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Microsoft® Word 97 Quick Reference

-9Outputting
Word provides many ways for you to produce output. You can print form letters and envelopes with the Mail Merge feature and even select specific records to limit the number of form letters you send. After you have previewed your data, you can send the data directly to a printer. You can print the current page, a group of pages (page range), or the whole document. You can even compress a document to fit on one page. In addition, you can fax or e-mail your data directly from your Word documents.

Documents: Previewing
When you are ready to print your document, using Print Preview first allows you to see the layout of the pages. You can then make any necessary corrections before you print the document. The Print Preview toolbar contains many convenient buttons for zooming and displaying multiple pages. Not only can you view the document, but you can edit in the Print Preview mode, too.

Steps
1. Open the document you want to preview, then click the Print Preview button on the Standard toolbar. The document is displayed so you can view one full page or multiple pages at a time. The Print Preview toolbar also helps view the document or make changes. The most common buttons are listed in the table following these steps. 2. Click the Magnifier button on the toolbar to edit in the document. Then click in the part of the document you want to edit. 3. Edit the document, revising and formatting text and even repositioning margins if needed. If the document is a little longer than a page and should fit on one page, click the Shrink to Fit button on the toolbar. 4. Click the Zoom Control button to see more of the page, click the Print button to print, and click the Close button to close Print Preview.
The most common buttons used on the Print Preview toolbar are listed in the following table. Use the pointer and the ScreenTip on the other buttons to see what they do. Button Action Print Prints the document using the printing options set in the Print dialog box. 1

Toggles the mouse pointer between a magnifying glass (for viewing the document) and the normal mouse pointer (for editing the document). One Page Displays the document one page at a time. Multiple Displays the document in multiple pages. If you click this button and drag down and to the Pages right, you can change the preview to display up to 24 pages. Magnifier

Mail Merge: Creating Data Source
If you do not have a data source that contains your list of names and addresses for your merge document, you can create one using the Mail Merge Helper. You can also use address information from Outlook and Schedule+ (see also "Mail Merge: Using Address Book"). You need to create the main document first. (See "Mail Merge: Creating Main Document" before you complete this task.)

Steps
1. With the main document for your mail merge open, choose Tools, Mail Merge to display the Mail Merge Helper dialog box. 2. Choose Get Data under Step 2 on the dialog box; then choose Create Data Source to display the Create Data Source dialog box. 3. Scroll through the list of fields in the Field Names in Header Row list box to see commonly used field names provided by Word. 4. Edit the list of field names using the list following these steps and when finished, choose OK. 5. Word displays the Save As dialog box. In the File Name box, enter a name for the data source document and choose Save. 6. Word displays a decision box; choose Edit Data Source to enter information into the data source file you just created, or choose Edit Main Document to insert merge fields into the main document.
   You can change field names in Step 4 through various options including the following: If you see any field names you won't use in your main document, select the name from the list, then choose the Remove Field Name button. To add a field name that isn't listed, type the name in the Field Name text box, then choose Add Field Name. To change the sequence of field names, select a field name in the Field Names in Header Row list box, then click the up-arrow or down-arrow buttons. The top-to-bottom order of the fields is the order the fields will be in for data entry in the data source. (See also "Mail Merge: Inserting Fields.")

Mail Merge: Creating Envelopes
With the Mail Merge Helper, you can create mail merge envelopes or a document that merges mail merge envelopes and documents at the same time. First, create a main document and a data source, and attach the data source to the main document. If you are not mailing a main document and just want to create mail merge envelopes, create a blank letter with the MERGEFIELD codes at the top in an address block. You will need to create a data source (a location for names and addresses) before you complete this task (see "Mail Merge: Creating Data Source"). After you create the data source, you need to be in the main document (see "Mail Merge: Creating Main Document").

Steps
1. With the main document active, choose Tools, Mail Merge. Click the Create button under Step 1 Main Document, select Envelopes, then select either the Active Window or New Main Document button.
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2. Click the Get Data button under Step 2 Data Source, then select Open Data Source to find the data source file. Select the file and choose Open. 3. Click Set Up Main Document to display the Envelope Options dialog box. Select an Envelope Size, and if necessary, change any of the other options; choose OK to display the Envelope Address dialog box. 4. Insert the appropriate merge fields in the Sample Envelope Address text box using the Insert Merge Field button. Choose the Insert Postal Bar Code if you want Word to insert the POSTNET bar code on the labels, then choose OK. 5. Proceed with the merge options under Step 3 Merge the Data with the Document.
(See also "Mail Merge: Merging Data.")

Mail Merge: Creating Mailing Labels
If you are sending many documents, mailing labels can save you lots of time. You can design a form that prints multiple labels on a page similar to the way you design a form letter. You will need to create a data source (a location for names and addresses) before you complete this task (see "Mail Merge: Creating Data Source").

Steps
1. Choose Tools, Mail Merge. (Unlike other mail merges, the main form letter document does not need to be active.) Click the Create button under Step 1 Main Document, select Mailing Labels, then select either the Active Window or New Main Document button. 2. Click the Get Data button under Step 2 Data Source, and then select Open Data Source to find the data source file. Select the file and choose Open. 3. Click Set Up Main Document to display the Label Options dialog box. Select a label format from the Product Number list box, and if necessary, change any of the other options. Choose OK to display the Create Labels dialog box. 4. Insert the appropriate merge fields in the Sample Label text box using the Insert Merge Field button. Use the Insert Postal Bar Code if you want Word to insert the POSTNET bar code on the labels, and then choose OK. 5. Proceed with the merge options under Step 3 Merge the Data with the Document.
(See also "Mail Merge: Merging Data.")

Mail Merge: Creating Main Document
A main document is a letter, envelope, or other document that has text that you want to appear on every merge, and codes that will be replaced with entries from a data source of names and addresses. The main document has the Mail Merge Helper button on the Mail Merge toolbar, which is the launching point for the other Mail Merge tasks. When creating a main document for a mail merge, you can use an existing document or create a new document. In either case, you need to define the document as the main document for the mail merge.

Steps
1. Open the existing document you want to use, or a new blank document window. Then choose Tools, Mail Merge to display the Mail Merge Helper. 2. Click the Create button under Step 1 Main document, then select Form Letters.
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3. Word will give you a choice to use the Active Window, which is the document window that is open behind the dialog box. Or, start a New Main Document, which will open a new blank document window. 4. Word takes you back to the Mail Merge Helper dialog box, which now displays the type of merge and the name and path of the document under the Main Document step. 5. You are now ready to choose Get Data under Step 2 Data Source, or Edit the Main Document under Step 1.
(See also "Mail Merge: Selecting a Data Source," "Mail Merge: Using Address Book," and "Mail Merge: Inserting Fields.")

Mail Merge: Entering Data
After you have created a data source (see "Mail Merge: Creating Data Source"), you will need to enter information into the source and edit existing information. If the data source is created in an application other than Word, follow the procedures for entering and editing in the source application. If, on the other hand, you created the source in Word using the Mail Merge Helper, you can follow these instructions.

Steps
1. When you have finished defining your header fields for the data source, you are presented with the decision box that has two options: choose Edit Data Source, or choose Edit Main Document. Choose the Edit Data Source button to enter information into the data source. 2. If you have been working with the main document, choose the Mail Merge Helper button on the toolbar. Then choose Edit under Step 2 Data Source and select the file listed. 3. The Data Form dialog box will be displayed. Type the information for each field; press Enter to move to the next field and Shift+Tab to move to the previous field. When you get to the last field on the record and press Enter, you will be presented with a new blank record. 4. To find a specific record, click the Find button, type what you are looking for in the Find What text box, then select the field that the data should be in from the In Field list box. Choose Find First to move to the first record that matches your criteria. 5. The Find First button changes to Find Next after you begin the search. Continue to click Find Next until you find the record you are looking for. When you are finished with the search, choose the Close button. When you finish entering or editing information in the Data Form dialog box, choose the OK button to return to your main document. TIP: You can also access the Data Form dialog box by clicking the Edit Data Source button on the Mail Merge toolbar.

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NOTE: Word data files are just simple tables. You can also open them up and edit them like other tables. However, if you have a lot of fields, it is easier to use the Data Form dialog box.

Mail Merge: Finding Records
You must first have created a data source (a location for your names and addresses) before you do this task (see "Mail Merge: Creating Data Source"). You must also be in the main document before you do this task (see "Mail Merge: Creating Main Document"). After you have created a data source in Word, you may need to find specific records to edit the information. Perhaps the address of one of your clients changed. Perhaps you received a "Return to Sender" notice from your last mailing. These are some examples of when you would want to find specific records in your mail merge.

Steps
1. To go to the data source, you can do one of two things depending on where you are. With the main document open, choose the Edit Data Source button on the Mail Merge toolbar. Or, from the Mail Merge Helper dialog box, choose Edit under Step 2 Data Source and then click the file name. 2. Choose the Find button to display the Find in Field dialog box. 3. In the Find What text box, type what you are searching for. In the In Field list box, select the field name that contains the information you are searching for. 4. Click the Find First button, examine the record, then click the Find Next button to continue the search. Choose Close when you are finished searching. 5. When you get to the record you need to edit, move through the Data Form dialog box with the Enter, Tab, and Shift+Tab keys. Click OK when you are finished editing information.

Mail Merge: Inserting Fields
Once you have attached a data source for your mail merge, you are ready to insert merge fields in the main document. Merge fields are the variable information that changes for each document. The document could be a letter, form, invoice, or even a brochure. Before you can insert merge fields, you must first create the Main Document and attach a data source. (See "Mail Merge: Creating Main Document." and "Mail Merge: Selecting a Data Source" before you do this task.)

Steps
1. If the main document is not open with the Mail Merge toolbar displayed, click the Mail Merge Helper button on the toolbar. Click Edit under Step 1 Main Document, and then select the main document from the displayed list. 2. Position the insertion point where you want a merge field to appear. Click the Insert Merge Field button on the Mail Merge toolbar, and then select the field from the list presented. 3. Type any text or punctuation that is needed in the document and continue inserting merge fields where necessary.
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Mail Merge: Merging Data
Once you have created your main document and selected a data source, you are ready to merge the two together. (See "Mail Merge: Creating Main Document" and "Mail Merge: Selecting a Data Source" before you do this task.)

Steps
1. Open the main document with the data source attached. This can be a form letter, mailing labels, or an envelope. 2. On the Mail Merge toolbar, select one of the buttons in the following list.
Merge to New Document Creates a merged document in a new Word document with the temporary name Form Letters1. Merge to Printer Creates the merged document and prints it on the currently selected printer. Mail Merge Displays the Merge dialog box, which provides options for selecting records and sorting records before you merge. (See also "Mail Merge: Selecting Specific Records and Sorting.")

Mail Merge: Opening a Data Source
(See "Mail Merge: Creating Main Document" before you complete this task.) You can use an existing file for the data source in your mail merge. Your data source could be a Word document, an Excel document, an Access database or query, a dBASE file, or even a FoxPro file, as well as many others.

Steps
1. With the main document for your mail merge open, choose Tools, Mail Merge to display the Mail Merge Helper dialog box. 2. Choose Get Data under Step 2 on the dialog box; then choose Open Data Source to display the Open Data Source dialog box. 3. Word can read many different data source formats. Choose the drop-down arrow on the Files of Type list to select the file type for your data source. 4. Navigate in the Look In list to find the drive and folder where the data source file is stored. Select the file and choose Open, or if available, click the MS Query button if you want to select a non-Word database. 5. When you are prompted that Word found no merge fields in your main document, choose the Edit Main Document button to insert merge fields into the main document. NOTE: Microsoft Query comes as a separate application with Microsoft Excel. If it is available, you can retrieve data that is on your computer, a network, SQL server, or many types of mainframe databases.
(See also "Mail Merge: Inserting Fields.")

Mail Merge: Selecting a Data Source
(See "Mail Merge: Creating Main Document" before you complete this task.) The second step in creating a mail merge is selecting a data source. When you attach the data source to the main document, three things happen: Word can then recognize the file name and path where the data will be located; the Mail 6

Merge toolbar is attached to the top of the main document; and Word can read the field names in the data source so you can use them as merge fields in your main document.

Steps
1. With the main document for your mail merge open, choose Tools, Mail Merge to display the Mail Merge Helper dialog box. 2. Choose Get Data under Step 2 on the dialog box; then choose Create Data Source, Open Data Source, or Use Address Book. 3. Respond to any messages that are displayed. When you are prompted that Word found no merge fields in your main document, choose the Edit Main Document button to insert merge fields into the main document.
(See also "Mail Merge: Opening a Data Source" and "Mail Merge: Inserting Fields.")

Mail Merge: Selecting Specific Records and Sorting
(See "Mail Merge: Creating Main Document," "Mail Merge: Opening a Data Source," and "Mail Merge: Inserting Fields" before you complete this task.) When you are preparing a mail merge, there are often times you don't want to send a letter to everyone in the data source. For example, you may want to limit the merge to a specific ZIP Code, or only send letters to purchasing agents. If this is the case, you can define your criteria for the merge by using the Merge dialog box.

Steps
1. Open the main document with the data source attached. This can be a form letter, mailing labels, or an envelope. 2. On the Mail Merge toolbar, select the Mail Merge button to display the Merge dialog box. 3. In the Merge To list box, select New Document. 4. Choose the Query Options button to specify your criteria for the merge. On the Filter Records tab, select the first field you want to limit from the Field list. On the Comparison list, select the type of comparison (Equal to, Not equal to, Less than, and so on); in the Compare To text box, type the numeric value or text you want compared. 5. After you make an entry in the Compare To box, the word "And" appears in the left-most drop-down list in the next row. Select the And or Or option to add another selection rule. Follow the instructions in Step 4 to add another rule. 6. Choose the Sort Records tab to identify up to three sort levels for the merge. In the Sort By list, select the primary sort field; in the Then By and the Then By list fields, select the secondary sort fields. Select the sort order with the option buttons to the right of the list boxes. Choose OK, then choose Merge to complete the merge. NOTE: In the previous Step 3, you can also choose electronic mail. You then need to choose the Setup button to define the mail or fax address and the subject line for mail messages. Another option is to merge directly to the printer.
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Mail Merge: Using Address Book
Managing names and addresses is a simple task if you use an address book application such as the one in Outlook or Schedule+. After you have entered names and addresses, you can perform a number of tasks on the information. You can edit, insert, delete, search, and sort the information. If you have Microsoft Office 97 and did a typical install, then you have Outlook installed. If you had Microsoft Office 95 and did a typical install, you have Schedule+. Outlook and Schedule+ are personal information managers. Both programs help you manage e-mail, appointments, contacts, and tasks (or todo items). Outlook also helps you manage documents and files on your hard disk, and combines e-mail, phone support, group scheduling, public folders, forms, as well as the capability to store and go to e-mail and Web addresses. If you use Outlook or Schedule+ to keep track of your contacts, you can easily use the contacts for your data source in a mail merge. (See "Mail Merge: Creating Main Document" before you complete this task.)

Steps
1. With the main document for your mail merge open, choose Tools, Mail Merge to display the Mail Merge Helper dialog box. 2. Choose Get Data under Step 2 on the dialog box, then click Use Address Book to open the Use Address Book dialog box. 3. In the Choose Address Book list, select either Outlook Address Book or Schedule+ Contacts, then choose OK. If you are prompted to select the user profile, select a profile from the Profile dialog box, then choose OK. 4. You will be prompted that Word found no merge fields in your main document. Choose the Edit Main Document button to insert merge fields into the main document.
(See also "Mail Merge: Inserting Fields.")

Printing: AutoText Entries
AutoText is like word processing shorthand. It saves you time by storing frequently used text and
graphics with or without formatting for you to use repeatedly. If you have created AutoText entries, you may find it useful to print a list for reference. (See also "AutoText: Creating" in the "Getting Started" part of this book.)

Steps
1. From any document window, choose File, Print to display the Print dialog box. 2. Click the down arrow on the Print What list box, select AutoText entries, and then choose OK. Each AutoText entry prints with the abbreviation in bold on one line and the AutoText entry on the following line(s).

Printing: Comments
If you have inserted comments in your document to provide a note to yourself or other readers, you may find it necessary to print the comments. (See also "Comments: Adding" and "Comments: Displaying" in the "Large Documents" part of this book.)

Steps
1. From any document window, choose File, Print to display the Print dialog box.

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2. Click the down arrow on the Print What list box and select Comments, then choose OK. Each comment prints with the page number on one line followed by the initials of the commentator and the comment on the next line(s).

Printing: Document Properties
Information that describes a document is called a property. For example, the file name, date created, and file size are all file properties for a Word document. You can also add your own descriptive information on the Summary tab of the Properties dialog box. Summary information includes descriptive notes that can help in organizing and finding files later. You can attach summary information to a file at any time. You can then print the document properties to help you organize your files.

Steps
1. Open document that you want to add summary information for. Choose File, Properties to display the Properties dialog box. 2. Click the Summary tab, if necessary. Fill in any of the fields with descriptive text. Notice that some of the information (such as Author) is filled in for you. Use Tab and Shift+Tab to move forward and backward in the dialog box. 3. Click the other tabs to view other property information. 4. On the Custom tab you can select a field name from the Name list (such as Checked by), or by typing in a new field name. Then choose the Type of information to be stored in the field, and type the Value information (such as your initials). Choose OK to return to the document. 5. To print the document properties, choose File, Print to display the Print dialog box. Click the down arrow on the Print What list box and select Document properties; then choose OK. The document properties print with the name of the property, a colon, and then the property value starting on the same line. NOTE: You can add summary information to the document at any point. If you choose to print document properties and have not added summary information, you will get the file name, location and file size, the date created, last saved, last saved by, total editing time, and information related to the last time the document was printed (number of pages, words, and characters).

Printing: Documents
The simplest way to print is to use the Print button on the Standard toolbar. Word skips displaying the Print dialog box and uses the settings last defined or the default settings. When you click the Print button, one copy of the entire document prints to the default printer. You can also change print options by using the Print dialog box.

Steps
1. Choose File, Print to display the Print dialog box. 2. In the Name list box, select the drop-down arrow and choose the printer you want to print the document to. If you are on a network and have shared network printers defined, they will be listed for you to use.
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3. Click the Properties button to display the options for the currently selected printer. Make any changes necessary on the Paper, Graphics, Fonts, and Device Options tabs. Choose OK to return to the Print dialog box. The tabs sometimes differ depending on the printer type. 4. To print one copy of the whole document, leave the other options as they are and choose OK.

Printing: Key Assignments
If you created macros and assigned a key combination to the macros, you may find it easier to remember the macros and their functions if you create a list of key assignments.

Steps
1. From any document window, choose File, Print to display the Print dialog box. 2. Click the down arrow on the Print What list box and select Key Assignments, then choose OK. Each key combination appears on one line with the name of the macro, style, or other entry. On the next line is any description you included (or the program automatically created) while assigning the key.
(See also "Macros: Recording" in the "Customizing" part of this book.)

Printing: Multiple Copies
After you have printed and proofed your document, you may decide to print multiple copies of the document for distribution.

Steps
1. Choose File, Print to display the Print dialog box. 2. In the Number of Copies text box, type the number of copies you want to print. 3. If you want a complete set of the document printed before another copy is printed (rather than multiple copies of each page), check the Collate box. 4. Make any other changes and click OK to print the document.

Printing: Page Ranges
After you have printed your document the first time, you may find and correct some errors. You can choose to print any page or combination of pages in the Print dialog box, rather than printing the entire document again.

Steps
1. Choose File, Print to display the Print dialog box. 2. In the Page Range area of the dialog box, select Current Page to print the page where the insertion point is located. 3. Or, in the Page Range section of the dialog box, select Pages and type the page ranges you want to print. For example: to print pages 21 to 36, you would type 2136; to print pages 1, 6, and 12, you would type 1,6,12. You can even mix and match the range definitions; typing 1,6,12,21-36 would print all pages from both of the previous examples. 4. Make any other changes, then choose OK to print the defined pages.
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Printing: Styles
Style sheets make creating documents with different text characteristics an easy task. Having a list of
styles can help you in planning what you want to use in creating documents. (See also "Styles: Applying" and "Styles: Updating Existing Documents" in the "Formatting" part of this book.)

Steps
1. From any document window, choose File, Print to display the Print dialog box. 2. Click the down arrow on the Print What list box and select Styles, then choose OK. Each style name prints in bold on one line, followed by the formatting characteristics of the style on subsequent lines.

Sending: E-Mail from Word
If you have a modem and Office 97 installed, you can e-mail your Word documents directly from your computer. Word comes with WordMail. Together with Microsoft Outlook, you can e-mail documents.

NOTE: To perform this procedure, you must have Microsoft Outlook installed and configured for use with your fax/modem and the e-mail systems with which you connect.

Steps
1. Open the document that you want to e-mail, then choose File, Send To, Mail Recipient. If prompted, select a Profile to use. Your document appears in the Outlook message as a document icon. This is an embedded OLE object. 2. Click the To button to display the Select Names dialog box, and then choose an address book from the Show Names drop-down list. 3. Select the person you want to send an e-mail message to from the Type Name or Select From list box, then click To. Repeat this step if you want to send the message to more than one person. Choose OK when you are finished selecting names. 4. Fill in the rest of the message, including any message text, and then click the Send button to send the message. NOTE: When you install Outlook, you have the option of using Word as your email editor.

Sending: Faxes from Word
If you have a fax/modem and fax software installed, you can fax your Word documents directly from your computer. Word has a built-in Fax Wizard that walks you through creating a cover sheet and faxing a document to one or more people.

Steps
1. Open the document that you want to fax, then choose File, Send To, Fax Recipient. The Fax Wizard is displayed.
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2. Work through the Fax Wizard dialog boxes to set up your fax. Choose the Next button to proceed to the next dialog box. When Next becomes dimmed, choose the Finish button. If you did not choose a cover sheet, the fax is sent. 3. If you chose to have a fax cover sheet, the cover sheet is displayed for you to enter any additional information. Make any changes, then click the Send Fax Now button on the Fax Wizard toolbar.

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