transducers, and the initial signal processing remain in the analog
embedded real-time systems. The course covers the integrated         domain. Simultaneously, the commercial market place optimizes
hardware and software aspects of embedded processor                  sensor technology based upon multiple attributes including cost,
architectures, along with advanced topics such as real-time,         detectivity, size, speed, etc. In this course we explore both the
resource/device and memory management. Students can expect           many types of possible responses to various physical stimuli, as
to learn how to program with the embedded architecture that is       well as the instrumentation, electronic detection, signal
ubiquitous in cell-phones, portable gaming devices, robots,          conversion and signal processing techniques used to bring the
PDAs, etc. Students will then go on to learn and apply real-time     physical event into the electronic world in a practical manner.
principles that are used to drive critical embedded systems like     This requires that we learn about the diversity of physical
automobiles, avionics, medical equipment, the Mars rover, etc.       phenomena, materials and devices that can be used to convert
Topics covered include embedded architectures (building up to        the various forms of physical energy into electronic signals. Due
modern 16/32/64-bit embedded processors); interaction with           to the significant diversity of physical phenomena the course
devices (buses, memory architectures, memory management,             requires reading from textbooks, the technical literature and
device drivers); concurrency (software and hardware interrupts,      patent literature. The course is taught via the case method with
timers); real-time principles (multi-tasking, scheduling,            student participation via oral and written reports. The student
synchronization); implementation trade-offs, profiling and code      should arrive with a strong interest in, and basic understanding of,
optimization (for performance and memory); embedded software         physics, material science, chemistry and analog electronic
(exception handling, loading, mode-switching, programming            circuits as taught at the sophomore and junior course level.
embedded systems). Through a series of laboratory exercises          Prerequisites are one of the courses listed below or permission of
with state-of-the-art embedded processors and industry-strength      the instructor.
development tools, students will acquire skills in the design/       Prerequisites: 18300 or 18303 or 18310 or 18311 or 18321 or
implementation/debugging of core embedded real-time                  27432
functionality. PRE-REQUISITES: 18-240, 15-213
Prerequisites: 18240 and 15213                                       18-411      Computational Techniques in Engineering
                                                                     Spring: 12 units
18-360     Introduction to Computer-Aided Digital Design             This course develops the methods to formulate basic engineering
Spring: 12 units                                                     problems in a way that makes them amenable to computational/
This course introduces the techniques of modeling digital            numerical analysis. The course will consist of three main
systems at various levels of abstraction, and computer-aided         modules: basic programming skills, discretization of ordinary and
design algorithms that are applied to these models to support        partial differential equations, and numerical methods. These
design and analysis tasks. The course covers modeling through        modules are followed by two modules taken from a larger list:
the use of a modern hardware description language (Verilog). The     Monte Carlo-based methods, molecular dynamics methods,
language is used to model an IC in the early stages of design        image analysis methods, and so on. Students will learn how to
using behavioral modeling techniques and in later stages using       work with numerical libraries and how to compile and execute
structural modeling techniques. This course is not a how-to          scientific code written in Fortran-90 and C++. Students will be
course on using CAD tools. Rather it is a study of the algorithms    required to work on a course project in which aspects from at
used by CAD tools. The course will cover: modeling of digital        least two course modules must be integrated. Prerequisites: Math
systems for simulation and synthesis using Verilog; test             sequence 21-120, 21-122, 21-259, 21-260 or equivalent; 15-
generation which is used to determine if a manufactured design is    100 or equivalent.
correct; event-driven simulation algorithms, and physical design
which is used to map the synthesized logic design onto physical      18-412      Field Effect Devices and Technology
IC area. 4 hrs. lec.                                                 Fall: 12 units
Prerequisites: 15211 and 18240                                       This course follows 18-310, which provides an introduction to the
                                                                     physics of semiconductor devices. 18-412 addresses in detail
18-370      Fundamentals of Control                                  the physics of semiconductor devices which work on the field
Fall: 12 units                                                       effect principle, which are today technologically and economically
An introduction to the fundamental principles and methodologies      dominant. These devices include the MOSFET, junction field
of classical feedback control and its applications. Emphasis is on   effect devices (JFET and MESFETs), thin film field effect
problem formulation and the analysis and synthesis of                transistors (TFTs), and related devices. The course material is
servomechanisms using frequency and time domain techniques.          specifically motivated by current applications in which portable
Topics include analytical, graphical, and computer-aided             and low power operation is required. Particular applications which
(MATLAB) techniques for analyzing and designing automatic            are discussed in detail include scaled MOSFETs for logic and
control systems; analysis of performance, stability criteria,        memory; CCD imagers; active matrix flat panel displays; and
realizability, and speed of response; compensation methods in the    MESFETs for digital and RF applications. This semester: The
frequency domain, root-locus and frequency response design, and      evolution continues, this course increasingly will incorporate
pole-zero synthesis techniques; robust controller design;            more content on semiconductor process technology. I believe
systems with delay and computer control systems; transfer            that an increasing degree of understanding of processing and its
function and state space modeling of linear dynamic physical         limitations is needed in order to make sense of current issues in
systems; nonlinearities in control systems; and control              device physics. There will be several lectures on process
engineering software (MATLAB). 4 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.               technology at the beginning of the course. This is the result of an
Prerequisites: 18396                                                 evolving convergence of this course with my graduate processing
                                                                     course 18-815, (not expected to be offered in the near future).
18-390    ECE CO-OP                                                  Prerequisites: 33107 and (18310 or 18311)
All Semesters: 0-3 units
                                                                     18-413    Introduction to Computer-Aided Instrumentation and
18-396    Signals and Systems                                        Characterization
Fall and Spring: 12 units                                            Intermittent: 12 units
This course is a breadth course that also is a prerequisite for      This course introduces students to the use of Labview, a
4 1 8 Course Descriptions




commonly used tool for instrument control. In addition, a number        Prerequisites: 18220
of essential aspects of measurement hardware and measurement
technology will be studied. Students will develop a fundamental         18-431    Undergraduate Projects - Senior
understanding of important issues encountered in instrumentation        Fall: 1-18 units
and device characterization, including accuracy, resolution, noise,     Experience in planning and conduct of independent engineering
parasitics, and grounding that will enable students to critically       research, development, or design projects, usually in concert with
assess their data and to rapidly develop solutions to new               the research interests and programs of individual faculty
measurement problems. In addition, this course will encourage a         members. Prerequisite: senior standing in Electrical and
systematic approach to the development of instrument control            Computer Engineering.
software, including overall planning, partitioning into testable and
reusable pieces, incorporation of error detection and error             18-432    Senior Projects
handling, and provision of a user-friendly interface.                   Spring: 1-42 units
Prerequisites: 18310 or 18311 or 18321                                  Experience in planning and conduct of independent engineering
                                                                        research, development, or design projects, usually in concert with
18-415     From Design to the Market for Deep Submicron IC's            the research interests and programs of individual faculty
Spring: 12 units                                                        members. Prerequisite: senior standing in Electrical and
The general objective of the 18-415 class is to introduce and           Computer Engineering.
analyze all major design-dependent trade-offs which decide about
the IC product commercial success. This objective will be               18-441    Verification of Computer Hardware Systems
achieved via playing in the class an "imaginary fabless IC design       Fall: 12 units
house startup game"- a main class activity. In this game                This course will present state-of-the-art methodologies and tools
students will be asked to construct "business plans" for a startup      for simulation-based and formal verification of complex digital
fabless IC design house. Each team in the class will have to            systems. The problem of verification will be introduced and its
envision, as an IC design objective, a new product with a               importance motivated by the current crisis in industry. Various
functionality, which is already provided by another existing IC         simulation-based techniques will be presented including white,
product (i.e. by microprocessor). The envisioned product should         grey, and black-box testing, random test case generation, and
provide a subset of functionality of the existing product but it        code-coverage metrics. Formal verification techniques will be
should be "better" in some other respect (e.g. it could be less         emphasized, as well. Lectures covering equivalence checking,
expensive to fabricate, faster etc.). To handle the above               model checking, and symbolic trajectory evaluation will be
assignment, students in the class will be using skills learned in       presented. Pros and cons of each technique will be evaluated and
18-322 as well as all legal sources of "industrial intelligence"        techniques for selecting a verification methodology appropriate
typically available for the IC industry. They can also use the          for a given application will also be described. Student projects will
class teacher as a source of free consulting, as well as, they can      involve the use of commercial tools to test, debug, and verify real
ask for any sequence of lectures or literature sources which they       designs from industry. Students enrolled in the course must have
will need to meet the class objectives.                                 advanced design experience and therefore prerequisites include
Prerequisites: 18322                                                    one of the following courses: 18-340, 18-347 (or 18-447), 18-
                                                                        348 or 18-349 or 18-360. 3 hrs. lec.
18-416     Data Storage Systems                                         Prerequisites: 18340 or 18347 or 18348 or 18349 or 18360 or
Fall: 12 units                                                          18447
This course teaches the fundamentals of magnetic and optical
recording technology as used in data storage systems, audio and         18-447      Introduction to Computer Architecture
video recording. It begins with a treatment of systems                  Fall and Spring: 12 units
considerations, including data rate, storage capacity, and formats      Computer architecture is the science and art of selecting and
of various tape and disk systems. It then moves on to treat the         interconnecting hardware components to create a computer that
details of the writing and readback processes including                 meets functional, performance and cost goals. This course
descriptions of the heads and media. The concepts in magnetic           introduces the basic hardware structure of a modern
materials and electromagnetics required to understand these             programmable computer including, the basic laws underlying
devices are also covered. Lectures and problem sets are                 performance evaluation. We will learn, for example, how to design
supplemented by six laboratories in which students record,              the control and data path hardware for a MIPS-like processor, how
readback, analyze actual signals, and operate magnetic and              to make machine instructions execute simultaneously through
magnetoresistive devices. 3.0 hrs. lec., 3.0 hrs. lab (meets six        pipelining and simple superscalar execution, and how to design
times). Pre-requisite: 18-300 or 18-310                                 fast memory and storage systems. The principles presented in
Prerequisites: 18300 or 18310                                           lecture are reinforced in the laboratory through design and
                                                                        simulation of a register transfer (RT) implementation of a MIPS-
18-417       Optical Communications Systems                             like pipelined superscalar in Verilog. Learning to design
Fall: 12 units                                                          programmable systems requires that you already have the
(Formerly 18-315.) In this course, students will receive an             knowledge of building RT systems as is taught in the prerequisite
introduction to the fundamental principles and components of            18-240, the knowledge of the behavior storage hierarchies (e.g.,
optical communications. The course objective is to provide a            cache memories) and virtual memory as is taught in the
basic understanding of present optical communication systems            prerequisite 15-213, and the knowledge of assembly language
as well as future engineering challenges. The course covers the         programming as is taught in the prerequisites. 3 hrs. lec., 3 hrs.
basic concepts of data modulation in optical fiber channels,            lab.
channel multiplexing, wavelength division multiplexing, and fiber       Prerequisites: 15213 and 18240
optics. The course also includes the basic function principles of
optical fiber, light emitting diodes, lasers, optical amplifiers,       18-450     Digital Wireless Communications
optical filters, and optical receivers. 3 hrs. lec., 1 hr rec. Pre-     Fall: 12 units
requisite: 18-310                                                       18-450 (12 units) In this course, wireless communication
Prerequisites: 18310                                                    channels will be introduced, and their peculiarities such as fading
                                                                        and co-channel interference will be emphasized. Solutions to
18-418      Electric Energy Processing: Fundamentals and                combat the problems will be described, covering equalization and
Applications                                                            detection, coding and diversity ideas. Throughout the course, the
Fall: 12 units                                                          emphasis will be on discovering unifying ideas in transmission,
This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of             rather than specifying the details of each application. Illustrative
electric energy conversion, and its use in several real-life electric   examples will be chosen from existing wireless standards (e.g. W-
energy systems. The course starts with a brief review of                CDMA). A course project on designing a wireless transceiver
electromagnetic and electromechanical conversion underlying             simulation model, based on MATLAB, will enhance understanding
electric power generation. The first part of the course introduces      of the underlying theory. Lab demonstrations will be used to show
basic components found in today’s electric energy systems, such         practical applications of the theory. Possible research directions
as 1) electric machines (generators and motors), 2) power               will be pointed out, for students interested in a more detailed
electronics for converting between AC and DC portion of an              understanding. The course will also cover basic communication
electric energy system, and 3) control of these components for          theory in sufficient detail. 18-450 is a pre-requisite for graduate-
their efficient use. The principles underlying design, operations       level wireless communication courses. 4 hrs. lec. Prerequisites:
and control of these components are introduced using conversion         18-396 or equivalent, and 36-217 or equivalent, and some
fundamentals and basic electric circuit knowledge. The second           exposure to MATLAB.
part of this course introduces several key electric energy              Prerequisites: 18396 and 36217
systems used in today’s industry. Examples of such systems are
1) home distribution electric power systems; 2) electric power          18-470     Fundamentals of Control
systems for vehicles; 3) electric power systems for ships; and 4)       Fall: 12 units
airspace electric power systems (such as airplanes and space            An introduction to the fundamental principles and methodologies
shuttles). This course provides an important bridge between the         of classical feedback control and its applications. Emphasis is on
applied physics and the systems areas in the ECE. It is intended        problem formulation and the analysis and synthesis of
to bring out the fact that it is electric energy and its conversion     servomechanisms using frequency and time domain techniques.
that underlies much of what one does in ECE.
                                                                                                             Course Descriptions     419




Topics include analytical, graphical, and computer-aided              intro-level fundamental knowledge of computer security and
(MATLAB) techniques for analyzing and designing automatic             applied cryptography. Students will learn the basic concepts in
control systems; analysis of performance, stability criteria,         computer security including software vulnerability analysis and
realizability, and speed of response; compensation methods in the     defense, networking and wireless security, and applied
frequency domain, root-locus and frequency response design, and       cryptography. Students will also learn the fundamental
pole-zero synthesis techniques; robust controller design;             methodology for how to design and analyze security critical
systems with delay and computer control systems; transfer             systems. Prerequisite: 15-213
function and state space modeling of linear dynamic physical          Prerequisites: 21127 and (18345 or 15441 or 15410)
systems; nonlinearities in control systems; and control
engineering software (MATLAB). 4 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec.                18-491     Digital Signal Processing
Prerequisites: 18396                                                  Spring and Summer: 12 units
                                                                      This course addresses the mathematics, implementation, design
18-474     Embedded Control Systems                                   and application of the digital signal processing algorithms widely
Spring: 12 units                                                      used in areas such as multimedia telecommunications and
This course introduces principles for design of embedded              speech and image processing. Topics include discrete-time
controllers. In applications ranging from airplanes, to               signals and systems, discrete-time Fourier transforms and Z-
automobiles, to manufacturing systems, embedded computers             transforms, discrete Fourier transforms and fast Fourier
now close feedback loops that were previously closed by               transforms, digital filter design and implementation, and multi-
mechanical devices or by humans in the loop. This course              rate signal processing. The course will include introductory
emphasizes practical insight into the tools for modeling and          discussions of 2-dimensional signal processing, linear prediction,
simulating these dynamic physical systems, and methods for            adaptive filtering, and selected application areas. Classroom
designing the real-time software for embedded computers to            lectures are supplemented with implementation exercises using
control them. Lectures cover relevant theory and background           MATLAB. Prerequisite(s): 18-396
from real-time systems and control engineering, including event-      Prerequisites: 18396
based and clock-based sampling, switching control, PWM (pulse-
width modulation), PID (proportional-integral-derivative) design,     18-493     Electroacoustics
state-variable feedback, state estimation, and methods for            Fall: 12 units
setpoint control and trajectory tracking. Basic embedded              This course provides an introduction to physical, engineering, and
computing, sensor, and actuator technologies are reviewed,            architectural acoustics. The course begins with a review of the
including microcontrollers, DC motors and optical encoders. In        wave equation and some of its solutions that are relevant to the
the laboratory, students use commercial tools for simulation and      propagation of sound from planar and spherical sources, and from
automatic code generation to design and implement embedded            arrays of simple sources. Lumped-parameter electrical circuit
control system experiments. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab.               analogies are developed to describe mechanical and acoustical
Prerequisites: 18396                                                  systems, leading to a discussion of the constraints and tradeoffs
                                                                      involved in the design of loudspeakers, microphones, and other
18-482      Telecommunications, Technology Policy & Management        transducers. The characteristics of sound in regular and irregular
Fall: 12 units                                                        enclosures will be developed and discussed in the context of the
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to basic            acoustical design for rooms and auditoriums. The interaction of
principles of telecommunications technology and the telephone         sound and man is also discussed, with introductory lectures on
network, and the legal, economic, and regulatory environment of       auditory perception and the acoustics of speech production, with
the telecommunications industry. Role of new technologies such        applications in the areas of efficient perceptually-based coding of
as fiber, integrated digital networks, computer communications,       music and speech, and virtual acoustical environments.
and information services. Common carrier law and the economics        Prerequisites: 18220
of natural monopoly as the basis for regulation of the
telecommunications industry. Issues of competition, monopoly          18-496     Bioimaging
and technical standards. Spectrum allocation and management.          Intermittent: 12 units
International communications and transborder data flow. Special       The goals of this course are to provide the student with the
emphasis on how the new technologies have altered and are             following: - The ability to use the mathematical techniques such
altered by regulation. Prerequisites: 73-100 and Junior or Senior     as linear algebra, Fourier theory and sampling in more advanced
standing.                                                             signal processing settings. - Fundamentals of multiresolution/
Prerequisites: 73100                                                  wavelet techniques. - In-depth coverage of bioimaging
                                                                      applications, such as compression, denoising and others. Upon
18-483     Civilian and Military Applications of Space                successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: -
Fall: 12 units                                                        Explain the importance and use of signal representations in
Space is an arena of growing activity and importance. The use in      building more sophisticated signal processing tools, such as
space puts specific requirements on the technology of remote          wavelets. - Think in basic time-frequency terms. - Describe how
sensing and communication. Furthermore, the access to space           Fourier theory fits in a bigger picture of signal representations. -
requires rocket engines. Operation in space supposes the ability      Use basic multirate building blocks, such as a two-channel filter
of controlling automatically the attitude of spacecraft. Navigation   bank. - Characterize the discrete wavelet transform and its
and guidance requires a very large and powerful infrastructure.       variations. - Construct a time-frequency decomposition to fit the
Most space endeavors are very ambitious and long term projects.       signal you are given. - Explain how these tools are used in
The cost of space projects are often easier to estimate than the      various applications. - Apply these concepts to solve a practical
benefit. The goal of this course is to penetrate somewhat in the      problem through an independent project.
world of space policy dilemmas by studying the interface between      Prerequisites: 18396
the technology and what space programs could or try to
accomplish. 3 hrs. lec. Prerequisites: Junior standing in             18-513    Antenna Design for Wireless Communications
engineering or science.                                               Fall: 12 units
                                                                      The demand for wireless products is growing at an impressive
18-484    Information Warfare                                         rate. Antennas are critical but often misunderstood components
Spring: 12 units                                                      of these products. This course will provide an introduction to the
Information security is one major concern raised by the               design of antennas for wireless applications. This will include the
increasing use of computers in networks. In this course, we first     fundamental theory of electromagnetic radiation, basic antenna
review, in some technical detail, the nature of the "threats."        concepts, antenna measurements, numerical design tools, and
These include viruses and worms (their history and how they           the design of several types of widely used antennas. Also
"evolved,") backdoor exploits, Trojan horses, buffer overflows,       discussed will be policy issues related to licensing and use of the
and the extent to which they imperil the information in computers.    electromagnetic spectrum, and how these issues impact antenna
Then we discuss the use and limitations of firewalls in protecting    design. Students will work in small groups to design, construct,
computer networks. We also discuss intrusion detection and the        and test an antenna to meet stated specifications. Course
problems associated with it. We review past and present               Outline 1. Electromagnetic Radiation 2. General Properties of
cyberattacks, like Denial of Service attacks, viruses such as         Antennas: Gain, Directivity, patterns, impedance, reciprocity, etc.
Melissa and I Love You, and assess their implications. We             3. Antenna Measurements 4. Numerical Analysis Techniques:
analyze the origin of computer vulnerabilities which make these       Method of Moments & NEC, Finite Element Method & HFSS 5.
attacks possible and discuss the extent to which they could be        Analysis of Popular Antennas a. Dipoles and Monopoles b. Yagi-
reduced. Finally, we analyze the response to this situation at the    Uda Antenna c. Collinear Wire Antenna d. Inverted F Antenna e.
national, security, and international level. Pre-requisites: This     Patch Antennas f. Ultrawideband antennas Prerequisite(s): 18-
course is intended for senior level undergraduates and first year     402 or equivalent course in electrodynamics and waves
graduate students.                                                    Prerequisites: 18402

18-487      Introduction to Computer & Network Security & Applied     18-517    Data Storage Systems Design Project
Cryptography                                                          Spring: 12 units
Spring: 12 units                                                      This course gives students a comprehensive understanding of
Security is becoming one of the core requirements in the design       data storage systems through lecture and simulation exercises.
of critical systems. This course will introduce students to the       Over the course of the semester, students will work in teams to
4 2 0 Course Descriptions




build a computer simulation of an entire disk drive recording          18-544     Network Design and Evaluation
channel, and observe the different forms that the stored               Fall: 12 units
information takes on its passage through a non-volatile storage        The purpose of the "Network Design and Evaluation" is to give
system. As many realistic aspects of the storage system will be        students hands-on experience building networking software. A
incorporated in the simulation as possible, including magnetic         typical project will be the design, implementation, and evaluation
media hysteresis, magnetic and electronic noise,                       of a network protocol. The design will specify the requirements,
magnetoresistive readback sensors, and various methods of data         protocol specification, and success criteria. The implementation
detection. The class will culminate with demonstrations by each        will have to work over an actual network, and the evaluation will
group of their models, and the effect the changes in recording         evaluate whether the success criteria have been met. Students
parameters have on data integrity. Currently the SIMULINK              will work in teams and will have a choice of a small number of
package is used with Matlab to construct the simulation, and           projects.
students are provided with a 3 hr. recitation period each week         Prerequisites: 15213 and (18345 or 15441)
during which they can work on their simulation under the
supervision of the course instructors. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. rec.     18-545      Advanced Digital Design Project
Pre-requisites: 18-416 or (18-316 and 18-396) or (18-300 and           Spring: 12 units
18-396) or (18-310 and 18-396) or graduate standing                    This is a term-project course oriented towards the development
Prerequisites: 18416 or (18316 and 18396) or (18300 and                of skills to design large digital systems at a professional level.
18396) or (18310 and 18396)                                            Proficiency gained in other software and hardware design courses
                                                                       will be utilized in the design and development of a System-on-a-
18-523      Analog Integrated Circuit Design                           Chip (SoC) prototype. Project development will utilize a mix of
Fall: 12 units                                                         system architecture design, custom hardware design and
Some form of analog circuit design is a critical step in the           software programming skills. The project will result in a prototype
creation of every modern IC. First and foremost, analog circuits       which will be built in a lab setting. Prototype development will
act as the interface between digital systems and the real world.       include some wire-wrap and also the use of some state-of-the-art
They act to amplify and filter analog signals, and to convert          design tools. Industry standard practices of design reviews, final
signals from analog to digital and back again. In addition, high       project presentations, and weekly reports will be followed. The
performance digital cell design (either high speed or low power)       design process will be studied. Through the project, class
also invokes significant analog circuit design issues. The goal of     discussions, and interactions with classmates the course will
this course is to teach students some of the methods used in the       allow you to enhance your effectiveness in future projects in
design and analysis of analog integrated circuits, to illustrate how   industry or academia. 2 hours lecture, 24 hour access lab.
one approaches design problems in general, and to expose               Prerequisite(s): (18447) or (18340 and 15213) or (18341 and
students to a broad cross-section of important analog circuit          15213) Substitute 18360 for 18341
topologies. The course will focus on learning design through           Prerequisites: 18447 or (18340 and 15213) or (18341 and
carrying out design projects. Design and implementation details        15213) or (18360 and 15213)
of wide-band amplifiers, operational amplifiers, continuous-time
filters, phase lock loops and data converters will be covered. The     18-549     Embedded Systems Design
course will focus primarily on analog CMOS, but some aspects of        Fall: 12 units
BJT design will be discussed. 4 hrs. lec.                              This advanced course considers embedded systems with
Prerequisites: 18321 and 18322                                         multiple, distributed processing elements connected by a real-
                                                                       time network. These distributed embedded systems are becoming
18-525     Integrated Circuit Design Project                           very common in application areas as diverse as transportation,
Spring: 12 units                                                       medical equipment, industrial control, and household appliances.
Integrated Circuit Design Project (18-525) is intended to provide      The course is divided into three phases: (1) the fundamentals of
the electrical and computer engineering student with IC design         distributed system architecture and design approaches, (2) real-
experience. It solidifies theoretical background and practical         time embedded networks and systemwide scheduling, and (3)
skills gained in 18-321 and/or 18-322. The primary stress of the       dependable system design. A semester-long course project, such
18-525 class will be on the IC design process as a whole. Such a       as a detailed distributed implementation of an elevator
process, seen as a sequence of design decisions, must lead to a        simulation, is used to tie together the various aspects of the
design which optimizes a given objective function under a number       lecture material. While a significant understanding of hardware
of constraints. The optimum design must be achieved using a            organization and operation is assumed, the focus of the course is
number of variables involving all levels of design abstraction and     mainly on software, simulation, and embedded network issues.
ranging between architecture choice and detail of the IC layout.       Relevant aspects of the Unified Modeling Language (UML) are
Typical design objectives adopted in 18-525 designs will be IC         included, although this is not an in-depth course on that topic. 1
performance (throughput, power, signal-to-noise ratio, clock           hour of the lecture periods per week is primarily used for
frequency, gain-bandwidth, etc.) and typical constraints will be die   discussion of non-testable advanced topics and talks by visitors
size and minimum feature size. The second most important               from industry. 4 hrs. lec., 1 hr. rec./lab. Prerequisites: 18-348 or
objective of 18-525 is to mimic a large design team environment        18-349 and at least senior standing.
in which individual designers must: (a) communicate precisely          Prerequisites: 18348 or 18349
and efficiently his/her ideas and (b) utilize any feedback provided
by the "design environment". This objective will be achieved           18-551     Digital Communication and Signal Processing Systems
through class presentations given by each student and by               Design
stressing the importance of design documentation. 4 hrs. class.        Fall: 12 units
Prerequisite: 18-321 or 18-322                                         This course provides the student with a rich, in-depth design and
Prerequisites: 18321 or 18322                                          application hardware project experience in the areas of digital
                                                                       communications and/or signal processing systems using DSP
18-540      Rapid Prototyping of Computer Systems                      hardware. Teams of students work on a semester-long project of
Spring: 12 units                                                       their choice. Topics include: speech and music processing, digital
This is a project-oriented course which will deal with all four        communications, multimedia processing, data compression, data
aspects of project development; the application, the artifact, the     storage, wireless communications, CD, image and/or signal
computer-aided design environment, and the physical prototyping        processing, etc. One month of introductory laboratories
facilities. The class, in conjunction with the instructors, will       familiarize the students with DSP hardware and support software.
develop specifications for a mobile computer to assist in              Lectures address z-transforms, IIR and FIR filter design using
inspection and maintenance. The application will be partitioned        MATLAB and DSP hardware, LPC and adaptive filters, channel
between human computer interaction, electronics, industrial            coding, time and frequency multiplexing, short time Fourier and
design, mechanical, and software components. The class will be         wavelet transforms, and spread spectrum techniques. 4 hrs. lec.,
divided into groups to specify, design, and implement the various      3 hrs. lab. Prerequisite: 18-491 or 18-791
subsystems. The goal is to produce a working hardware/software         Prerequisites: 18396 and (15211 or 18450 or 18791 or 18792
prototype of the system and to evaluate the user acceptability of      or 18793 or 18795 or 18796 or 18798)
the system. We will also monitor our progress in the design
process by capturing our design escapes (errors) with the              18-575     Control Systems Design
Orthogonal Defect Classification (ODC). Upon completion of this        Intermittent: 12 units
course the student will be able to: generate systems                   A capstone design elective in Electrical and Computer
specifications from a perceived need; partition functionality          Engineering integrating the computer-aided analysis and design
between hardware and software; produce interface specifications        of feedback control systems from both the classical (transfer
for a system composed of numerous subsystems; use computer-            function) and modern (state-space) points of view. The
aided design tools; fabricate, integrate, and debug a hardware/        perspective spans the dynamic modeling of physical systems and
software system; and evaluate the system in the context of an          the analysis and computer-aided design (utilizing MATLAB) of
end user application. Prerequisites: 18-348 or 18-349 or two of        linear and nonlinear, continuous-time and discrete-time, robust
(18-322, 18-360, 18-396). Senior standing is required. This            multivariable feedback systems. In illustrating the centrality of
course is cross-listed as 18-745.                                      numerical linear algebra in control engineering, case studies are
Prerequisites: 18349 or (18322 and 18360) or (18322 and                selected from servomechanism and linear-quadratic design and
18396) or (18360 and 18396)                                            Kalman filtering. A significant emphasis is placed upon student
                                                                       selected design projects. 4 hrs. lec., 3 hrs. MATLAB lab.
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions     421




Prerequisites: 18370
                                                                        18-723     RFIC Design and Implementation
18-578      Mechatronic Design                                          Fall: 12 units
Spring: 12 units                                                        This course covers the design and analysis of radio-frequency
Mechatronics is the synergistic integration of mechanism,               integrated systems at the transistor level using state of the art
electronics, and computer control to achieve a functional system.       CMOS and bipolar technologies. It focuses on system-level
Because of the emphasis upon integration, this course will center       trade-offs in transceiver design, practical RF circuit techniques,
around system integration in which small teams of students will         and physical understanding for device parasitics. Accurate
configure, design, and implement a succession of mechatronic            models for active devices, passive components, and interconnect
subsystems, leading to a main project. Lectures will complement         parasitics are critical for predicting high-frequency analog circuit
the laboratory experience with comparative surveys, operational         behavior and will be examined in detail. The course will start with
principles, and integrated design issues associated with the            fundamental concepts in wireless system design and their impact
spectrum of mechanism, electronics, and control components.             on design trade-offs in different transceiver architectures.
Class lectures will cover topics intended to complement the             Following that, RF transistor model, passive matching networks
laboratory work, including mechanisms, actuators, motor drives,         will be discussed. Noise analysis and low-noise amplifier design
sensors and electronic interfaces, microcontroller hardware and         are studied next. The effects of nonlinearity are treated along with
programming and basic controls. During the first week of class,         mixer design techniques. Practical bias circuit for RF design will
each student will be asked to complete a questionnaire about            be illustrated. Then, the importance of phase noise and VCO
their technical background. The class will then be divided into         design will be considered together. The course will conclude with
multi-disciplinary teams of three students. During the first half of    a brief study of frequency synthesizer and power amplifier design.
the class, lab assignments will be made every 1-2 weeks to              Pre-requisiste 18-523 or permission from the instructor.
construct useful subsystems based on material learned in                Prerequisites: 18523
lecture. The lab assignments are geared to build to the main
project. This course is cross-listed as 16-778 and 24-778.              18-724      MEMS Design
Students in other departments may take the course upon                  Fall: 12 units
availability of slots with permission of instructor. Pre-requisites:    This course covers advanced design of integrated
18348 or 18349 or 18370 or 18470 or 18-474 or 18349 or                  MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) as the basis for
(18321 and 18396)                                                       futuristic sensor and actuator systems on chip. The course starts
Prerequisites: 18370 or 18349 or 18470 or (18321 and                    with design of low-level device details and builds to design of
18396)                                                                  "VLSI MEMS." Topics include layout vs. process design;
                                                                        analysis and modeling of micromechanics, thermomechanics,
18-623      Analog Integrated Circuit Design                            capacitive sensing, and coupled electromechanics; noise; test
Fall: 12 units                                                          structures and characterization; modulation and switched-
Some form of analog circuit design is a critical step in the            capacitor interface circuits; and system design. Homework and
creation of every modern IC. First and foremost, analog circuits        projects will make intensive use of MEMS schematic design;
act as the interface between digital systems and the real world.        behavioral modeling with analog hardware description languages;
They act to amplify and filter analog signals, and to convert           layout generation and synthesis tools; visualization tools; and
signals from analog to digital and back again. In addition, high        MEMS design rules and extraction. Assigned readings of recent
performance digital cell design (either high speed or low power)        advances in MEMS design are actively discussed. A final project
also invokes significant analog circuit design issues. The goal of      centers on a complete microsystem design within a post-CMOS
this course is to teach students some of the methods used in the        micromachined process. Possible systems include sensor/
design and analysis of analog integrated circuits, to illustrate how    actuator arrays for inertial, ultrasonic, RF, micropositioning,
one approaches design problems in general, and to expose                acoustic, optic or fluidic applications. Prerequisites: 18-614, 18-
students to a broad cross-section of important analog circuit           714; or equivalent by petition of instructor.
topologies. The course will focus on learning design through            Prerequisites: 18414 or 18614
carrying out design projects. Design and implementation details
of wide-band amplifiers, operational amplifiers, continuous-time        18-730     Introduction to Computer Security
filters, phase lock loops and data converters will be covered. The      Fall: 12 units
course will focus primarily on analog CMOS, but some aspects of         This course provides a principled introduction to techniques for
BJT design will be discussed. 4 hrs. lec. Prerequisites: 18-322         defending against hostile adversaries in modern computer
(or equivalent experience with Cadence tools) and 18-321 or             systems and computer networks. Topics covered in the course
graduate standing.                                                      include operating system security; network security, including
Prerequisites: 18321 and 18322                                          cryptography and cryptographic protocols, firewalls, and network
                                                                        denial-of-service attacks and defenses; user authentication
18-630     Introduction to Security and Policy                          technologies; security for network servers; web security; and
Fall: 12 units                                                          security for mobile code technologies, such as Java and
The growing importance of networks and distributed systems, and         Javascript. More advanced topics will additionally be covered as
their use to support safety-critical applications, has made             time permits, such as: intrusion detection; techniques to provide
computer and communications security a central issue for                privacy in Internet applications; and protecting digital content
systems today. This course will introduce students to the               (music, video, software) from unintended use. 3 hrs. lec.
technical and policy foundations of computer and                        Prerequisites: 15-211 and senior standing.
communications security. These foundations will be illustrated          Prerequisites: 15211
using deployed systems as case studies. The course will assume
a basic working knowledge of computers and networks, but will not       18-732     Secure Software Systems
assume any prior exposure to topics in computer or                      Fall: 12 units
communications security. Graduate standing or permission of the         Poor software design and engineering are the root causes of most
instructor is required.                                                 security vulnerabilities in deployed systems today. Moreover, with
                                                                        code mobility now commonplace--particularly in the context of
18-712    Elements of Photonics for Communication Systems               web technologies and digital rights management--system
Fall: 12 units                                                          designers are increasingly faced with protecting hosts from
Please see the ECE website for a full course description of this        foreign software and protecting software from foreign hosts
course. Pre-requisites include: 18-300, 18-310, 18-402 or 33-           running it. This class takes a close look at software as a
439 or knowledge of equivalent material covered in these                mechanism for attack, as a tool for protecting resources, and as a
courses.                                                                resource to be defended. Topics covered include the software
Prerequisites: 18300 and 18310 and 18402                                design process; choices of programming languages, operating
                                                                        systems, databases and distributed object platforms for building
18-721     Advanced Analog Integrated Circuits Design                   secure systems; common software vulnerabilities, such as buffer
Spring: 12 units                                                        overflows and race conditions; auditing software; proving
This course will familiarize students with advanced analog              properties of software; software and data watermarking; code
integrated circuit design issues. Analog circuit design issues          obfuscation; tamper resistant software; and the benefits of open
play an important role in creating modern ICs. First and foremost,      and closed source development. Prerequisite: 18-730. Skills
analog circuits act as the interface between digital systems and        needed: operating systems, programming languages: C & Java.
the real world. They act to amplify and filter analog signals, and to   Prerequisites: 18730
convert signals from analog to digital and back again. These
analog interfaces appear in all communications devices (e.g., cell      18-741     Advanced Computer Architecture
phones) – both to condition the “transmitted” signal and as             Fall: 12 units
sensitive “receivers.” In addition, these analog interfaces appear      Computer architecture is the science and art of selecting and
in sensors (e.g., accelerometer). The goal of this course is to         interconnecting hardware components to create a computer that
familiarize students with some of the advanced analog circuit           meets functional, performance and cost goals. This course
design ideas that are involved in these tasks. Specific topics will     qualitatively and quantitatively examines computer design trade-
include analog filtering (continuous-time and discrete-time),           offs. The topics covered include: advanced processor designs
sample-and-hold amplifiers, analog-to-digital converters, digital-      such as superscalar and out-of-order execution, advanced
to-analog converters. Prerequisites: 18-523 or 18-623                   memory systems such as non-blocking caches and multiporting/
Prerequisites: 18523 or 18623
4 2 2 Course Descriptions




banking and alternative virtual memory implementations, I/O            review of Boolean algebra, but from a computational viewpoint you
systems, interconnects, introduction to multiprocessor                 don't see when you do Karnaugh maps by hand. We then move on
architectures, performance and cost metrics, and benchmarking.         to look at synthesis tools for 2-level and multi-level logic, that
Examining trade-offs requires that the students already know how       transform Boolean equations and finite state machine
to correctly design a computer, as is taught in the important          descriptions into optimized logic, and verification tools that
prerequisite, 18-347 (or 18-447). 3 hrs. lec. Prerequisite: 18-        decide whether the logic you built does the same thing as the
347 (or 18-447).                                                       specification you started with. We look at geometric layout
Prerequisites: 18347 or 18447                                          synthesis tools for component partitioning, placement, and wire
                                                                       routing.We look at geometric layout verification tools that decide
18-746     Advanced Storage Systems                                    if you satisfied the manufacturing design rules, that extract back
Fall: 12 units                                                         the circuit from all those polygons. Course grade is based on
This course covers the design, implementation, and use of              homework assignments (about 5-6), paper reviews (2), and
storage systems, from the characteristics and operation of             projects (1-2 smaller warm-up projects, and then 1 significant
individual storage devices through the OS, database, and               group design project that allows creative input from the students.)
networking approaches involved in tying them together and              4 hrs. lec. Prerequisites: 18-240, 15-211 and 18-322.
making them useful to key applications' demands and technology         Prerequisites: 15211 and 18322
trends. Topics to be covered include: network-attached storage,
disk arrays, storage networking, storage management, advanced          18-764     In Between IC Design and Manufacturing
file systems, disk performance enhancement, wide-area data             Fall: 12 units
sharing, and storage security. 3 hrs. lec. Prerequisites: 15-410       Essentially, design of integrated circuit (IC) is nothing more than
or 15-412.                                                             a set data files. Thus, theoretically, IC designer should have
Prerequisites: 15410 or 15412                                          unlimited freedom in exploring IC design space. We know,
                                                                       however, that the reality is different. IC design space is severely
18-747     Advanced Techniques in Microprocessors                      restricted. On one hand it is limited by the nature of electronics
Fall: 12 units                                                         marketplace and on the other hand it is bounded by "Mother
This course presents recent commercial and research                    Nature". Market place dictates what kind of design can be sold
developments in microprocessors. The course begins with an in-         and with what profit. Mother Nature, i.e. laws of physics, decides
depth microarchitectural-level review of basic out-of-order            what performance is achievable and what kind of IC device can be
superscalar processor datapath. The course next discusses              fabricated with the acceptable cost. The overall objective of this
extensions and variations of the basic superscalar design to           class is to derive the IC design space restrictions from the basic
address not only performance but also increasingly important           rules governing both electronic market place and physics of IC
issues of power and reliability. Both hardware and software            manufacturing process. Such an objective will be achieved by
techniques for improving the efficiency of microprocessing will be     evolving subject of the discussion in the class around notion of
discussed. Furthermore, the course goes beyond current                 "IC manufacturability" i.e. ability to fabricate a given design, in
commercial state-of-the-art to discuss emerging ideas that are         volume, with a necessary profit margin. The concepts of
likely to impact microprocessor developments in the next 10            manufacturability will be developed in class by first studying in
years. 3 hrs. lec. Prerequisite: 18-741 (previously 18-547).           detail a number of examples of modern IC technologies. These
Prerequisites: 18741                                                   examples will be used then to explain all major reasons limiting
                                                                       efficiency of manufacturing processes. Next concept of
18-751      Applied Stochastic Processes                               manufacturing yield and yield learning process will be explained.
Fall: 12 units                                                         Relation between yield, spectrum of design attributes and
We introduce random processes and their applications.                  limitations of key processing steps will be discussed. Design
Throughout the course, we mainly take a discrete-time point of         techniques instrumental in achieving desired levels of
view, and discuss the continuous-time case when necessary. We          manufacturability will be reviewed as well. Finally, discussion in
first introduce the basic concepts of random variables, random         the class will be focused on explanation of IC industry evolution
vectors, stochastic processes, and random fields. We then              trends. These trends will be examined from the DFM perspective
introduce common random processes including the white noise,           in order to help with the forecasting of future trends of IC industry.
Gaussian processes, Markov processes, Poisson processes, and           Prerequisites: 18-322 or 18-525.
Markov random fields. We address moment analysis (including            Prerequisites: 18322 or 18525
Karhunen-Loeve transform), the frequency-domain description,
and linear systems applied to stochastic processes. We also            18-765     Digital System Testing and Testable Design
present elements of estimation theory and optimal filtering            Fall: 12 units
including Wiener and Kalman filtering. Advanced topics in modern       This course examines in depth the theory and practice of fault
statistical signal processing such as linear prediction, linear        analysis, test generation, and design for testability for digital ICs
models and spectrum estimation are discussed. 4 hrs. lec.              and systems. The topics to be covered include circuit and system
Prerequisites: 36-217 and 18-396 are required for                      modeling; fault sources and types; the single stuck-line (SSL),
undergraduates, or permission of the instructor. It is strongly        delay, and functional fault models; fault simulation methods;
advised that students have a prior Signals and Systems course          automatic test pattern generation (ATPG) algorithms for
and a Probability course.                                              combinational and sequential circuits, including the D-algorithm,
Prerequisites: 18396 and 36217                                         PODEM, FAN, and the genetic algorithm; testability measures;
                                                                       design-for-testability; scan design; test compression methods;
18-756      Packet Switching and Computer Networks                     logic-level diagnosis; built-in self-testing (BIST); VLSI testing
Fall: 12 units                                                         issues; and processor and memory testing. Advance research
This course is designed to provide graduate students an                issues, including topics on MEMS and mixed-signal testing are
understanding of the fundamental concepts in computer networks         also discussed. 4 hours of lecture per week
of the present and the future. In the past, the scarce and             Prerequisites: 15211 and 18240 and 18360
expensive resource in communication networks has been the
bandwidth of transmission facilities. Accordingly, the techniques      18-791    Digital Signal Processing I
used for networking and switching have been chosen to optimize         Fall: 12 units
the efficient use of this resource. These techniques have differed     This course addresses the mathematics, applications and
according to the type of information carried: circuit switching for    implementation of the digital signal processing algorithms widely
voice and packet switching for data. It is expected that elements      used in areas such as multimedia telecommunications and
of circuit and packet switching will be used in the integrated         speech and image processing. Topics include discrete-time
networks. This course focuses on packet switching for computer         signals and systems, discrete-time Fourier transforms and Z-
networks and protocol design. Topics in the course include:            transforms, discrete Fourier transforms and fast Fourier
computer networks over-view; OSI layers, queuing theory; data          transforms, digital filter design and implementation, and multi-
link protocol; flow control; congestion control; routing; local area   rate signal processing. The course will include introductory
networks; transport layer. The current networks and applications       discussions of 2-dimensional signal processing, linear prediction,
will be introduced through the student seminars in the last weeks      adaptive filtering, and selected application areas. Classroom
of the course. 4 hrs. lec. Prerequisite: 18-345.                       lectures are supplemented with implementation exercises using
Prerequisites: 18345                                                   MATLAB. 4 hrs. lec. Prerequisite: 18-396 or equivalent.
                                                                       Prerequisites: 18396
18-760     VLSI CAD: Logic to Layout
Fall: 12 units                                                         18-792     Advanced Digital Signal Processing
A large digital integrated circuit (IC) may require 100,000 lines      Fall: 12 units
of high-level description in a hardware modeling language, which       This course will examine a number of advanced topics and
then turns into 1,000,000 logic gates, which ultimately end up as      applications in one-dimensional digital signal processing, with
100 million polygons on the masks that define the IC. This             emphasis on optimal signal processing techniques. Topics will
course opens up the important CAD tools that perform the many          include modern spectral estimation, linear prediction, short-time
steps of the transformation from Boolean equations to masks. We        Fourier analysis, adaptive filtering, plus selected topics in array
focus on mathematical models, algorithms, and data structures.         processing and homomorphic signal processing, with applications
We will write programs for simple versions of these tools. We will     in speech and music processing. 4 hrs. lec. Prerequisites: 18-
look at, and experiment with, a few real tools. We begin with a        491 or 18-791, 36-217, or permission of the instructor.
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions     423




Prerequisites: (18791 or 18491) and 36217                               18-303, 18-310, 18-402, 27-770, 33-225, 33-234 or
                                                                        familiarity with the material or basic concepts covered in these
18-795      Advanced Bioimaging                                         courses.
Fall: 12 units                                                          Prerequisites: 09511 and 09701 and 09702 and 18303 and
The goal of this course is to expose you to multiresolution signal      18310 and 18402 and 27770 and 33225 and 33234
processing methods and their use in bio(medical) imaging
applications as well as to guide you through the steps of a             18-843     Mobile and Pervasive Computing
research process. The course is roughly divided in two parts: (1)       Fall: 12 units
The first part introduces the necessary mathematical tools with a       This is a course exploring research issues in the newly emerging
great emphasis on intuitive understanding of how they operate on        field of mobile computing. Many traditional areas of computer
real-life signals. (2) The second part is project-based, where,         science and computer engineering are impacted by the
through your own bio(medical) imaging project, you will learn how       constraints and demands of mobility. Examples include network
to choose a research area, formulate a problem, research                protocols, power management, user interfaces, file access,
previous work, propose your own solutions, carry out experiments        ergonomics, and security. This will be an "advanced" course in
and interpret results. The focus is on training you to become a         the truest sense --- most, if not all, the topics discussed will be
researcher. To that end, you will write papers in a typically           ones where there is little consensus in the research community
conference format, rehearse your presentations with feedback            on the best approaches. The course will also offer significant
both from the instructor and other students in the class, as well       "hand-on" experience in this area. Each student will have to
as present your project as part of the BME Seminar. Upon                present and lead the discussion on a number of papers. Students
successful completion of this course, you will be able to: *            will work in groups of three under the guidance of a mentor on a
Explain the importance and use of signal representations in             hands-on project. Each student will also be required to write one
building sophisticated signal processing tools such as wavelets.        of two documents: (a) a research proposal (similar in spirit to an
* Describe how Fourier theory fits in a bigger picture of signal        NSF proposal) on an idea in mobile computing or (b) a short
representations. * Use basic multirate building blocks, such as a       business plan for a commercial opportunity in mobile computing.
two-channel filter bank and characterize the discrete wavelet           Grading will be based on the quality of the presentations, the
transform and its variations. * Construct a time-frequency              project, and the proposal or business plan. Prerequisite: 15-410.
decomposition to fit the signal you are given. * Apply these            Prerequisites: 15412
concepts to solve a practical problem through your independent
project. 2 hrs. lec., 2 hrs. recitation/lab. Prerequisites: 18-491 or   18-849      Dependable Embedded Systems
18-791 or instructor's permission.                                      Spring: 12 units
Prerequisites: 18491 or 18791                                           The area of dependable embedded systems encompasses an
                                                                        increasingly larger and more important fraction of "intelligent"
18-798     Image and Video Processing                                   products made worldwide. For the purposes of this course,
Spring: 12 units                                                        "dependable" systems include those that are safe, fault tolerant,
The course studies image processing, image understanding, and           robust, secure, timely, maintainable, and designed correctly. In
video sequence analysis. Image processing deals with                    addition, dependable embedded systems are usually created with
deterministic and stochastic image digitization, enhancement.           small teams using lightweight design processes under extreme
restoration, and reconstruction. This includes image                    cost constraints. The focus of the course will be understanding
representation, image sampling, image quantization, image               the challenges of creating a truly dependable, yet affordable,
transforms (e.g., DFT, DCT, Karhunen-Loeve), stochastic image           embedded system. The areas covered will include software safety,
models (Gauss fields, Markov random fields, AR, ARMA) and               software fault tolerance, safety critical networking, graceful
histogram modeling. Image understanding covers image                    degradation, system architecture approaches, ultra-dependable
multiresolution, edge detection, shape analysis, texture analysis,      system assessment, "embedded Internet" issues, regulatory/
and recognition. This includes pyramids, wavelets, 2D shape             societal issues, and best known practices. Students will gain
description through contour primitives, and deformable templates        familiarity with the core literature in this area as well as explore
(e.g., 'snakes'). Video processing concentrates on motion               important areas in which literature is sparse or nonexistent.
analysis. This includes the motion estimation methods, e.g.,            Students will be expected to read multiple journal and conference
optical flow and block-based methods, and motion segmentation.          papers for each class meeting. Grading will be based in large part
The course emphasizes experimenting with the application of             on student ability to demonstrate understanding of the reading
algorithms to real images and video. Students are encouraged to         and relate ideas to problem areas discussed in class. Each
apply the algorithms presented to problems in a variety of              student will make in-class presentations of varying lengths.
application areas, e.g., synthetic aperture radar images, medical       Active class participation is required of each and every student.
images, entertainment video image, and video compression. 3             Prerequisites: 18-549 or Narasimhan's 18-749 (Spring '05 or
hrs. lec. Prerequisites: 18-396 or equivalent, or permission of         Spring '02 only) or 18-846 or permission of instructor.
instructor.                                                             Prerequisites: 18549 or 18749
Prerequisites: 18396
                                                                        Economics
18-799     Special Topics in Signal Processing
Intermittent: 12 units                                                  73-100      Principles of Economics
For a complete course description, please refer to the following        Fall and Spring: 9 units
link: http://www.ece.cmu.edu/users/shared/courses/                      Literally, an introduction to economic principles, the goal of this
grdescript.php#18-799E                                                  course is to give students an understanding as to what
                                                                        constitutes good “economic thinking”. This thought process is
18-817     Fundamentals of Semiconductors and Nanostructures            grounded in the construction and use of economics models.
Spring: 12 units                                                        Drawing on issues in both microeconomics and macroeconomics,
This course is designed to provide students with a foundation of        fundamental principles are shown to transcend particular
the physics required to understand nanometer-scale structures           examples and allow the field to be seen as a coherent, unified
and to expose them to different aspects of on-going research in         whole. (Lecture, 2 hours; Recitation, 1 hour).
nanoscience and nanotechnology. Illustrative examples will be
drawn from the area of semiconductor nanostructures, including          73-101     Freshman Seminar
their applications in novel and next-generation electronic,             Fall and Spring: 9 units
photonic, and sensing devices. The course begins with a review of       A topics-based course for first-year students who intend to major
basic concepts in quantum physics (wave-particle duality,               in economics. The subjects discussed vary from year-to-year
Schrödinger's equation, particle-in-a-box, approximation                and from instructor-to-instructor. Check with the Undergraduate
methods in quantum mechanics, etc.) and then continues with a           Economics Program or their website for descriptions of recent and
discussion of bulk three-dimensional solids (band structure,            current offerings. (Seminar, 3 hours)
density of states, the single-electron effective-mass
approximation). Size effects due to nanometer-scale spatial             73-111   Internship I
localization are then discussed within a quantum-confinement            All Semesters: 3 units
model in one-, two-, and three- dimensions for electrons. An            By permission of the Undergraduate Economics Program.
analogous discussion for photons is also presented. The basic
electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of the low-              73-112   Internship II
dimensional nanostructures are then discussed. A select number          All Semesters: 3 units
of applications in electronics, photonics, biology, chemistry, and      By permission of the Undergraduate Economics Program.
bio-engineering will be discussed to illustrate the range of utility
of nanostructures. Upon completion of the course, students will         73-113    Internship III
have an appreciation and an understanding of some of the                All Semesters: 3 units
fundamental concepts in nanoscience and nanotechnology. The             By permission of the Undergraduate Economics Program.
course is suitable for first-year graduate students in engineering
and science (but advanced undergraduates with appropriate               73-148    Environmental Economics
backgrounds may also take it with permission from the
instructor). Pre-requisites: include 09-511, 09-701, 09-702,
4 2 4 Course Descriptions




Intermittent: 9 units                                                  Prerequisites: (21256 or 21259) and 73252
A course for non-majors which explores the interplay between
economics and environmental issues. Topics include: market             73-261      Econometrics
failures and environmental problems, economically efficient            Fall: 9 units
allocations of environmental resources, and the intended and           This course takes as its starting point ordinary-least-squares
unintended consequences of public policies designed to improve         estimation and the linear regression model, which are presented
the environment. Practical issues surrounding the feasibility of       utilizing vector and matrix notation. This is followed by the
implementing theoretically efficient principles and policies are       application of OLS to non-linear models. Cases are then
analyzed, and alternative policies that might achieve better           considered where the various assumptions of OLS do not hold
results in practice are investigated. (Lecture, 3 hours)               and what corrective actions should be taken. Topics include:
Prerequisites: 73100                                                   nonlinear-least-squares, two-stage estimation, instrumental
                                                                       variables, simultaneous equations, maximum likelihood
73-150     Microeconomics                                              estimation, and logit/probit models. (Lecture, 3 hours)
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               Prerequisites: 21122 and (21256 or 21259) and 73226
A calculus-based introduction to microeconomics, first offered in
Spring 07. Topics in partial equilibrium analysis include supply       73-270    Writing for Economists
and demand, consumer theory, theory of the firm, profit                Fall and Spring: 9 units
maximizing behavior, monopoly theory, and perfect competition.         Fall or Spring A writing course specifically designed for third-year
The course concludes with an introduction to general equilibrium       Economics majors and additional majors. Students gain
analysis and the welfare laws. (Lecture, 3 hours; Recitation, 1        experience with technical writing techniques and skills needed for
hour)                                                                  both their senior thesis and their eventual professional careers.
Prerequisites: 21120       Corequisites: 21-259, 21-256                The course emphasizes both individual and group projects.
                                                                       (Lecture, 3 hours)
73-200     Macroeconomics                                              Prerequisites: 73200 and 76101
Fall and Spring: 9 units
Through macroeconomic models built upon microeconomic                  73-310     History of Economic Ideas and Analysis
foundations, insights are developed into economic growth               9 units
processes and business cycles. Topics include aggregation and          This course will be organized around the study of several central
measurement, national income, business cycle measurement,              topics in the development of economics such as: the "invisible
economic welfare theorems and social inefficiencies, the effect of     hand;" classical analysis of trade, value, and incomcome
government fiscal policy upon employment and productivity, and         distribution; the marginalist revolution; general equilibrium
the relationship between investment, interest rates and economic       theory; classical monetary economics; Keynesian
growth. Beginning in Fall 07, this course will be (Lecture, 3 hours;   macroeconomics; and recent trendsw in theory and empirical
Recitation, 1 hour).                                                   analysis. Whereve possible, examination of the contemporary
Prerequisites: (21256 or 21259) and 73150                              policy issues mortivating major analytical developments will be
                                                                       included.
73-226     Quantitative Economic Analysis                              Prerequisites: 73200
Spring: 9 units
Using and extending upon students' introductory knowledge of           73-325     Strategic Behavior in Non-cooperative Games
probability and economic models, this course introduces students       Intermittent: 9 units
to the tools of economic analysis. Taking the perspective of           Combining non-cooperative game theory and its experimental
active economic participants (rather than outside observers),          methods in a computer laboratory environment, this course
students gain experience with a diversity of analytical                teaches students how to develop and test models of social and
techniques--such as regression analysis and simulation--in the         business interactions. Both extensive and normal form game are
context of real world data decision problems. Classes consist of a     treated in depth, including the concept of Nash equilibrium and it
combination of cases, lectures, and interactive discussions.           refinements. In the latter part of the course, students design, run
(Lecture, 3 hours)                                                     and analyze their own experiments, and do individual
Prerequisites: 21122 and (73150 or 73200 or 73251) and                 experimental/research projects. (Lab/Lecture, 3 hours)
(21325 or 36217 or 36225 or 36310 or 73207)                            Prerequisites: 73150

73-251     Economic Theory                                             73-340     Labor Economics
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               Intermittent: 9 units
This course prepares students for advanced coursework in               This course uses economic theory and data to analyze topics
economics by providing a mathematically intensive overview of          such as: (1) individuals decisions about hours of work,
economic theory. Students take advantage of their knowledge of         investment in training or education, and choosing an occupation;
multi-dimensional calculus and constrained optimization                (2) firms decisions about hiring, training workers, and setting
techniques in order to understand the development and logical          wage rates; and (3) the resulting wage and employment outcomes
consistency of the most commonly employed economic models.             as influenced by union contracts and implicit employment
Topics include consumer preferences and utility function               contracts. Also considered are public policy recommendations
representations, consumer choice under a budget constraint,            concerning minimum wages, job training programs, hazards on the
substitution and income effects, compensated and                       job, race and sex discrimination, and income inequality. (Lecture,
uncompensated demands, expected utility theory, risk and               3 hours)
insurance, technology and production functions, cost                   Prerequisites: 73150
minimization, profit maximizing firms, perfect competition, single-
firm markets, game theoretic analysis of markets with few firms,       73-347     Game Theory for Economists
introduction to general equilibrium models and the welfare laws.       Intermittent: 9 units
Course will be replaced by 73-252/253 in Spring 08.                    An introduction to the theory of non-cooperative games with an
Prerequisites: (21256 or 21259) and 73100                              emphasis on economic applications. After an initial examination
                                                                       of two-person, zero-sum games, the notion of a Nash equilibrium
73-252     Advanced Microeconomic Theory                               in an n-person, non-cooperative game is considered. Existence of
Fall and Summer: Mini Session - 6 units                                and refinements to the equilibrium concept are discussed in the
Mini I and Mini III This course provides a mathematically              context of both normal and extensive form games. Economic
intensive overview of advanced applications of microeconomic           applications may include various topics, including Cournot and
theory. Topics include: Marshallian and Hicksean demands,              Bertrand oligopoly models, general competitive exchange
indirect utility functions, substitution/income effects and the        equilibrium, and free rider problems. (Lecture, 3 hours)
Slutsky equation, expected utility theory, risk and insurance,         Prerequisites: 21122 and (73251 or 73252)
game theory, principle/agent problems, oligopoly, and general
equilibrium theory. (Lecture, 3 hours) Course will be offered in       73-351     Public Finance
Spring 08.                                                             Intermittent: 9 units
Prerequisites: (21256 or 21259) and 73150                              Fall or Spring This course examines problems created by market
                                                                       failure and analyzes the incentives and institutions, which can be
73-253    Advanced Macroeconomic Theory                                used to alleviate these problems. We will consider applications
Fall and Spring: Mini Session - 6 units                                such as education, environmental issues, defense, crime, and
Mini II and Mini IV Fall and Spring, second mini-session: 6 units      common resources. The common thread in these situations is
This course provides a mathematically intensive overview of            that individual optimizing behavior does not necessary lead to an
advanced applications of microeconomic theory. Topics may              outcome, which is optimal for the society. We will evaluate
include: Solow and neo-classical growth models, the role of            possible solutions involving private, informal mechanisms as well
money and its effect on the economy, and the over-lapping              as those requiring public sector interventions. (Lecture, 3 hours)
generations model. (Lecture, 3 hours) Course will be first offered     Prerequisites: 73150
in Spring 08.
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions      425




73-352     Public Economics                                            labor markets, asset markets and the bubble mystery, the
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  winner’s curse in auctions, and optimal contract design..
Fall or Spring In this course, students analyze the role of            Prerequisites: 73251 or 73252
governments in market economies and their impact on the
behavior and welfare of citizens. Reasons for government               73-392     Financial Economics
intervention in markets are examined in light of some of the           Intermittent: 9 units
economic challenges faced by modern societies in an                    Fall or Spring A rigorous quantitative course covering the
increasingly globalized marketplace. Topics include: taxation and      economic fundamentals of financial markets. The course covers
expenditure policies, externalities and market failure, social         individual decision making about saving and investment under
security, public assistance and income redistribution programs.        uncertainty, and the equilibrium determination of asset prices for
There will also be some coverage of the role of local governments      both complete- and incomplete-market settings. In addition, the
in the economy with respect to such issues as crime, urban             course will cover topics in corporate financial decision making
development and education. (Lecture, 3 hours)                          and the micro-structure of financial markets.
Prerequisites: 73200 and (73251 or 73252)                              Prerequisites: 73226 and (73251 or 73252)

73-357     Regulation: Theory and Policy                               73-395    Independent Study in Economics
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  All Semesters: 1-18 units
Government regulations touch almost every aspect of our lives –        The Independent Study course in economics allows the student
from our healthcare and work environments, right down to the food      to pursue his or her own research interests in any of a variety of
we eat and the air we breathe.. Using an analytical framework that     topics in economics. A typical independent study course involves
encompasses economic, political, and bureaucratic forces that          a semester long project under the supervision of an appropriate
create and shape them, this course explores the origins, goals,        faculty advisor. The nature and scope of the project are
and implementation of many major regulations. Areas of                 determined by the student and faculty advisor.
regulation specifically examined might include air pollution, auto     Prerequisites: 73150
safety (air bags), food additives, technological risk (nuclear
reactors), occupational safety (asbestos, cotton dust), hospitals,     73-410     The Economics of Business Cycles
airlines and trucking, and consumer protection (truth in               Intermittent: 9 units
advertising). (Lecture, 3 hours)                                       The purpose of this course is to educate the student in modern
Prerequisites: 73251 or 73252                                          business cycle theory. The first part of the course surveys the
                                                                       empirical regularities, which comprise fluctuations in aggregate
73-358     Economics of the Environment and Natural Resources          economic activity, which economists have labeled business
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  cycles. The second part of the course discusses the existing
Fall or Spring A advanced course on the allocation of                  macroeconomic models, which students have learned in
environmental and natural resources. Topics include:                   intermediate macroeconomics, while the third part of the course
externalities and the misallocation of resources, examining the        examines the policy implications of these models and the
efficiency/inefficiency of markets for non-renewable resources,        inadequacies of the models as economic explanations of cycles.
intended and unintended consequences of regulatory and tax             The final part of the course discusses rational expectations
policies, and modern alternative to regulation – such as the           models of the business cycle in considerable detail. The empirical
creation of new markets and property rights for environmental          implications of these new models are examined, and their policy
resources. (Lecture, 3 hours)                                          implications are assessed. (Lecture, 3 hours)
Prerequisites: 73150 or 73251                                          Prerequisites: 73226 and 73253

73-359     Benefit-Cost Analysis                                       73-420    Monetary Theory and Policy
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  Intermittent: 9 units
Fall or Spring The evaluation of public private sector projects.       This course is concerned with various topics in monetary and
The theory of benefit-cost analysis and related techniques, such       macroeconomics including anticipated inflation, hyperinflation,
as cost-effectiveness analysis. Attention is given to such issues      output effects of monetary policies, alternative techniques of
as valuing goods and services that are not normally traded in the      monetary policy implementation, and the interaction of monetary
marketplace (e.g., the value of an individuals life) and the social    and fiscal policy strategies. Analysis of these issues is
rate of discount. Applications are considered in detail. (Lecture, 3   conducted by means of simple by explicit dynamic models
hours)                                                                 incorporating rational expectations. In addition, attention is
Prerequisites: 73150 and 73226                                         devoted to alternative types of monetary systems – commodity
                                                                       vs. paper money, for example. This segment of the course
73-365     Industrial Organization                                     includes some consideration of issues relating to a
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  technologically advanced society in which transactions are
Fall or Spring This course is concerned with the economic              carried out by means of a computerized economy-wide
analysis of industrial markets that are not perfectly competitive.     bookkeeping system, rather than by money. (Lecture, 3 hours)
The effects of imperfect competition on firms’ decisions (pricing,     Prerequisites: 73200 and (73251 or 73252)
location, advertising, research and development, among others)
are reviewed. Implications of these effects in terms of public         73-422     Real Estate Economics and Finance
policy are also discussed from a variety of perspectives. Finally,     Intermittent: 9 units
applications to actual markets are considered. (Lecture, 3 hours)      The principle objective of this course is to analyze the financial
Prerequisites: 73251 or 73252                                          characteristics of real assets and their derivative products, as
                                                                       well as to provide an introduction to their associated institutions.
73-371     International Trade and Economic Development                Topics include: residential real estate markets, urban land
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  markets, analysis of mortgages and mortgage markets,
This course examines the economic rationale for trade among            commercial property markets, financial valuation of real assets,
nations and its consequences for global economic development.          influence of debt financing on risk and returns, innovations in real
Topics include: comparative advantages among nations, the free         estate capital markets, and analysis of asset allocation
trade versus protectionism debate, and the effects of special          decisions. (Lecture, 3 hours)
trade agreements, free trade zones, and transnational economic         Prerequisites: 73150 or 73251
unions. (Lecture, 3 hours)
Prerequisites: 73200 and (73150 or 73251)                              73-426      Advanced Quantitative Economic Analysis
                                                                       9 units
73-372     International Money and Finance                             This course builds on the concepts developed in 73-226 and 73-
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  261 and provides an introduction to advanced economic analysis
Fall or Spring The course concerns itself with the determination of    at the undergraduate level. The main objectives of the course are:
real, monetary, and financial aggregates and the policies that         to provide a solid core of analytical and conceptual tools that
influence them in an international context. Topics include:            students can use directly in their research; to give students an
monetary policy and its effects on employment and inflation, the       understanding of both the classic theory and some of the recent
role of the banking system in the transmission of monetary policy,     advances; to enable students to perform analysis by structuring
credit markets, banks as financial intermediaries, and the effect      the problem as a formal model and performing analysis of which
of domestic policies on international trade and financial markets.     yields useful predictions and insights. (Lecture, 3 hours) Course
Prerequisites: (73150 or 73251) and 73200                              will be first offered in Fall 2009.
                                                                       Prerequisites: 73226 and 73261 and (73251 or 73252)
73-390    Behavior in Games, Auctions, and Markets
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  73-428     Markets for Energy
This course examines models describing economic/strategic              9 units
behavior in environments where the usual “perfectly rational           This course offers students a broad survey of the oil, natural gas,
agents” paradigm does not capture observed phenomena. Topics           and electric-power industries, with a particular focus on their
include: decisions and the endowment effect, heuristics and            transformation from vertically-integrated, regulated entities to
biases in decision making, overconfidence and under-confidence         organizations participating in open markets and on the role of new
effects, myopia and under-saving, public goods games, learning         technologies which enabled these changes. Topics include:
and reputation in repeated games, fairness and reciprocity in          economics of resource extraction, volatility in futures markets for
4 2 6 Course Descriptions




oil and natural gas, the rise and fall of OPEC, power systems
engineering and economics, and wholesale markets for electric         73-476      American Economic History
power.                                                                Intermittent: 9 units
Prerequisites: (73251 or 73252) and 73226                             The study of economic history provides important perspective on
                                                                      current economic institutions and policies. A failure to
73-432      Economics of Education                                    understand the historical evolution of economic institutions or the
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 variety of past economic experience is perhaps the worst
In this course we examine economic issues related to education,       shortcoming of many economists. The study of economic history
particularly at the elementary and secondary level. In exploring      provides an opportunity to test currently fashionable theories
why we care about education, we examine the private returns to        against data different from those used in their construction. In
education (those that accrue to the individual) and the social        fact, this is a course in applied economics. The theories
returns (those that accrue to society), and how social returns        developed in the intermediate courses will be applied to episodes
provide one rationalization for government’s involvement in           from the past in ways that increase understanding both of the
education. After an overview of basic facts related to the            specific historical episodes considered and the economic
provision of elementary and secondary education in the United         theories employed. (Lecture, 3 hours)
States, we turn to the issue of how education is produced. We         Prerequisites: 73150 and 73200 and (70208 or 73226)
study the role of financial resources, teachers and peers in the
production process, and examine evidence on the effectiveness of      73-495     Advanced Independent Study in Economics
public vs. private schools. In the face of evidence that public       All Semesters: 1-18 units
schools in the United States do not fare well in international        The Independent Study course in economics allows the student
comparisons, one response has been to give parents greater            to pursue his or her own research interests in any of a variety of
choice of schools for their children. This leads us to study the      topics in economics. A typical independent study course involves
most prevalent school choice mechanism (choosing where to             a semester long project under the supervision of an appropriate
live), as well as charter schools and private school vouchers.        faculty advisor. The nature and scope of the project are
Another response has been the movement to hold public schools         determined by the student and faculty advisor.
accountable, of which the No Child Left Behind legislation is an      Prerequisites: 73251 or 73252
example. Thus, we examine issues on accountability theory and
practice. The concern remains, however, that even if elementary       73-497     Senior Project
and secondary education were significantly improved through           Fall: 9 units
various mechanisms, the cognitive ability of some children would      A fourth-year project course, open only to Economics primary and
already lag behind by the time they start school due to their early   additional majors with Senior standing.
childhood experiences. In this spirit we analyze evidence on early    Prerequisites: 73200 and 73226 and (73251 or 73252)
childhood interventions for disadvantaged children. Building on
our understanding of educational outcomes through high school,        73-500      Tepper College Honors Thesis I
we finalize with an overview of the market for higher education,      Fall and Spring: 3-18 units
with an emphasis on college pricing and admission decisions.          Economics majors with outstanding academic records and
Throughout we use microeconomic analytical tools, and we              intellectual promise will be given the opportunity to undertake
examine empirical evidence that applies econometric techniques.       original research under the direction of individual faculty
Prerequisites: 73150 and 73226                                        members. Research topics are selected by students and
                                                                      approved by faculty. Prerequisites: Senior standing in the
73-435     Economics of Negotiations                                  Economics Program and permission of the Economics faculty.
Intermittent: 9 units
The objective of this course is to understand the influence of        73-501      Tepper College Honors Thesis II
economic factors upon both the conduct of involved parties and        Fall and Spring: 3-18 units
upon their anticipated outcomes. Insights gained from economic        Economics majors with outstanding academic records and
analysis are used to help find profitable negotiation strategies      intellectual promise will be given the opportunity to undertake
and to help evaluate opportunities which depend upon a                original research under the direction of individual faculty
negotiated outcome. Topics include: the creation and allocation of    members. Research topics are selected by students and
economic value; the negotiator’s fundamental decision problem;        approved by faculty. Prerequisites: Senior standing in the
the tension between creating and claiming value; strategies for       Economics Program and permission of the Economics faculty.
better agreements; the role of coalitions in multi-party
negotiations; negotiations within and between organizations.          Engineering & Public Policy
Considerable emphasis will be placed on negotiation exercises,
role playing, and on student discussion and analysis of actual        19-101     Introduction to Engineering and Public Policy
current and past negotiation situations. (Lecture, 3 hours)           Spring: 12 units
Prerequisites: 73150 and 73226                                        This course examines the processes of public and private
                                                                      decision making and of policy formation, which shape the
73-469     Global Electronic Markets: Economics and the Internet      evolution of a technology and its impact on our society.
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 Technology plays an important role in shaping our worlds. At the
Fall or Spring The information revolution brought about by the        same time, social forces often play a central role in the evolution
Internet is having a dramatic impact on the organization of           of a technology. A particular technology such as an automobile or
economic activity. Long-term contractual relationships that once      computer is chosen to study technology and policy in context.
governed corporate procurement are being dismantled as                Specific topics covered in the case of the automobile includes
manufacturers use the Internet to market directly to the public.      automotive design and manufacture, safety, pollution, fuel
New transportation networks that used to simply move goods            economy and their interactions. In each area, we discuss the
from point A to point B are evolving into dynamic inventory           technological and institutional issues, their interaction, the
pipelines that allow manufacturers to track and even reroute          possible need for public policy and the factors that govern the
shipments in real time. At the same time, individuals are making      policy. The course will involve several group problem-solving
use of sophisticated search engines to comparison shop at a           sessions.
scale that would have been physically exhausting even five years      Corequisites: 21-115, 21-116, 33-106
ago. In the Economics of E-commerce, we will use the basic tools
of economic analysis to understand how and why the changes in         19-102     EPP Sophomore Seminar
information technology are reshaping the economic landscape.          Fall: 3 units
(Lecture, 3 hours)                                                    The Sophomore Seminar has the objective of introducing the
Prerequisites: 73251 or 73252                                         student to the interdisciplinary nature of Engineering and Public
                                                                      Policy problems. This is achieved through the use of case studies
73-474     The Economics of Ideas: Growth, Innovation and             dealing with aspects of decision-making and ethics in policy
Intellectual Property                                                 issues which have a technological basis. Students are introduced
9 units                                                               to the technical and policy dimensions of these problems as well
Fall or Spring Healthy economies in many way resemble healthy         as to skills such as data collection and analysis, group work, and
people – they are alive and vibrant, growing and adjusting in         oral and written presentations. A few seminars by EPP graduates
response to changing circumstances – and what fuels economic          and faculty are occasionally included to give the student an idea
growth and innovation are ideas. This course explores the role of     of careers and EPP problems.
ideas in the modern economy. Topics include: models of
economic growth, economic efficiency and development,                 19-402     Telecommunications, Technology Policy & Management
innovation and human capital, intellectual property and public        Intermittent: 12 units
policy issues. (Lecture, 3 hours)                                     This course provides a comprehensive introduction to basic
Prerequisites: 73251 or 73252                                         principles of telecommunications technology and the legal,
                                                                      economic, and regulatory environment of the telecommunications
                                                                      industry. Topics covered are: role of new technologies such as
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions        427




fiber, wireless, voice over packet, and broadband access;              the interaction of technology and public policy, with different
principles behind telecommunications regulation from common            projects being chosen each semester. Oral and written
carrier law and natural monopoly to open access and                    presentations concerning the results of project studies are
interconnection; differences in the treatment of                       required.
telecommunications versus information services. Also, mergers,
antitrust, and the changing industrial structure of                    19-452     EPP Projects
telecommunications; spectrum allocation and management; and            Fall: 12 units
international comparison of telecommunications regulations.            Interdisciplinary problem-solving projects in which students work
Special emphasis on how the new technologies have altered and          as leaders or members of project teams. Problem areas are
are altered by regulation.                                             abstracted from local, state and national situations and involve
Prerequisites: 73100                                                   the interaction of technology and public policy, with different
                                                                       projects being chosen each semester. Oral and written
19-424     Energy and the Environment                                  presentations concerning the results of project studies are
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  required.
This course will explore the relationships between environmental
impacts and the utilization of energy through a series of case         19-500     Directed Study in EPP: Undergraduate
studies on topics of current interest. Such topics might include       All Semesters: 0-12 units
the use of renewable and non-renewable fuels for electric power        Students may do undergraduate research as one course for EPP
generation; energy use for automobiles and other transportation        technical elective credit, with an EPP faculty member, or on an
systems; energy use for buildings and industrial processes; and        approved project with a faculty member from another department.
environmental issues such as urban air pollution, ozone                The research credits must be pre-approved by your advisor, and
formation, acid rain, and global warming. The emphasis will be on      should result in a written product, one copy of which should be
analysis of energy-environmental interactions and tradeoffs, and       sent to EPP.
their dependency upon engineering design choices, economic
variables, and public policy parameters.                               19-601     Information Warfare
                                                                       Intermittent: 12 units
19-426     Environmental Decision Making                               Information security is one major concern raised by the
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  increasing use of computers in networks. In this course we first
This course will cover a number of topics in environmental             review, in some technical detail, the nature of the "threats".
decision making, including risk perception, risk communication,        These include viruses and worms (their history and how they
risk ranking, multi-attribute utility theory, decision analysis, the   "evolved"), backdoor exploits, Trojan horses, buffer overflows,
"precautionary principle," the economics of environmental              and the extent to which they imperil the information in computers.
externalities, commons dilemmas, cost-benefit analysis, the            Then we discuss the use and limitations of firewalls in protecting
valuation of health and environmental amenities, discounting,          computer networks. We also discuss intrusion detection and the
intergenerational equity, environmental justice, and sustainability.   problems associated with it. We review past and present
                                                                       cyberattacks, like Denial of Service attacks, viruses such as
19-430      Civilian and Military Applications of Space                Melissa and I love you, and assess their implications. We analyze
Intermittent: 12 units                                                 the origin of computer vulnerabilities which make those attacks
An analysis of some specific defense and space policy issues is        possible and discuss the extent to which they could be reduced.
conducted. This analysis is abstracted from a study of the             Finally, we analyze the response to this situation at the national,
specific technologies involved. An assessment of the impact of         security and international level.
technological advancement on the military capability, space
policy and arms control issues is proposed. As the exploitation of     19-606     Special Topics: Civil Systems Investment Planning and
high technology has a lot of ramifications, the course focuses on      Pricing
some areas carefully chosen, based on the recent events, to            Intermittent: 12 units
illustrate the extent of the impact and to permit as wide-ranging a    Economic framework for identifying and analyzing investment and
discussion as possible. Those issues cover areas of advanced           operation options facing agencies and firms, (both in theory and in
imaging and target recognition capabilities; the military              practice); economic efficiency, utilization, pricing, and
exploitation of new physical principles; the development of new        investment; and multi-objective evaluation.
capabilities in space for military or civilian exploitation, and the
convolution of these new capabilities with the increasing              19-609     Public Policy and Regulation
technological demands of arms control. In all examples, the            Intermittent: 9 units
interaction between techno-logical progress and needs for policy       Regulations are a significant policy tool of government. How
changes (or emergence of policy dilemmas) are emphasized.              society and the economy will react to new regulations can be hard
                                                                       to predict. Unintended side effects sometimes occur resulting in
19-440     Combustion and Air Pollution Control                        costs exceeding estimates and/or benefits never being realized.
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  This course will review the basics of regulatory policy and using
Formation and control of gaseous and particulate air pollutants in     historical examples, will explore the reasons why past regulations
combustion systems. Basic principles of combustion, including          have succeeded and failed. The second half of the course will
thermochemical equilibrium, flame temperature, chemical                involve 2-3 detailed case studies. Quantitative methods will be
kinetics, hydrocarbon chemistry, and flame structure. Formation        used to evaluate several pending regulations for real-world
of gaseous and particulate pollutants in combustion systems.           clients from both government and industry perspectives.
Combustion modifications and postcombustion technologies for           Prerequisites: Basic statistics, economics, and quantitative
pollutant control. Relationship between technology and regional,       methods
national, and global air pollution control strategies. The internal
combustion engine and coal-fired utility boiler are used as            19-644      Medical Devices
examples.                                                              Intermittent: 9 units
                                                                       This course is an introduction to the engineering, clinical, legal
19-448     Science, Technology & Ethics                                and regulatory aspects of medical device performance and failure.
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  Topics covered include phenomenological and mechanistic
Technology has always been a pervasive force in society. But the       descriptions of processes such as wear, corrosion fatigue and
last century, and especially the last 50 years have seen an            fretting, in addition to the characterization of bone and other
unprecedented acceleration of the growth and permeation of             biological materials as it relates to device performance
technology. The central role of technology and engineering in the      requirements, including biocompatibility. The course also
modern world calls for a reflective examination of the                 involves case studies of orthopedic fixation devices and
responsibility of those who develop, deploy and spread                 prostheses, pacemakers, heart valves and artificial organs. A
technologies as well as those who avail of them for various            major portion of the course is a final design project which involves
purposes. This course will explore one technology of recent origin     the design of a new medical device or the redesign of an existing
in detail –biotechnology. After examining the way people think         device.
about and deal with technological risk, the basic science behind
the technology and the ethos of science and technology, the            English
students will learn about the philosophical foundations of possible
ethics for science and technology. Projects and discussions will       76-100     Introduction to Reading and Writing
explore how these foundations can be used to provide ways to           All Semesters: 9 units
frame important questions and develop an understanding of an           76-100 is a reading and writing course for those students who
ethic for the development and use of biotechnology.                    are not native speakers of English. Students who have identified
                                                                       themselves as those who speak English as a second or third
19-451     EPP Projects                                                language rather than as their primary or home language are
Spring: 12 units                                                       eligible to take this class. The course, designed as a prerequisite
Interdisciplinary problem-solving projects in which students work      for 76-101, stresses reading in English for comprehension and
as leaders or members of project teams. Problem areas are              application of key concepts for writing summaries and short
abstracted from local, state and national situations and involve       position papers. Students will be introduced to readers'
                                                                       expectations for Western rhetorical style at the sentence,
4 2 8 Course Descriptions




paragraph, and whole text levels. Norms for academic English will      pure play of the mind. It turns out that there have been a few
be explicitly taught within the contexts of these assignments, as      notable attempts to help us understand just why comedy is the
well as academic standards for citing. Studentes who take this         “social” genre beyond all others, why the comic attitude is the
course will qualify through a placement test that is administered      civilized, urbane, mature view of life. And we’ll consider some of
through the university prior to the fall semester. All sections of     those theories while trying to understand why some things are
76-100 for the Fall of 2006 will use the reader Now and Then by        comic and some are not. We’ll consider the following texts, and
Judith Stanford.                                                       some representative funny movies: Aristophanes, Lysistrata;
                                                                       Shakespeare, As you Like It ; Congreve, Way of the World;
76-101     Interpretation and Argument                                 Voltaire, Candide; Oscar Wilde, The Importance of Being
All Semesters: 9 units                                                 Earnest; Samuel Beckett, Endgame; Evelyn Waugh, The Loved
***PLEASE NOTE THAT 76-101 SECTIONS W AND X ARE                        One; Joseph Heller, Catch-22; Wylie Sypher, ed., Comedy.
SECTIONS FOR THE QATAR CAMPUS AND WILL NOT BE
OFFERED AT THE PITTSBURGH CAMPUS*** This course will                   76-238     Introduction to Media Studies
give students a comprehensive grounding in communication               Intermittent: 9 units
processes. The class focuses on the way in which interpretive          The terms mass culture and mass media are historically new,
areguments in the processes of communication and social and            being a little over 100 years old, yet much has been written about
personal development. In the class, students will deveop these         them. This class will begin by seeking to understand the words
skills by reading and understanding the important issues and           "media" and “culture.” What does the addition of “mass” to these
arguments regarding those issues advanced by a variety of texts,       terms signify? Beginning with these deceptively basic questions,
both fiction and non-fiction. They will then be asked to respond to    this course will serve as a theoretical and historical introduction
these positions by developing positions of their own, in their         to the study of commercial forms of mass media, and provide
writing and in their speaking. The course thus serves as an            students with a framework for analyzing the media that surround
introduction to the discourse and arguments of the academic            us. To this end, we will focus primarily on the case of advertising,
community, as well as serving as an introduction to some of the        as it is a body of texts that has exploited all forms of media.
broader issues that the academic community address.                    Though advertising can be understood as constituting its own
                                                                       medium, it is believed that looking at advertisements that span
76-144      English Freshman Seminar: The War Against Cliche           different types of media will allow us to hone our analytical skills
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  while understanding its historical development. This course will
Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions          begin by introducing some core concepts and debates central to
provided by the department for current offerings. EXAMPLE: Fall        critical analysis of mass media, that focus on questions of types
2006 The War Against Cliche. The war against predictability, the       of media, production, consumption, communication, audience, and
war against superficial discourse, the war against stereotypes--       message(s).This will become the language for our analysis of the
"all writing is a campaign against cliche" says Martin Amis in his     historical development of commercial mass media, and give us a
collection of essays and reviews, The War Against Cliche. He           vocabulary with which to approach the study of varying forms of
asserts the writer's obligation to battle "not just cliches of the     media. We will examine a variety of historians and theorists some
pen but cliches of the mind and cliches of the heart." But what is     of whom argue that mass culture manipulates the masses, others
the difference between an expression that is universal and one         who argue that advertising and consumer culture is the equivalent
that is cliche? And what does it mean to use fresh language, and       of "social realism" for capitalist culture, and others still who
still have cliched sentiments? Is there such a thing as a good         argue that advertising and mass culture creates its own
cliche? Is there such a thing as an utterly original piece of          oppositional subcultures.
writing? In this course we will explore how overused expressions
influence us as critical thinkers and how can we combat/               76-239      Introduction to Film Studies
transform/transcend them in our own poems and stories. The             Intermittent: 9 units
materials (poetry, prose and film) for this course will offer          This course is an introduction to the technology, history,
"penetrating insights" into the "ever-present problem" of cliche.      semiotics, and ideology of film. It is a required pre-requisite for
"Original in conception," "devoid of sentimentality," "highly          most other film classes at CMU. In this class, we focus on the
informative," "consistently witty,"” and "rich in color," they will    Hollywood film, with special concentration on the studio era of
"throw a clear light" on the subject of cliche.                        that form, 1920-1950. The course will be organized more or less
                                                                       historically, beginning with early films, moving through the
76-206     Introduction to Creative Writing                            development of different cinematic styles in European and
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                               American silent features, and then into the sound era. Throughout
This is not a workshop, but an introduction to the craft of creative   the course, we will be concerned with the ideologies present in the
writing. The class will read individual collections of poetry and      films we see, especially those concerning gender and class. At
fiction by contemporary authors in addition to a variety of essays     several points, we will focus specifically on a theory of film
written by poets and writers on the craft. A small percentage of       criticism, including feminism and auteurism. In general, our
class time will be spent on the critique of student poems, and         approach will be to draw connections between the films and the
original student writing and critical papers will represent much of    larger culture.
the grade. Attendance and participation in class and at public         Prerequisites: 76101
readings are expected.
                                                                       76-241     Introduction to Gender Studies
76-221     Books You Should Have Read By Now: Studies in               Intermittent: 9 units
Classical Literature                                                   This course, required for a minor in gender studies, will provide
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  students with basic skills in reading about and understanding
It may seem more and more difficult to get a good classical,           gender as a fluctuating and problematic cultural construct. The
liberal education these days. The demands of professional              course materials are designed to give students an introduction to
training force many of us to skimp on our understanding of major       some of the various fields that intersect with debates about
artistic achievements. So, this class is for those people who          gender construction, such as sexuality, feminism, race, class,
should have read some of the best books around, but haven’t            history, medicine, media, and popular culture’s representations of
managed to yet—books you should have read by now. Kurt                 femininity and masculinity. We will read theoretical arguments and
Vonnegut’s character Kilgore Trout sings the praises of                interpretive arguments, but we will also take a look at some case
Dostoevski’s The Brothers Karamazov, pointing out that it              studies of gender construction in magazines, advertising and
contains everything you need to know about life. He then ruefully      movies. Students will be asked, in addition to completing all
adds that unfortunately that’s not enough any more. It may not be      assigned reading, to write several short responses about their
enough, but it might be a place to start. Each book will be            observations of the gendered world around them. Students will
considered in itself for whatever it might offer by way of             also be asked to write a final paper involving further research in a
understanding the world, then and now. Each one can be seen as a       chosen field and its participation in gendered discourse.
useful foundation point for understanding an important period of
history (Machiavelli and the Renaissance, for example). Finally we     76-244     World English
shall use the idea that literature is equipment for living as a way    Intermittent: 9 units
of understanding and evaluating our experiences.                       A Limit of 15 students from Pittsburgh. We welcome international
                                                                       students on the Pittsburgh campus to take this course. This
76-227     Comedy                                                      course is primarily geared for sophomores. This course will study
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  how so-called Standard English is broadening its definition to
We can’t, of course, expect to come up with an absolutely              accommodate the fact that English is now an international
complete definition of the comic, but for our purposes we can          language, the default lingua franca for all educated speakers and
consider it as an embodiment of the opposite of “gravity”. Comedy      writers who share no other language. We shall study the social,
is characterized by its levity. This does not mean, of course, that    economic, and political facts that have caused English to rise to
it is any less “serious” than tragedy, even if “or especially”         this status. We shall also focus on many cultural issues raised by
because it tends to favor the superficial over the profound.           these facts. Each week will introduce readings raising new issues
Indeed, if tragedy is adolescent, then the mature, adult mode is       and students will be expected to write short weekly position
the comic, being more social and rational. A key characteristic of     papers relative to these issues. The course will have an
comedy is wit or simply intelligence. Comedy involves a lot of
                                                                                                                Course Descriptions      429




international component, as it will be taken concurrently by CMU        discussed. Students are required to submit a final project, which
students on the Qatar campus, most of whom are not native               contains exercises and poems written and revised throughout the
speakers of English. We will have regular video "town meetings"         semester.
between students on both campuses.                                      Prerequisites: 76101

76-245     Shakespeare: Histories and Tragedies                         76-269     Survey of Forms: Screenwriting
Fall: 9 units                                                           Intermittent: 9 units
We will be reading eight plays—three histories from early in            It is not so difficult to learn the format or even to master the style
Shakespeare’s career and five tragedies from later—and                  of the screenplay — the challenge lies in writing image-driven
considering films of some of them. The course will approach these       stories with believable dialogue, vivid characters, and a coherent,
plays from two angles. First, we will try to see them in relation to    well-structured plot. Writing assignments include exercises that
the culture for which they were written and which they helped           prepare students to write a polished short script — the blueprint
shape--the newly established public theater in London, prevailing       for a well-told screen story. Students will also write short papers
notions about social class and gender, Puritan attacks on               on assigned viewings.
playgoing, and the like. In addition, we want to see these plays in     Prerequisites: 76101
terms of "what's in it for us"—how current audiences and readers
can enjoy and interpret these plays. We will be considering how         76-270     Writing for the Professions
complicit the plays are with the authoritative institutions and         All Semesters: 9 units
discourses of their time, and how well or poorly they speak to us       Writing in the Professions is a writing course specifically
now that those institutions and discourses have been replaced by        designed for juniors and seniors in all majors other than English.
others. Students will be required to attend and participate             The course is appropriate for upper-level students in all CMU
regularly, submit brief responses in class and/or over email from       colleges, has no writing prerequisites, and assumes that you may
time to time, write two prepared essays, and take a final exam.         not have had much college-level writing instruction past your
                                                                        freshman year. The basic idea of the course is to give you
76-246     British and American Literature and Culture                  experience in developing the writing skills you will be expected to
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   have as you make the transition from student to professional. The
Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions           course will cover resume writing, proposal writing, writing
provided by the Department each semester for current offerings.         instructions, the difference between writing for general and
Example: The British and American Novel: Much has been made             specific audiences, and analysis of visual aids in various texts.
of the differences between English and American novelists in their      The course requires that students work both independently and in
handling of narrative but is it true? In this course we’ll consider     groups.
eight influential novels from the two sides of the Atlantic, four
from England and four from the US. We’ll look at adventure stories      76-271      Introduction to Professional and Technical Writing
like Frankenstein and Huck Finn, at novels about working                All Semesters: 9 units
conditions from Dickens, Hawthorne, and Stowe, and at courtship         Introduction to Professional and Technical Writing is designed
novels from Austen, Charlotte Bronte and James. Students are            specifically for declared majors in Professional or Technical
required to attend regularly, participate in discussions, prepare       Writing. The main work of the course is a series of six situation-
brief commentaries to deliver in class, write two papers, and take      based writing assignments spread over three broad and often
a final exam.                                                           overlapping areas - business/professional writing, media writing,
                                                                        and technical writing. Typical assignments include resumes,
76-247     Shakespeare: Comedies and Romances                           correspondence, reviews and evaluations, news coverage, feature
Spring: 9 units                                                         articles, consumer/user instructions, proposals, and adaptations
In this class we examine two genres of Shakespearean drama –            of specialized information for non-expert audiences. At least one
comedy and romance – and think about how his work in these two          of the assignments will be a group project. As a final project,
dramatic "kinds" helps us understand his place in the larger            you'll create a portfolio of polished writing samples that you can
context of Renaissance drama, in particular the religiously             use in applying for internships and employment. The range of
fraught, thriving mercantile culture of London, which supported         assignments in the course is designed to give you experience
the institution of theater in the English Renaissance. On the one       with a variety of writing situations that professional writers
hand, we will be considering Shakespeare's ambitions as a writer,       frequently encounter. The assignments also reflect options for
in particular the ways in which he adopted these two forms in           specialization that you may wish to pursue in future coursework
order to advance his artistic (and financial) interests as a            and in your career as a professional writer. As you work through
professional playwright for the public theater. On the other, we will   the assignments, you should learn both current conventions for
be considering how the issues he dealt with in these plays – the        the kinds of writing you'll be doing and a broadly applicable
nature of romantic love, the duties of children to parents, the         procedure for analyzing novel situations and adapting
correction of vices in the theater, the "coded" aspects of romantic     conventional forms (and creating new ones) to meet the unique
communication – in order to understand how these issues                 demands of each new situation and task.
translate into contemporary performances (in film) of these plays.
                                                                        76-272      Language in Design
76-260     Survey of Forms: Fiction                                     Fall: 9 units
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                Language in Design is a professional communication course for
This is an introduction to the reading and writing of fiction           designers. During your career as a designer, you will be expected
designed as the first in a sequence of courses for creative writing     to produce written documents to supplement and accompany your
majors and also as a general course for students wanting some           design processes and solutions. In this course, you will learn the
experience in creative writing. Writing exercises will be devoted       conventions associated with the types of writing that designers
to such aspects of fiction as description, characterization, and        most often have to produce on the job, such as proposals,
narration, and to the writing of scenes and stories. In the second      memos, and reports. Additionally, you will prepare a job packet
half of the course, students write a full short story of around 10-     (including a resume, a cover letter, and a portfolio) that you can
12 pages due two weeks before the end of the term. These are            use as you begin your job search. Finally, you will also refine your
distributed to the class, discussed, and revised.                       ability to talk about your projects to both expert and non-expert
Prerequisites: 76101                                                    audiences. Ultimately, this course aims to prepare you for the
                                                                        professional communication situations that you will encounter in
76-261     Survey of Forms: Creative Nonfiction                         your design career. Enrollment is limited to majors in
All Semesters: 9 units                                                  Communication and Industrial Design.
The National Endowment for the Arts defines "creative nonfiction"
as "factual prose that is also literary." In this survey course,        76-294      Interpretive Practices
students will read a wide range of work that falls into this lively     Fall and Spring: 9 units
genre, including memoir, travel writing, the personal essay, and        This course introduces students to the theories and practices of
nature writing. Weekly writing assignments will give students the       interpretation. Combining the approach of critical theoretical
chance to work on short pieces of their own creative nonfiction.        study with close textual analysis, we will consider how meaning is
Prerequisites: 76101                                                    produced through language and narrative. Theoretical approaches
                                                                        include those that explore the role of the author, those
76-265     Survey of Forms: Poetry                                      emphasizing the workings of language, such as structuralism and
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                post-structuralism, as well as those that underscore the
This course is an introduction to the reading and writing of poetry.    relationship between texts and contexts, such as feminism,
It is designed as the first in a sequence of courses for creative       critical race theory, and postcolonial studies. Texts will be drawn
writing majors. Non-majors wishing experience in the writing of         from a range of periods, genres and geographical origin and
verse, both traditional and free, are welcome. Writing exercises        include non-literary as well as literary. See English Department
are concerned with the elements of diction, scansion and metrics,
as well as imagery. Some classes are devoted to workshop
sessions in which poems written by members of the class are
4 3 0 Course Descriptions




for detailed descriptions.                                             best understood as a resource, as an object of scientific inquiry,
Prerequisites: 76101                                                   or as spirit? Over the course, students will also create an issue
                                                                       book on an environmental issue of their choice in which they will
76-300     Professional Seminar                                        be able to analyze and compare multiple discourses surrounding
Fall: 3 units                                                          that issue (from scientific reports, policy discussions, and
This once-a week, 3-unit seminar is designed to give students an       activist organizing in media and fiction, to naturalist observation
overview of the broad range of career options in professional and      and experiential reflection) with the goal of also making their own
technical writing. Practicing professionals in a range of              contribution.
communications fields – writing for the internet, corporate
communications, public relations, journalism, science writing,         76-330      Medieval Literature: Women's Lives/Men's Lives
healthcare communications, freelance writing, and writing for the      Intermittent: 9 units
software industry, for example – come to campus to talk with           Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions
students and answer their questions. Speakers generally talk           provided by the department each semester for current offerings.
informally about what they do, how they got into their fields, how     EXAMPLE: Women's Lives/Men's Lives. Some contemporary
students can prepare to enter those fields, and related career         critics argue that fictions about individual agency began with
options. At the end of each session there is generally time for        Shakespeare (the invention of the human, as Harold Bloom puts
students to ask questions and talk individually with speakers.         it); are they right? This course will consider records from as early
The course is required for first semester MAPW students and            as the 700s and as late as the 1400s. We will explore the
open to all English undergraduate majors.                              distinctive ways medieval men and women represented
                                                                       themselves in texts, their sober thoughts and their flights of
76-301     Internship                                                  fancy, including well-known fictions like Beowulf, The Song of
Fall and Spring: 1-12 units                                            Roland, Inferno, various Arthurian tales, and writing by women.
Prerequisites: Open to all junior and senior English majors with a     Students will also choose one twentieth-century fiction based on
3.0 or above QPA in their major. One prior 200-level or above          medieval materials to read and report on. Course requirements
writing-intensive course (including Survey of Forms) or                include regular attendance and participation in discussions, three
permission of Internship Coordinator also required. This course is     brief papers and a final exam.
designed to help you explore possible writing-related careers as
you gain workplace experience and earn academic credit. You’ll         76-331      Renaissance Literary and Cultural Studies
work on- or off-campus as an entry-level professional for 8-10         Intermittent: 9 units
hours per week in a field of interest to you. You might, for           Topics will vary by semester. Consult the Course Descriptions
example, intern with a local newspaper or magazine or radio or TV      provided by the Department each semester for current offerings.
station, work for a publisher or political campaign, or do research    EXAMPLE: X-Files of the Seventeenth Century. Ghosts,
and promotions for a non-profit agency associated with a cause         monsters, prodigies, demons, and other strange phenomena:
you feel strongly about. Other possibilities include local             many of these so called "preternatural" occurrences were
hospitals, museums, theatre and other arts groups, software            becoming the object of overlapping (and sometimes conflicting)
documentation firms and other groups needing technical writers         forms of explanation during the seventeenth century. Whereas
and communications specialists, PR and ad agencies, law-related        some of these phenomena could be explained philosophically -
sites, and just about any place you can think of that requires         with reference to natural causes - others belonged to religious
writing and communication skills. Most of your class time for the      debate or seemed exclusively to exist in the imagination. Using a
course will be completed through work at your internship site -- a     broad range of texts, we will examine the widespread interest in
minimum of 120 hours (8-10 per week) over the semester for 9           the preternatural in seventeenth century culture, exploring the
units of credit. As the academic component of the course, you’ll       political, religious, and ideological consequences of this
keep a reflective journal, do some related research and short          fascination. Texts for the class will include images of natural
writing assignments, and meet periodically with the internship         "marvels" and "monstrosities," collections of "curiosities," plays
coordinator to discuss your internship and related professional        by William Shakespeare and Ben Jonson, utopian fiction by
issues. The first step is to contact the instructor to set up a time   Margaret Cavendish, selections from Edmund Spenser's Faerie
to talk about your interests and what opportunities are open to        Queene, seventeenth century crime pamphlets, philosophical
you. You should do this before registration week so we have time       texts by Francis Bacon, Robert Hooke's images from the
to make necessary arrangements.                                        microscope, readings in Renaissance and classical poetics, and
                                                                       various religious texts. Students can expect the reading for this
76-318     Communicating in the Global Marketplace                     class to be demanding but interesting. Several written
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  assignments, a final exam, and conscientious participation in
Prerequisite: 76-270 or 76-271 Many of today's most exciting           class discussion will be required.
employment opportunities are with multinational and international
corporations. But are you prepared for the challenge of working        76-332     African American Literature
with professionals from all over the world? Even as more poeple        Intermittent: 9 units
around the glove learn English, specific cultural values, beliefs,     Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions
and assumptions continue to influence the ways in which they           provided by the department each semester for current offerings
communicate. Often, there is a wholly different worldview behind a     EXAMPLE: The Harlem Renaissance. The Harlem Renaissance
foreign accent. The same word or phrase in English might actually      roughly encompasses the period between the two World Wars.
carry very distinct connotations for someone whose native              Mass migration of African Americans to urban areas north and
language is French, German, Russian, or Japanese. this course is       south, the experience of fighting for the U.S. overseas, a
designed as an introduction to international professional              developing global consciousness, and improved education
communication. We will talk about the way in which culture             changed the composition, structure, and mindset of black
influences communication, about the job of translators and             America. Black cultural production during this period articulated a
interpreters, and about specific communicative norms for the           form of American modernism, encouraged black political and
global marketplace. We will look at many concrete examples of          social consciousness (and thus changed the face of urban and
communication in the international arena and have a chance to          national politics), and spurred lasting debates about the
meet some experienced professionals in this field.                     relationship between culture and identity. This course aims to
                                                                       introduce you to major themes and structures of expression in
76-319     Environmental Rhetoric                                      American literature of the Harlem Renaissance. Our primary
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  focus is long fiction. We will also spend time on critical essays,
Who speaks for Nature? The poet, the hiker, the rancher, the           poetry, and people that defined the period to provide historical
scientist, or the activist? How do theses different stances            context and analytical perspectives. This class will perform close
“represent” the meaning of environment in their words and              readings, paying attention to theme, image, language,
actions? This introduction to ways we talk about the environment       representation, etc. Critical concerns of the course include the
and understand our relation to the natural world will trace an         relationship between culture and social change. How do
American history that has combined mystical celebration with           communities (re)define group identity? In a system of
militant critique, and scientific research with public debate. We      disenfranchisement and social marginalization, is it possible for
will read some of the landmark voices in this public discussion,       culture (mainstreamed or radical) to institute a shift in social
which includes writers such as Henry Thoreau, John Muir, Rachel        beliefs and behaviors? For whom? What are the conditions that
Carson, Aldo Leopold, Edward Abbey, and we will see their              might make this possible or even imaginable?
influence in popular films and activist groups, from the radical
Earth First! to Greenpeace, to the mainstream Sierra Club and          76-334     19th Century Literary and Cultural Studies
Nature Conservancy. We will explore the competing discourses           Intermittent: 9 units
that have emerged in the American debate (the conservationists         Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions
versus preservationists, the scientific ecologists versus deep         offered by the department for current offerings. This course
ecologists), looking at both their rhetorical strategies and their     engages the unprecedented changes in the period through major
response to the fundamental environmental question: is nature
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions     431




and minor cultural works and secondary texts. In particular, we        Prerequisites: 76101
focus on the "Condition of England Question"—the discourse
surrounding the great social, economic and political upheavals         76-349      Lost Generation
following the Napoleonic wars and before the halcyon days of mid-      Intermittent: 9 units
Victorianism. We will explore the set of issues represented by         Before the Beat Generation there was the Lost Generation. Both
this complex (and not unchallenged) phrase, from various social        moments of literary history have an important relevance for our
locations. Richard Carlile, Thomas Hodgskin, Thomas Carlyle,           time, and both produced many major literary works. The 20’s, like
Friedrich Engels, Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill, Benjamin Disraeli,      the 50’s and 60’s were marked by the effects of World War.
Charles Dickens, George Eliot, and Matthew Arnold are among            Gertrude Stein seems to have started the whole generation
the authors whose works we will examine. We will also read poetry,     naming fad with her comment to Hemingway, You are the lost
including that by Alfred Lord Tennyson, Elizabeth and Robert           generation. Paul Fussell identifies the cultural effect of WWI as
Browning, and James Thomson, B.V., and others.                         the production of ‘irony’ as the central quality of modern identity
                                                                       (some Beat writers make a similar claim for the effects of WWII).
76-335     20th Century Literary and Cultural Studies                  This class is neither a prequel nor a sequel to the Beat writers
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  class; it is related in theme but focussed on different writers and
Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions          texts. Students might consider taking this class as a point of
provided by the department for current offerings. EXAMPLE Fall         entry to ‘The Beat’, or might consider this class as a follow-on to
2006: Introduction to Race and Representation. This class              ‘The Beat’ in order to understand more fully some of the central
examines the way in which race makes meaning in American               literary and historical issues of our time. In both cases we focus
culture through images and narrative. The class focuses most           on the intersection between cultural change and major war. The
clearly on racial identities, such as blackness and whiteness, as      Lost Generation class might include, for example, work by Stein,
important symbols that have tangible social and cultural               Hemingway, W.B. Yeats, Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, the major War
consequences. We will also address issues of identity more             Poets, F.Scott Fitzgerald, Robert Graves, Vera Brittain, Evelyn
generally in our theoretical readings and discussions. How do we       Waugh.
know, understand, and live these identities? We will examine
literature and films as a means to approach the question of how        76-355     The Rhetoric of Making a Difference
race comes to be understood and conveyed in culture. In what           Intermittent: 9 units
ways do such texts use race to make meaning? Texts include             The rhetoric of making a difference is about writing and speaking
D.W. Griffith’s Birth of a Nation, Toni Morrison’s short-story         wisely and persuasively for change in everyday settings. This
Recitatif and excerpts from Morrison’s Playing in the Dark,            class combines the study of such rhetoric with practical
William Faulkner’s Go Down Moses, speculative fiction by Octavia       experience supporting change making through the methods of a
Butler, and Anna Deveare Smith’s Twilight, plus several films.         community think tank (see www.cmu.edu.thinktank). We begin
Thomas Cripps, Slow Fade to Black William Faulkner, Go Down            with writers out of the American Pragmatist tradition, from
Moses Manthia Diawara, Black American Cinema bell hooks, Reel          Emerson and Martin Luther King to bell hooks and Cornel West,
to Real Robert Gooding Williams, ed. Reading Rodney King               who wrestle with the tensions change makers face between
Reading Urban Uprising Octavia Butler, TBA                             critique and commitment, between non-conformity and
                                                                       community connections, and who model distinctive approaches to
76-338     The American Cinema                                         posing problems, negotiating conflict, and creating change. We
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  then focus on how everyday people make a difference in local
This course will look at major works of sound-era American             contexts and compare different approaches, from working on
Cinema in the context of the history of the film industry and the      institutional change, to creating public ideas and transformative
larger society. The course will focus on the changes that follow       social "tools," to intercultural dialogues that amplify marginalized
major transitions in the industry: the production code of 1934;        voices. In your final project (as a "think tank consultant" to a
the consent decree of 1948; the end of the production code in          campus or community group you choose), you will learn how to
1968. We will look at the work of major directors, such as Hawks,      investigate the problem your group is addressing and to develop a
Hitchcock, Coppola, and Polanski, major genres, such as                briefing book which supports deliberation and change by
screwball comedy, women's pictures, and Westerns, and major            documenting rival perspectives and options on the issue they are
styles, such as film noir. Requirements are likely to include, in      facing. This portfolio project will also document your research
addition to readings and film viewing, three papers and a final        skills and ability to support a problem-solving dialogue within a
exam.                                                                  community or organization.

76-339     Advanced Studies in Film and Media                          76-357 Language, Power and the Law
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  Intermittent: 9 units
Studies in the history, theory, and analytical reading of print and    Professionals in many fields – in particular people engaged in
electronic media, using the techniques of structural, contextual,      professional communication, in public/community deliberation, or
and ideological analysis. Offerings will vary by semester. Consult     in discussions of personal rights – often find themselves working
detailed course descriptions available from the Department each        in legal and regulatory environments without a clear
semester for details. Example: Sounding it Out: The history,           understanding of how legal language operates. This course will
theory, and interpretation of sound technology in the 20th             give you an introduction to legal discourse – its specialized forms
century. This course puts sound at the center of analytical study.     of language and argument – and a working knowledge of the ways
Sound...Noise...Hearing...Listening...Voice...Speaking. These are      professional writers and ordinary citizens can successfully
concepts we take for granted, like breathing, yet most of the mass     function within that discourse. It will address the nature of legal
media, especially electronic mass media such as radio, film, and       language, modes of argument in legal discussion, and critical
television, are unthinkable without sound. While critical theory       legal studies. Students in this course will learn practical
has devoted great energy to thinking about text and image, and         strategies for navigating and manipulating legal discourse such
even music, we do not have a fully developed cultural study of         as locating and reading pertinent legal information and texts,
sound. What makes sound so hard to think? Jane Gaines has              managing the role of this text in both political and corporate
argued that it is the ephemerality of sound that makes it difficult    (profit and not-for-profit) situations, and working with documented
to study: sound cannot be isolated, pinned down, or frozen like a      public deliberations that surround community action. Writing will
movie still. Sound, Gaines argues, exists just as it is going out of   focus on legally-oriented professional documents such as
existence.                                                             memoranda for decision makers, public comment on pending
                                                                       legislation, advocacy and lobbying documents, and consumer and
76-347     American Literary and Cultural Studies: American            regulatory information for lay readers.
Fiction
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  76-360     Literary Journalism Workshop
Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions          Fall: 9 units
provided by the Department each semester for current offerings.        PW: 300 level writing course or English Elective EBA: 300 level
EXAMPLE: Fall 2006 American Fiction. American women,                   English Elective CW: can be taken as either an English Elective
American writers. In this course we will examine novels written by     or for credit as a Workshop Requirement. CW majors who want to
some of the greatest novelists and short story writers of early        have the course count as a Workshop Requirement must have
20th century. They range from the haunting beauty of the stories       earned a grade of “A” or “B” in either 76-260 or 76-265.
of the Southwest by Willa Cather and Katherine Anne Porter, to         Prerequisites: 76-260, 76-265, 76-270, 76-271, 76-372 or
the controversial Southern stories of Kate Chopin, and the             76-472 While culture becomes increasingly obsessed with
inspiring memoir of Eudora Welty. We will also look at the women       celebrities, contemporary literary journalism is writing that
who confronted urban issues like immigration and labor strife,         usually focuses on so called “ordinary” people in various social
including Harriet Arnow and Mary Heaton Vorse, in their novels         contexts. The emphasis is to use the journalistic essay to reveal
The Dollmaker and Strike! Throughout the course we will think          character rooted in and influenced by a particular time and place.
about what it means to call something "American literature" and        Students will be required to do a series of short essays, and one
the categories of "author" vs. "woman author." We will also            long essay, on subjects of their own choosing. These essays will
consult essays and ideas found in Feminist Theory, using               almost always involve field research; one goal of the course will
readings drawn from a popular reader in Feminist Literary Theory.
4 3 2 Course Descriptions




be to acquaint students with research techniques and methods.           clearly define and address problems.
This is both a reading and writing intensive course, and will be run
usually as a workshop. The class is designed for both the               76-375     Magazine Writing
professional writing student and creative writing student.              Intermittent: 9 units
Prerequisites: 76260 or 76265 or 76270 or 76271 or 76372 or             We’ll read a variety of magazine articles (everything from N.Y.
76375 or 76472                                                          Times magazine section to Utne to Smithsonian to Atlantic
                                                                        Monthly and many more) all of which are aimed at a wide,
76-363     Reading Contemporary Poetry                                  educated audience. The class will be run as a seminar and
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   workshop: each student will produce their own magazine writing,
We will explore the multifaceted relationship between modern            after reading and analyzing the work of other professionals.
science and poetry, discussing the ways in which poetry has             Students will have freedom to choose their own subjects.
taken on the language and theories of science as well as relating       Research/interview techniques will be taught. The art and craft of
how science has been influenced by poetic thought. The course is        writing (student and professional) will be discussed all term long.
designed for English majors who are not necessarily trained in the      Prerequisites: 76260 or 76270 or 76271 or 76372 or 76472
sciences, as the essays and original poems aim for an audience
of general college-level readers. We will also view—during class        76-377     Rhetoric of Fiction
time—the entirety of Brian Greene’s The Elegant Universe as a           Intermittent: 9 units
means of spurring discussion on the philosophy underlying both          Wayne Booth’s book, The Rhetoric of Fiction, is one of the classic
poetry and science. We will employ Greene’s wildly popular, and         discussions of the ways in which fiction communicates, moves or
poetic, video portrayal of the ways in which we experience and          motivates us. It is a commonplace to assume that literature has
make sense of the cosmos in order to augment the poetry and             a message, but it is still not at all clear just how an imaginative
essays assigned during the course—be it at the microscopic level        representation of the world does, or can, communicate. Booth had
of disease or at the macroscopic level of the discovery of              particular difficulty understanding how fiction could communicate
satellites orbiting Jupiter in the seventeenth century. Readings        a felt sense of life and value when there was doubt about narrative
from the anthology Verse and Universe: Poems about Science              authority, or the “reliability” of the author. So, postmodern fiction
and Mathematics will be occasionally included in course                 (from Joyce on) caused him problems. In an attempt to develop a
handouts. Some of the poetry we will read and discuss includes          postmodern rhetoric of fiction we shall be looking at texts that
work by: Alice Fulton; William Carlos Williams; Forrest Gander;         deal directly with issues of persuasion, or texts that seem
Miroslav Holub; Marianne Moore; A. R. Ammons; and Albert                directly to address the reader. Of particular interest will be texts
Goldbarth...(see English Department for full description)               that indirectly implicate the reader, and achieve a kind of implicit
                                                                        rhetoric even when they apparently frustrate normal expectations
76-365     Beginning Poetry Workshop                                    of communicative language (e.g. the apparent fact that the reader
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   is also a character in Calvino’s ‘novel’). The reading will include
Prerequisites: A student must receive an A or B in 76-265               the following: Jane Austen, Persuasion; Henry James, The Turn of
Survey of Forms: Poetry class in order to be eligible to enroll in      the Screw; James Joyce, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man;
76-365. A student who received a C in 76-265 may enroll in 76-          Fedor Dostoevsky Notes From Underground, Gustave Flaubert
365 only with the permission of the 76-365 professor. A student         Madame Bovary; Italo Calvino, If on A Winter Night a Traveller;
who received a D or R in Survey of Forms: Poetry class may not          selections from Wayne Booth, Kenneth Burke, and Mikhail
take a Poetry workshop. This course is an introduction to writing       Bakhtin.
and thinking about poetry. You are expected to learn the
principles and elements of poetry and utilize them in workshop          76-378      Literacy: Educational Theory and Community Practice
discussions, written analysis, and the composition of your own          Intermittent: 9 units
poems. Class will be constructed around a combination of                Literacy has been called the engine of economic development, the
creative and critical writing connected to readings in The Best         road to social advancement, and the prerequisite for critical
American Poetry 2000.                                                   abstract thought. But is it? And what should count as literacy:
Prerequisites: 76265                                                    using the discourse of an educated elite or laying down a rap?
                                                                        What is your literacy quotient? Competing theories of what counts
76-366    Reading Contemporary Fiction                                  as “literacy”-and how to teach it-shape educational policy and
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   workplace training. However, they may ignore some remarkable
This course will focus on reading and analyzing late 20th century       ways literacy is also used by people in non-elite communities to
and contemporary fiction. Specific works and topics will vary by        speak and act for themselves. In this introduction to the
semester. The goal of the course is to help students develop a          interdisciplinary study of literacy-its history, theory, and
deeper understanding and awareness of recent fiction.                   problems-we will first explore competing theories of what literacy
Prerequisites:                                                          allows you to do, how people learn to carry off different literate
                                                                        practices, and what schools should teach. Then we will turn ideas
76-372     Contemporary Journalism                                      into action in a hands-on, community literacy project, helping
Fall: 9 units                                                           urban students use writing to take literate action for themselves.
Students in Contemporary Journalism will learn the rudiments of         As mentors, we meet on campus for 8 weeks with teenagers from
reporting, interviewing and writing in a journalistic style while       Pittsburgh's inner city neighborhoods who are working on the
participating in discussions and completing assignments on              challenging transition from school to work. They earn the
current issues in the news. What makes a story newsworthy? How          opportunity to come to CMU as part of Start On Success (SOS),
does a reporter decide which approach to take? What are effective       an innovative internship that helps urban teenagers with hidden
techniques for executing a successful interview? How does a             learning disabilities negotiate the new demands of work or
journalist turn pages of scribbled notes into a coherent news           college. We mentor them through Decision Makers (a CMU
story on deadline? Class sessions will examine questions of             computer-supported learning project that uses writing as a tool
professional ethics, using real life examples, and deconstruct          for reflective decision making.) As your SOS Scholar creates a
famous and infamous stories that have gained national attention.        personal Decision Maker's Journey Book and learns new
The emphasis will be on writing assignments and learning                strategies for writing, planning and decision making, you will see
different styles of news writing, for print and electronic media. But   literacy in action and develop your own skills in intercultural
students also will look at how newer mediums, such as blogs,            collaboration and inquiry.
have impacted the newsgathering business.
                                                                        76-380       Research for Writers: Finding Information & Studying
76-373     Topics in Rhetoric: Argument                                 Your Audience
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                Intermittent: 9 units
This course is designed for both the student interested in              Can readers comprehend the document you have worked so hard
developing a more thorough critical apparatus of argumentation          to produce? Can they follow its directions safely? Are they fearful
and the student interested, for professional or scholarly reasons,      or confident as they do so? In Research Methods for Writers, you
to develop more effective arguments. The course presumes that           will study and practice methods for providing valid and reliable
argument is a fundamental form of human communication, and              answers to these types of questions, both in the lab-before a
that finding, analyzing, and producing arguments are activities         document goes out the door-and in the field-after a document is
central to our professional and public lives. Students will study       in the world. Topics include both basic issues in empirical
argumentation theory, and will test that theory against the             research methods-sampling, response rates, validity and
arguments we find within a public controversy surrounding an            reliability, the design of questionnaires, scales and surveys, the
important social issue. This theory building should provide us          ethical issues involved in doing research with people-as well as
with a framework for evaluating and critiquing the effectiveness of     methods specifically relevant to assessing documents, such as
arguments in context. In addition, students will identify and define    testing comprehension. Our activities will raise some
problems as the initial step toward developing arguments of their       fundamental questions, such as what it means to comprehend a
own. Students' assignments will include written analyses of             document, and how the answers we give affect the nature of tests
arguments within a controversy and written arguments that               we design (even whether comprehension can be tested at all). To
                                                                        achieve the course objectives, you will criticize existing research
                                                                        and practice important methods by analyzing and interpreting
                                                                                                              Course Descriptions     433




data. There will generally be two exams and a final.                   culture are inseparable, and one cannot be studied without the
Prerequisites: 76270 or 76271 or 76379                                 other. This course will engage students with the multiple concepts
                                                                       of linguistic practice to explore the connections between human
76-382     Multimedia Authoring I                                      language and human life through readings, lectures, and
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  discussions.
This course will provide an introduction to the technical skills
needed for designing On-Line content and Interactive Multimedia.       76-387     Sociolinguistics
Current multimedia tools for use in creating web-based products        Intermittent: 9 units
will be taught alongside ample opportunity for practice. Students      This course provides an overview of the field of sociolinguistics,
learn authoring tools and multimedia techniques while covering         or the study of language in its social and cultural contexts.
topics including non-text-based communication, integration of          Among the questions posed in the course are these: How and why
visuals, the animation of text and graphics, and digital video web-    do speakers select among the range of linguistic varieties in their
deployment. Principles of design will be discussed and stressed        repertoire, standard and vernacular, regional-sounding or not,
throughout the course. Group design processes and project              more writerly or more oral, gendered in one way or another, and so
management issues will also be addressed. This course makes            on? How can such variation be accounted for in a theory of
extensive use of web-oriented applications such as Dreamweaver         language? What kind of “grammar” is involved in knowing how to
and Flash. Preference will be given to majors in the English           participate in conversations, and how do conversational styles
department, Multimedia Production minors and IS Majors in the          differ from group to group? What causes misunderstanding and
Design and Communication Track. For English majors (EBA, CW,           what enables understanding in interaction among people who are
PW, and TWC) who are also in the Multimedia minor, 76-382 may          different? What are the effects of multilingualism and language
NOT double count toward both the minor and their English degree        contact, for speakers and for languages? How and why do
requirements. PW students interested in learning web and on-line       standard varieties of languages come to be, and how are they
information design are strongly advised to take 76-487, On-Line        perpetuated? What are the relationships between language,
Information Design as their primary course in web design and web       society, and the individual speaker? There will be several written
design issues. 76-382 may be taken in addition to 76-487 but           assignments in addition to regular reading assignments, as well
should not be seen as a substitute for 76-487. Technical Writing       as a mid-term exam and a final project.
(TWC) majors are required to take 76-487, On-Line Information
Design, as one of their core requirements and may NOT use 76-          76-389    Grammar of Standard Written English
382 as a substitute.                                                   Spring: 9 units
                                                                       This is a course in the grammar that characterizes relatively
76-383     Multimedia Authoring II                                     formal, relatively planned, often written English. As we develop
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  and/or review a vocabulary for talking about the structural
Multimedia authoring involves the combination of graphics,             choices that are available to writers of English, we will practice
sound, text and movies to create products such as sales                analyzing and constructing sentences and parts of sentences.
presentations, kiosks, software prototypes, games, CD-ROMs,            The course is meant primarily for people whose professional plans
and computer-based training materials. You will be using               include writing or editing. Grades are based on 5 quizzes, midterm
Macromedia Director, the most often used program today for             and final exams, homework assignments, and class attendance
multimedia development and authoring. But producing interactive        and preparation. Textbook: Hopper, Paul J. 1999. A Short Course
applications in Macromedia Director often involves much more           in Grammar. Norton.
than we bargained for. Beginning developers are continually
asking themselves a variety of questions: Is there an easier way?      76-390     Style
Is there a more efficient way? How do I handle user interaction,       Fall and Spring: 9 units
decision-making, and web-interaction issues? And how do I              Style is a term used to describe the manner of expression in
design an interface that works for the user? In this course, we’ll     written language. To achieve the mastery of style that will enable
also learn about Director’s Lingo scripting language in-depth, and     you to express yourself in a way that is fresh, original, and
use it to control the content, flow and interactivity of a             appropriate across audiences and situations, you need to be able
presentation (or movie). By the end of this class, you will have a     to choose the right words, arrange them appropriately, and
thorough grounding of the basics of animation, Lingo scripting and     punctuate them in a way that controls pacing and emphasis. This
multimedia authoring, and you will work on several smaller             course is intended to help you achieve those goals. Working
projects in preparation for a final class project, due at the end of   together, we will learn specific principles of style and examine the
the semester. This is a course demanding a lot of self-directed        effects of stylistic variations. We will (1) derive a common
study; students will be encouraged to work diligently on their final   vocabulary for discussing writing, (2) examine the effect of
project throughout most of the term. For English majors (EBA,          particular stylistic devices on readers, and (3) become better
CW, PW, and TWC) who are also in the Multimedia minor, 76-383          editors of our own writing and the writing of others. The course
may NOT double count toward both the minor and their English           focuses on the theory and practice of writing clear, effective
degree requirements.                                                   prose. It will interest and benefit any student who wants to
Prerequisites: 15100 or 15111 or 15112 or 15125 or 15127               improve the clarity, precision and coherence of his or her writing--
                                                                       -whether the student intends to be a professional writer (creative,
76-385      Introduction to Discourse Analysis                         professional or technical writers) or a professional who writes
3 units                                                                (lawyers, engineers, scientists, business managers---in other
"Discourse" is language in use: people talking or signing or           words, just about anybody).
writing. Discourse analysts ask and answer many questions
about why people do the things they do with language. They study       76-391     Document Design
the structure of written texts — the semi-conscious rules people       Fall: 12 units
use to organize paragraphs, for example — as well as the               Today, many professionals are responsible for the visual design of
unconscious rules that organize oral discourse such as                 documents. This course provides students who have already
spontaneous stories and arguments. They look at how grammar is         learned the foundation of written communication with an
influenced by what people need to do with language, and how            opportunity to develop the ability to analyze and create visual-
discourse changes grammar over time. They ask how children             verbal synergy in printed documents. Students will be introduced
learn how to make things happen with talk and writing. They            to the basic concepts and vocabulary, as well as the practical
analyze the choices that speakers and writers make and what            issues of visual communication design through a series of hands-
these choices reveal about how they see themselves and how             on projects in various rhetorical situations. Assigned readings
they relate to others. They study how people define disease,           will complement the projects in exploring document design from
aging, and disability as they talk about them, and how language is     historical, theoretical, and technological perspectives. Class
used to mirror and establish social relations in institutional         discussions and critiquing are an essential part of this course.
settings like law courts and schools as well as more personal          Adobe Creative Studio (InDesign, Photoshop, Illustrator) will be
relationships within families and among friends. This course           taught in class, and used to create the assigned projects.
touches on a selection of these topics and gives students              Prerequisites: 76270 or 76271 or 76379
practice in paying close attention to the details of language.
                                                                       76-392     Rhetoric and Public Policy
76-386      Language & Culture                                         Intermittent: 9 units
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  Rhetoric and public policy have been linked in the public
This course seeks to develop an understanding of what language         imagination: in the Athenian polis, in the politics of Machiavelli,
can do socially and communicatively. Language plays a                  and, more recently, the rhetoric of the Nazi Regime, the Cold War,
significant and complex role in our lives. We commonly use             and the New Global Economy. The term "rhetoric" has become
language to perform actions, to accomplish things like asserting,      synonymous with the power of language to deceive, control, and
persuading, telling stories, expressing individual identities and      emancipate the public. For Cicero, rhetoric, ethics, and public
social affiliations by choosing among various ways of talking.         action were inseparable. For Machiavelli, the ends justified the
Thus, in using language, we also organize ourselves socially. By       means. But rhetoric's role in public policy has been far less
studying how language is used to organize human life we can            visible in contexts that are highly contested, uncertain,
understand what ‘culture’ means. In this sense, language and           debatable, and -- in some cases -- risky. Rhetoric in this sense is
4 3 4 Course Descriptions




not merely words, but an art, a technique, a process, a mode of        often in local, state, or national policies and practices. You will
invention for the production of public knowledge, public argument,     view/read and critique a variety of professional works on
public problem-solving, public action, public response, and public     controversial issues, including documentaries, creative nonfiction
critique. In this course, students read classical and modern           articles and books, mass media pieces, advocacy Web sites, and
theorists in order to understand the role of rhetoric in public        large foundation-sponsored social change campaigns. This
decision-making, public argument, and the construction of public       course also allows you to identify and research a public issue of
knowledge and to rethink rhetoric as a theory of public discourse.     personal interest whether that be the pros and cons of quota-
                                                                       based affirmative action programs, preventing sexual assault on
76-393      Rhetorical Traditions                                      campus, improving education for disadvantaged children,
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  establishing responsible local land use policies, or _______ (you
Rhetoric has traditionally been the study of the relationship          name it). You will follow the news closely, do library and Web
between words and action, with persuasion as its central concern.      research, talk to experts of your own choosing, perhaps even
As one of the oldest academic disciplines in the West, rhetoric        attend public meetings on hot-button issues, and certainly
has provided concepts, models, and systems for understanding           consult the opinions and arguments of both your allies and
how we use words to do things. In this course, we will examine         adversaries. Knowledge you develop on your issue throughout the
various approaches to rhetoric in light of recurring questions         term becomes the basis for a series of assignments: a media
about its definition, legitimacy, function, and methods.               scan, opinion pieces (letters to the editor and op-editorials), a
Specifically, we will be interested in some of the following           position statement supported by simple statistics, a case study
questions: How does persuasive communication take place? How           defining your ideal solution to a social problem, and a team-based
is persuasive communication influenced by various cultural,            oral presentation such as a press conference with press kit.
social, and political phenomena? How can we apply rhetorical           Student writing gets a lot of attention, and class discussions are
concepts to current social and political problems? We will also be     live
interested in how these questions relate to particular examples of     Prerequisites: 76270 or 76271 or 76372 or 76373
rhetorical practice, such as Gorgias’s Encomium of Helen,
Thoreau’s Civil Disobedience, and more recently, Michael Moore’s       76-397      Instructional Text Design
film, FAHRENHEIT 9/11. Assignments will include a take-home            Intermittent: 9 units
midterm and final, as well as a final paper.                           This course focuses on the planning, writing, and evaluating of
                                                                       instruction of various kinds. It is particularly appropriate for
76-394     Research in English                                         professional and technical writers, but also a good option for
Fall: 9 units                                                          anyone interested in fields that involve substantial instruction,
Advising Note: 76-394 is offered in the fall only. EBA majors          such as teaching or employee training. In the first part of the
should take 76-394 in the fall of their junior year to prepare for     course, we'll examine the recent history of instructional design
EBA 400-level seminar courses, for which 76-394 is a                   and the major current theories. Then we'll take a step back and
prerequisite. This course offers training in gathering information     study the concepts of learning upon which these theories are
systematically and building arguments based on that information.       based, with particular attention to their implications for how
Students will hone their skills in choosing a topic, addressing it     instruction is structured. You'll find that different learners (e.g.,
with the help of relevant research resources, reading and              children, older adults) and goals (e.g., learning concepts and
interpreting texts, doing critical commentary, or conducting           principles, learning to apply principles to solve novel problems,
interviews and surveys. Students will also learn how to situate        learning a procedure, learning to change one's behavior, etc.)
their work in the context of a scholarly conversation, by testing      require different types of instruction. In the second part of the
their hypotheses against alternatives and presenting their             course, we'll look in detail at models of how people learn from
research to audiences in the field of English studies. To ground       texts and what features (e.g., advanced organizers, examples,
the discussions, the course uses a thematic content: it looks at       illustrations) enhance learning. We will study and analyze
the experience of political exiles and refugees in the post-World      particular types of texts. Some possible examples include an
War II era                                                             introduction to the concept of gravity; a tutorial for computer
Prerequisites: 76294                                                   software; a self-paced unit in French; adult educational materials
                                                                       in health care; a workshop on sexual harassment in the
76-395      Science Writing                                            workplace; or a unit to train someone how to moderate a
Spring: 9 units                                                        discussion. You will do a project, either individually or in a small
Today, more than ever, we need illuminating science writing. As        group (2-3), in which you design, write and evaluate instruction.
the world changes at an ever-accelerating pace, it becomes             Prerequisites: 76270 or 76271 or 76379
increasingly difficult for mainstream readers to remain
scientifically literate and technologically current. This science      76-420     Process of Reading and Writing
writing course looks for students who want to meet that challenge      Spring: 9 units
by developing the special skills needed to comprehend important        This course is an introduction to the constructive processes
scientific subjects, and then clearly and effectively write about      behind reading and writing. It asks: what are social and cognitive
them for mainstream readers. Students will write short and             processes, what are the conscious and unconscious problem-
medium form science journalism critiqued in a workshop                 solving strategies we use to comprehend and interpret text, to
atmosphere. They will develop pieces for a variety of publication      construct and communicate our own meanings, and to project or
styles including newspapers, hard and soft science magazines, as       discover our readers' responses? Good writers and designers
well as general readership publications. The course will feature       don't just convey information, they work as problem solvers trying
ongoing, in-class writing exercises as a way to limber up your         to persuade, educate, or motivate in diverse, often cross-cultural
writing muscles and stimulate creativity. Students from all            contexts. Here they encounter one of the most intriguing
disciplines are welcome to the course. A special knowledge of          challenges in writing-the meaning-making reader and the
science is not necessary (though an appreciation for science is).      constructive, interpretive process of comprehension.
A central goal is to learn how to engagingly communicate science       Understanding (and user-testing for) what our readers actually
and technology to lay readers on a professional level without          make of a text can be critical in many kinds of writing, from
sacrificing the integrity and complexity of the subjects at hand. In   creating a job application, to a public relations crisis response, an
an effort to take a real world approach to the subject, the course     educational website, or a policy report urging change. In this
will also investigate the unique challenges of science writing (as     course, you will learn to recognize the factors that affect
opposed to other forms of journalism), the need to recognize           communication and to use methods that track the constructive,
emerging trends that can be transformed into interesting topics        inferential process of readers' comprehension. You will learn the
as well as the skills that keep readers’ attention. Students will be   why behind the what they do through an introduction to the
expected to hone their abilities in research (primary, secondary       research and theory on reading and writing as social and
and other sources), interviewing, organization and concept             cognitive processes. You will see how the action of memory
“pitching.”                                                            networks, cognitive schemas, and meta-knowledge shapes and is
Prerequisites: 76270 or 76271 or 76372 or 76375 or 76379 or            shaped by language and discourse as socially constructed
76472                                                                  mediating tools. In the second half of the course we turn to your
                                                                       own writing as a thinking process caught up in the constant effort
76-396     Writing and the Public Interest                             to juggle competing goals. You will learn to recognize some of
Spring: 9 units                                                        your current problem-solving strategies and develop new ones for
Prerequisite: 76-270, 76-271, 76-372, or 76-373 or                     doing reader-based writing and design.
Instructor’s permission Are you interested in developing your
writing skills to advance causes you really care about (e.g.,          76-431     Advanced Seminar in British Literary and Cultural
protecting the environment or ensuring that Katrina evacuees get       Studies: The Long 18th Century
the help they need)? Or perhaps you would like to expand your          Intermittent: 9 units
portfolio to include work samples on public issues? Or maybe you       Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions
follow current events closely and wonder how you could influence       offered by the department for current offerings. EXAMPLE Fall
debate on the great issues of our time. Writing and the Public         2006: The Long Eighteenth Century. EBA Majors: 76-294 and
Interest builds skills in deliberative rhetoric—the kind of            76-394 are pre-requisites for this and all 400-level EBA
discourse used to shape public opinion and bring about change,         seminars. This period in British history, 1660-1790, plays an
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions     435




important role in what we call “the modern.” “Reason,”                  “wicked” house where a gypsy named Mary Squires attempted to
“enlightenment,” “the public sphere,” “the rights-bearing               force her into prostitution. When, Canning claimed, she refused,
individual,” indeed, modern imperialism and the nation-state,           she was held captive in an attic, with very little bread and water,
while not originating during this time, took on characteristic forms    until she managed to escape and walk the ten miles to her
that are recognizable as “modern” from our historical perspective.      mother’s house. II. Student Projects: Students in the class will
This course focuses on how present-day historians and literary          design and develop their own projects in feminist cultural studies
scholars construct the years between 1660 and 1790: what                that will further help us to delineate and understand the methods
cultural events punctuate historical narratives of this time            and objects of study that comprise this critical, political, and
period? What writers and texts are important to those events?           theoretical field. These projects may be collaborative or
The heart of this course is a wide sampling of imaginative literary     individual. Students will design a case study select materials
texts prose, fiction, poetry, and drama from the beginning to the       representative of that case for class reading lead discussions of
end of the long eighteenth century. Obviously, this reading list will   the case write a prospectus for a feminist research project based
have to be highly selective. To keep us aware of and honest about       on the case materials.
these choices, we will also study histories of the period that have
been influential in the field of literary and cultural studies. These   76-438      Advanced Seminar in American Literary and Cultural
texts should help us consider how the stories we tell about the         Studies
past and the texts we chose to study from that past mutually            Intermittent: 9 units
determine each other. Six kinds of historical narratives have           Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions
come to dominate current cultural approaches to this period. We         provided by the department for current offerings. EXAMPLE
can think of these as dominant, or at least important, frameworks       Airtime: Radio, Television and Culture in the 20th Century. In this
for interpreting and defining eighteenth-century studies. They          advanced course we will examine the cultural history and
determine many of the stories we tell about eighteenth-century          interpretation of radio and television. How do we apply the fields
culture and they lie behind the on-going formation of the               of literary studies and cultural studies to these vast, almost
canon...(see English Department for full description)                   infinite forms of media? These are still relatively new fields, and
Prerequisites: 76294         Corequisites: 76-394                       thus we will look at new research, and you will also be expected to
                                                                        conduct new research of your own. Our readings will include Lynn
76-432     Advanced Seminar in African American                         Spigel, Welcome to the Dreamhouse: Popular Media and the
Studies:Modernism and the Harlem Renaissanc                             Postwar Suburbs, Paul Buhle, Hide in Plain Sight, Michele Hilmes,
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   Radio Voices, Robert McChesney, Telecommunications, Mass
Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions           Media and Democracy, and Curtin and Spigel, eds., Revolution
provided by the department for current offerings. EXAMPLE Fall          Wasn't Televised.
2006: Modernism and the Harlem Renaissance. This advanced               Prerequisites: 76238 and 76239 and 76294
seminar takes a broad, interdisciplinary approach to studying
Harlem Renaissance culture and its significance. The Harlem             76-439     Advanced Seminar in Film and Media Studies: Sound
Renaissance roughly encompasses a period in America between             Theory
the two World Wars. Mass migration of African Americans to              Intermittent: 9 units
urban areas north and south, the experience of fighting for the         Topics will vary by semester. Consult the course descriptions
U.S. overseas, a developing global consciousness, and improved          provided by the department for current offerings. EXAMPLE Fall
education constituted some of the conditions of modernity that          2006: Sound Theory. Sound. Noise. Music. What tools do we have
changed the composition, structure, and mindset of Black                to study these ephemeral objects? How do we study something
America. Black cultural production during this period articulated a     that, as Jane Gaines argues, "exists just as it is going out of
form of American modernism, encouraged black political and              existence"? In this class we will look at some of the oldest---and
social consciousness (and thus changed the face of urban and            the most recent---tools that cultural studies has to offer for the
national politics), and spurred lasting debates about the               study of sound. Books include Jonathan Stern's The Audible Past,
relationship between culture and identity. It is well known that an     Walter Ong's Orality and Literacy, Murray Schafer's The
explosion of literary production characterized African American         Soundscape, Josh Kun's Audiotopia, The Auditory Culture
culture during this period. Less well known are the roles               Reader, and Film Sound. The class will involve keeping a sound
performance, music, art and public debate played in ushering in         journal, and weekly exercises in "ear cleaning."
new conceptions of community and race. Course materials                 Prerequisites: 76239
include written work by Nella Larsen, Alain Locke, Zora Hurston,
and Langston Hughes, including works that remain controversial,         76-441     Chaucer
like Carl Van Vecthen's Nigger Heaven. We will also examine             Intermittent: 9 units
artwork, music, and film and theatrical production. This class will     Geoffrey Chaucer is sometimes thought of as the author of
approach questions of race, migration, creative expression,             universal, timeless fictions containing "God's plenty" (in
transnationalism, community, and identity.                              Dryden's famous phrase). This course, however, will stress the
Prerequisites: 76294        Corequisites: 76-394                        ways in which Chaucer's fictions are situated within specific, but
                                                                        complex and fluid, 14th-century political, social, and religious
76-433      British Literary Movement                                   controversies. We will read The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   Criseyde in Middle English (which is not hard to learn, but fun to
Seminars focusing on British literary movements, forms, periods,        know), and look at other representations of medieval English
or authors since 1800. Topics will vary by semester. Consult the        culture as it saw itself and as we see it from a 20th-century
course descriptions provided by the Department each semester            vantage point. Regular attendance, participation in classroom
for current offerings. EXAMPLE: Modernist Poetry, Poetics, and          discussion, and brief oral presentations from time to time are
Politics. In this course we will read the poetry and prose of poets     required. Each of you will asked to take a special interest in one
in the period. Hugh Kenner dubbed other famous writers, wrote           of the Canterbury pilgrims and try to see the unfolding saga from
both difficult poetry and bizarre political tracts about money,         that character’s point of view. Writing assignments include two
usury, and banking. Charged with treason against the United             brief papers and one longer one, but no final exam. Graduate
States for his propaganda radio broadcasts during World War II,         students will meet for an extra hour a week to discuss additional
Pound escaped a possible death sentence by copping an insanity          readings.
plea. His career raised issues that are relevant to other               Prerequisites: 76294
modernists. Why were so many canonical modernists politically
reactionary, and how does this tendency jive with their radical         76-451     Topics in Language Study
aesthetics? We will contemplate this question in relation to the        Intermittent: 9 units
work of Yeats, Rilke, and Stevens. We will also consider whether        Seminars focusing on topics in linguistics and discourse studies.
women poets in this same period-H.D., Edna St. Vincent Millay,          Topics will vary by semester. Consult detailed course
and Amy Lowell-or dispute the politics and poetics of their male        descriptions available from the Department each semester for
counterparts.                                                           details. May be repeated for credit. EXAMPLE: Patterns of
                                                                        English Usage. Beside the conventional "grammar" of English
76-435     Feminist Cultural Studies                                    there lurk an unlimited number of patterns that play an important
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   and largely unrecognized role in organizing our language. In this
What is feminist cultural studies? This course will answer this         course you will learn some techniques for recovering these
question with practical work as well as abstract definitions, with      patterns from an electronic corpus and making generalizations
case studies as well as theory. The goal of the course is to            about their structure and distribution.
develop some models for how to do feminist cultural study; we will
pursue this development through an instructor-designed model            76-457     Topics in Rhetorical Study
case study and through the design and study of cases that arise         Intermittent: 9 units
from the students’ interests and intellectual investments: I.           Seminars focusing on topics in linguistics and discourse studies.
Model Case Study: We will work together on studying print               Topics will This is a seminar course focusing on a variety of
materials that comprise a particular “case” from early modern           special topics in Rhetoric that examine the relationships among
English culture: In 1753 Elizabeth Canning, an 18-year-old              thought, expression, and understanding within specific social and
servant, disappeared from her London home for nearly two                cultural situations. Topics will vary by semester. Consult detailed
months. She reappeared, nearly naked and in an emaciated
condition, and told of being kidnapped and held captive in a
4 3 6 Course Descriptions




course descriptions available from the Department each                    Though creative nonfiction is based on actual events, characters
semester for details. May be repeated for credit. Example:                and places, writers in this broad, vital genre often borrow
Rhetoric of Place. In this seminar, we explore how people in              techniques from fiction, such as scene, dialogue, distinctive
Pittsburgh orient to and use local-sounding speech. We will begin         narrative voice, and point of view. Journalists seek the truth by
with reading, research in on-line linguistic atlas materials, and         attempting to be objective. Writers of memoir, the essay and
fieldwork about the sources and features of accent and speech             literary journalism (three of the many forms that are part of the
style in Southwestern Pennsylvania. We then turn to humanistic            genre) understand that truth is the very biased, very personal
geography, social theory, and sociolinguistics to read about              "truth" as experienced by the author. In this workshop, students
theories of place and contemporary sociolinguistic research that          will read widely within the genre and work on three of their own
tests such theories. During the second half of the course, we             pieces. By semester's end, they will have produced a portfolio
design and carry out research projects that explore local speech          with forty pages of their own work.
and its rhetorical uses.
                                                                          76-469     Screenwriting Workshop
76-460     Beginning Fiction Workshop                                     Intermittent: 9 units
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                  Prerequisites: A student must receive an A or B in 76-269:
Prerequisites: A student must receive an A or B in the 76-260             Survey of Forms: Screenwriting in order to enroll in 76-469. A
Survey of Forms: Fiction class in order to enroll in 76-460. A            student who received a C in 76-269 may enroll in 76-469 only
student who received a C in 76-260 may enroll in 76-460 only              with the permission of the 76-469 professor. A student who
with the permission of the 76-460 professor. A student who                received a D or R in 76-269 may not enroll in 76-469. This
received a D or R in 76-260 may not enroll in 76-460. Students            workshop is designed for students who understand the
will read professional writers, write many stories, and actively          fundamentals of screenwriting and are ready to plan and write a
engage in discussions about the craft and art of fiction writing.         three-act screenplay. Students will spend half of the semester
The class demands regular attendance, consistent participation,           planning their projects. The first major assignment will be the
and a real desire to develop as a writer.                                 treatment, which will be discussed in class and in conference.
Prerequisites: 76260                                                      Next will be a scene-by-scene outline. By mid-semester
                                                                          everyone should be starting to write. Scenes from student
76-461      Personal Essay                                                screenplays will be critiqued in class. Students will also read
Intermittent: 9 units                                                     produced scripts and view movies, focusing in particular on story
Prerequisites: At least one Survey of Forms (Fiction or Poetry) in        structure, and write critical papers.
which a student received a grade of an A or B. This is an                 Prerequisites: 76269
advanced writing course that has been specifically designed for
the student who wishes to polish and practice the skills of prose         76-472     Advanced Journalism
writing while pursuing the intellectual challenge of this peculiar        Spring: 9 units
form, the personal essay. Professional writing majors were                Prerequisites: 76-372 or 76-375 or 76-360 or 76-376 or 76-
particularly considered as “clients” for this course. The form of         472 or permission of the instructor. This continuation of a two-
the personal essay did not exist until Michel Montaigne                   course sequence begun in the fall semester will emphasize further
“accidentally” invented it in the 16th Century. His speculative           refinement and use of the skills introduced in 76-372. Students
musings, observations of nature and, especially, himself came             will be encouraged to and assisted in finding outlets to publish
together to make a unique genre which engages any topic while             their assignments. Weekly sessions will focus on the history and
the actual subject of any topic is the essayist. To try to explore        evolution of journalism in the 20th century as a way of
one’s mind on a particular question has become a favorite activity        understanding contemporary practices and trends. In addition,
of writers ever since — all the way down to Erma Bombeck and              classes will include presentations of student projects; discussion
Russell Baker. Essays by Montaigne will be read to see how he             of practical problems in newsgathering; analysis of published
put his thoughts together; was it a casual endeavor or a self-            stories; and visits by professional journalists. While it is
conscious craft? For us, the second method. Then, we will turn to         recommended that students with little to no journalism
more contemporary practitioners to study and enjoy their                  experience take 76-372 before enrolling in this course, students
variations on the model. Meanwhile, students will put their writing       with previous or current journalism experience are encouraged to
skills to the test of this seemingly informal, arbitrary form. Some       contact the instructor for permission to enroll. This course may
students will, at first, find it difficult not to make a point, not “to   be taken more than once for credit.
stick to the subject.” The object here is to engage the full range of     Prerequisites: 76360 or 76372 or 76375 or 76376 or 76472
the mind’s capacity for speculation and observation, recall and
realignment of opinions and information. And, the results of this         76-476     Rhetoric of Science
self-inquiry expressed in disciplined, lively prose. Student essays       Intermittent: 9 units
will be workshopped in class. By the end of the course, a student         Do scientists ever argue? Theories of nature developed using
is required to have a portfolio of a minimum of 35 pages of essays        scientific methods are often perceived as truths discovered by a
— of various lengths — and all are to be finished. Rewritings of          purely logical process whose results command instant
workshopped essays will be called for.                                    acceptance within and without the scientific community. In this
Prerequisites: 76260 or 76265                                             course, we will dig beneath this common stereotype in order to
                                                                          examine more closely the role of argument in science. In order to
76-462     Advanced Fiction Workshop                                      establish that science is a persuasive enterprise we will be
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                  exploring the philosophy, communication conventions, and texts
Prerequisite: A student must receive an A or B in 76-460 or 76-           of scientists. Guided by rhetorical concepts, we will consider a
461 or 76-462 in order to enroll in Advanced Fiction Workshop.            number of historical and modern case studies of science and
In this class we will work on narrative voice. Using masterworks          technology. Our efforts will be mainly devoted to understanding
to help guide our writing, we will spend the first part of the            and explaining science as a profession with specific norms of
semester writing stories that imitate the style or narrative voice        interaction, and as a field in which knowledge is produced
of several authors. You will have a story due every week. We will         according to certain norms, conventions, and practices. Rhetoric
workshop several of these stories concentrating our editorial             will allow us to see how scientists use language to represent the
comments on story, development, character, and voice. Your time           world, develop new ideas, and communicate their work among
after mid-semester will be devoted to rewriting and reworking             themselves and to the public. But we will also consider how the
these exercises into stories. I expect you are all taking this class      application of rhetoric to science might re-shape our view of
because you want to be in an advance fiction workshop and                 rhetorical theory and criticism. Students will work on a series of
therefore are working towards mastery of the craft.                       assignments that will help them apply and evaluate theories
Prerequisites: 76460 or 76461 or 76462                                    within specific contexts. Throughout these assignments students
                                                                          will begin to develop their own theories, and eventually, they will
76-465     Advanced Poetry Workshop                                       formulate their own answers to the questions raised about
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                  science and argumentation during the course.
Prerequisites: A student must receive an A or B in 76-265,
Survey of Forms: Poetry. Additionally, he or she must have                76-479     Marketing, Public Relations, and Corporate
completed 76-365 This workshop will focus primarily on the work           Communications
of class members, with emphasis being on the revision process.            Spring: 9 units
In addition, we will read books by a number of visiting poets and         Effective marketing and internal and external communication are
discuss their work. The course will be graded on improvement, so          essential to the success of businesses, non-profit agencies,
the poet must be open to the reality that a writer’s development is       academic institutions, public interest groups, and other groups of
never complete. Also, it should be tacitly understood that                people with a shared purpose and identity to promote. This course
students in this course are to be in active pursuit of having their       explores problems and solutions that apply to marketing and
poems published in respectable journals.                                  communication in a broad range of business settings, where
Prerequisites: 76265 and 76365                                            professional communicators manage relationships with a wide
                                                                          variety of constituencies including customers, investors, news
76-466   Nonfiction Workshop                                              agencies, employees, local communities, and local, regional, and
Spring: 9 units                                                           national government agencies. This course will help you develop
                                                                                                             Course Descriptions      437




the written and oral communication skills to handle the wide          issues in on-line design for other modes, such as sound, and
variety of tasks demanded of a professional communicator in           animation, will be touched upon. Special lecture topics may
such settings. You will learn how to plan and develop a coherent      include personalization, Web communities, or on-line help. There
approach for all of an organization’s communications as well as       is a series of homework assignments in which students analyze
effective marketing tactics for achieving business objectives.        and report on user needs, iteratively design, and develop a Web
Topics covered will vary somewhat by semester but generally           site. There are two in-class exams and a final.
include corporate branding, messaging, and positioning; crisis        Prerequisites: (76270 or 76271 or 76379 ) and (76480 or
communication; public, media, government, community, and              76382 or 51261 or 51262)
investor relations; internal employee communication; Web
publishing and corporate Web sites; annual reports;                   76-488     On-Line Information Design Lab
measurement and evaluation of communication effectiveness;            Fall and Spring: 3 units
knowledge management; and customer relationship management.           Lab exercises for On-line Information Design include the
Prerequisites: 70340 or 76270 or 76271 or 76372                       following: basic HTML, images, tables, animation, image maps,
                                                                      interactive forms, Web interfaces to databases, and basic Java-
76-481     Writing for Multimedia                                     scripting. All students must do the lab exercises. The exercises
Fall: 12 units                                                        are designed so that those students who already know particular
There is increasing demand for professional/technical writers who     topics (e.g., basic HTML) do not need to attend the lab session.
understand multimedia and it’s communicative possibilities. This      Students who would like guided practice in doing the lab
class will provide students with the opportunity to develop the       exercises must attend the lab session. Lab sessions take place
ability to analyze and create multimedia experiences. Students        in a computer cluster.
will be introduced to the basic concepts and vocabulary of            Prerequisites: (76270 or 76271 or 76379 ) and (76480 or
multimedia, as well as the practical issues surrounding               76382 or 76383)
multimedia design through a series of hands-on projects involving
various rhetorical situations. We will explore what it means to       76-491     Software Documentation
write in multimedia and how the elements of time, motion and          Spring: 9 units
interactivity can help writers expand their communicative skills.     This course introduces students to basic practices involved in
Assigned readings will complement the projects in exploring           software documentation for both internal and external audiences.
document design from historical, theoretical, and technological       You will learn to understand the purpose of and create documents
perspectives. Class discussion and critiquing are an essential        appropriate for internal audiences (such as Requirements
part of this course. While students are not expected to become        Documents) and external audiences (user guide, online help,
masters of multimedia software, Macromedia Flash will be taught       marketing collateral). By the end of the course, you will have a
in the class in order to provide them with the basic skills           grasp of the standard vocabulary, practices, and methodology for
necessary to complete assignments and explore multimedia              creating software documentation alone and as part of a
possibilities                                                         development team. You will better understand the relationship
Prerequisites: 76270 or 76271 or 76260 or 76269                       between the software, its objectives and tasks, and the most
                                                                      effective ways to instruct users. You will also gain experience in
76-482      Comparative Rhetoric                                      assembling and writing material used in software releases,
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 including analysis and requirements specifications documents.
This course serves a two-fold purpose. It attempts (1) to address     The course requires a series of homework assignments,
the theoretical and methodological issues in cross-/inter-cultural    collaboration, and several smaller team projects. Assigned
communication from a rhetorical point of view and (2) to examine      readings and documentation examples will enhance the projects
critically the way comparative studies of different rhetorical        in providing a bridge between design theory and usage. Students
traditions/systems are currently conducted. In particular, it is      will also use and gain experience with current authoring tools.
concerned with the rhetorical problems we encounter in trying to      Subtopics include the fundamentals of software design, project
write, argue, and persuade across languages and cultures. And it      and document management, single-sourcing, and responding to
aims to take a close look at the need for rhetoric to rethink its     change.
own identity, purpose, formation and agenda in an increasingly
multicultural and globalized world.                                   76-494     Healthcare Communication
                                                                      Fall: 9 units
76-485      Going Public: Local Publics, Counterpublics, and the      Prerequisites: 76-270 or 76-271 or 76-379 or instructor
Rhetoric of Deliberation                                              permission Healthcare Communications is designed for all those
Intermittent: 9 units                                                 with an interest in how medical and health care information is
This course starts with the energetic debate around theories of       constructed and transferred between medical experts, health care
the public sphere that asks: is significant public dialogue really    providers, educators, researchers, and patients and family
even a live option in a media-saturated world of sound bites or       members who are often not experts but need a thorough
corporate control? Is there a public sphere or just a network of      understanding of the information to make important health care
“local” plural publics? Is the traditional, rational-universal (and   decisions. Throughout the course, we will (1) explore the
elite) model of public deliberation (in which the best argument       interactions of current theory and practice in medical
wins) the best model for a democratic society? Then we take a         communication and (2) explore the role of writing in the transfer
close look at the rhetoric of individual local publics and            and adoption of new therapies and promising medical research.
counterpublics (from studies of ecorhetoric, grassroots women’s       We will also study how new technologies such as the World Wide
groups, and web-based forums, to a Pittsburgh community think         Web and computer-based training alters the way that information
tank) where the process of deliberation and change takes many         is both constructed and distributed. Last, we will read the Pulitzer
different forms. To support your own inquiry into the meaning         Prize winning play Wit by Margaret Edsen to discuss the issues
making process of a local public, we will work with the               related to clinical research and patient care. This course does not
observational tools of activity analysis and social/cognitive         provide you with a set of static skills. Rather, you will be expected
negotiation analysis.                                                 to put theory to practice. Early in the semester, you will choose a
                                                                      medical area of interest that you will research using sources such
76-487      Online Information Design                                 as journals, articles, books, web sites and direct contact with
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                              appropriate medical, healthcare, and/or research professionals.
Students taking On-Line Information Design must register for          For your final project, you will write and design one of the
both 76-487 and 76-488. The only exception to this policy is for      following: a journal article, a Web site, a magazine article, a
IS students who have already completed 76-382 or 67-272.              brochure or booklet or a set of training materials. Your final
Only students enrolled in 76-487 may take 76-488. On-Line             project should fill a specific need in the medical area that you
Information Design This course will introduce you to issues and       have chosen. In addition to a final project, there are a series of
practices in the design of on-line information. The course has the    short writing assignments.
following interrelated goals: Introduce you to the major theories,    Prerequisites: 76270 or 76271 or 76379
methodologies, and practices of on-line information design.
Develop your skills in evaluating on-line information designs.        76-511     Senior Project
Develop your skills in analyzing and reporting on user needs prior    Intermittent: 9 units
to design, and verifying a given design's effectiveness through       Seniors in all four majors within the English Department may, with
usability testing. Develop the background knowledge you need to       faculty permission and sponsorship, design and complete an
succeed in the interdisciplinary world of information design.         original, student-planned Senior Project. Creative Writing majors
Topics for in-class lecture and discussion will include: methods      may work on a book-length manuscript in fiction or poetry.
for exploring users' needs and tasks (interviews, observation, and    Students in all majors within the Department may also, with the
more); characteristics of effective Web site design (organization,    permission of a faculty advisor who will supervise and sponsor the
navigational design, link labeling, form and search design, visual    project, develop and complete senior projects that involve either
design); methods and artifacts of iterative design and evaluation     traditional academic research or investigations of problems in
of Web sites; methods for evaluating and reporting on a design's      professional or technical communication.
usability. The course's primary focus will be on the design of
verbal and pictorial information typical of Web sites, though
4 3 8 Course Descriptions




Entertainment         Technology
                      Technology                                         African American Experience
                                                                         Intermittent: 9 units
53-800     Introduction to Maya                                          This course examines major issues in the development of African
Summer: Mini Session - 12 units                                          American urban life, from slavery to recent times. Students will
Course Description: This is an introductory class for                    explore major works that have shaped the field of African
Alias|Wavefront's Maya 4.0. Students will master the complex             American urban history; pinpoint the strengths and weaknesses
interface and toolset of Maya. Introduction to Maya will                 of past scholarship; and develope their own theoretical and
concentrate primarily on the proficiency of use for the tool, and        methodological approach to the subject. In addition to weekly
secondarily on the sharpening of personal skill sets such as             discussions of assigned readings, students will write a 15-20
modeling and animating. There will be in-depth discussion of the         page paper based upon an assessment of available scholarship
basic paradigms and methodologies use in all leading 3D                  as well as an examination of primary sources in various published
modeling packages for a better understanding of how Maya and             sources, microfilm, and archival collections at Carnegie Mellon
other 3D applications work internally. Students will be assigned         and the University of Pittsburgh.
small-scope projects in modeling, animating, texturing, and
lighting. Most of the features discussed will be geared towards          79-156     Freshman Seminar: History of Psychoactive Drug Use
current game industry use. Specific features covered include...          in America
Low-poly modeling High-poly modeling Character modeling Bones            Intermittent: 9 units
NURBS UV Mapping Mechanical Animation Character Animation                This course will examine the use of psychoactive drugs in
...and may include... MEL Scripting Dynamics (Physics) Lighting          American history from a cultural and historical perspective,
(Including Radiosity) Who should apply: Students who want to             focusing chiefly on alcohol, opiates, marijuana, tobacco, and
learn how to use all of the features of Maya 4.0. This is an intro       cocaine. We will explore both cultural patterns of drug use and
course. No prior knowledge of any 3D software is required.               policies directed at perceived problems associated with such use.
                                                                         Attempts to control use of various drugs, through law and policy
53-887     Virtual Presence: Art and Applications                        and through informal social controls, will be examined. Primary
Spring: 12 units                                                         texts, including narratives by drug users and perceived problems
Virtual Presence: Art and Applications is an interdisciplinary           as described by social reformers and policy makers, will also be
graduate-level seminar exploring the use of interactive virtual          read.
representations of real places (i.e., the Earth, Pittsburgh, etc.) for
educating, engaging, motivating, and/or serving segments of the          79-158     Freshman Seminar: Slavery and Emancipation in the
public. This class will be an extension of the previously taught         Americas
Telepresence: Art and Applications class. Details: The Carnegie          Intermittent: 9 units
Mellon University Remote Experience and Learning Lab,                    The course is an introduction to comparative slavery and
developer of the EventScope remote experience software, invites          emancipation in New World societies. It examines the evolution of
students into the lab to learn about virtual presence and                the African slave trade and involuntary labor and their impact on
participate in the development of new experiences. Software such         the development of North America, South America, and the
as EventScope and Google’s recently released Google Earth                Caribbean Islands. It explores the distinctiveness of the overall
highlight the coming of sophisticated, 3D applications that              Atlantic system and differences among slave societies. Major
display satellite data for the public.                                   themes of the course include: tensions between domination and
                                                                         resistance; cultural adaptation of bound people; women and
History                                                                  families; free people of color; and the relationship between race,
                                                                         class, and gender in systems of forced labor. Students will engage
79-104      Introduction to World History                                a variety of texts, including first-hand testimonies of slaves,
All Semesters: 9 units                                                   traders, and owners in Africa, Europe, and the Americas.
Introduction to World History challenges students to think
analytically about the major historical processes that shaped and        79-159     Freshman Seminar: Religious Origins of the Culture
continue to shape cultures and civilizations. The course is based        Wars
on a series of case studies that focus on shifting power relations       Intermittent: 9 units
between and within civilizations. Three major themes connect the         In recent decades Americans have become increasingly aware of
several topics discussed throughout the semester: issues of              a sharp cultural division in our society, sometimes characterized
authority and inequality within civilizations; encounters and            by such dichotomies as “red state/blue state” or “metro vs. retro.”
conflicts between civilizations; and patterns of continuity and          In this freshman seminar we will explore certain aspects of
change across space and time. The course demonstrates how                American religious history that may shed light on the present
historians explain what has happened in the past and in various          polarization over such value-laden issues as sexuality, bioethics,
civilizations and cultures; presents the kinds of evidence that          patriotism, warfare and immigration. We will be studying the
historians use to reconstruct the past; and examines the                 religious antecedents of both sides in the culture wars. On the
interpretations historians make based on this evidence.                  conservative side, topics will include fundamentalism,
                                                                         evangelicalism, tridentine Catholicism and Orthodox Judaism. On
79-112     Race, Nationality, and Culture in American Society            the liberal side we will examine the effects of modernism upon the
Intermittent: 9 units                                                    mainstream religious bodies, the appearance of “New Age”
This course examines the interplay of race, ethnicity, and               movements and the growth of secular humanism.
nationality in the development of the United States. We evaluate
the comparative role of these factors as different groups                79-161     Freshman Seminar: Hyphenated-Americans & the
interacted over time in American society.                                Stories They Tell
                                                                         Intermittent: 9 units
79-113    Culture and Identity in American Society                       Robert Coles, author of The Call of Stories, says that we all have
Intermittent: 9 units                                                    accumulated stories in our lives, that each of us has a history of
This discussion course focuses on economic identity from the era         such stories about our lives, and that no one's stories are quite
of Benjamin Franklin to the dot-com bust of recent years. We will        like anyone else's. In this course we will read a series of fictional
study changing ideas about the American Dream, considering               stories written by hyphenated-Americans and analyze their
how class, gender, race, ethnicity, religion, and occupation shape       experience through their characters. We will identify the common
our assessments of ourselves and each other. Readings include            issues raised across a number of authors and time periods,
memoirs, poems, and fiction from authors such as Thoreau,                question why certain issues are raised and others are not,
Frederick Douglass, and Arthur Miller. Assignments include a             compare these fictional accounts to historians' representation of
readings journal and short essays.                                       the immigrant and hyphenated-American experience, examine
                                                                         whether the issues identified have changed over time in fictional
79-154     Freshman Seminar: Education & Society in                      accounts, and compare and contrast different ethnic-American
Comparative Perspective                                                  authors writing at roughly the same time. We will, through the
Intermittent: 9 units                                                    eyes of fiction writers, try to capture the essence of what it's like
This course will analyze the evolution of key educational patterns       to be a hyphenated-American.
and cultural characteristics of the United States and Russia
during the past century and a half, with particular concern for          79-162      Freshman Seminar: "Slavery" and "Freedom" in African
distinguishing between education and culture. Educational                History?
innovation and reform movements in both countries, and the               Intermittent: 9 units
impact of each country on the other, will receive special attention,     Living in a society still struggling to come to grips with its own
including such specific topics as the ideas of John Dewey, the           history of slavery, American scholars have often imposed words
Dalton Plan of schooling, the Project Method, the Core                   like "slavery" and "freedom" onto African contexts. But, such
Curriculum, and the impact of Sputnik on American science                labels have the effect of masking dynamic social institutions in
education. Distinctive cultural achievements of both countries           pre-colonial Africa. This course will turn this terminology on its
will also be highlighted, especially through art and music. The          head by delineating the relationship between "slavery" and
course will include secondary readings, primary documents,               "freedom," kinship, dependency, and marginality. It will look
museum visits, and films.                                                historically at institutions which are integral to African societies,
                                                                         such as patron-client relationships, marriage, and pawnship. It
79-155    Freshman Seminar: Rethinking Race:The Shaping of the           will interrogate the multiple ways that these institutions
                                                                         functioned before the period of the trans-Atlantic slave trade and
                                                                         the multiple ways that African communities transformed their
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions      439




institutions in response to it. Students will engage a variety of       should assess these changes.
historigraphical debates in secondary sources and first-hand
testimonies of "slave's" primary sources.                               79-202      The History of Public Policy in the United States
                                                                        Intermittent: 9 units
79-165     Freshman Seminar: The Historian as Detective and             This course will describe and analyze public policy as the making
Storyteller                                                             of laws and rules and their implementation by government. Public
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   policy will be analyzed as an alternative to private markets for
Most history courses engage students in what is essentially the         making collective decisions. The US began in 1787 as a minimal
consumption of other historians' work. The centerpiece of such          state providing mainly collective goods such as national defense,
histories is the presentation of a carefully selected and defined       with markets making most of the decisions about the allocation of
research problem or agenda, and a narrative of the historian's          resources. The course will be organized around the general
findings and conclusions, with an explanation of evidence and           presumption that a justification for government activity is to do
methods playing an important but subordinate role. This seminar         things that markets do not do well, that is, to remedy “market
seeks to reverse this order in certain key respects. It places at       failures.” Among the policy areas to be considered are
center stage the fundamental tasks and motivations that                 environmental protection, science and technology policy,
historians face at the outset of their research, and of the many        competition policy, trade policy, health policy and social security.
issues of research and presentation that pose additional                The course will consider the possibility that government
challenges and choices for them along the way.                          intervention to remedy market failures can make things worse as
                                                                        well as better.
79-169     Freshman Seminar: Stalin and the Great Terror
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   79-204      20th Century America
This course will explore a period of Soviet history known as "the       Intermittent: 9 units
Great Terror." Using a variety of sources, including history,           The twentieth century marked the rise of the United States as a
memoirs, film, and primary source documents, we will examine the        global power. By the end of the century, the United States had
key questions associated with this dark and painful period in the       achieved economic, military, and political dominance. The United
Soviet past. We will explore Stalin's personal role, the execution      States also made great strides in expanding political and civil
of oppositionists in the Communist Party, the "mass operations"         rights for workers, women, African-Americans, and gays and
or round ups of targeted groups, and the spread of terror               lesbians. This course explores the cultural implications of these
throughout society. The course begins with the murder of Sergei         developments on the generations of American people who came
M. Kirov, the head of the Leningrad Party organization, in 1934.        of age in the twentieth century. It assesses both the triumphs and
The murder was used by Stalin and his supporters to eliminate           tribulations of twentieth-century life. We will analyze the
important civil liberties and judicial rights. It ends in 1939, when    continuities, contradictions, and conflicts in American history,
Nikolai Yezhov, the head of the NKVD, was replaced and executed         especially in regard to the nation’s twin pillars: democracy and
for his role in repressing innocent people. The course will deal        capitalism. Special attention will be given to the evolving
with the sharp debates among historians over the causes,                relationship among the state, the corporate sector, and ordinary
meaning, and impact of the terror at the same time it familiarizes      people. Topics include: Progressivism, the Great Depression,
students with its history.                                              World War II, the Cold War, Civil Rights, Vietnam, and the New
                                                                        Conservatism.
79-198     Research Training
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                79-205     20th Century Europe
This course is part of a set of 100-level courses offered by H&SS       Intermittent: 9 units
departments as independent studies for second-semester                  This course covers aspects of western European history from
freshmen, and first- or second-semester sophomores, in the              1914 to the 1990s. Its themes are the roots of the profound
College. In general, these courses are designed to give students        crisis of democracy and civil society and the parallel rise of
some real research experience through work on a faculty project         radical intolerance in Europe between 1918 and 1945 and the
or lab in ways that might stimulate and nurture subsequent              causes behind the success of democratic republics since World
interest in research participation. Faculty and students devise a       War II. We consider the social and economic impact of the two
personal and regularized meeting and task schedule. Each                World Wars, the extraordinary artistic vitality of the 1920s, and
Research Training course is worth 9 units, which generally means        the reasons why some countries produced large and successful
a minimum for students of about 9 work-hours per week.                  fascist movements while others did not. We also discuss the rise
Prerequisites/restrictions: For H&SS students only; minimum             of Communist parties and the crisis of democratic socialism. In
cumulative QPA of 3.0 (at the time of registration) required for        the post-war era we focus on European responses to revolts
approved entry; additional prerequisites (e.g., language                against colonialism, the "economic miracle" of the 1950s, anti-
proficiency) may arise out of the particular demands of the             Communism, and student radicalism of the 1960s. Readings
research project in question. By permission of the relevant             include primary sources, novels, reportage, and scholarly
professor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies.                    monographs.

79-200     Historical Evidence and Interpretation                       79-206    Development of American Culture
Fall and Spring: 12 units                                               Intermittent: 9 units
"Historical Evidence and Interpretation" is a course designed to        This is an introductory survey of American history from colonial
acquaint history majors and other students how historians really        times to the present. The course focuses on cultural analysis
work. This course considers how historians practice their craft in      instead of the more traditional emphasis on presidents, wars, and
interpreting great events. The emphasis is on learning to               memorizing facts or timelines. The major theme of the course is
supplement standard secondary accounts of an event with                 the changing meaning of freedom over three centuries. Required
primary sources such as memoirs, government documents,                  readings include novels, memoirs, historical documents, and a
speeches, interviews, newspapers, maps, eye-witnesses and UN            study of the concept of freedom. There is no textbook;
resolutions. Other unusual sources include poetry, music, film,         background facts and events are covered in lectures to provide
satire, and political cartoons. The goal is for the student to          students with context needed to think about and understand
develop a familiarity with the skills an historian uses to identify a   America's cultural history. Assignments include exams and
research topic, make use of a wide array or sources, and present        essays.
his or her findings in a proper scholarly fashion.
                                                                        79-207      Development of European Culture
79-201      Introduction to Anthropology                                Intermittent: 9 units
Fall and Spring: 9 units                                                This course surveys the evolution of European culture from
Cultural anthropologists "make the strange familiar and the             1500-1950. It defines 'culture' broadly to include not only
familiar strange," attempting to understand the internal logic of       philosophy, literature, and art but also science, manners,
cultures which might, at first glance, seem bizarre to us, while at     sexuality, morality, and religion. Lectures, readings, and
the same time probing those aspects of our own society which            discussions will introduce students to what Europeans thought
might appear equally bizarre to outsiders. In doing so,                 and wrote about these questions. Readings will include no 'history
anthropology makes us more aware of our own culturally-                 books' but only novels, plays, and memoirs. We will discuss these
ingrained assumptions, while broadening our understanding of the        writings, on the one hand, as 'literature', that is, as examples of
possibilities and alternatives in human experience. This course         literary styles and themes and, on the other hand, as documents
will use ethnographic writings (descriptive accounts of particular      that reveal much about the philosophical and social conflicts that
cultures), as well as ethnographic films, to investigate the ways in    divided Europeans.
which diverse societies structure family life, resolve conflict,
construct gender relations, organize subsistence, etc. We will          79-208     Theory and Practice in History and Policy
assess the advantages and pitfalls of comparing cross-cultural          Intermittent: 9 units
data, analyze the workings of power within and between societies,       (Open only to declared majors in History and Policy) This is an
and consider the politics of cultural representations. We will also     introductory course in the theory and practice of using formal
discuss what the anthropologist's relationship is to the people s/      historical study and method to address issues in public policy,
he studies, and the responsibilities inherent in that relationship.     either in the formation of policies or the evaluation of those
Throughout the course, students will learn the importance of an         policies for both their intended and unintended consequences.
historical perspective on culture, looking at how and why               Students will study the theoretical underpinnings of the field of
societies change, and considering how we, as anthropologists,
4 4 0 Course Descriptions




History and Policy, learn to become critical consumers of               Intermittent: 9 units
historical studies that address issues in public policy, and            In this course we examine the origins of Christianity. Although we
develop basic skills in the actual practice of applying history to      deal with biblical, as well as other contemporary, materials, the
policy formation and evaluation. Case analyses may focus on the         approach is not theological but historical. We want to understand
regulation of markets, urban planning, the environment, public          how and why Christianity assumed the form that it did by
health, education, science and technology, or other policy              examining its background in the Jewish community of Palestine,
domains. Prerequisite: 79-202.                                          its place in the classical world, its relationship to other mystery
                                                                        religions of the time and certain variant forms (now known as
79-209     Theory and Practice in Anthropology                          Gnosticism) which it assumed prior to the crystallization of
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   orthodoxy.
How has anthropology changed over its relatively short lifetime?
This course will examine the major trends and schools of thought        79-221     Christendom Divided: The Protestant and Catholic
in anthropology in the twentieth century, focusing on how theory        Reformations, 1450-1650
shapes the questions anthropologists ask as well as their               Intermittent: 9 units
fieldwork methods. Students will learn to "find" theory within          At the dawn of the sixteenth century, western Europeans still
ethnographic writing, both by analyzing the work of notable             shared a common religion and identity as members of the Roman
anthropologists, and by experimenting with various theoretical          Catholic Church. Within less than two decades, this uniformity
orientations in their own analysis of ethnographic data. After first    began to crumble, and the very fabric of western culture was
examining some of the 19th century influences on the emerging           irrevocably altered. By 1550, Europe was splintered into various
field of social science, we will explore the paths anthropology took    conflicting churches, confessions, sects, and factions, each with
in the early and mid-twentieth century, focusing on how culture         its own set of truths and its own plan for reforming the church and
and social structure were understood and analyzed at this time.         society at large. This period of rapid and unprecedented change in
Next, we will turn to issues of power, practice, and history, and the   western history is commonly known as the Reformation. Though
influence of new theoretical approaches on anthropological              this term has traditionally referred to the birth of Protestantism, it
conceptualizations of culture. Finally, we will explore how more        also encompasses the simultaneous renewal and reform that
recent theoretical trends, including feminist and post-modern           occurred within Roman Catholicism. This course will survey the
contributions, have shaped contemporary anthropology. The               Reformations of the sixteenth century, both Protestant and
course will emphasize that, though theory has developed in              Catholic, examining the causes of the Reformation, the dynamics
recognizable ways throughout anthropology's history, this               of reform, and its significance for western society and culture. In
development has not been linear. To show how older theoretical          the process, we will analyze such on-going problems as religious
approaches resurface in more recent anthropological work,               persecution and the accommodation of dissent, the relationship
readings will pair classic works in the various theoretical schools     between religion and politics, and the interactions between
with more contemporary reworkings of those same theoretical             ideology and political, social, and economic factors in the process
orientations.                                                           of historical change.

79-210      Picturing Others: A Course on Ethnographic Film             79-222     Religion in American Society
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   Intermittent: 9 units
Western society has long been fascinated with the "primitive."          Opinion polls taken from the 1940s through the 1990s report
From their earliest days, photography and movies have been used         annually that over 90 percent of Americans believe in God. Our
to picture these others, seeming to offer a direct account of ways      earliest institutions, when they were not churches themselves,
of life, a "truth" that cannot be conveyed in words. In this course     reflected a strong religious influence. Americans have felt
we examine ethnographic films as descriptions of unfamiliar (and        religious competition so keenly in various times in our history
sometimes familiar) others. We discuss the ways films interpret         that they have rioted in support of one denomination over another.
and portray material, examine the significance of changing              Why was (is) this so? How have Americans experienced, thought
techniques, and confront the problem of point of view. We also          about, and manifested their various religious beliefs throughout
evaluate the use of visual media for social analysis in general.        our history, and how have Americans interacted with fellow
Students make a film or video tape, applying ideas and issues           citizens of differing beliefs? How has religion influenced the
from readings and class discussion. The work with film and video        development of our current institutions, and why do Americans
require extra course hours (to be announced in class).                  believe what they do? This course examines these and other
                                                                        issues connected to American religious development.
79-214     18th Century European History
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   79-223     Protest and Dissent in American History
The goal of this course will be to examine, in both breadth and         Intermittent: 9 units
depth, the history of Europe between roughly 1715 (the death of         What does it mean to protest in a country that was founded by
Louis XVI) and 1815 (the fall of Napoleon). Broad themes to be          revolutionaries? Are radicals heroes or traitors? Dissenters like
covered include “old regime” Europe, European religiosity and           Sarah Grimke, Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, Eugene V.
secularism, the Enlightenment, the development of public opinion,       Debs, Emma Goldman, Malcolm X, Cesar Chavez and others
the rise of Prussia, the industrial revolution in Britain and the       struggled for different convictions but had one thing in common:
continent, mercantilism, and trends in the arts. Students will be       to further their causes they had to overcome the traditional
expected to attend lectures, participate in class discussion, write     aversion to radicalism in America. This course traces not only
two exams, read and discuss a number of primary and secondary           the history of particular protest movements since revolutionary
sources, submit weekly opinion papers, and complete a term              times, but also the historical development of mainstream politics,
paper on an 18th-century European topic.                                law, and public opinion regarding radical dissent.

79-218    The Roots of Rock & Roll                                      79-225     Religions of China
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   Intermittent: 9 units
This course spends 8 weeks on early blues and country “roots”           How have Chinese addressed universal questions of personal
music (like Bessie Smith and Woody Guthrie) of the 1920s-               meaning and survival, and of social connection and authority, with
1950s before turning, in the last third of the semester, to the         the help of religion? This course is interested in solutions
1960s revolutions of Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin and          elaborated over the centuries by Chinese of all social classes.
other rock & roll legends. The format is informal lecture and           Without neglecting the textual canon, we are particularly
discussion on Tues/Thurs afternoons – plus a required film              interested in changing styles of ritual organization and practice.
screening and discussion every Wednesday evening, 6:30-                 We examine mutual borrowing and competition among
9:20pm. Besides reading 3-4 books and many articles,                    shamanism, ancestor worship, Confucianism, Buddhism, and
assignments include weekly music listening, four short essays           Daoism, and the adaptation of each to varying social contexts
and a longer final paper.                                               and state policies up to the present. Much of the material is in the
                                                                        form of original sources including descriptive accounts,
79-219     The Holocaust in Historical Perspective                      introduced by religious historians, and fiction. The latter part of
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   the course uses anthropological works to account for the religious
Why did Hitler unleash the Holocaust against the Jews? How did          practices currently flourishing in both Taiwan and Mainland China.
he do it, and how did he get away with it? This course explores the
attitudes and actions of the perpetrators, the bystanders, and the      79-230     Technology in American Society
victims. Moreover, it discusses what implications and issues            Intermittent: 9 units
arise from this watershed event in World and Jewish history. It         This course introduces students to the history of technology in
descends into the world of the Holocaust not only by reading            the United States and examines the ways that American society
about events and viewing several films, but also by meeting             both shaped and was shaped by technological change. The
Holocaust survivors.                                                    course’s readings, films, and lectures give voice to both the
                                                                        prophets of technological progress and those who found both such
79-220    Early Christianity                                            change and its prophets less than desirable. The course aims to
                                                                        raise fundamental questions about technology, society, culture,
                                                                        and power and their interaction across time and space.

                                                                        79-231     American Foreign Policy 1945-Present
                                                                        Fall and Spring: 9 units
                                                                                                               Course Descriptions      441




This course provides an introduction to the study of U.S. foreign      relations is an important component of the course, but the major
policy. Its main focus will be on problems and possibilities           emphasis is placed on the internal experiences of black people
confronting the world during the Cold War as well as global            within the framework of larger socioeconomic and political
political changes in the post-Cold War era and since 9/11.             processes in U.S. history. Although the course includes a general
Important foreign policy strategies which will be discussed            text, assigned readings revolve around detailed studies of
include the strategy of containment, NSC-68, the Eisenhower-           particular topics (e.g., work, family, and religion) or chronological
Dulles “New Look,” the Kennedy-Johnson “flexible response,”            periods (e.g., the colonial, revolutionary, and ante-bellum eras).
“détente,” the democratic peace, and contemporary approaches
to combating global terror. Theoretical readings in history and        79-242     African-American History II
political science will be used as analytic filters to assess both      Intermittent: 9 units
scholarly evaluations of American foreign policy and key               This course examines the black experience from Reconstruction
historical episodes.                                                   to the present. The evolution of race relations is an important
                                                                       component of the course, but the major emphasis is placed on the
79-233     The United States and the Middle East since 1945            internal experiences of black people, within the framework of
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  larger socioeconomic and political processes in U.S. history.
Since the end of WWII, the United States has been repeatedly           Although the course includes a general text, assigned readings
involved in Middle Eastern affairs. This course examines US            revolve around detailed studies of particular topics (e.g., work,
interests and intrigues in the region, moving chronologically from     family, and religion) or chronological periods (e.g., the Great
1945 to the present. Issues covered include the Cold War in the        Migration, Depression, World War II, and the Civil Rights Era).
Middle East arena; oil politics; US as Arab-Israeli peacemaker;
US military intervention in the Middle East; US and Islamic            79-243     A History of American Urban Life
fundamentalism; Middle Eastern terrorism; and case studies             Intermittent: 9 units
concerning US relations with key Middle Eastern countries.             This course examines the development of urban America during
                                                                       the 19th and 20th centuries. It explores the evolution of urban
79-234    Body Politics: Women and Health in America                   structure, the development and impact of urban technologies
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  (transportation, water/wastewater, energy and communications),
Women's bodies have been the sites of long-standing, and               ethnic and racial change and conflict in the city, and political and
sometimes deadly, political battles. This course takes a topical       policy issues. It discusses alterations in American city structure
approach to the history of American women's health in the              and form through the walking city, the networked city, and the
nineteenth and twentieth centuries in order to understand why          development of the outer or edge city.
women's bodies have been such heated sites of struggle. It
covers topics such as the history of contraception, abortion,          79-244      Pittsburgh and the Transformation of Modern Urban
menstruation, sexuality, female anatomy, rape, domestic abuse,         America
menopause, pregnancy, and childbirth. It explores how American         Intermittent: Mini Session - 6 units
culture has constructed these issues over time, while also             This course examines 5 major themes: (1) the development of
examining women's organizing around them. Paying attention to          the Pittsburgh region in the 19th century from a commercial to a
the biological, socio-cultural, economic, and political dimensions     leading industrial center; (2) the development of the urban built
of these various subjects, this course investigates how biology        environment; (3) attempts to cope with the impacts of
and science are not simply objective, but often subjective, being      industrialism on labor, government, and the environment before
deeply implicated in the politics and history of inequality.           World War II; (4) the Pittsburgh Renaissances in the post-World
                                                                       War II period; and (5) the deindustrialization of Pittsburgh and
79-236      Eighteenth Century China Through Literature                attempts to adapt to new social-technological realities. The class
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  will follow a seminar-type format; students will be expected to
Run like a seminar, this course examines China’s most famous           contribute to class discussions and to complete a major research
novel, the 18th century work by Cao Xueqin and Gao E, The Story        study on the region. The class will make use of both visual
of the Stone (aka Dream of Red Mansions, Hongloumeng), in a            (photographs, films) and written materials as well as using the
lively five-volume translation. This portrait of a family in decline   Pittsburgh region as a laboratory through tours.
offers a comprehensive view of urban social life and culture in the
18th century. We add brief analytical readings on such key topics      79-247      East Asians in Film
as authority in the family, gender, sexuality, folk religion,          Intermittent: 9 units
connoisseurship (of food, gardens, art, poetry), patronage and         The course is intended as a visual introduction to East Asian
ethnic relations. In case some of the volumes go out of print, the     societies, as they adapted to the wrenching experiences in the
seminar will read a one-volume version and parts of several other      20th century. Our focus is on love and family life and the
novels of the period. No prior knowledge of China is required, but     representation of both in China and Japan. The topics are seen in
you should enjoy reading! Limited enrollment, assigned papers,         relationship to the Confucian ethic, and under pressure of war,
no exams.                                                              rapid economic change, crime, and revolution. We also ask how
                                                                       East Asian filmmakers have made use of their medium, and how
79-237     City Histories: Delhi and London                            political and other conditions have affected their work.
Intermittent: 9 units
The British Empire connected two great cities – London and Delhi       79-248    History and Theory of Property: Land, Bodies, Ideas
– but even before the British came to India, Tudor London and          and Information
Mughal Delhi presented a dazzling display of imperial politics and     Intermittent: 9 units
culture to the world. This course looks at the parallel destinies of   This course surveys the changing relationship between private
these metropolises. It proceeds from that early-modern period          property and the public domain from the Roman Empire to the
into the age of Queen Victoria and her Indian Viceroys, down until     present. In the first part of the class, we will explore the roots of
today’s post-colonial era. Finally, it examines some of the ways in    our present day property regimes: the land enclosure movement
which late-modern political events, environmental change and           in early modern England (the conversion of common lands into
migration have affected these two civic spaces. Art, travel,           private estates); and the development of intellectual property
diaries, poetry, film, music and other documents will supplement       protection in Anglo-American law. We will also examine the slave
the main textbooks. At the end of the course, you are expected to      laws of ancient Rome and the antebellum United States, as well
have learnt something about South Asian and British history,           as some representative non-Western views of property, including
about city cultures in ‘East’ and ‘West’ and to have reflected about   those of Native Americans and the Chinese. In the second part of
the changing roles for metropolises in a contemporary globalized       the course, we will examine how concepts of property have
world.                                                                 recently expanded to include works of art and culture, software
                                                                       code, materials shared via the internet, various forms of
79-240      Recent U.S. History 1945 - Present                         information, one's own body, cell lines, and regions of the genome.
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  We will conclude with a discussion of how Western ideas of
This course will explore the social and cultural history of America    property are being spread around the world through international
since World War II. Topics include: the dawn of the nuclear age,       trade agreements at the same time that they are being contested
the cold war, the beatniks, the Korean and Vietnam wars, the civil     and rethought in their places of origin.
rights movement, the women's movement, hippies, the energy
crisis of the 1970s, the rise of environmentalism, yuppies, the        79-251     Flesh and Spirit: Early Modern Europe, 1400-1800
turn toward conservatism in the 1980s. We will use music, film,        Intermittent: 9 units
television, and literature as evidence of cultural change in           This course examines European history from the Black Death to
American society during the past 50 years.                             the French Revolution, a period known to history as the “early
                                                                       modern” period. That is, it marks a period in European history
79-241     African-American History I                                  that was not quite medieval, and yet not quite modern. Many
Intermittent: 9 units                                                  features of modern society, such as the nation-state, free-trade
This course examines a series of topics--economic,                     economies, religious pluralism, scientific rationalism, and secular
demographic, social, cultural and political--in African-American       culture trace their origins to the early modern era, yet the period
history from slavery to the Civil War. The evolution of race           was also marked by important continuities with the Middle Ages.
                                                                       During this course, we will explore how Europeans re-imagined
                                                                       their world in its transition from the medieval to the modern.
4 4 2 Course Descriptions




Topics to be considered will include the “renaissance” of the arts,
the problems of religious reform, exploration and colonialism, the       79-258     Introduction to African History: 18th Century to Neo-
rise of science, and the expansion of the state. Through these           Colonialism
developments, we will focus on Europeans’ changing notions of            Intermittent: 9 units
the human body, the body politic, and the natural world, as well as      The course is designed to give students an understanding and
their re-interpretations of the proper relation between the human        appreciation of African history and culture from the "inside out."
and the divine, the individual and the community, and the present        Though it deals with the period of European expansion in Africa, it
and the past.                                                            is centered on African language/ ethnic groups, villages, and
                                                                         individuals as historical actors who daily make collective and
79-253      The Development of Caribbean Culture                         personal decisions to pass down, innovate, and borrow practices,
Intermittent: 9 units                                                    technology, spiritual systems, etc. in the face of social, political,
This course is a general introduction to Caribbean histories and         and economic realities. The course is also designed to get
cultures, from before the arrival of Columbus to the present.            students thinking critically about how historians select and
Comprised of dozens of islands, the Caribbean has been a stage           interpret sources to construct and reconstruct history at these
for the encounter of multiple empires and peoples-indigenous,            different levels.
European, African, and Asian. It remains an area of remarkable
linguistic, religious, political, and ethnic diversity in the present.   79-259     Introduction to Religion
In this course we will explore some of the major themes that have        Intermittent: 9 units
characterized the region's many histories and cultures: the early        The objective of this course is to introduce students to the
cultural encounters of the period of conquest and colonization;          variety of intellectual disciplines by which religions can be
the Atlantic slave trade, the emergence of plantation societies,         studied and some of the topical concerns of Hinduism, Buddhism,
and patterns of slave resistance; nationalism, imperialism and           Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Topics to be covered in the
revolution; and the place of migration, popular religion and             course include: What is religion? Religious studies vis-à-vis
tourism in the contemporary Caribbean. Through the exploration           historical, anthropological, sociological, and psychological
of such topics as Negritude and Rastafari, and such media as             approaches to religion; the sacred/holy; myth, symbol; society
music and film, this course will place the connections between           and the sacred; deity; cosmogony, religious anthropology,
politics and culture at the center of our encounter with the             theodicy; ethics, eschatology and secular humanism in the
Caribbean's complex historical past.                                     modern age.

79-254      The Pacific Islands: History and Culture                     79-260     Mayan America
Intermittent: 9 units                                                    Intermittent: 9 units
This semester, we are focusing on Hawaii--a Pacific Island, an           This course will explore the history and culture of the Maya from
American state, and a popular tourist spot. Hawaii at once fills         before the European conquest of the Americas to the present.
our imagination and occupies a strategic niche in United States          After a survey of pre-Hispanic Mayan societies and of the
policies. Since its “discovery” by Captain Cook, Hawaii has              European conquest of Mexico and Central America, we will
attracted visitors and has welcomed visitors not only from the           consider the experience of the indigenous Maya under Spanish
Untied States but from all over the world. The story has not             colonial rule and under the rule of Latin American nation-states in
always been positive: we will take a historical perspective on the       the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Finally, we will cover the
changes in Hawaii over the past two and a half centuries, and we         recent history of political conflict and military repression in
will explore the culture of the islands. We will read accounts by        Guatemala, the Zapatista uprising in southern Mexico, and
“outsiders” and accounts by kama’aina, “children of the land,”           increasing Mayan migration to the United States. Drawing upon
residents of Hawaii. We will also consider representations of the        the varied perspectives of archaeology, cultural anthropology, and
islands in media other than text, films, for instance, and visual        social history, this course will explore several recurrent themes in
arts. The goal is to explore the complexity of a place that is often     Mayan America, such as: conquest, adaptation and resistance;
stereotyped as “paradise,” but exemplifies problems of conquest          indigenous political and communal organization; popular religion;
and commercialization, of ethnic groups and boundaries, of               Mayan cultural and ethnic identity; "tradition" and "modernity";
commercialization and globalization, and of identity politics and        state violence and human rights; and indigenous political and
independence movements. Readings include anthropological                 cultural mobilization at the local, national, and transnational
texts, literature, and selected essays.                                  levels.

79-255     Irish History                                                 79-261      A History of Asian Americans in the United States
Intermittent: 9 units                                                    Intermittent: 9 units
This course surveys Irish history from the earliest human                Immigration has been a major transforming force in American
settlements until the present day, with emphasis on the period           history. In the past forty years the population of Asian Americans
since the sixteenth century. Our main objective is to understand         in the United States has increased dramatically and has become
the sources of conflict in modern Ireland. In order to do that,          much more diverse. New groups have joined the earlier Chinese,
however, we look at a number of topics such as the role of religion      Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, and Asian Indians, and they range
in Irish society; the causes of population growth, movement and          from peasants to Ph.D.s. In this course we will trace the history of
decline; changing forms of protest; and the formation of rival           Asian immigration to the United States and examine how
myths of the Irish past and its meaning.                                 historical, social, political and economic factors have both
                                                                         affected and been affected by this migration. We will identify and
79-256      Biology and Society: Evolution, Animal Experimentation       discuss the common experience of migrants across a number of
and Eugenics                                                             time periods and Asian ethnic groups, as well as the differences
Intermittent: 9 units                                                    that make each group's story unique. Finally, we will examine the
This course focuses on the relationship between biology and              evolution of American responses to these various immigrant
society in Britain, Europe and the United States from the early          groups, questioning whether the responses reflected or helped to
19th century to the beginning of WWII. We will examine the ways          shape the opinions of Americans in the respective time periods.
that biology and society evolved together during this period, and
became increasingly reliant on one another in the process. The           79-263     From Soil to Oil: Energy, Ecology, and Globalization
first part of the course will cover the development of evolutionary      Intermittent: 9 units
thought, especially Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural              Both critics and advocates of globalization agree that the world
selection. In order to gain a full appreciation of Darwin’s              we live in is characterized by the accelerated movement of
accomplishments, we will examine the scientific, religious,              capital, goods, and people across borders. All of this movement,
political and philosophical ideas that influenced him. We will also      whether it occurs across physical or virtual space, requires
explore the influence of Darwin’s theory in all realms of society.       energy - lots of energy. For most of recorded history, human
The second part of the course will be devoted to the rise of             societies derived energy from a “biological regime” that included
experimentalism in biology. As part of this unit, we will analyze        soils, plants, animals, and water. This started to change more
scientific and moral debates about animal experimentation that           than two hundred years ago when people in England began to heat
took place in the mid-19th century as Western conceptions of             their homes with coal. However, a “global” shift to fossil fuels did
humanity’s place in nature were changing dramatically. The               not take place until after World War II when agriculture,
course will culminate with an exploration of the early history of        manufacturing, and transportation systems became heavily
genetics and its social application in the form of eugenics              dependent on coal, oil, and gas. The transition to a “fossil fuel
                                                                         regime” has enabled unprecedented rates of consumption and
79-257    History of the American Working Class                          wealth accumulation while contributing to equally unprecedented
Intermittent: 9 units                                                    rates of ecological change. This course will use lecture, readings,
This course will examine the transformation of the American              film, and fieldtrips to explore the political, economic, and
working class from its preindustrial origins to the recent period of     ecological dimensions of this great transformation in a variety of
deindustrialization. It will emphasize the changing relationship         geographical contexts including Brazil, China, England, India, the
between owners, managers, and workers, the role of the state, and        Middle East, Mexico, Nigeria, and Venezuela.
the impact of gender, race, and ethnicity. More specifically, this
course will not only analyze the factors that facilitated and/or         79-264     China's Neighbors
impeded working class solidarity, but assess the impact of the           Intermittent: 9 units
working class upon the development of American history.                  This course examines East Asian peoples on the peripheries of
                                                                                                                   Course Descriptions     443




China and their interrelations from the time of Genghis Khan to            79-278     China's Environment: Past and Present
the present, including Mongols, Manchus, Koreans, Tibetans,                Intermittent: 9 units
Muslim Turks of Central Asia, and ethnic groups of south China.            This course examines China's changing ecology, and explores
It is, in part, a history of a civilization seen from its margins. We      whether and how sustainable development has been, is being, and
question the usual narrative of China’s uncomplicated absorption           might be pursued by its vast population. Without neglecting
of its neighbors and conquerors, and pay attention,                        culture--e.g., Confucian, Daoist, Buddhist and Altaic (steppe)
unconventionally, to voices of minority peoples. Besides ecology,          views of ideal human/environment interaction--we trace historical
war and diplomacy, we examine cultural conceptions and mutual              demographic patterns and their effects on China's fauna and flora,
influences. We also look for the emergence of a sense of identity          and investigate past government efforts at water control,
among peoples in contact, including Han Chinese, especially at             migration, new crop introduction, natural disasters, etc. Over half
the onset of nationalism and industrialization. The course also            of the course concerns the People's Republic (1949-), paying
looks at some Western views of the subcontinent’s peoples.                 special attention to birth control policies, the steppe reclamation,
Among our reading materials will be Harrell, Cultural Encounters           the Three Gorges dam, industrial growth, pollution scandals,
on China’s Ethnic Frontiers; Elliott, Manchu Way; Goldstein, Snow          tourism and environmental policy. We work mostly by discussion,
Lion; and Rudelson, Oasis Identities. Students research and                centering on materials read in advance by class members. Mid-
present their own topic in stages and do a term paper. No exams.           term and final exams, and two five-page papers on set topics.

79-267      Pre-Colonial West African History 1100 to 1800                 79-280     Russian History from the First to the Last Tsar
Intermittent: Mini Session - 6 units                                       Intermittent: 9 units
This course examines major themes in pre-colonial West African             This course covers a broad sweep of Russian history beginning
history, Islamization, urbanization, economic specialization,              with the first settlements of tribal nomads in the ninth century and
identity formation, interregional and trans-Atlantic trade, and            ending with the fall of the 300-year-old Romanov dynasty in
European conquest. The focus of the course is on indigenous                1917. In our study of Russian colonization and state formation,
social processes and institutions and their evolution as West              we make the acquaintance of Mongol marauders, greedy princes,
Africa becomes an important part of the wider Islamic and                  and peasant rebels, as well as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great,
Atlantic worlds. Students will be introduced to a variety of               and the long succession reformers and reactionaries who
interdisciplinary sources as we reconstruct a history which in             occupied the Russian throne. We explore the development of a
some cases pre-dates and in others is not recorded in written              working class, and the uprising of workers, peasants, and soldiers
sources.                                                                   that ultimately brought down the Tsar.

79-268 From the Local to the Global: Africa in the World                   79-281      Russian History: From Communism to Capitalism
Intermittent: Mini Session - 6 units                                       Intermittent: 9 units
Most Americans would identify slavery and colonialism when                 This course covers a broad sweep of Soviet history from the
thinking of Africa’s relationship to the rest of the world. While          revolution in 1917 to the turmoil of the present. Spanning almost
these two institutions have been critically important in shaping           a century of upheaval and transformation, the course examines
Africa’s present condition and recent history, they only constitute        the October revolution, the ruthless power struggles of the
a fraction of Africa’s past and its interaction with the wider world.      1920s, the triumph of Stalin, the costly industrialization and
This course traces globalization to ancient times and seeks to             collectivization drives, the battle against fascism, and the
understand it from an African perspective.                                 present attempts to create a market economy. The course
                                                                           provides essential background for anyone interested in
79-270     Chinese Culture and Society                                     understanding the explosive, history-making events in the former
Intermittent: 9 units                                                      Soviet Union.
Few courses provide an opportunity to look at a civilization as a
whole. If we examine the Chinese quarter of humanity in this way,          79-282     The Soviet Union in World War II: Military, Political, and
we can better understand the interplay of ecology and history, of          Social History
class and community, and of self and society in China-and in any           Intermittent: 9 units
other society. We may also gain a new perspective on the West,             On June 22, 1941, Hitler invaded the Soviet Union. German
whose peculiarities we too readily take as normal. This                    troops quickly reached the hills above Moscow, surrounded
introductory course focuses on Chinese solutions to Chinese                Leningrad in the longest running siege in modern history,
problems, as reflected in the words of the literate (e.g.,                 devastated the country's economy, and slaughtered millions of
philosophers and soldiers, dramatists and novelists) or in the             Soviet civilians. Eventually, the Red Army came back from defeat
actions of the unlettered (e.g., peasants, women and religious             to free the occupied territories and drive Hitler's army back to
cultists). We proceed by making explicit their values and ours,            Berlin. This course examines why and how the war was fought.
setting up a kind of discourse across cultures. Special attention          Using history, films, poetry, veterans accounts, documentaries,
is paid to the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.                       and journalism, it surveys the rise of fascism, the Stalinist purges
                                                                           of the Red Army, the Hitler-Stalin pact of 1939, the Nazi
79-271     Modern China                                                    massacres of Soviet Jews, peasants, and partisans, life on the
Intermittent: 9 units                                                      home front, and the great battles of the war. Occasional Thursday
Assuming no prior familiarity with China or its culture, this course       evening film screenings.
examines China’s continuous changes from the 1800s on, in its
cultural traditions, identities, daily life, social relations, and self-   79-283      East Asia and World War II
perceptions, engendered by both internal initiatives and external          Intermittent: 9 units
contact. We look at how changes unfolded in mass movements                 This is a history of the experience of war in East Asia (1931-
and in individual lives, in statecraft thought and in societal             1945). The course explores the rise of Japan's empire in the
practices. We examine the roles of such historical actors as the           context of international security concerns, with a special focus on
extended family, modern reformers, the state, and ethnic groups.           China and the fateful impact of invasion there. It examines the
Participants learn to use primary sources in making historical             cultural settings of the Pacific War, the impact of the war on
observation and to critique some analytical approaches to                  civilians, and the conduct of the war on the battlefield. It
modern Chinese history. Since we rely heavily on assigned                  concludes by re-examining the continuing debate on the atomic
readings, active class participation is essential in this course.          bombing of two Japanese cities. We explore these topic through
                                                                           memoirs, contemporary accounts, cartoons, scholarly studies,
79-275     Religious Identities and Religious Conflicts in                 and a wide range of films.
Nineteenth-Century Europe
Intermittent: 9 units                                                      79-284     Family and Gender in Russian History
This course explores the place of religious identity and conflict in       Intermittent: 9 units
the history of European society from the French Revolution to              Using film, novels, interviews, and historical sources, this course
World War I. We study the many ways that individuals                       will explore the history of gender relations, the family, and women
constructed and used their religious identities to approach                in Russia. Beginning in the late nineteenth century, we will explore
problems of public life. We examine continuities and changes in            family relations in both noble and peasant families, the laws
religious institutions as well as conflicts between churches and           governing marriage, divorce and children, restrictions on women's
states. The course shows that, far from declining in importance            movement and education, and gender roles. We will look at the
during the processes of economic and political modernization, or           explosive changes of the Russian revolution and the radical
becoming part of private life, religious beliefs and identities            experiments with free love and communal childrearing. We will
played an increasing critical role in public life. We approach the         trace the development of opportunities for women in the 1930s,
topic through case studies, beginning with the religious conflicts         the painful demographic impact of WWII, and the changing culture
and settlement between church and state during the French                  of the post war years. We will end by examining the difficulties
revolution, Evangelical Christian participation in the anti-slavery        that rural and urban families are currently facing in the transition
movement in Britain, Protestant-Catholic rivalries in Germany,             to a market economy.
the power of the papacy in Italy, and the s Dreyfus case in France.
Students will have reading assignments from both primary and               79-286    African Americans in Pittsburgh
secondary sources. Written assignments include several short               Intermittent: Mini Session - 6 units
papers and a final examination.                                            This course will examine the development of Pittsburgh’s African
                                                                           American community from its late 18th century roots through the
                                                                           era of deindustrialization during the late 20th and early 21st
4 4 4 Course Descriptions




centuries. The course will emphasize not only the ways that a           79-296     Genes, Clones and Stem Cells: Biology and Society in
variety of external socioeconomic, cultural, and political forces       the 20th Century and Beyond
shaped the history of black people in western Pennsylvania, but         Intermittent: 9 units
also the diverse strategies that African Americans devised to           This course examines the historical, political, cultural, and
give meaning to their own lives and how these changed over time.        ethical dimensions of genetics, developmental biology and
Students will read both primary and secondary accounts of               reproductive medicine from the beginning of the 20th century to
Pittsburgh’s African American history; write short analytical           the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on: 1) charting the
papers on specific topics or themes; and engage in regular              growth of scientific knowledge about life processes; 2) analyzing
classroom discussions of assigned readings.                             how cultural and social context deeply affects the production of
                                                                        biological knowledge; 3) understanding the central role of the life
79-288     Bananas, Baseball, and Borders: Latin America and the        sciences in shaping the way we think about ourselves and our
US from Alamo to Drug Wars                                              world; and 4) critiquing the ways that biological knowledge is
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   portrayed in the public sphere by both scientists and the media.
Consider this: The U.S. government maintains an economic                Topics covered will include: the discovery of the structure of
embargo on Cuba even as Cuban musicians like the Buena Vista            DNA; the emergence of ideas about embryonic development; the
Social Club enjoy wild popularity in the United States. Former          nature/nurture (sociobiology) debate; the cloning controversy;
left-wing guerrillas in El Salvador resent the U.S. government for      the stem cell debate and the politics of abortion; the Human
its past support of military dictators while they anxiously await for   Genome Project and its offspring; the commercialization of
money to be sent from their cousins who clean office buildings in       biology in the late 20th century; and the ethical dimensions of
Washington DC. North Americans donate money to protect                  reproductive medicine (i.e., genetic screening, sex selection and
tropical forests while they consume enormous quantities of              IVF).
bananas grown where rainforests once stood. This course will
attempt to make sense of the tumultuous and paradoxical                 79-299      US-Arab Encounters
relationships between Latin America and the United States from          Intermittent: 12 units
the early 1800s to the present. The course will go beyond state-        What is the nature of the relationship between the United States
to-state diplomatic relations in order to explore the economic,         and the Arab countries? This is an innovative cross-cultural
social, and cultural dimensions of the often intimate ties between      course that will enable CMU students in Pittsburgh and at the
the two regions. Readings and other course materials will focus on      CMU campus in Qatar to interact with one another and with
U.S. encounters with Mexico, Central America, Cuba, and the             students at other American and Arab universities in exploring the
Andean nations.                                                         US-Arab relationship. The goal is to improve awareness and
                                                                        understanding. Students will delve into themes and questions
79-289    Development of South Asian Culture and Society                within an interdisciplinary framework that includes history,
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   international relations, conflict resolution and media studies.
This course will familiarize students with an overview of South         Topics range from the role of religion in society to an
Asian culture and society from a historical standpoint. It provides     investigation of the part media plays in shaping US and Arab
a broad perspective on the present –day countries of India,             perceptions. CMU students in Pittsburgh and Qatar will utilize the
Pakistan and Bangladesh, and also the South Asian diasporas             newest web-camera and videoconferencing for the traditional in-
across the contemporary world. While it does not require any prior      class part of the course and enjoy a chance to work
background in Asian history, it demands a willingness to read and       collaboratively on projects with students elsewhere in the US and
encounter a variety of historical and cultural materials from the       the Arab world via an on-line discussion forum. Students
region. Audio-visual materials and literature extracts will be          registering for this class should be prepared for a substantial time
extensively used to supplement and enrich the readings.                 commitment to allow for the opportunity to meet and work in real
                                                                        time with students far from Pittsburgh. Participating schools
79-290       Between Revolutions: The Development of Modern Latin       include: Tufts, Harvard, Clark, Virginia Commonwealth, Birzeit,
America                                                                 Qatar, American University of Cairo, American University of
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   Beirut, and Philadelphia University (Jordan).
When the Haitian Revolution began in 1789, everything south of
the newly created United States was under European colonial             79-301      Ritual, Culture, and Identity
rule, slavery was an established institution, and the Catholic          Intermittent: 9 units
Church held considerable power over the daily lives of people.          The study of religious rituals, and of related phenomena such as
However, when the Mexican Revolution began in 1910, Spanish             secular celebrations, political rites, and "social dramas," has an
and Portuguese colonialism had collapsed along with slavery, and        important place in the disciplines of anthropology and history. As
the power of the church had greatly diminished. New societal            well-defined formal events that deploy culturally familiar symbols
institutions emerged that reflected novel ideas about the role of       and transform social positions and identities, rituals have long
secular nation-states, ”free market” economies, and the                 been seen as a key to the relationship between ideas and action.
meanings of “civilization.” This course will use scholarly writings,    Among the topics investigated in this course are the roles of
fiction, film, and video to analyze the profound changes that took      ritualization as a source of power for the state and its enemies, as
place in Latin American society during and between these two            a way of establishing group identity and reframing memory, and as
important revolutions. We will pay attention to the lives of both       a means of coping with social change and subordination. We shall
elites as well as the “everyday” people who helped to shape the         compare ritual and quasi-ritual idioms and solutions across
region’s history.                                                       cultures, under a variety of modern as well as "traditional"
                                                                        conditions.
79-294     The Making of the African Diaspora in the New World
Intermittent: 9 units                                                   79-303     Visual Anthropology
The trans-Atlantic slave trade dispersed Africans in the New            Intermittent: 9 units
World and the Old, creating the African Diaspora. Generations of        The use of photography and film in anthropology raises important
scholars have disputed whether descendants of enslaved                  theoretical and methodological questions. Using ethnographic
Africans could have retained any of their African culture and/ or       films and selected anthropological readings as our source
fully assimilated into New World societies. This course will            material, we discuss issues like: the relationship between the
combine a chronological, geographical, and a thematic approa