Docstoc

Imperial County_ California

Document Sample
Imperial County_ California Powered By Docstoc
					       Impact Fee Study


           Prepared for:


Imperial County, California




           Prepared by:




        August 17, 2006
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


                                                                  Table of Contents

Executive Summary .......................................................................................................7
   LEGAL FRAMEWORK ............................................................................................................................................. 7
   IMPACT FEE CALCULATION METHODOLOGY........................................................................................ 11
   TWO IMPACT FEES - COUNTYWIDE AND UNINCORPORATED ....................................................... 12
   MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE IMPACT FEES.................................................................................................... 12
       Figure 1a: Schedule of Maximum Supportable Impact Fees Per Unit – Countywide............................. 13
       Figure 1b: Schedule of Maximum Supportable Impact Fees Per Unit –Unincorporated Area ............ 14
       Figure 1c: Schedule of Maximum Supportable Impact Fees Per Unit – Countywide and
       Unincorporated Area Combined Fee............................................................................................................. 14
       Figure 1d: Schedule of Maximum Supportable Impact Fees – Library Service District......................... 15
Sheriff ........................................................................................................................... 16
   METHODOLOGY.................................................................................................................................................... 16
        Figure 2: Sheriff Impact Fee Methodology ................................................................................................... 17
   PROPORTIONATE SHARE FACTORS ............................................................................................................. 18
        Figure 3: Proportionate Share Factors – Countywide ................................................................................ 19
        Figure 4: Proportionate Share Factors – Unincorporated Area ................................................................ 20
        Figure 5: Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday (2005) – Countywide.................................... 21
        Figure 6: Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday (2005) – Unincorporated Area.................... 22
   SHERIFF FACILITIES............................................................................................................................................. 22
        Countywide Area .............................................................................................................................................. 22
     Countywide Sheriff Facilities – LOS Analysis ............................................................................................................ 22
        Figure 7: Sheriff Facilities LOS Standards - Countywide........................................................................... 23
     Countywide Sheriff Facilities – Cost Analysis ............................................................................................................. 23
        Figure 8: Sheriff Facilities Cost Standards - Countywide........................................................................... 24
        Unincorporated Area ....................................................................................................................................... 24
     Sheriff Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis............................................................................ 24
        Figure 9: Sheriff Facilities LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area.......................................................... 25
     Sheriff Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis ............................................................................. 25
        Figure 10: Sheriff Facilities Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area........................................................ 25
   LAND FOR SHERIFF FACILITIES ..................................................................................................................... 26
        Countywide Area .............................................................................................................................................. 26
     Countywide Sheriff Land – LOS Analysis ................................................................................................................. 26
        Figure 11: Sheriff Land LOS Standards - Countywide............................................................................... 26
     Countywide Sheriff Land – Cost Analysis .................................................................................................................. 27
        Figure 12: Sheriff Land Cost Standards - Countywide ............................................................................... 27
        Unincorporated Area ....................................................................................................................................... 27
     Sheriff Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis................................................................................. 27
        Figure 13: Sheriff Land LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area.............................................................. 28
     Sheriff Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis .................................................................................. 28
        Figure 14: Sheriff Land Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area.............................................................. 28
   SHERIFF VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT........................................................................................................ 29
        Figure 15: Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment – Countywide and Unincorporated Share ........................ 30
        Countywide Area .............................................................................................................................................. 30
     Countywide Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment – LOS Analysis .................................................................................... 30
        Figure 16: Countywide Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards ............................................... 31
     Countywide Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment – Cost Analysis ..................................................................................... 31
        Figure 17: Countywide Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards................................................ 32
        Unincorporated Area ....................................................................................................................................... 32
     Unincorporated Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment – LOS Analysis .............................................................................. 32
        Figure 18: Unincorporated Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards......................................... 33
     Unincorporated Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment – Cost Analysis................................................................................ 34
        Figure 19: Unincorporated Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards......................................... 34



                                                                                                                                                                      2
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006

   IMPACT FEE STUDY.............................................................................................................................................. 34
   MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE SHERIFF IMPACT FEE................................................................................... 34
       Figure 20: Sheriff Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary – Countywide Area ...................... 35
       Figure 21: Sheriff Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary – Unincorporated Area ............... 36
       Figure 22: Countywide Sheriff Impact Fee Schedule ................................................................................. 37
       Figure 23: Unincorporated Sheriff Impact Fee Schedule........................................................................... 38
       Figure 24: Countywide and Unincorporated Area Combined Sheriff Impact Fee Schedule ................ 39
General Government.................................................................................................... 40
   METHODOLOGY.................................................................................................................................................... 40
        Figure 25: General Government Impact Fee Methodology ....................................................................... 41
   PROPORTIONATE SHARE FACTORS ............................................................................................................. 41
        Countywide Area .............................................................................................................................................. 41
        Figure 26: Proportionate Share Factors – Countywide .............................................................................. 43
        Unincorporated Area ....................................................................................................................................... 43
        Figure 27: Proportionate Share Factors – Unincorporated Area.............................................................. 44
   GENERAL GOVERNMENT FACILITIES ........................................................................................................ 44
        Figure 28: General Government Facilities .................................................................................................... 45
        Countywide Area .............................................................................................................................................. 45
     Countywide General Government Facilities – LOS Analysis....................................................................................... 45
        Figure 29: General Government Facilities LOS Standards - Countywide............................................... 47
     Countywide General Government Facilities – Cost Analysis ........................................................................................ 48
        Figure 30: General Government Facilities Cost Standards - Countywide ............................................... 48
        Unincorporated Area ....................................................................................................................................... 48
     General Government Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis ...................................................... 48
        Figure 31: General Government Facilities LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area.............................. 49
     General Government Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis........................................................ 50
        Figure 32: General Government Facilities Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area.............................. 51
   GENERAL GOVERNMENT LAND ................................................................................................................... 51
        Figure 33: General Government Land – Countywide and Unincorporated Share.................................. 51
        Countywide Area .............................................................................................................................................. 51
     Countywide General Government Land – LOS Analysis............................................................................................ 51
        Figure 34: General Government Land LOS Standards - Countywide ..................................................... 53
     Countywide General Government Land – Cost Analysis ............................................................................................. 53
        Figure 35: General Government Land Cost Standards - Countywide ..................................................... 54
        Unincorporated Area ....................................................................................................................................... 54
     General Government Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis............................................................ 54
        Figure 36: General Government Land LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area .................................... 55
     General Government Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis............................................................. 55
        Figure 37: General Government Land Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area .................................... 55
   GENERAL GOVERNMENT VEHICLES .......................................................................................................... 56
        Figure 38: General Government Vehicles – Countywide and Unincorporated Share........................... 57
        Countywide Area .............................................................................................................................................. 57
     Countywide General Government Vehicles– LOS Analysis......................................................................................... 57
        Figure 39: Countywide General Government Vehicles LOS Standards.................................................. 58
     Countywide General Government Vehicles– Cost Analysis.......................................................................................... 58
        Figure 40: Countywide General Government Vehicles Cost Standards .................................................. 59
        Unincorporated Area ....................................................................................................................................... 59
     Unincorporated Area General Government Vehicles– LOS Analysis.......................................................................... 59
        Figure 41: Unincorporated Area General Government Vehicles LOS Standards.................................. 60
     Unincorporated Area General Government Vehicles– Cost Analysis ........................................................................... 60
        Figure 42: Unincorporated Area General Government Vehicles Cost Standards.................................. 61
   IMPACT FEE STUDY.............................................................................................................................................. 61
   CREDITS..................................................................................................................................................................... 61
        Figure 43a: 1999 COPS - Countywide Service Area .................................................................................... 62
        Figure 43b: 1999 COPS - Unincorporated Service Area…………………………………………….62
   MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE GENERAL GOVERNMENT IMPACT FEE .............................................. 62


                                                                                                                                                                               3
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006

             Figure 44: General Government Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary – Countywide...... 63
             Figure 45: General Government Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary -Unincorporated. 64
             Figure 46: General Government Impact Fee Schedule – Countywide ..................................................... 65
             Figure 47: General Govt. Impact Fee Schedule – Unincorp. Area............................................................ 66
             Figure 48: General Govt. Impact Fee Schedule – Combined Countywide & Unincorp. Area Fee ...... 67
Fire ............................................................................................................................... 68
   METHODOLOGY.................................................................................................................................................... 68
        Figure 49: Fire Impact Fee Methodology...................................................................................................... 69
   PROPORTIONATE SHARE FACTORS ............................................................................................................. 69
        Unincorporated Area ....................................................................................................................................... 69
        Figure 50: Proportionate Share Factors – Unincorporated Area.............................................................. 70
   FIRE FACILITIES..................................................................................................................................................... 70
     Fire Facilities in the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis ....................................................................................... 70
        Figure 51: Fire Facilities LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area ............................................................ 71
        Fire Facilities in the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis ................................................................................... 71
        Figure 52: Fire Facilities Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area............................................................. 72
   LAND FOR FIRE FACILITIES ............................................................................................................................. 72
     Fire Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis .................................................................................... 72
        Figure 53: Fire Land LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area................................................................... 73
     Fire Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis...................................................................................... 73
        Figure 54: Fire Land Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area................................................................... 73
   FIRE VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ................................................................................................................ 74
     Unincorporated Fire Vehicles and Equipment – LOS Analysis.................................................................................. 74
        Figure 55: Unincorporated Fire Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards ............................................. 75
     Unincorporated Fire Vehicles and Equipment – Cost Analysis ................................................................................... 75
        Figure 56: Unincorporated Fire Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards.............................................. 76
   CREDITS..................................................................................................................................................................... 76
        Figure 57: Fire Credit ....................................................................................................................................... 76
   IMPACT FEE STUDY.............................................................................................................................................. 76
   MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE FIRE IMPACT FEE ........................................................................................... 77
        Figure 58: Fire Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary - Unincorporated Area.................... 78
        Figure 59: Fire Impact Fee Schedule – Unincorporated Area................................................................... 79
Parks and Recreation................................................................................................... 80
   METHODOLOGY.................................................................................................................................................... 80
        Figure 60: Parks and Recreation Impact Fee Methodology Chart............................................................. 80
   PARKLAND ............................................................................................................................................................... 81
     Countywide Parkland – LOS Analysis...................................................................................................................... 81
        Figure 61: Parkland LOS Standards – Countywide..................................................................................... 81
     Countywide Parkland – Cost Analysis ....................................................................................................................... 81
        Figure 62: Parkland Improvement Costs Per Acre ...................................................................................... 82
        Figure 63: Parkland Cost Standards - Countywide ..................................................................................... 82
   PARK AMENITIES .................................................................................................................................................. 82
     Park Amenities – LOS Analysis............................................................................................................................... 83
        Figure 64: Park Amenities LOS Standards................................................................................................... 83
     Park Amenities – Cost Analysis ................................................................................................................................ 83
        Figure 65: Park Amenities Cost Standards................................................................................................... 83
   COMMUNITY CENTERS AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES ............................................................... 84
     Countywide Community Centers and Recreational Facilities – LOS Analysis.............................................................. 84
        Figure 66: Community Centers and Recreational Facilities LOS Standards - Countywide................... 85
     Countywide Community Centers and Recreational Facilities – Cost Analysis ............................................................... 85
        Figure 67: Community Centers and Recreational Facilities Cost Standards - Countywide ................... 86
   VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT ........................................................................................................................... 86
     Countywide Vehicles and Equipment – LOS Analysis ............................................................................................... 86
        Figure 68: Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards - Countywide.......................................................... 87
     Countywide Vehicles and Equipment – Cost Analysis ................................................................................................ 88


                                                                                                                                                                               4
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006

       Figure 69: Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards - Countywide.......................................................... 88
   IMPACT FEE STUDY.............................................................................................................................................. 88
   MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE PARKS AND RECREATION IMPACT FEE .............................................. 88
       Figure 70: Parks and Recreation Impact Fee Cost Summary ..................................................................... 89
       Figure 71: Parks and Recreation Impact Fee Schedule................................................................................ 89
Libraries ....................................................................................................................... 90
   METHODOLOGY.................................................................................................................................................... 90
        Figure 72: Library Impact Fee Methodology ............................................................................................... 90
   LIBRARY FACILITIES ............................................................................................................................................ 90
     Library Facilities – LOS Analysis............................................................................................................................. 91
        Figure 73: Library Facilities LOS Standards ................................................................................................ 91
     Library Facilities – Cost Analysis .............................................................................................................................. 91
        Figure 74: Library Facilities Cost Standards................................................................................................. 92
   LAND FOR LIBRARY FACILITIES .................................................................................................................... 92
     Land for Library Facilities – LOS Analysis .............................................................................................................. 92
        Figure 75: Land for Library Facilities LOS Standards ................................................................................ 93
     Library Land – Cost Analysis ................................................................................................................................... 93
        Figure 76: Land for Library Facilities Cost Standards ................................................................................ 93
   LIBRARY COLLECTIONS ..................................................................................................................................... 93
     Library Collections – LOS Analysis .......................................................................................................................... 93
        Figure 77: Library Collections LOS Standards ............................................................................................ 94
     Library Collections – Cost Analysis............................................................................................................................ 94
        Figure 78: Library Collections Cost Standards ............................................................................................ 94
   IMPACT FEE STUDY.............................................................................................................................................. 95
   MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE LIBRARY IMPACT FEE .................................................................................. 95
        Figure 79: Library Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary ......................................................... 95
        Figure 80: Library Impact Fee Schedule........................................................................................................ 96
Public Works................................................................................................................ 97
   METHODOLOGY.................................................................................................................................................... 97
        Figure 81: Public Works Impact Fee Methodology ..................................................................................... 98
   PROPORTIONATE SHARE FACTORS ............................................................................................................. 98
        Figure 82: Proportionate Share Factors – Unincorporated Area.............................................................. 99
   PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE, SHOP AND STORAGE SPACE......................................................................... 99
     Public Works Facilities in the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis ........................................................................ 99
        Figure 83: Public Works Facilities LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area.......................................... 100
     Public Works Facilities in the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis........................................................................ 101
        Figure 84: Public Works Facilities Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area.......................................... 101
   LAND FOR PUBLIC WORKS FACILITIES..................................................................................................... 101
     Public Works Land for Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis................................................ 101
        Figure 85: Public Works Land LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area................................................ 102
     Public Works Land for Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis ................................................. 102
        Figure 86: Public Works Land Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area ................................................ 102
   PUBLIC WORKS VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT - ROADS..................................................................... 103
     Public Works Road Vehicles and Equipment Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis ............................. 103
        Figure 87: Public Works Road Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area.... 104
     Public Works Road Vehicles and Equipment Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis............................... 105
        Figure 88: Public Works Road Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area.... 105
   PUBLIC WORKS VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT – SOLID WASTE...................................................... 105
     Public Works Solid Waste Vehicles and Equipment Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis................... 106
        Figure 89: Public Works Solid Waste Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards – Unincorp. Area .. 106
     Public Works Solid Waste Vehicles and Equipment Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis .................... 106
        Figure 90: Public Works Solid Waste Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards – Unincorp. Area .. 107
   IMPACT FEE STUDY............................................................................................................................................ 107
   MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE PUBLIC WORKS IMPACT FEE .................................................................. 107
        Figure 91: Public Works Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary ........................................... 108


                                                                                                                                                                      5
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006

           Figure 92: Public Works Impact Fee Schedule.......................................................................................... 109
Appendix 1: Demographic Estimates and Development Projections........................110
  ESTIMATES AND PROJECTIONS - COUNTYWIDE ................................................................................. 110
    Persons Per Housing Unit - Countywide.................................................................................................................... 110
       Figure A1: Persons Per Housing Unit in Imperial County ....................................................................... 111
    Housing Unit Estimates and Projections – Countywide ............................................................................................. 111
       Figure A2: Estimated Housing Units 2000-2005 ...................................................................................... 111
       Figure A3: Countywide Housing Unit Projections ................................................................................... 112
    Population Estimate & Projections - Countywide ...................................................................................................... 112
       Figure A4: Estimated 2005 Population & Population Projections ......................................................... 113
  NONRESIDENTIAL MULTIPLIERS - COUNTYWIDE.............................................................................. 113
       Figure A5: Floor Area Per Employee and Nonresidential Trip Rates ................................................... 114
    Job & Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates – Countywide ................................................................................ 114
       Figure A6: Job and Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates ................................................................ 115
    Job & Nonresidential Square Footage Projections - Countywide................................................................................. 115
       Figure A7: Job and Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates and Projections................................... 116
    Average Daily Vehicle Trip Estimates - Countywide................................................................................................. 116
       Figure A8: Average Daily Trips ................................................................................................................... 117
  SUMMARY OF DEVELOPMENT ESTIMATES & PROJECTIONS 2005-2020 - COUNTYWIDE ... 117
       Figure A9: Development Projections 2005-2020 ....................................................................................... 118
  ESTIMATES AND PROJECTIONS - UNINCORPORATED AREA......................................................... 119
    Persons Per Housing Unit – Unincorporated Area.................................................................................................... 119
       Figure A10: Persons per Housing Unit in Imperial County’s Unincorporated Area ............................ 119
    Housing Unit Estimates and Projections – Unincorporated Area............................................................................... 119
       Figure A11: Estimated Housing Units in the Unincorporated Area, 2000-2005……………………120
       Figure A12: Housing Unit Projections in the Unincorporated Area………………………………..120
       Figure A13: Estimated 2005 Population and Population Projections for the Unincorporated Area..121
  NONRESIDENTIAL MULTIPLIERS – UNINCORPORATED AREA .................................................... 121
    Job & Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates – Unincorporated Area.................................................................. 121
       Figure A14: Job and Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates .............................................................. 122
    Job & Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates and Projections – Unincorporated Area .......................................... 122
       Figure A15: Job and Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates and Projections................................. 123
    Average Daily Vehicle Trip Estimates – Unincorporated Area................................................................................. 123
       Figure A16: Average Daily Trips in the Unincorporated Area ............................................................... 124
  SUMMARY OF DEVELOPMENT PROJECTIONS 2005-2020 – UNINCORPORATED AREA........ 124
       Figure A17: Development Projections 2005-2020 in Unincorporated Area .......................................... 125
Appendix 2: Implementation and Administration .....................................................126
  ADOPTION.............................................................................................................................................................. 126
  ADMINISTRATION .............................................................................................................................................. 126




                                                                                                                                                                         6
Executive Summary

Imperial County has retained TischlerBise to prepare an impact fee study. This report
documents the data, methodology, and results of the impact fee study. Impact fees are one-
time payments used to fund system improvements needed to accommodate new
development. As documented in this report, the methods used to calculate impact fees in
this study are intended to satisfy all legal requirements governing such fees, including
provisions of the U.S. Constitution, the California Constitution, and the California
Mitigation Fee Act (Government Code Sections 66000 et seq.).
Impact fees for Imperial County are proportionate and reasonably related to the capital
facility service demands of new development. The written analysis of each development
impact fee methodology establishes that impact fees are necessary to achieve an equitable
allocation of costs in comparison to the benefits received. Impact fee methodologies also
identify the extent to which newly developed properties are entitled to various types of
credits to avoid potential double payment of capital costs. Specifically, the impact fees
contained in this report include the following infrastructure categories:
       Sheriff
       General Government
       Fire
       Parks and Recreation
       Libraries
       Public Works


LEGAL FRAMEWORK
U. S. Constitution. Like all land use regulations, development exactions, including impact
fees, are subject to the Fifth Amendment prohibition on taking of private property for
public use without just compensation. Both state and federal courts have recognized the
imposition of impact fees on development as a legitimate form of land use regulation,
provided the fees meet standards intended to protect against regulatory takings. To comply
with the Fifth Amendment, development regulations must be shown to substantially
advance a legitimate governmental interest. In the case of impact fees, that interest is in the
protection of public health, safety, and welfare by ensuring that development is not
detrimental to the quality of essential public services.
There is little federal case law specifically dealing with impact fees, although other rulings on
other types of exactions (e.g. land dedication requirements) are relevant. In one of the most
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


important exaction cases, the U. S. Supreme Court found that a government agency
imposing exactions on development must demonstrate an "essential nexus" between the
exaction and the interest being protected (See Nollan v. California Coastal Commission, 1987).
In a more recent case (Dolan v. City of Tigard, OR, 1994), the Court ruled that an exaction also
must be "roughly proportional" to the burden created by development. However, the Dolan
decision appeared to set a higher standard of review for mandatory dedications of land than
for monetary exactions such as impact fees. Constitutional issues related to impact fees will
be discussed in more detail below.
California Constitution. The California Constitution grants broad Sheriff power to local
governments, including the authority to regulate land use and development. That Sheriff
power is the source of authority for a wide range of regulations, including the authority to
impose impact fees on development to pay for infrastructure and capital facilities. Some
impact fees have been challenged on grounds that they are special taxes imposed without
voter approval in violation of Article XIIIA, which was added by Proposition 13 in 1978.
That objection is valid only if the fees exceed the cost of providing capital facilities needed
to serve new development. If that were the case, then the fees would also run afoul of the
U. S. Constitution and the Mitigation Fee Act. Articles XIIIC and XIIID, added by
Proposition 218 in 1996, require voter approval for some “property-related fees,” but
exempt “the imposition of fees or charges as a condition of property development.”
The Mitigation Fee Act. California’s impact fee statute originated in Assembly Bill 1600
during the 1987 session of the Legislature, and took effect in January, 1989. AB 1600 added
several sections to the Government Code, beginning with Section 66000. Since that time
the impact fee statute has been amended from time to time, and in 1997 was officially titled
the “Mitigation Fee Act.” Unless otherwise noted, code sections referenced in this report
are from the Government Code.
The Act does not limit the types of capital improvements for which impact fees may be
charged. It defines public facilities very broadly to include "public improvements, public
services and community amenities." Although the issue is not specifically addressed in the
Mitigation Fee Act, other provisions of the Government Code (see Section 65913.8) prohibit
the use of impact fees for maintenance or operating costs. Consequently, the fees calculated
in this report are based on capital costs only.
The Mitigation Fee Act does not use the term “mitigation fee” except in its official title.
Nor does it use the more common term “impact fee.” The Act simply uses the word “fee,”
which is defined as “a monetary exaction, other than a tax or special assessment, … that is
charged by a local agency to the applicant in connection with approval of a development
project for the purpose of defraying all or a portion of the cost of public facilities related to
the development project ….” To avoid confusion with other types of fees, this report uses
the widely-accepted term “impact fee,” which should be understood to mean “fee” as
defined in the Mitigation Fee Act.
The Mitigation Fee Act contains requirements for establishing, increasing and imposing
impact fees. They are summarized below. It also contains provisions that govern the
collection and expenditure of fees, and require annual reports and periodic re-evaluation of
impact fee programs.        Those administrative requirements are discussed in the
Implementation Chapter of this report. Certain fees or charges related to development are
exempted from the requirements of the Mitigation Fee Act. Among them are fees in lieu of


                                                                                               8
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


park land dedication as authorized by the Quimby Act (Section 66477), fees collected
pursuant to a reimbursement agreement or developer agreement, and fees for processing
development applications.
Required Findings. Section 66001 requires that an agency establishing, increasing or
imposing impact fees, must make findings to:
        1. Identify the purpose of the fee;
        2. Identify the use of the fee; and,
        3. Determine that there is a reasonable relationship between:
            a. The use of the fee and the development type on which it is imposed;
            b. The need for the facility and the type of development on which the fee is
               imposed; and
            c. The amount of the fee and the facility cost attributable to the development
               project. (Applies only upon imposition of fees.)
Each of those requirements is discussed in more detail below.
Identifying the Purpose of the Fees. The broad purpose of impact fees is to protect the
public health, safety and general welfare by providing for adequate public facilities. The
specific purpose of the fees calculated in this study is to fund the construction of certain
capital improvements identified in this report. Those improvements are needed to mitigate
the impacts of additional development in the County, and thereby prevent deterioration in
public services that would result from additional development if impact fee revenues were
not available to fund such improvements. Findings with respect to the purpose of a fee
should state the purpose of the fees as financing development-related public facilities in a
broad category, such as street improvements or water supply system improvements.
Identifying the Use of the Fees. According to Section 66001, if a fee is used to finance
public facilities, those facilities must be identified. A capital improvement plan may be used
for that purpose, but is not mandatory if the facilities are identified in the General Plan, a
Specific Plan, or in other public documents. If a capital improvement plan is used to identify the
use of the fees, it must be updated annually by resolution of the governing body at a noticed
public hearing. Impact fees calculated in this study are based on specific capital facilities
identified in this report. We recommend that this report be designated as the public
document identifying the use of the fees.
Reasonable Relationship Requirement. As discussed above, Section 66001 requires that,
for fees subject to its provisions, a "reasonable relationship" must be demonstrated between:
    1. the use of the fee and the type of development on which it is imposed;
    2. the need for a public facility and the type of development on which a fee is
       imposed; and,
    3. the amount of the fee and the facility cost attributable to the development on
       which the fee is imposed.
These three reasonable relationship requirements as defined in the statute are closely related
to “rational nexus” or “reasonable relationship” requirements enunciated by a number of
state courts. Although the term “dual rational nexus” is often used to characterize the


                                                                                                9
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


standard by which courts evaluate the validity of development impact fees under the U. S.
Constitution, we prefer a formulation that recognizes three elements: “impact or need”
“benefit,” and “proportionality.” The dual rational nexus test explicitly addresses only the
first two, although proportionality is reasonably implied, and was specifically mentioned by
the U.S. Supreme Court in the Dolan case.
The reasonable relationship language of the statute is considered less strict than the rational
nexus standard used by many courts. Of course, the higher standard controls. We will use
the nexus terminology in this report for two reasons: because it is more concise and
descriptive, and also to signify that the methods used to calculate impact fees in this study
are intended to satisfy the more demanding constitutional standard. Individual elements of
the nexus standard are discussed further in the following paragraphs.
Demonstrating an Impact. All new development in a community creates additional
demands on some, or all, public facilities provided by local government. If the supply of
facilities is not increased to satisfy that additional demand, the quality or availability of public
services for the entire community will deteriorate. Impact fees may be used to recover the
cost of development-related facilities, but only to the extent that the need for facilities is a
consequence of development that is subject to the fees. The Nollan decision reinforced the
principle that development exactions may be used only to mitigate conditions created by the
developments upon which they are imposed. That principle clearly applies to impact fees.
In this study, the impact of development on improvement needs is analyzed in terms of
quantifiable relationships between various types of development and the demand for specific
facilities, based on applicable level-of-service standards. This report contains all information
needed to demonstrate this element of the nexus.
Demonstrating a Benefit.         A sufficient benefit relationship requires that impact fee
revenues be segregated from other funds and expended only on the facilities for which the
fees were charged. Fees must be expended in a timely manner and the facilities funded by
the fees must serve the development paying the fees. Nothing in the U.S. Constitution or
California law requires that facilities paid for with impact fee revenues be available exclusively
to development paying the fees.
Procedures for earmarking and expenditure of fee revenues are mandated by the Mitigation
Fees Act, as are procedures to ensure that the fees are expended expeditiously or refunded.
All of those requirements are intended to ensure that developments benefit from the impact
fees they are required to pay. Thus, an adequate showing of benefit must address procedural
as well as substantive issues.
Demonstrating Proportionality. The requirement that exactions be proportional to the
impacts of development was clearly stated by the U.S. Supreme Court in the Dolan case
(although the relevance of that decision to impact fees has been debated) and is logically
necessary to establish a proper nexus. Proportionality is established through the procedures
used to identify development-related facility costs, and in the methods used to calculate
impact fees for various types of facilities and categories of development. In this study, the
demand for facilities is measured in terms of relevant and measurable attributes of
development. For example, the need for road improvements is measured by the number of
vehicle trips generated by development.
In calculating impact fees, costs for development-related facilities are allocated in proportion
to the service needs created by different types and quantities of development. The following


                                                                                                 10
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


section describes methods used to allocate facility costs and calculate impact fees in ways
that meet the proportionality standard.
Impact Fees for Existing Facilities. It is important to note that impact fees may be used
to pay for existing facilities, provided that those facilities are needed to serve additional
development and have the capacity to do so. In other words, such fees must satisfy the
same nexus requirements as any other impact fee.

IMPACT FEE CALCULATION METHODOLOGY
Any one of several legitimate methods may be used to calculate development impact fees.
The choice of a particular method depends primarily on the service characteristics and
planning requirements for the facility type being addressed. Each method has advantages
and disadvantages in a particular situation, and to some extent they are interchangeable,
because they all allocate facility costs in proportion to the needs created by development.
Reduced to its simplest terms, the process of calculating development impact fees involves
only two steps: determining the cost of development-related capital improvements, and
allocating those costs equitably to various types of development. In practice, though, the
calculation of impact fees can become quite complicated because of the many variables
involved in defining the relationship between development and the need for facilities. The
following paragraphs discuss three basic methods for calculating impact fees and how those
methods can be applied.
Plan-Based Impact Fee Calculation. The plan-based method allocates costs for a
specified set of improvements to a specified amount of development. The improvements
are identified by a facility plan and the development is identified by a land use plan. In this
method, the total cost of relevant facilities is divided by total demand to calculate a cost per
unit of demand. Then, the cost per unit of demand is multiplied by the amount of demand
per unit of development (e.g. dwelling units or square feet of building area) in each category
to arrive at a cost per unit of development.
The plan-based method is often the most workable approach where actual service usage is
difficult to measure (as is the case with administrative facilities), or does not directly drive the
need for added facilities (as is the case with fire stations). It is also useful for facilities, such
as streets, where capacity cannot always be matched closely to demand. This method is
relatively inflexible in the sense that it is based on the relationship between a particular
facility plan and a particular land use plan. If either plan changes significantly, the fees
should be recalculated.
Cost Recovery Impact Fee Calculation. The rationale for the cost recovery approach is
that new development is paying for its share of the useful life and remaining capacity of
facilities from which new growth will benefit. To calculate an impact fee using the cost
recovery approach, facility cost is divided by ultimate number of demand units the facility
will serve.
Incremental Expansion Impact Fee Calculation. The incremental expansion method
documents the current level-of-service (LOS) for each type of public facility in both
quantitative and qualitative measures, based on an existing service standard such as square
feet per capita or park acres per capita. The level-of-service standards are determined in a
manner similar to the current replacement cost approach used by property insurance


                                                                                                  11
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


companies. However, in contrast to insurance practices, Imperial County will not use the
funds for renewal and/or replacement of existing facilities. Rather, the County will use the
impact fee revenue to expand or provide additional facilities, as needed, to accommodate
new development. An incremental expansion cost method is best suited for public facilities
that will be expanded in regular increments, with LOS standards based on current conditions
in the community.

TWO IMPACT FEES – COUNTYWIDE AND UNINCORPORATED
Imperial County provides certain services on a county-wide basis while others are provided
only in the unincorporated area of the County. For example, the County provides Fire and
Public Works service in the unincorporated area only. In contrast, Parks and Recreation
offerings benefit all residents of the County, including those living in incorporated cities and
the unincorporated area. Some departments provide services to both areas, though with
varying service levels in each area. For example, The Sheriff’s department provides police
protection to the unincorporated areas and operates the County Jail which is utilized on a
countywide basis. In these cases, impact fees are allocated based on the provision of services
countywide and in the unincorporated area.
Demand for services varies in these two areas, with the unincorporated area clearly having a
significantly smaller population and employment base (see Appendix 1 for detailed
demographic information). In order to reflect the differences in service provision and
demand base in the two areas, four sets of impact fees are presented – one to be applied
countywide, a second limited to the unincorporated area and a third that reflects a
combination of the countywide and unincorporated fee. This third set of fees is presented as
new development in the unincorporated area will benefit from the County services provided
both countywide and in the unincorporated area. The fourth set of fees is for the library
service district, which has its own service boundaries.

MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE IMPACT FEES
Figures 1a – 1d provide schedules of the maximum supportable impact fees for Imperial County
that are assessed per housing unit for residential development and per square foot of floor
area for nonresidential development. The schedules are presented for the countywide area
(Figure 1a), the unincorporated area only (Figure 1b), countywide and unincorporated area
combined (Figure 1c) and for the library service district (Figure 1d). The County may adopt
fees that are less than the amounts shown. However, a reduction in impact fee revenue will
necessitate an increase in other revenues, a decrease in planned capital expenditures and/or a
decrease in the County’s LOS standards.




                                                                                             12
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 1a: Schedule of Maximum Supportable Impact Fees Per Unit (residential) and
per Square Foot (nonresidential) – Countywide
                                                            General         Parks and
                                            Sheriff
                                                           Government       Recreation     TOTAL
                                         (Countywide)
                                                          (Countywide)     (Countywide)
Residential                                                   Per Housing Unit
     Single Family                                $619          $1,350              $452    $2,421
     Multi-Family                                 $484          $1,057              $354    $1,894
     Mobile Home                                  $415            $906              $304    $1,625
Nonresidential                                                Per Square Foot
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less             $0.41          $0.26               N/A     $0.67
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF             $0.36          $0.23               N/A     $0.59
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF            $0.31          $0.21               N/A     $0.51
 820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF               $0.26          $0.18               N/A     $0.45
 710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less              $0.17          $0.38               N/A     $0.55
 710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF               $0.14          $0.36               N/A     $0.50
 710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF              $0.12          $0.34               N/A     $0.46
 720 Medical-Dental Office                        $0.33          $0.37               N/A     $0.70
 610 Hospital                                     $0.16          $0.31               N/A     $0.47
 770 Business Park                                $0.12          $0.29               N/A     $0.41
 110 Light Industrial                             $0.06          $0.21               N/A     $0.28
 140 Manufacturing                                $0.03          $0.17               N/A     $0.20
 150 Warehousing                                  $0.04          $0.12               N/A     $0.16
 520 Elementary School                            $0.13          $0.08               N/A     $0.22
Other Nonresidential
 320 Lodging (per room)                           $0.05            $0.04             N/A     $0.09
 565 Day Care (per student)                       $0.04            $0.01             N/A     $0.05
 620 Nursing Home (per bed)                       $0.02            $0.03             N/A     $0.05
Other Nonresidential
 320 Lodging (per room)                            $50              $41                       $91
 565 Day Care (per student)                        $40              $15                       $55
 620 Nursing Home (per bed)                        $21              $33                       $54




                                                                                                13
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006




Figure 1b: Schedule of Maximum Supportable Impact Fees Per Unit (residential)
and per Square Foot (nonresidential) – Unincorporated Area
                                                                                                          Public
                                              Sheriff          Gen. Gov.        Fire
                                                                                                          Works       TOTAL
                                         (Unincorporated)     (Unincorp.)    (Unincorp.)
                                                                                                        (Unincorp.)
Residential                                                                Per Housing Unit
     Single Family                                    $317            $349       $1,273                      $1,894    $3,833
     Multi-Family                                     $243            $268         $977                      $1,453    $2,940
     Mobile Home                                      $217            $239         $872                      $1,297    $2,625
Nonresidential                                                             Per Square Foot
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                 $0.35          $0.05        $0.50                       $1.86     $2.75
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                 $0.31          $0.04        $0.44                       $1.63     $2.41
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                $0.26          $0.04        $0.39                       $1.41     $2.10
 820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                   $0.23          $0.03        $0.35                       $1.21     $1.82
 710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                  $0.14          $0.07        $0.73                       $0.76     $1.69
 710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                   $0.12          $0.06        $0.69                       $0.65     $1.51
 710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                  $0.10          $0.06        $0.65                       $0.55     $1.36
 720 Medical-Dental Office                            $0.28          $0.06        $0.71                       $1.49     $2.55
 610 Hospital                                         $0.14          $0.05        $0.59                       $0.73     $1.51
 770 Business Park                                    $0.10          $0.05        $0.55                       $0.53     $1.23
 110 Light Industrial                                 $0.05          $0.04        $0.41                       $0.29     $0.78
 140 Manufacturing                                    $0.03          $0.03        $0.31                       $0.16     $0.53
 150 Warehousing                                      $0.04          $0.02        $0.22                       $0.20     $0.49
 520 Elementary School                                $0.11          $0.01        $0.16                       $0.60     $0.89
Other Nonresidential
 320 Lodging (per room)                                $43              $7          $77                        $232     $359
 565 Day Care (per student)                            $34              $3          $28                        $184     $249
 620 Nursing Home (per bed)                            $18              $6          $63                         $97     $184




Figure 1c: Schedule of Maximum Supportable Impact Fees Per Unit (residential) and
per Square Foot (nonresidential) – Countywide and Unincorporated Area Combined
Fee
                                                               Gen. Gov.                                  Public
                                         Sheriff (Unincorp.                     Fire        Parks
                                                              (Unincorp. +                                Works       TOTAL
                                           + Countywide)                     (Unincorp.) (Countywide)
                                                              Countywide)                               (Unincorp.)
Residential                                                                Per Housing Unit
     Single Family                                    $936          $1,699       $1,273          $452        $1,894    $6,254
     Multi-Family                                     $727          $1,324         $977          $452        $1,453    $4,933
     Mobile Home                                      $632          $1,145         $872          $452        $1,297    $4,398
Nonresidential                                                             Per Square Foot
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                 $0.76          $0.31        $0.50           N/A         $1.86     $3.42
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                 $0.66          $0.27        $0.44           N/A         $1.63     $2.99
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                $0.57          $0.24        $0.39           N/A         $1.41     $2.61
 820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                   $0.49          $0.22        $0.35           N/A         $1.21     $2.27
 710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                  $0.31          $0.45        $0.73           N/A         $0.76     $2.24
 710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                   $0.26          $0.42        $0.69           N/A         $0.65     $2.02
 710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                  $0.22          $0.40        $0.65           N/A         $0.55     $1.82
 720 Medical-Dental Office                            $0.61          $0.44        $0.71           N/A         $1.49     $3.25
 610 Hospital                                         $0.29          $0.37        $0.59           N/A         $0.73     $1.98
 770 Business Park                                    $0.21          $0.34        $0.55           N/A         $0.53     $1.64
 110 Light Industrial                                 $0.12          $0.25        $0.41           N/A         $0.29     $1.06
 140 Manufacturing                                    $0.06          $0.19        $0.31           N/A         $0.16     $0.73
 150 Warehousing                                      $0.08          $0.14        $0.22           N/A         $0.20     $0.65
 520 Elementary School                                $0.24          $0.10        $0.16           N/A         $0.60     $1.10
Other Nonresidential
 320 Lodging (per room)                                $93             $48          $77           N/A          $232     $450
 565 Day Care (per student)                            $74             $17          $28           N/A          $184     $303
 620 Nursing Home (per bed)                            $39             $39          $63           N/A           $97     $238




                                                                                                                          14
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 1d: Schedule of Maximum Supportable Impact Fees Per Unit (residential) –
Library Service District

                                Library
                               (Library
                                             TOTAL
                                Service
                               District)

Residential                       Per Housing Unit




            Single Family           $382           $382
            Multi-Family            $363           $363
            Mobile Home             $276           $276



All costs in the impact fee calculations are given in current dollars with no assumed inflation
rate over time. Necessary cost adjustments can be made as part of the recommended annual
evaluation and update of impact fees. One approach is to adjust for inflation in construction
costs by means of an index like the one published by Engineering News Record (ENR).
This index could be applied against the calculated impact fees. If cost estimates change
significantly, the fees should be recalculated.




                                                                                            15
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006



Sheriff

METHODOLOGY
The impact fee for Sheriff services is derived using the incremental expansion methodology,
meaning that the impact fee is calculated based on the cost of maintaining the County’s
current level of service to residential and nonresidential development. This approach will
allow the Sheriff’s department to address the need for additional facilities, land and vehicles
and equipment that will be needed to support the greater demand for law enforcement
services due to future residential and nonresidential development in Imperial County.
As shown in Figure 2, the Sheriff Impact Fee approach uses different demand indicators for
residential and nonresidential development. Residential impact fees are calculated on a per
capita basis and then converted to an appropriate amount by type of housing based on
persons per housing unit. To calculate nonresidential impact fees, nonresidential vehicle
trips are the best demand indicator for sheriff facilities as they are the best measure of the
presence of people at nonresidential land uses. For example, a 30,000 square foot retail
establishment generates more calls for service than a 30,000 square foot warehouse. Fees are
allocated to residential and nonresidential development using the functional population
analyses presented in Figures 3 and 4.
The Imperial County Sheriff’s Department operates the County Jail and Coroner’s Office
which serve the county as a whole. In addition, the Sheriff’s Department provides police
protection to the unincorporated area of the County. To reflect this, three sets of Sheriff
Impact Fees are presented. The fees are allocated based on the provision of services
countywide and in the unincorporated area, and a third fee schedule is presented
representing a combination of the two fees for the countywide and unincorporated areas.




                                                                                            16
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 2: Sheriff Impact Fee Methodology



               Residential Development             Nonresidential Development




               Persons Per Housing Unit            Nonresidential Vehicle Trips
                                                  Per Square Foot of Floor Area


                     multiplied by                        multiplied by
                Capital Cost Per Person                Capital Cost Per Trip


                    Sheriff Facilities                    Sheriff Facilities
                    Cost Per Person                        Cost Per Trip


             plus Land for Sheriff Facilities      plus Land for Sheriff Facilities
                    Cost Per Person                        Cost Per Trip


            plus Sheriff Vehicles and Equip.      plus Sheriff Vehicles and Equip.
                   Cost Per Person                         Cost Per Trip

                                  Countywide                            Countywide
                                  Service Area                          Service Area

                                Unincorporated                        Unincorporated
                                 Service Area                          Service Area




                                                                                       17
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


PROPORTIONATE SHARE FACTORS
Countywide
The Sheriff Impact Fee uses a functional population concept to allocate capital costs to
residential and nonresidential development. Figure 3 distinguishes time at home (2/3 of a
day, 16 hours) versus time at work (1/3 of a day, 8 hours) and accounts for commuting
patterns in Imperial County. To estimate the residential share, person hours for individuals
living in the County are calculated first.
The Census reported Imperial County’s employed labor force as 43,204 in 2000. This figure
is subtracted from the 2000 household population estimate of 131,364, providing a resident,
non-working population estimate of 88,160 persons. This group is estimated to be in the
County 24 hours/day, bringing the person hours for this group to 2,115,840 (88,160 x 24
hours/day = 2,115,840 person hours). Of those workers living in Imperial County, the 2000
Census found that 7%, or 3,023, go to work outside of Imperial County. This figure is
subtracted from the Census labor force figure of 43,204 to reach the number of County
residents working in Imperial County – 40,181. Each of these figures is multiplied by 16
demand hours/day representing the time these workers spend in the County outside of the 8
hour work day. This results in 691,264 person hours. Combined with the 2,115,840 person
hours from resident non-workers, this brings the total residential person hours to 2,807,104.
To estimate the non-residential share, person hours for individuals working in the County is
calculated. The U.S. Census estimated jobs in the County in 2000 at 43,204. As there is
some in-migration of workers, the total number of Imperial County residents working in
Imperial County (40,181) is subtracted from the total number of jobs (43,204) to reach the
number of non-resident workers (3,023). The person hours for resident and non-resident
workers in Imperial County are multiplied by 8 hours, the typical work day, bringing the total
number of non-residential person hours to 345,632 ((40,181 x 8 = 321,448) + (3,023 x 8 =
24,181) = 345,632). This brings the total number of person hours in Imperial County in
2000 to 3,152,736. Of this, 2,807,104 is attributable to residential uses and 345,632 to non-
residential uses. Thus, according to the functional population analysis, residential
development accounts for 89% of the demand for Sheriff facilities, land and vehicles and
equipment while nonresidential development accounts for 11% of the demand.




                                                                                           18
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 3: Proportionate Share Factors – Countywide
                                                                                               Demand          Person
Residential                                                    Demand Units in 2000           Hours/Day        Hours
      Household Population (2000)1                             131,364

      Residents Not Working                                                88,160                       24    2,115,840
      Workers Living in Imperial County2                                   43,204

                                                                  3
      County Residents Working in Imperial County.                                   40,181           16        642,896
      County Residents Working outside of Imperial County                             3,023           16         48,368
                                                                                    Residential Subtotal      2,807,104
                                                                                                                   89%
Nonresidential
      Jobs Located in Imperial County (2000) 4                             43,204

                                                                  3
      County Residents Working in Imperial County.                                  40,181            8         321,448
      Non-Resident Workers                                                           3,023            8          24,184
                                                                                Nonresidential Subtotal         345,632
                                                                                                                   11%
                                                                                                 TOTAL        3,152,736

      1
          Source: Census 2000, household population excluding group quarters population.


      2
          Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the total number of workers living in the the County.
      3
       Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the number of Imperial County residents working in
      Imperial County.
      4
          Source: Census 2000 Table PHC-T-40, detailing total workers working in Imperial County

Unincorporated Area
Figure 4 presents the proportionate share factors for the unincorporated area of Imperial
County. The analysis shows that residential development accounts for 87% of the demand
for Sheriff facilities, land and vehicles and equipment in the unincorporated area of the
County and nonresidential development accounts for 13% of the demand.




                                                                                                                        19
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 4: Proportionate Share Factors – Unincorporated Area
                                                                                                  Demand       Person
Residential                                                              Demand Units in 2000    Hours/Day     Hours
   Household Population in Unincorporated County (2000)1                27,487

   Residents Not Working                                                           18,925                24     454,200
   Workers Living in Unincorporated Imperial County2                                8,562

   Unincorporated County Residents Working in Imperial County.3                           7,139           16    114,224
   Unincorporated County Residents Working outside of Imperial County                     1,423           16     22,768
                                                                                        Residential Subtotal    591,192
                                                                                                                   87%
Nonresidential
   Jobs Located in Unincorporated Imperial County (2000) 4                         10,580

   Unincorporated County Residents Working in Imperial County.3                           7,139            8     57,112
   Non-Resident Workers                                                                   3,441            8     27,528
                                                                                     Nonresidential Subtotal     84,640
                                                                                                                   13%
                                                                                                    TOTAL       675,832

   1
       2000 household population excluding group quarters population.

   2
       Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the total number of workers living in unincorporated County.
   3
    Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the number of Imperial County residents working in Imperial
   County.
   4
    Job estimate for 2000 based on estimate of .89 jobs for every 1 housing unit in 2005. Estimate calculated by using
   2005 business data from ESRI Business Information Solutions.

Vehicle Trips
The proportionate share of costs attributable to residential development will be allocated to
population and then converted to an appropriate amount by type of housing unit, based on
average persons per housing unit. Since the breakdown of nonresidential calls for service is
not by specific nonresidential use (i.e. retail, office, industrial, etc.), we recommend using
average daily nonresidential vehicle trips on a weekday as the best demand indicator for
sheriff services. Trip generation rates are highest for commercial development, such as a
shopping center, and lowest for industrial/warehouse development. Office/institutional trip
rates fall between the other two categories. This ranking of trip rates is consistent with the
relative demand for sheriff protection from nonresidential development. Other possible
nonresidential demand indicators, such as employment or floor area, do not accurately
reflect the demand for sheriff services. If employees per 1,000 square feet of building area
were used as the demand indicator, sheriff impact fees would be too high for
office/institutional development.
Average weekday vehicle trip ends are from the reference book, Trip Generation, published
by the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE, 2003). A "trip end" represents a vehicle
either entering or exiting a development (as if a traffic counter were placed across a
driveway). Trip generation rates are adjusted to avoid double counting each trip at both the
origin and destination points. For all types of nonresidential development except
commercial, the trip adjustment factor is 50%. For commercial / shopping center
development, the trip adjustment factor ranges from 22-32% depending on the floor area of
the development. The trip adjustment factor is less than 50% because retail uses attract


                                                                                                                        20
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


vehicles as they pass by on arterial and collector roads. For example, when someone stops at
a convenience store on the way home from work, the convenience store is not the primary
destination. For a medium-size shopping center of 100,000 square feet of floor area, the
ITE manual indicates that on average 42% of the vehicles that enter are passing by on their
way to some other primary destination. The remaining 58% of attraction trips have the
shopping center as their primary destination. Because attraction trips are half of all trips, the
trip adjustment factor is 58% multiplied by 50%, or approximately 29% of the trip ends.
The data contained in Trip Generation indicates there is an inverse relationship between
shopping center size and pass-by trips. Therefore, appropriate trip adjustment factors have
been calculated for each category of shopping center size used in the sheriff impact fee
calculations. Figures 5 and 6 below summarize average nonresidential weekday vehicle trip
factors on a countywide basis and in the unincorporated area, respectively.


Figure 5: Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday (2005) – Countywide
Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday (2005)
Nonresidential Gross Floor Area (1,000 sq.ft.)**   Assumptions
Retail/Commercial                                       6,995
Office                                                  2,635
Public Sector                                           1,609
Goods Production                                        5,626 Adjustment
Average Weekday Ends per 1,000 sq. ft.*            Rate         Factor
Retail/Commercial                                       67.91        29%
Office                                                  15.65        50%
Public Sector                                           15.65        50%
Goods Production                                         6.97        50%
Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday
Retail/Commercial                                                137,767
Office                                                            20,618
Public Sector                                                     12,594
Goods Production                                                  19,608
Total Nonresidential Trips                                       190,587

**Trip rates are from the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation Manual (2003)
*Floor area estimates were derived using sq. ft. per employee factors from ITE and ULI




                                                                                                      21
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 6: Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday (2005) – Unincorporated
Area

Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday (2005)
Nonresidential Gross Floor Area (1,000 sq.ft.)**   Assumptions
Retail/Commercial                                           887
Office                                                      412
Public Sector                                                607
Goods Production                                          2,084 Adjustment
Average Weekday Ends per 1,000 sq. ft.*            Rate            Factor
Retail/Commercial                                         67.91          29%
Office                                                    15.65          50%
Public Sector                                             15.65          50%
Goods Production                                            6.97         50%
Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday
Retail/Commercial                                                      17,476
Office                                                                  3,226
Public Sector                                                           4,754
Goods Production                                                        7,264
Total Nonresidential Trips                                             32,720

**Trip rates are from the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation Manual (2003)
*Floor area estimates were derived using sq. ft. per employee factors from ITE and ULI




SHERIFF FACILITIES
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the facilities component of the
Sheriff Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis determines the current level-of-service
(LOS) being provided to existing development. The second step involves determining the
cost per person and nonresidential vehicle trip to provide this LOS. These steps are repeated
for those facilities serving only the unincorporated areas of the county.


Countywide Area

Countywide Sheriff Facilities – LOS Analysis
Figure 7 lists the current Sheriff facilities that serve the county as a whole, totaling 123,909
square feet in size. The facilities are the County Jail, Sheriff booking, Sheriff administration
at the County Jail, the minimum security jail and the communications shelter. Based on the
countywide proportionate share analysis in Figure 3, residential development creates 89% of
the demand for Sheriff facilities, with nonresidential development accounting for 11% of the
demand. The current countywide Sheriff facility LOS for residential development is
calculated as follows: ((123,909 square feet x 89%)/149,935 persons) = .73 square feet per
person. The current countywide Sheriff facility LOS for nonresidential development is
calculated as follows: ((123,909 square feet x 11%)/190,587 nonresidential vehicle trips) =
.07 square feet per trip.


                                                                                                  22
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 7: Sheriff Facilities LOS Standards - Countywide
                                             Square     Replacement         Replacement
 Facility                                   Footage     Cost/Sq. Ft.*              Cost
 County Jail                                 58,031             $235        $13,658,886
 Sheriff Booking                              7,601             $235         $1,789,064
 Sheriff Administration @
 County Jail                                 20,267             $235         $4,770,289
 Minimum Security Jail                       37,674             $184         $6,935,889
 Communications Shelter                         336             $484           $162,647
 Total/Average                              123,909             $220        $27,316,775


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                   89%
 Nonresidential                                11%


 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                 149,935
 Nonresidential Vehicle Trips               190,587


 LOS
 Residential–sq. ft. per person                0.73
 Nonresidential–sq. ft. per trip               0.07
*Source: Driver-Alliant Insurance County Property Schedule - 2006 Estimate of Replacement Value



Countywide Sheriff Facilities – Cost Analysis
As shown in Figure 7, the County’s Sheriff Department estimates its facilities serving the
county as a whole have a replacement cost of $27,316,775, for an average of $220.46 per
square foot ($27,316,775/123,909 square feet = $220.46 per square foot). The cost per
person is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .73 square feet per person by $220.46
per square foot which results in a cost factor of $162.21 per person. The cost per trip is
calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .07 square feet per trip by $220.46 per square
foot which results in a cost factor of $15.71 per trip.




                                                                                                  23
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 8: Sheriff Facilities Cost Standards - Countywide
 LOS
 Residential - square feet per person                  0.73
 Nonresidential - square feet per nonres trip          0.07


 Cost Factor
 Cost per Square Foot                              $220.46


 Cost
 Per Person                                        $162.21
 Per Nonresidential Vehicle Trip                    $15.71



Unincorporated Area

Sheriff Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis
Figure 9 lists the current Sheriff facilities that serve the unincorporated area, totaling 7,384
square feet in size. The facilities are the Sheriff training center, Niland substation and the
Winterhaven substation. The Palo Verde station is not included because it is a small facility
in an area in which minimal growth is expected. Based on the unincorporated area
proportionate share analysis in Figure 4, residential development creates 87% of the demand
for Sheriff facilities, with nonresidential development accounting for 13% of the demand in
the unincorporated area. The current unincorporated Sheriff facility LOS for residential
development is calculated as follows: ((7,384 square feet x 87%)/28,798 persons) = .22
square feet per person. The current unincorporated Sheriff facility LOS for nonresidential
development is calculated as follows: ((7,384 square feet x 13%)/32,720 nonresidential
vehicle trips) = .03 square feet per trip.




                                                                                             24
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 9: Sheriff Facilities LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area
                                                   Square            Replacement      Replacement
 Facility                                          Footage           Cost/Sq. Ft.*    Cost
 Sheriff Training Center                                  2,520                $31            $78,137
 Niland Substation                                        1,296               $126           $162,889
 Winterhaven Substation                                   3,568               $100           $356,046
 Total/Average                                            7,384             $80.86           $597,072

 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                87%
 Nonresidential                             13%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                              28,798
 Nonresidential Vehicle Trips            32,720

 LOS
 Residential – sq. ft. per person            .22
 Nonresidential – sq. ft. per trip           .03
*Source: Driver-Alliant Insurance County Property Schedule - 2006 Estimate of Replacement Value

Sheriff Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis
The County’s Sheriff Department estimates its facilities serving the unincorporated area have
a replacement cost of $597,072, for an average of $80.86 per square foot ($597,072/7,384
square feet = $80.86 per square foot). The cost per person is calculated by multiplying the
current LOS of .22 square feet per person by $80.86 per square foot which results in a cost
factor of $18.13 per person. The cost per trip is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of
.03 square feet per trip by $80.86 per square foot which results in a cost factor of $2.28 per
trip.


Figure 10: Sheriff Facilities Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area
 LOS
 Residential - square feet per person                             .22
 Nonresidential - square feet per nonres trip                     .03


 Cost Factor
 Cost per Square Foot                                         $80.86


 Cost
 Per Person                                                   $18.13
 Per Nonresidential Vehicle Trip                               $2.28




                                                                                                        25
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


LAND FOR SHERIFF FACILITIES
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the land component of the
Sheriff Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis determines the current level-of-service
(LOS) being provided to existing development. The second step involves determining the
cost per person and nonresidential vehicle trip to provide this LOS. These steps are repeated
for the land serving only the unincorporated areas of the county.


Countywide Area

Countywide Sheriff Land – LOS Analysis
Figure 11 lists the current Sheriff land that serves the county as a whole, totaling 10.18 acres
in size. Based on the countywide proportionate share analysis in Figure 3, residential
development creates 89% of the demand for Sheriff facilities, with nonresidential
development accounting for 11% of the demand. The current countywide Sheriff land LOS
for residential development is calculated as follows: ((10.18 acres x 89%)/149,935 persons) =
.00006 acres per person. The current countywide Sheriff land LOS for nonresidential
development is calculated as follows: ((10.18 acres x 11%)/190,587 nonresidential vehicle
trips) = .00001 acres per trip.


Figure 11: Sheriff Land LOS Standards - Countywide
                                                          Acquisition   Acquisition
 Site                                          Acreage
                                                          Cost/Acre*          Cost
 County Jail                                      5.69      $312,800    $1,779,832
 Minimum
                                                  4.33      $312,800    $1,354,424
 Security Jail
 Communications
                                                  0.16      $312,800       $50,048
 Shelter
 Total/Average                                   10.18      $312,800    $3,184,304



 Proportionate Share
 Residential                        89%
 Nonresidential                     11%


 Demand Units 2005
 Population                      149,935
 Nonresidential Vehicle Trips    190,587


 LOS
 Residential–acres per person     .00006
 Nonresidential–acres per trip    .00001
*Imperial County




                                                                                             26
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Countywide Sheriff Land – Cost Analysis
Future Sheriff facilities are planned for the County Center #2 site, in an area recently
annexed to the City of El Centro. Land acquisition costs are lower than in the City center,
though the County will incur significant land development costs, including underground,
utilities, sidewalk, landscaping, paving, and traffic improvements. The County estimates land
acquisition and development costs to total $312,800/acre.
The cost per person is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .00006 acres per person
by $312,800 per acre which results in a cost factor of $18.90 per person. The cost per trip is
calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .00001 acres per trip by $312,800 per acre
which results in a cost factor of $1.83 per trip.


Figure 12: Sheriff Land Cost Standards - Countywide
 LOS
 Residential - acres per person                    .00006
 Nonresidential - acres per nonres trip            .00001


 Cost Factor
 Cost per Acre                                   $312,800


 Cost
 Per Person                                        $18.90
 Per Nonresidential Vehicle Trip                    $1.83



Unincorporated Area

Sheriff Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis
Figure 13 lists the current Sheriff land that serves the unincorporated area, totaling 1.59
acres. Based on the unincorporated area proportionate share analysis in Figure 4, residential
development creates 87% of the demand for Sheriff land, with nonresidential development
accounting for 13% of the demand in the unincorporated area. The current Sheriff land
LOS for residential development is calculated as follows: ((1.59 acres x 87%)/28,798
persons) = .00004 acres per person. The current Sheriff land LOS for nonresidential
development is calculated as follows: ((1.59 acres x 13%)/32,720 nonresidential vehicle trips)
= .0000063 acres per trip.




                                                                                           27
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 13: Sheriff Land LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area
                                   Acreage          Acquisition    Acquisition
 Site                                               Cost/Acre*     Cost
 Sheriff Training Center                     0.80       $200,000         $160,000
 Niland Substation                           0.34       $200,000          $68,000
 Winterhaven Substation                      0.45       $200,000          $90,000
 Total/Average                               1.59       $200,000         $318,000


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                 87%
 Nonresidential                              13%


 Demand Units 2005
 Population                               28,798
 Nonresidential Vehicle Trips             32,720


 LOS
 Residential - acres per person           .00004
 Nonresidential - acres per
 trip                                  .0000063
*Imperial County



Sheriff Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis
The County estimates it costs $200,000 an acre to acquire improved land for County
functions that serve the unincorporated area. This estimate is based on a recent sale of
improved commercial land in the City of Brawley. This results in a total acquisition cost of
$318,000 ($200,000 x 1.59 acres = $318,000) for Sheriff land in the unincorporated area. The
cost per person is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .00005 acre per person by
$200,000 an acre which results in a cost factor of $9.65 per person. The cost per trip is
calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .0000063 acre per trip by $200,000 per acre
which results in a cost factor of $1.21 per trip.


Figure 14: Sheriff Land Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area
 LOS
 Residential - acres per person                           .00004
 Nonresidential - acres per nonres trip                 .0000063


 Cost Factor
 Cost per Acre                                          $200,000


 Cost
 Per Person                                                $9.65
 Per Nonresidential Vehicle Trip                           $1.21




                                                                                         28
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


SHERIFF VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the vehicle component of the
Sheriff Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis determines the current level-of-service
(LOS) being provided to existing development. The second step involves determining the
cost per person and per nonresidential vehicle trip to provide this LOS. These steps are
repeated to determine the current LOS being provided in the unincorporated area of the
County.
Figure 15 lists the current fleet of Sheriff vehicles and equipment. In order to distinguish the
vehicles used on a county-wide basis and those used only in the unincorporated area, a
percentage share is assigned to each vehicle and piece of equipment, representing the time
the item is used in those areas. While the Sheriff’s department primarily uses its vehicles and
equipment to serve the unincorporated area of the County, the Sheriff also operates the
County Jail and Coroner’s Office serving the entire county. A percentage share is assigned
for select Sheriff vehicles reflecting those vehicles used in moving County prisoners and in
serving warrants throughout the County. For example, the sedans (Ford Taurus, Chev.
Malibu and Chev. Lumina) and vans are used countywide. Other vehicles, such as patrol
cars, are used only in the unincorporated area of the county.




                                                                                             29
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 15: Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment – Countywide and Unincorporated Share
                       Type of                           Units*    Countywide   Unincorporated
             Vehicle/Equipment                                       Share          Share
 Ford Taurus                                                   5         20%              80%
 Chev Malibu                                                   8         20%              80%
 Chev Lumina                                                   1         20%              80%
 Ford C/V 4DR                                                 23           0%            100%
 Chev S-10 Ext Cab                                             1           0%            100%
 Chev S-10                                                     2           0%            100%
 Chev 1500 1/2 Ton                                             1           0%            100%
 Chev 3500 Ext Cab                                             1           0%            100%
 Ford F-250 4x4                                                5           0%            100%
 Chev Silverado                                                1           0%            100%
 Ford f-450                                                    1           0%            100%
 Chev Astro                                                    1           0%            100%
 Chev Venture                                                  1           0%            100%
 Ford E-350                                                    1         20%              80%
 Chev 3500 Express                                             1         20%              80%
 Chev 3/4 Ton Express                                          1         20%              80%
 Ford E-350 Van                                                2         20%              80%
 Chev Express Van                                              3         20%              80%
 Ford Expd 4x4                                                 6           0%            100%
 Chev Tahoe                                                   12           0%            100%
 Vehicle Equipment (Per Vehicle) - Patrol
 Cars                                                         23          0%             100%
 Vehicle Equipment (Per Vehicle) - 4x4s                       30          0%             100%
 Vehicle Equipment (Per Vehicle) - Vans                       10          0%             100%
 Officer Equipment (By Officer)                              109          0%             100%
 30 Foot, Caged, 24 Passenger International
 Bus                                                           1        100%               0%
 32 Passenger Bus                                              1        100%               0%
 Ford F600 16 Foot Flat Bed                                    1        100%               0%
 Electric Fork Lift                                            1        100%               0%
 26 Foot Chuck Wagon (Mobile Kitchen)                          1          0%             100%
 Ford F350 Flat Bed with Generator &
 Water Tank                                                    1          0%             100%
 16 Foot Ford Armored Van                                      1          0%             100%
 Trailer with Generator and Lights                             1          0%             100%

 Total                                                       255
*Imperial County Sheriff’s Department and Imperial County Garage



Countywide Area

Countywide Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment – LOS Analysis
Based on the proportionate share analysis in Figure 3, residential development creates 89%
of the demand for Sheriff vehicles and equipment countywide, with nonresidential
development accounting for 11% of the demand. The current Sheriff vehicle and equipment
LOS for residential development is calculated as follows: ((8.4 vehicles and equipment x


                                                                                                 30
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


89%)/149,935 persons) = .000049 vehicles per person. This calculation is repeated for
nonresidential development resulting in a LOS of .0000048 vehicles/equipment per
nonresidential vehicle trip ((8.4 vehicles and equipment x 11%)/190,587 trips) = .0000048
vehicles/equipment per trip.


Figure 16: Countywide Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards
                                        units         Unit
                                                                Countywide Share of
 Vehicle/Equipment               (Countywide        Replac.
                                                                       Replac. Cost
                                     share) *        Cost**
 Ford Taurus                                1       $16,500                 $16,500
 Chev Malibu                                 1.6     $16,500                $26,400
 Chev Lumina                                 0.2     $16,500                 $3,300
 Ford E-350                                  0.2     $22,500                 $4,500
 Chev 3500 Express                           0.2     $22,500                 $4,500
 Chev 3/4 Ton Express                        0.2     $22,500                 $4,500
 Ford E-350 Van                              0.4     $22,500                 $9,000
 Chev Express Van                            0.6     $22,500                $13,500
 30 Foot, Caged, 24
 Passenger International                       1     $60,000                $60,000
 Bus
 32 Passenger Bus                              1     $75,000                $75,000
 Ford F600 16 Foot Flat
                                               1     $40,000                $40,000
 Bed
 Electric Fork Lift                            1     $20,000                $20,000
 TOTAL                                      8.4                            $277,200


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                            89%
 Nonresidential                                         11%


 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                          149,935
 Nonresidential Vehicle Trips                        190,587


 LOS
 Residential - vehicles per person                  .000049
 Nonresidential - vehicles per nonres trip         .0000048
*Imperial County Sheriff’s Department
** Imperial County Sheriff’s Department and Imperial County Garage

Countywide Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment – Cost Analysis
Figure 16 shows the share of Sheriff vehicles used on a countywide basis. The unit number
was calculated using the share indicated in Figure 15 (for countywide and/or
unincorporated). As shown in Figure 16, the County’s Sheriff Department estimates the
countywide share of the current fleet of vehicles and equipment to have a total value of
$277,200 for an average of $33,000 per unit ($277,200/8.4 units = $33,000). This results in


                                                                                        31
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


a cost factor of $1.64 per person and $.15 per nonresidential vehicle trip. For residential
development, this is calculated by multiplying the current residential LOS of .000049
vehicles/equipment per person by $33,000 per unit (.000049 x $33,000 = $1.64). This
calculation is repeated for nonresidential development resulting in a cost per trip for Sheriff
vehicles and equipment of $.15 (.0000048 x $33,000) = $.15).


Figure 17: Countywide Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards
 LOS
 Residential–vehicles/equip. per person             .000049
 Nonresidential-vehicles/equip. per nonres trip   .0000048


 Cost Factor
 Cost per vehicle/equipment                        $33,000


 Cost
 Per Person                                          $1.64
 Per Nonresidential Vehicle Trip                      $.15



Unincorporated Area

Unincorporated Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment – LOS Analysis
Based on the proportionate share analysis in Figure 4, residential development creates 87%
of the demand for Sheriff vehicles and equipment in the unincorporated area, with
nonresidential development accounting for 13% of the demand. The current Sheriff vehicle
and equipment LOS for residential development is calculated as follows: ((246.6 vehicles and
equipment x 87%)/28,798 persons) = .0075 vehicles per person. This calculation is repeated
for nonresidential development resulting in a LOS of .0009 vehicles/equipment per
nonresidential vehicle trip ((246.6 vehicles and equipment x 13%)/32,720 trips) = .0009
vehicles/equipment per trip.




                                                                                            32
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 18: Unincorporated Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards
                                                      # of         Unit Replac.     Total Replac.     Unincorporated Share
 Vehicle/Equipment
                                                    Units*               Cost**             Cost            of Replac. Cost
 Ford Taurus                                              4             $16,500           $82,500                   $66,000

 Chev Malibu                                            6.4             $16,500          $132,000                  $105,600

 Chev Lumina                                            0.8             $16,500           $16,500                   $13,200

 Ford E-350                                             0.8             $22,500           $22,500                   $18,000

 Chev 3500 Express                                      0.8             $22,500           $22,500                   $18,000

 Chev 3/4 Ton Express                                   0.8             $22,500           $22,500                   $18,000

 Ford E-350 Van                                         1.6             $22,500           $45,000                   $36,000

 Chev Express Van                                       2.4             $22,500           $67,500                   $54,000

 Ford C/V 4DR                                            23             $21,500          $494,500                  $494,500

 Chev S-10 Ext Cab                                        1             $26,000           $26,000                   $26,000

 Chev S-10                                                2             $26,000           $52,000                   $52,000

 Chev 1500 1/2 Ton                                        1             $26,000           $26,000                   $26,000

 Chev 3500 Ext Cab                                        1             $26,000           $26,000                   $26,000

 Ford F-250 4x4                                           5             $26,000          $130,000                  $130,000

 Chev Silverado                                           1             $26,000           $26,000                   $26,000

 Ford f-450                                               1             $26,000           $26,000                   $26,000

 Chev Astro                                               1             $19,500           $19,500                   $19,500

 Chev Venture                                             1             $19,500           $19,500                   $19,500

 Ford Expd 4x4                                            6             $28,000          $168,000                  $168,000

 Chev Tahoe                                              12             $28,000          $336,000                  $336,000

 Vehicle Equip. (Per Vehicle) - Patrol Cars              23             $10,400          $239,200                  $239,200

 Vehicle Equip. (Per Vehicle) - 4x4s                     30             $16,800          $504,000                  $504,000

 Vehicle Equip. (Per Vehicle) - Vans                      8              $4,687           $37,496                   $37,496

 Officer Equip. (By Officer)                            109              $1,783          $194,347                  $194,347

 26 Foot Chuck Wagon (Mobile Kitchen)                     1             $35,000           $35,000                   $35,000

 Ford F350 Flat Bed                                       1             $40,000           $40,000                   $40,000

 16 Foot Ford Armored Van                                 1             $75,000           $75,000                   $75,000

 Trailer with Generator and Lights                        1              $4,000            $4,000                    $4,000

 TOTAL                                                246.6                                                      $2,807,343

 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                                               87%
 Nonresidential                                                            13%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                                              28,798
 Nonresidential Vehicle Trips                                            32,720

 LOS
 Residential - vehicles per person                                        .0075
 Nonresidential - vehicles per nonres trip                                .0009
*Imperial County Sheriff’s Department, ** Imperial County Sheriff’s Department and Imperial County Garage



                                                                                                                    33
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Unincorporated Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment – Cost Analysis
The County’s Sheriff Department estimates the unincorporated share of the current fleet of
vehicles and equipment to have a total value of $2,807,343 for an average of $11,384.19 per
unit ($2,807,343/246.6 units = $11,384.19). This results in a cost factor of $85.27 per
person and $10.74 per nonresidential vehicle trip. For residential development, this is
calculated by multiplying the current residential LOS of .0075 vehicles/equipment per
person by $11,384.19 per unit (.0075 x $11,384.19 = $85.27). This calculation is repeated for
nonresidential development resulting in a cost per trip for Sheriff vehicles and equipment of
$11.20 (.0009 x $11,384.19 = $10.74).


Figure 19: Unincorporated Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards
 LOS
 Residential–vehicles/equip. per person               .0075
 Nonresidential-vehicles/equip. per nonres trip       .0009


 Cost Factor
 Cost per vehicle/equipment                       $11,384.19


 Cost
 Per Person                                          $85.27
 Per Nonresidential Vehicle Trip                     $10.74




IMPACT FEE STUDY
The cost of preparing the Sheriff Impact Fee is also included in the fee calculations. The
County should update its impact fees every three years to ensure the methodologies,
assumptions, and cost factors used in the calculations are still valid and accurate.
TischlerBise has included the cost of preparing the current Sheriff Impact Fee in the fee
calculations in order to create a source of funding to conduct this regular update.
This cost ($19,500) is allocated between the countywide and unincorporated components of
the fee. The cost is then allocated to the projected increase in population and nonresidential
vehicles trips over the next three years in the two areas. As the unincorporated area
represents 21% of the County’s population and jobs (41,203 people and jobs in 2005 in the
unincorporated area / 196,997 people and jobs in 2005 in the County as a whole = 21%),
21% of the fee, or $4,095, is allocated to the unincorporated area. The remainder ($15,405) is
allocated to the countywide portion of the fee. A three year period is used since this is the
period of time at which the impact fee methodology should be revisited. This results in a
consultant fee cost per demand unit of $.41 per person and per trip for the countywide area
($15,405/37,963 people and trips = $.41). The consultant cost per demand unit is $1.29 per
person and per trip for the unincorporated area ($4,095/3,168 people and trips = $1.29).

MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE SHERIFF IMPACT FEE
Figure 20 provides a summary of the level of service standards used to calculate impact fees
for Sheriff services. Sheriff Impact Fees are calculated for both residential and


                                                                                           34
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


nonresidential land uses. Developers may be eligible for site-specific credits or
reimbursements only if they provide system improvements that have been included in the
Sheriff Impact Fee calculation schedule. Project improvements normally required as part of
the development approval process are not eligible for credits against impact fees.
As shown in the bottom of Figure 20, the capital costs per demand unit are $183.16 per
person and $18.10 per nonresidential vehicle trip in the countywide area. Figure 21 shows
the capital costs per demand unit of $114.34 per person and $15.52 per nonresidential
vehicle trip in the unincorporated area.
Figure 20: Sheriff Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary – Countywide
Area
Countywide
                                        Standards:
Persons Per Housing Unit
     Single Family                               3.38
     Multi-Family                                2.65
     Mobile Home                                 2.27
Average Weekday Vehicle Trip Ends per 1,000 Sq Ft
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                86.56
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                67.91
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                               53.28
 820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                  41.80
 710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                 18.35
 710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                  15.65
 710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                 13.34
 720 Medical-Dental Office                                           36.13
 610 Hospital                                                        17.57
 770 Business Park                                                   12.76
 110 Light Industrial                                                 6.97
 140 Manufacturing                                                    3.82
 150 Warehousing                                                      4.96
 520 Elementary School                                               14.49
Average Weekday Vehicle Trip Ends
 320 Lodging (per room)                                                5.63
 565 Day Care (per student)                                            4.48
 620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                            2.37
Trip Adjustment Factors
     Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                  26%
     Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                  29%
     Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                 32%
     Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                    35%
     All Other Nonresidential                                          50%
Level of Service                          Per Person               Per Trip
     Sheriff Building and Facility Cost     $162.21                 $15.71
     Sheriff Land                            $18.90                  $1.83
     Sheriff Vehicle and Equipment Cost        $1.64                 $0.15
     Impact Fee Study                          $0.41                 $0.41
     Capital Cost Per Demand Unit           $183.16                 $18.10




                                                                                       35
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 21: Sheriff Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary – Unincorporated
Area
Unincorporated
                                       Standards:
Persons Per Housing Unit
    Single Family                              2.78
    Multi-Family                               2.13
    Mobile Home                                1.90
Average Weekday Vehicle Trip Ends per 1,000 Sq Ft
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                 86.56
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                 67.91
820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                53.28
820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                   41.80
710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                  18.35
710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                   15.65
710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                  13.34
720 Medical-Dental Office                                            36.13
610 Hospital                                                         17.57
770 Business Park                                                    12.76
110 Light Industrial                                                  6.97
140 Manufacturing                                                     3.82
150 Warehousing                                                       4.96
520 Elementary School                                                14.49
Average Weekday Vehicle Trip Ends
320 Lodging (per room)                                                 5.63
565 Day Care (per student)                                             4.48
620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                             2.37
Trip Adjustment Factors
    Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                   26%
    Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                   29%
    Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                  32%
    Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                     35%
    All Other Nonresidential                                           50%
Level of Service                        Per Person                 Per Trip
    Sheriff Building and Facility Cost     $18.13                    $2.28
    Sheriff Land                             $9.65                   $1.21
    Sheriff Vehicle and Equipment Cost     $85.27                   $10.74
    Impact Fee Study                         $1.29                   $1.29
    Capital Cost Per Demand Unit          $114.34                   $15.52


Figure 22 contains a schedule of the impact fees for Sheriff in the countywide area. For
residential land uses in the countywide area, for example, persons per housing unit (3.38 for
a single family unit) is multiplied by the capital cost per person ($183.16) from Figure 20, for
an impact fee per unit of $619. For nonresidential land uses in the countywide area, such as
a commercial shopping center less than 50,000 square feet, the number of trips per 1,000
square feet (86.56) is multiplied by the corresponding trip adjustment factor (26%) and then
multiplied by the capital cost per nonresidential vehicle trip ($18.10), for a fee of $407 per
1,000 square feet.



                                                                                             36
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 22: Countywide Sheriff Impact Fee Schedule
Maximum Supportable Impact Fee
Residential                                     Per Housing Unit
     Single Family                                     $619
     Multi-Family                                      $484
     Mobile Home                                       $415
Nonresidential                                               Per 1,000 Sq Ft
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                  $407
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                  $356
 820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                 $308
 820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                    $264
 710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                   $166
 710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                    $141
 710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                   $120
 720 Medical-Dental Office                                             $326
 610 Hospital                                                          $158
 770 Business Park                                                     $115
 110 Light Industrial                                                   $63
 140 Manufacturing                                                      $34
 150 Warehousing                                                        $44
 520 Elementary School                                                 $131
Other Nonresidential
 320 Lodging (per room)                                                $50
 565 Day Care (per student)                                            $40
 620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                            $21




                                                                               37
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 23 contains a schedule of the impact fees for Sheriff services in the unincorporated
area of the County. This fee schedule reflects those Sheriff services provided only in the
unincorporated area of the County.
For residential land uses in the unincorporated area, for example, persons per housing unit
(2.78 for a single family unit) is multiplied by the capital cost per person ($114.34) from
Figure 21, for a total per unit of $317. For nonresidential land uses in the unincorporated
area, such as a commercial shopping center less than 50,000 square feet, the number of trips
per 1,000 square feet (86.56) is multiplied by the corresponding trip adjustment factor (26%)
and then multiplied by the capital cost per nonresidential vehicle trip ($15.52), for a total of
$349 per 1,000 square feet.


Figure 23: Unincorporated Sheriff Impact Fee Schedule
Maximum Supportable Impact Fee
Residential                                      Per Housing Unit
     Single Family                                    $317
     Multi Family                                     $243
     Mobile Home                                      $217
Nonresidential                                             Per 1,000 Sq Ft
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                 $349
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                 $305
820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                $264
820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                   $227
710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                  $142
710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                   $121
710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                  $103
720 Medical-Dental Office                                            $280
610 Hospital                                                         $136
770 Business Park                                                     $99
110 Light Industrial                                                  $54
140 Manufacturing                                                     $29
150 Warehousing                                                       $38
520 Elementary School                                                $112
Other Nonresidential
320 Lodging (per room)                                                $43
565 Day Care (per student)                                            $34
620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                            $18




                                                                                             38
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 24 contains an alternate schedule of the impact fees for Sheriff in the unincorporated
area of the County. As new development in the unincorporated area of the County benefits
from the Sheriff services provided both countywide and in the unincorporated area, Figure
24 reflects a combination of the two fee schedules.


Figure 24: Countywide and Unincorporated Area Combined Sheriff Impact Fee
Schedule
Maximum Supportable Impact Fee
Residential                                    Per Housing Unit
     Single Family                                  $936
     Multi Family                                   $727
     Mobile Home                                    $632
Nonresidential                                           Per 1,000 Sq Ft
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                               $756
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                               $661
820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                              $572
820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                 $491
710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                $308
710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                 $262
710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                $223
720 Medical-Dental Office                                          $606
610 Hospital                                                       $294
770 Business Park                                                  $214
110 Light Industrial                                               $117
140 Manufacturing                                                   $63
150 Warehousing                                                     $82
520 Elementary School                                              $243
Other Nonresidential
320 Lodging (per room)                                             $93
565 Day Care (per student)                                         $74
620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                         $39




                                                                                          39
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006



General Government

METHODOLOGY
The General Government Impact Fee uses an incremental expansion cost approach to
determine the need for:
    •   office space,
    •   land, and
    •   additional vehicles and equipment.
As shown in Figure 25, this impact fee is allocated on a per capita basis for residential
development. For nonresidential development, the fee methodology allocates the capital
cost on a per employee basis. Within the general government category, some facilities benefit
both residential and non-residential development, while others benefit exclusively one or the
other. For example, health, youth, and veterinary programs benefit residential development
only, while the County’s courthouse serves both residential and non-residential development.
As a result, facilities and other items in this fee category are allocated to residential and/or
non-residential or both, depending on the services provided.
Imperial County provides certain general government services on a county-wide basis while
others are provided only in the unincorporated area of the County. In order to reflect the
differences in service provision and demand base in the two areas, three sets of impact fees
are presented – one to be applied countywide and the second for the unincorporated area. A
third fee schedule is presented representing a combination of the two fees for the
countywide and unincorporated areas.




                                                                                             40
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 25: General Government Impact Fee Methodology



        Residential Development                Nonresidential Development




        Persons Per Housing Unit                        Employees
                                                   Per 1,000 Square Feet


            multiplied by                             multiplied by
      Net Capital Cost Per Person             Net Capital Cost Per Employee


         General Govt. Facilities                 General Govt. Facilities
            Cost Per Person                        Cost Per Employee


   plus Land for Gen. Govt. Facilities      plus Land for Gen. Govt. Facilities
           Cost Per Person                         Cost Per Employee


              plus Vehicles                           plus Vehicles
             Cost Per Person                        Cost Per Employee


          less Principal Payment                   less Principal Payment
            Credit Per Person                       Credit Per Employee


                          Countywide                                Countywide
                          Service Area                              Service Area

                         Unincorporated                            Unincorporated
                          Service Area                              Service Area


PROPORTIONATE SHARE FACTORS
Countywide Area
The General Government Impact Fee uses a functional population concept to allocate
capital costs to residential and nonresidential development. Figure 3 distinguishes time at


                                                                                        41
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


home (2/3 of a day, 16 hours) versus time at work (1/3 of a day, 8 hours) and accounts for
commuting patterns in Imperial County. To estimate the residential share, person hours for
individuals living in the County are calculated first.
The Census reported Imperial County’s employed labor force as 43,204 in 2000. This figure
is subtracted from the 2000 household population estimate of 131,364, providing a resident,
non-working population estimate of 88,160 persons. This group is estimated to be in the
County 24 hours/day, bringing the person hours for this group to 2,115,840 (88,160 x 24
hours/day = 2,115,840 person hours). Of those workers living in Imperial County, the 2000
Census found that 7%, or 3,023, go to work outside of Imperial County. This figure is
subtracted from the Census labor force figure of 43,204 to reach the number of County
residents working in Imperial County – 40,181. Each of these figures is multiplied by 16
demand hours/day representing the time these workers spend in the County outside of the 8
hour work day. This results in 691,264 person hours. Combined with the 2,115,840 person
hours from resident non-workers, this brings the total residential person hours to 2,807,104.
To estimate the non-residential share, person hours for individuals working in the County is
calculated. The U.S. Census estimated jobs in the County in 2000 at 43,204. As there is
some in-migration of workers, the total number of Imperial County residents working in
Imperial County (40,181) is subtracted from the total number of jobs (43,204) to reach the
number of non-resident workers (3,023). The person hours for resident and non-resident
workers in Imperial County are multiplied by 8 hours, the typical work day, bringing the total
number of non-residential person hours to 345,632 ((40,181 x 8 = 321,448) + (3,023 x 8 =
24,181) = 345,632). This brings the total number of person hours in Imperial County in
2000 to 3,152,736. Of this, 2,807,104 is attributable to residential uses and 345,632 to non-
residential uses. Thus, according to the functional population analysis, residential
development accounts for 89% of the demand for General Government facilities, land and
vehicles and equipment while nonresidential development accounts for 11% of the demand.




                                                                                           42
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 26: Proportionate Share Factors – Countywide
                                                                                               Demand          Person
Residential                                                    Demand Units in 2000           Hours/Day        Hours
      Household Population (2000)1                             131,364

      Residents Not Working                                                88,160                       24    2,115,840
      Workers Living in Imperial County2                                   43,204

                                                                  3
      County Residents Working in Imperial County.                                   40,181           16        642,896
      County Residents Working outside of Imperial County                             3,023           16         48,368
                                                                                    Residential Subtotal      2,807,104
                                                                                                                   89%
Nonresidential
      Jobs Located in Imperial County (2000) 4                             43,204

                                                                  3
      County Residents Working in Imperial County.                                  40,181            8         321,448
      Non-Resident Workers                                                           3,023            8          24,184
                                                                                Nonresidential Subtotal         345,632
                                                                                                                   11%
                                                                                                 TOTAL        3,152,736

      1
          Source: Census 2000, household population excluding group quarters population.


      2
          Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the total number of workers living in the the County.
      3
       Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the number of Imperial County residents working in
      Imperial County.
      4
          Source: Census 2000 Table PHC-T-40, detailing total workers working in Imperial County

Unincorporated Area
Figure 27 presents the proportionate share factors for the unincorporated area of Imperial
County. The analysis shows that residential development accounts for 87% of the demand
for General Government facilities, land and vehicles and equipment in the unincorporated
area of the County and nonresidential development accounts for 13% of the demand.




                                                                                                                        43
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 27: Proportionate Share Factors – Unincorporated Area
                                                                                                  Demand       Person
Residential                                                              Demand Units in 2000    Hours/Day     Hours
   Household Population in Unincorporated County (2000)1                27,487

   Residents Not Working                                                           18,925                24     454,200
   Workers Living in Unincorporated Imperial County2                                8,562

   Unincorporated County Residents Working in Imperial County.3                           7,139           16    114,224
   Unincorporated County Residents Working outside of Imperial County                     1,423           16     22,768
                                                                                        Residential Subtotal    591,192
                                                                                                                   87%
Nonresidential
   Jobs Located in Unincorporated Imperial County (2000) 4                         10,580

   Unincorporated County Residents Working in Imperial County.3                           7,139            8     57,112
   Non-Resident Workers                                                                   3,441            8     27,528
                                                                                     Nonresidential Subtotal     84,640
                                                                                                                   13%
                                                                                                    TOTAL       675,832

   1
       2000 household population excluding group quarters population.

   2
       Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the total number of workers living in unincorporated County.
   3
    Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the number of Imperial County residents working in Imperial
   County.
   4
    Job estimate for 2000 based on estimate of .89 jobs for every 1 housing unit in 2005. Estimate calculated by using
   2005 business data from ESRI Business Information Solutions.


GENERAL GOVERNMENT FACILITIES
Figure 28 provides a listing of the major office buildings currently used by County
employees. The facilities include County administration and storage facilities and buildings
for mental health, youth, agriculture and veterinary programs. As the County grows it will
need to expand its office space for general government functions. The County’s general
government facilities total approximately 377,382 square feet with a total replacement value
of $61,039,135. Replacement costs are for 2006, and are provided by the County’s property
insurance company, Driver Alliant Insurance Services.
In order to distinguish the facilities serving the county-wide area and those serving only in
the unincorporated area, a percentage allocation is assigned to each facility in Figure 28,
representing the nature of services provided in each facility. Four facilities - the County
Garage, Old Hospital Complex, and two storage spaces - have a share of functions that are
dedicated solely to unincorporated, while other services are countywide. These four facilities
are allocated 60% to countywide and 40% to unincorporated, based on discussions with
County staff. All other facilities are allocated 100% to countywide or 100% to
unincorporated.




                                                                                                                        44
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 28: General Government Facilities

                                                              Square            Total            Countywide    Unincorporated
Facilities                                                     Feet*       Replace. Value*       Allocation**   Allocation**
County Administration Center                                    64,300   $       10,227,565               100%             0%
Economic Development                                             1,620   $          180,744                 0%           100%
Purchasing Dept.                                                 3,040   $          275,405               100%             0%
County Court House                                              61,320   $       12,973,151               100%             0%
Former Washington Building (Planning and Dev.)                   6,050   $          675,000                 0%           100%
Development Alliance                                             1,568   $          142,012               100%             0%
Behavioral Health Building (Mental Health Bldg)                 24,631   $        3,123,984               100%             0%
Agriculture Commission/Storage Building                         31,641   $        4,684,824               100%             0%
Mental Health Administration Bldg.                               8,256   $          795,270               100%             0%
Health Center                                                   22,380   $        2,814,068               100%             0%
Mental Health Administration Bldg.                               3,040   $          299,944               100%             0%
County Garage                                                   10,487   $          941,998                60%            40%
Building and Grounds                                             1,831   $          164,785               100%             0%
Admin Building (Youth)                                          14,100   $        1,736,090               100%             0%
Juvenile Hall Building                                          26,663   $        6,074,126               100%             0%
California Youth Authority                                      21,204   $        4,459,873               100%             0%
Betty Jo McNeese Facility (offices and child care center)       13,612   $        1,996,299               100%             0%
Mental Health Treatment - Day Care                                 856   $            94,292              100%             0%
Public Administrator - Ivar Development Center                   3,104   $          311,227               100%             0%
County Center #2 - Old Hospital Complex                         13,293   $        1,448,997                60%            40%
Agriculture Commissioner/Offices/Weights and Measures
and Ag Extension                                                 3,880   $           234,773               100%           0%
Veternarian's Office                                               864   $            81,649               100%           0%
Animal Shelter - Kennels East                                    1,200   $            87,862               100%           0%
Animal Shelter - Kennels West                                    1,372   $            98,196               100%           0%
County Administration Center - Brawley                          20,903   $         4,712,767               100%           0%
Heber Essential Services Bldg.***                                8,647   $         1,887,090                 0%         100%
Health Dept. Storage -                                           1,000   $            97,675               100%           0%
Health Dept. Storage -                                           2,520   $           205,286               100%           0%
County Property Services Warehouse/Storage                       1,600   $            45,678                60%          40%
County Center Shop/Storage -                                     2,400   $           168,505                60%          40%
Total                                                          377,382   $        61,039,135

*Source: Driver Alliant Insurance Services 2006 Estimate of Replacement Value
**Share provided by the County
***The portion of the Heber Essential Services Building dedicated to the Fire Station is not included in this table.


Countywide Area

Countywide General Government Facilities – LOS Analysis
Figure 29 lists the current general government facilities that serve the county as a whole, as
well as the share of total square footage for each facility allocated to the countywide area,
totaling 349,953 square feet in size. All but four of these facilities are allocated 100% to
countywide. The County Garage, the Old Hospital Complex and two storage facilities are
split between countywide and unincorporated, 60% and 40%, respectively, based on
discussion with County staff.
Some general government facilities benefit both residential and non-residential development,
while others serve exclusively one or the other. The right hand columns of Figure 29 present
the allocation of the facilities and their corresponding replacement costs to residential
and/or non-residential, which varies on the services provided in each facility.




                                                                                                                          45
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


The current countywide general government facility LOS is calculated by first determining
the residential and non-residential shares of square footage for each of the sites. This
approach is different than other fee categories as the proportionate share factors vary by
building based on the services provided in that building. First, the countywide share of
square footage for each building is multiplied by the proportional share factors for that site.
For example, the countywide share of the County Garage (6,292 sq. feet) is multiplied by the
residential proportionate share factor of 89%. This results in 5,611 square feet attributable to
residential for that building. The remainder, 681 sq. ft., is attributable to nonresidential
development. This calculation is repeated for each of the remaining buildings, resulting in
328,779 countywide residential square feet and 21,174 nonresidential square feet.
The current countywide general government facility LOS for residential development is
calculated as follows: (328,779 residential sq. ft./149,935 persons) = 2.19 sq. ft. per person.
The current countywide general government facility LOS for nonresidential development is
calculated as follows: (21,174 nonresidential sq. ft./47,062 jobs) = .45 sq. ft. per job.




                                                                                             46
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 29: General Government Facilities LOS Standards - Countywide
                                  Ctywide                              Countywide     Prop. Share*       Countywide Replac. Cost
                                                Ctywide     Replace.
                                 Allocation                                Share of
 Facility                                     Allocation    Cost/Sq.                           Non
                                                                           Replace.    Res.             Residential    Non-residential
                                               of Sq. Ft.       Ft.*                           -res.
                                                                              Cost
 County Admin. Center                100%        64,300        $159    $10,227,565     89%     11%      $9,120,442         $1,107,123
 Purchasing Dept.                    100%          3,040        $91       $275,405     89%     11%       $245,593             $29,812
 County Court House                  100%        61,320        $212    $12,973,151     89%     11%     $11,568,821         $1,404,330
 Development Alliance                100%          1,568        $91       $142,012    100%      0%       $142,012                  $0
 Behavioral Health Building
                                     100%        24,631        $127     $3,123,984    100%      0%      $3,123,984                 $0
 (Mental Health Bldg)
 Ag. Commission/Storage
                                     100%        31,641        $148     $4,684,824     89%     11%      $4,177,697           $507,127
 Bldg.
 Mental Health Admin. Bldg.          100%          8,256        $96       $795,270    100%      0%       $795,270                  $0
 Health Center                       100%        22,380        $126     $2,814,068    100%      0%      $2,814,068                 $0
 Mental Health Admin. Bldg.          100%          3,040        $99       $299,944    100%      0%       $299,944                  $0
 County Garage                        60%          6,292        $90       $565,199     89%     11%       $504,017             $61,182
 Building and Grounds                100%          1,831        $90       $164,785     89%     11%       $146,947             $17,838
 Admin Building (Youth)              100%        14,100        $123     $1,736,090    100%      0%      $1,736,090                 $0
 Juvenile Hall Building              100%        26,663        $228     $6,074,126    100%      0%      $6,074,126                 $0
 California Youth Authority          100%        21,204        $210     $4,459,873    100%      0%      $4,459,873                 $0
 McNeese Facility (offices and
                                     100%        13,612        $147     $1,996,299    100%      0%      $1,996,299                 $0
 child care center)
 Mental Health Treatment -
                                     100%            856       $110        $94,292    100%      0%         $94,292                 $0
 Day Care
 Public Administrator - Ivar
                                     100%          3,104       $100       $311,227    100%      0%       $311,227                  $0
 Development Center
 County Center #2 - Old
                                      60%          7,976       $109       $869,398    100%      0%       $869,398                  $0
 Hospital Complex
 Agriculture
 Commissioner/Offices/Weig
                                     100%          3,880        $61       $234,773     89%     11%       $209,359             $25,414
 hts and Measures and Ag
 Extension
 Veterinarian’s Office               100%            864        $95        $81,649    100%      0%         $81,649                 $0
 Animal Shelter - Kennels East       100%          1,200        $73        $87,862    100%      0%         $87,862                 $0
 Animal Shelter - Kennels
                                     100%          1,372        $72        $98,196    100%      0%         $98,196                 $0
 West
 County Admin. Center –
                                     100%        20,903        $225     $4,712,767     89%     11%      $4,202,615           $510,152
 Brawley
 Health Dept. Storage                100%          1,000        $98        $97,675    100%      0%         $97,675                 $0
 Health Dept. Storage                100%          2,520        $81       $205,286    100%      0%       $205,286                  $0
 County Property Services
                                      60%            960        $29        $45,678     89%     11%         $24,440             $2,967
 Warehouse/Storage
 County Center Shop/Storage           60%          1,140        $70       $168,505     89%     11%         $90,159            $10,944
 Total                                          349,953                $57,254,230                     $53,577,341         $3,676,889


 Square Footage
 Residential                                    328,779

 Nonresidential                                  21,174


 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                     149,935
 Jobs                                            47,062




                                                                                                                      47
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006



 Levels of Service
 Residential–sq. ft. per person                            2.19
 Nonresidential–sq. ft. per job                             .45

*Source: Driver-Alliant Insurance County Property Schedule - 2006 Estimate of Replacement Value
**Proportionate share shown is for facilities serving residential and non-residential development. Those facilities serving residential
development exclusively are indicated as 100% residential.



Countywide General Government Facilities – Cost Analysis
As shown in Figure 29, the countywide share of the County’s general government facilities
have an estimated replacement cost of $57,254,230. Of this, the 328,779 square feet
attributable to residential development has a replacement cost of $53,577,341. This results in
an average of $162.95 per square foot ($53,577,341/328,779 square feet = $162.95 per
square foot). The cost per person is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of 2.19 square
feet per person by $162.95 per square foot which results in a cost factor of $357.02 per
person.
Of the countywide share of the replacement cost for general government facilities,
$3,676,889 is attributable to non-residential development. In terms of facility usage, 21,174
square feet are attributable to non-residential development. This results in an average of
$173.65 per square foot ($3,676,889/21,174 square feet = $173.65 per square foot). The cost
per job is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .45 square feet per job by $173.65 per
square foot which results in a cost factor of $79.12 per job.


Figure 30: General Government Facilities Cost Standards - Countywide
 LOS
 Residential - square feet per person                                    2.19
 Nonresidential - square feet per job                                     .45


 Cost Factor
 Residential - Cost per Square Foot                                  $162.95
 Nonresidential – Cost per Square Foot                               $173.65


 Cost
 Per Person                                                          $357.02
 Per Job                                                              $79.12


Unincorporated Area

General Government Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis
Figure 31 lists the current general government facilities that serve the unincorporated area, as
well as the share of each facility allocated to the unincorporated area, totaling 27,429 square
feet in size. The facilities include planning and development services functions, the Heber
Essential Services building, and shares of the County Garage, old Hospital Complex and


                                                                                                                                     48
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


storage facilities. The County Garage, Old Hospital Complex and the two storage facilities
are allocated 40% to unincorporated due to the nature of functions in those facilities. The
other facilities are allocated 100% to unincorporated.
Based on the unincorporated area proportionate share analysis in Figure 27, residential
development creates 87% of the demand for general government facilities in the
unincorporated area, with nonresidential development accounting for 13% of the demand.
The facilities are allocated on these percentages, with the exception of the Old Hospital
Complex which is allocated 100% to residential.
The current unincorporated general government facility LOS is calculated by first
determining the residential and non-residential shares of square footage for each of the sites.
This approach is different than other fee categories as the proportionate share factors vary
by building based on the services provided in that building. First, the unincorporated share
of square footage for each building is multiplied by the proportional share factors for that
site. For example, the unincorporated share of the County Garage (4,195 sq. feet) is
multiplied by the unincorporated area residential proportionate share factor of 87%. This
results in 3,669 square feet attributable to residential for that building. The remainder, 525
sq. ft., is attributable to nonresidential development. This calculation is repeated for each of
the remaining buildings, resulting in 25,743 unincorporated residential square feet and 1,686
nonresidential square feet.
The current unincorporated general government facility LOS for residential development is
calculated as follows: (25,743 residential sq. ft./28,798 persons) = .89 sq. ft. per person. The
current unincorporated general government facility LOS for nonresidential development is
calculated as follows: (1,686 nonresidential sq. ft./11,016 jobs) = .15 sq. ft. per job.




                                                                                             49
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 31: General Government Facilities LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area
                                                                                Unincorp.
                                                Unincorp.        Replac/                         Prop. Share**          Unincorporated Replac. Cost
                                Unincorp.                                        Share of
 Facility                                        Share of       Cost/Sq.
                                Allocation                                       Replace.                   Non-
                                                   Sq. Ft.          Ft.*                          Res                            Res.       Non-Res
                                                                                    Cost                     Res
 Economic
                                     100%            1,620          $112         $180,744        87%         13%            $158,108          $22,636
 Development Office
 Former Washington
 Building (Planning                  100%            6,050          $112         $675,000        87%         13%            $590,464          $84,536
 and Dev.)
 County Garage                         40%           4,195            $90        $376,799        87%         13%            $329,610          $47,190
 County Center #2 -
 Old Hospital                          40%           5,317          $109         $579,599       100%          0%            $579,599                  $0
 Complex
 Heber Essential
                                     100%            8,647          $202       $1,887,090        87%         13%          $1,887,090                  $0
 Services Bldg.
 County Property
 Services                              40%             640            $29         $18,271        87%         13%              $15,983          $2,288
 Warehouse/Storage
 County Center
                                       40%             960            $70         $67,402        87%         13%              $58,961          $8,441
 Shop/Storage
 Total                                              27,429                     $3,784,905                                 $3,619,814         $165,091


 Square Footage
 Residential                                        25,743
 Nonresidential                                      1,686


 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                         28,798
 Jobs                                               11,016

 Levels of Service
 Res–sq. ft. per person                                 .89
 Nonres–sq. ft. per job                                 .15

*Source: Driver-Alliant Insurance County Property Schedule - 2006 Estimate of Replacement Value
** Proportionate share shown is for facilities serving residential and non-residential development. Those facilities serving residential
development exclusively are indicated as 100% residential.

General Government Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis
As shown in Figure 31, the unincorporated share of the County’s general government
facilities have an estimated replacement cost of $3,784,905. Of this, the 25,743 square feet
attributable to residential development has a replacement value of $3,619,814. This results in
an average of $140.61 per square foot ($3,619,814/25,743 square feet = $140.61). The cost
per person is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .89 square feet per person by
$140.61 per square foot which results in a cost factor of $125.70 per person.
Of the unincorporated share of the replacement cost for general government facilities,
$165,091 is attributable to non-residential development. In terms of facility usage, 1,686
square feet are attributable to non-residential development. This results in an average of
$97.91 per square foot ($165,091/1,686 square feet = $97.91 per square foot). The cost per
job is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .15 square feet per job by $97.91 per
square foot which results in a cost factor of $14.99 per job.


                                                                                                                                      50
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 32: General Government Facilities Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area
 LOS
 Residential - square feet per person                                    .89
 Nonresidential - square feet per job                                    .15


 Cost Factor
 Residential - Cost per Square Foot                                 $140.61
 Nonresidential – Cost per Square Foot                               $97.91


 Cost
 Per Person                                                         $125.70
 Per Job                                                             $14.99

GENERAL GOVERNMENT LAND
Figure 33 provides a listing of the major site areas that house the County facilities listed in
Figure 28. As the County grows it will need to acquire additional land for general
government office space. Figure 33 shows the County’s current acreage for those facilities
listed in Figure 28.
In order to distinguish between the land serving the county-wide area and that serving only
the unincorporated area, a percentage allocation is assigned to each site area in Figure 33,
representing the nature of services provided at each site. For County Center #1 and #2, the
proportionate share factor reflects the average proportionate share for those buildings at
each Center.
Figure 33: General Government Land – Countywide and Unincorporated Share
                                                            Acres           Proportionate Share***
 Land                                                                     Countywide Unincorporated
 County Center #1*                                              5.60            95%                5%
 County Center #2**                                             2.21            96%                4%
 County Administration Center - Brawley                         1.38           100%                0%
 TOTAL                                                          9.19
*County Center #1 includes land for the first 14 buildings listed in Figure 28 – County Administration Center through
Agriculture Commissioner/Offices/Weights and Measures
**County Center #2 includes land for the following 10 buildings in Figure 28 – Admin Building (Youth) through Animal
Shelter – Kennels West
***Proportionate share is the average of proportionate shares presented for the facilities listed in Figure 28 (by County Center).
**** Heber Essential Services Building land is not included here as the land component of the site is included in the Fire Fee.


Countywide Area

Countywide General Government Land – LOS Analysis
Figure 34 lists the current general government land that serves the county as a whole,
totaling 8.8 acres in size. Some general government sites benefit both residential and non-
residential development, while others serve exclusively one or the other. The right hand
columns of Figure 34 present the allocation of the facility land and the corresponding
acquisition costs to residential and/or non-residential, which varies based on the services
provided on the sites. These percentages correspond with those presented in the General


                                                                                                                                     51
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Government Facilities component of the fee. Shares for County Center #1 represent the
average of the respective proportionate shares for each building at the site.
The current countywide general government facility land LOS is calculated by first
determining the residential and non-residential shares of acreage for each of the sites. This
approach is different than other fee categories as the proportionate share factors vary by
building and site area based on the services provided at that site. First, the countywide share
of acreage for each site is multiplied by the proportional share factors for that site. For
example, the countywide share of County Center #1 of 5.33 acres is multiplied by the
residential proportionate share factor of 92%. This results in 4.9 acres attributable to
residential at the County Center # 1 site. The remainder, .43, is attributable to nonresidential
development. This calculation is repeated for each of the remaining sites, resulting in 8.21
countywide residential acres and .58 nonresidential acre.
The current countywide general government facility land LOS for residential development is
calculated as follows: (8.22 residential acres/149,935 persons) = .00005 acre per person. The
current countywide general government facility land LOS for nonresidential development is
calculated as follows: (.58 nonresidential acre/47,062 jobs) = .00001 acre per job.




                                                                                             52
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 34: General Government Land LOS Standards - Countywide
                                    Ctywide                                      Countywide       Prop. Share**       Countywide Acquisition Cost
                                                  Ctywide
                                   Allocation                    Acquisition        Share of
 Facility                                        Allocation                                                  Non
                                                                 Cost/Acre*      Acquisition        Res.               Residential      Non-residential
                                                   of Acres                                                  -res.
                                                                                       Cost
                                         95%           5.33        $615,000       $3,278,012        92%       8%       $3,011,320             $266,692
 County Center #1
 County Admin. Center –
                                        100%           1.38        $615,000         $846,855        89%     11%         $754,015               $92,840
 Brawley

                                         96%           2.09        $312,800         $653,109       100%       0%        $653,109                    $0
 County Center #2
 Total                                                  8.8                       $4,777,976                           $4,418,444             $359,532


 Acres
 Residential                                           8.21

 Nonresidential                                         .58


 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                        149,935
 Jobs                                                47,062



 Levels of Service
 Residential–acres per                               .00005
 person
 Nonresidential–acres per                            .00001
 job

*Source: City of El Centro
**Proportionate share shows the demand for land from residential and non-residential development. County Center #1 represents
the average of the respective proportionate shares for each building serving the countywide area at the site. County Center #2 serves
residential development exclusively, thus the share indicated is 100% residential.



Countywide General Government Land – Cost Analysis
The County estimates it costs $615,000 an acre to acquire improved land in the incorporated
cities, including El Centro (the location of County Center #1) and Brawley. As discussed in
the Sheriff chapter, the County estimates future development at County Center #2 to have
an acquisition and development cost per acre of $312,800. Land acquisition costs are lower
than in the City centers, though the County will incur significant land development costs,
including underground, utilities, sidewalk, landscaping, paving, and traffic improvements.
The County estimates land acquisition and development costs to total $312,800/acre at
County Center #2.
For County Center #1, the residential portion has an acquisition cost of $3,011,320 ((5.33
acres x 92%) x $615,000/acre = $3,011,320) and the non-residential portion a cost of
$266,692 ((5.33 x 8%) x $615,000/acre = $266,692). This calculation is repeated for the
County Administration Center at Brawley, generating a total acquisition cost of $846,855, of
which $754,015 is residential and $92,840 is non-residential. For County Center #2, it is
100% attributable to residential development, so the acquisition cost totals $653,109 ((2.09
acres x 100%) x $312,800/acre = $653,109).



                                                                                                                                     53
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


The cost per person is calculated by dividing the total residential acquisition cost
($4,418,444) by the population (149,935) which results in a cost factor of $29.47 per person.
The cost per job is calculated by dividing the total non-residential acquisition cost ($359,532)
by the number of jobs (47,062) which results in a cost factor of $7.64 per job.


Figure 35: General Government Land Cost Standards - Countywide
 LOS
 Residential - acres per person                      .00005
 Nonresidential - acres per job                      .00001


 Cost Factor
 Cost per Acre – County Center #1/Brawley          $615,000
 Cost per Acre – County Center #2                  $312,800


 Cost
 Per Person                                          $29.47
 Per Job                                              $7.64


Unincorporated Area

General Government Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis
Figure 36 lists the current general government land that serves the unincorporated area,
totaling .39 acres in size. The right hand columns of Figure 36 present the allocation of the
facility land and the corresponding acquisition costs to residential and/or non-residential,
which varies based on the services provided on the sites. These percentages correspond with
those presented in the facilities component of the general government fee. Shares for
County Center #1 and #2 represent the average of the respective shares for each building at
the sites.
The current unincorporated general government facility land LOS is calculated by first
determining the residential and non-residential shares of acreage for each of the sites. First,
the unincorporated share of acreage for a site is multiplied by the proportional share factors
for that site. For example, the unincorporated share of County Center #1 of .27 acre is
multiplied by the residential proportionate share factor of 87%. This results in .24 acre
attributable to residential from the County Center # 1 site. The remainder, .03, is attributable
to nonresidential development. This calculation is repeated for County Center #2, resulting
in .36 unincorporated residential acres and .03 nonresidential acres. The Heber Essential
Services site area is not included in this analysis as it is a part of the Fire Fee.
The current unincorporated general government facility land LOS                for residential
development is calculated as follows: (.36 residential acre/28,798 persons)    = .000013 acre
per person. The current unincorporated general government facility             land LOS for
nonresidential development is calculated as follows: (.03 acre/11,016 jobs)    = .000003 acre
per job.




                                                                                             54
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 36: General Government Land LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area
                                                                                  Unincorp.
                                                    Unincorp.                                       Prop. Share**       Unincorporated Acquisition Cost
                                   Unincorp.                      Acq. Cost         Share of
 Facility                                            Share of
                                   Allocation                     per Acre*      Acquisition                  Non-
                                                       Acres                                       Res                        Res.         Non-Res
                                                                                       Cost                   Res
 County Center #1                         5%               .27     $200,000         $54,476         87%        13%              $47,653         $6,822
 County Center #2                         4%               .12     $200,000          $24,413       100%          0%             $24,413              $0
 Total                                                     .39                       $78,889                                    $72,066         $6,822

 Acreage
 Residential                                               .36
 Nonresidential                                            .03


 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                            28,798
 Jobs                                                  11,016

 Levels of Service
 Res–acres per person                                 .000013
 Nonres– acres per job                                .000003

*Source: City of El Centro
**Proportionate share shows the demand for land from residential and non-residential development. County Center #1 represents
the average of the respective shares for each building serving the unincorporated area at the site. County Center #2 serves residential
development exclusively, thus the share indicated is 100% residential.

General Government Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis
The County estimates it costs $200,000 an acre to acquire improved land for County
functions that serve the unincorporated area. This estimate is based on a recent sale of
improved commercial land in the City of Brawley. Using this estimate, the .36 acre
attributable to residential development has an acquisition cost of $72,066 (.36 acre x
$200,000 = $72,066). The cost per person is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of
.000013 acre per person by $200,000 per acre which results in a cost factor of $2.50 per
person. The .03 acre attributable to non-residential development has an acquisition cost of
$6,822 (.03 acre x $200,000 = $6,822). The cost per job is calculated by multiplying the
current LOS of .000003 acre per job by $200,000 per acre which results in a cost factor of
$.62 per job.
Figure 37: General Government Land Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area
 LOS
 Residential - acres per person                                     .000013
 Nonresidential - acres per job                                     .000003


 Cost Factor
 Cost per Acre                                                    $200,000


 Cost
 Per Person                                                            $2.50
 Per Job                                                                $.62



                                                                                                                                     55
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


GENERAL GOVERNMENT VEHICLES
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the vehicle component of the
General Government Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis determines the current level-
of-service (LOS) being provided to existing development. The second step involves
determining the cost per person and per job to provide this LOS. These steps are repeated
to determine the current LOS being provided in the unincorporated area of the County.
Figure 38 lists the current fleet of general government vehicles. In order to distinguish the
vehicles used on a county-wide basis and those used only in the unincorporated area, a
percentage share is assigned to each vehicle category, representing the time the vehicles are
used in those areas.




                                                                                          56
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 38: General Government Vehicles – Countywide and Unincorporated Share
                                                                                    Total          Countywide Unincorporated
Vehicles                                                           # of Units Replacement Cost     Allocation**  Allocation**
Midsize Sedan                                                             102        $1,734,000              96%            4%
Full-size Sedan Non Police                                                  29         $638,000             100%            0%
Midsize Pickup                                                              46         $851,000              91%            9%
Full-size Pickup                                                            15         $307,500             100%            0%
1 Ton Trucks                                                                 1          $28,000             100%            0%
Midsize SUV                                                                  8         $192,000             100%            0%
Mini Vans 7-Passenger                                                       37         $740,000             100%            0%
Full-size Van 15-Passenger                                                   9         $198,000             100%            0%
Full-size SUV                                                                7         $203,000             100%            0%
New Holland Trencher MT 330                                                  1          $38,300               0%          100%
Ford 225 Skip Loader                                                         1          $45,000               0%          100%
Dodge Boom Truck 1 Ton                                                       1          $30,000               0%          100%
5-Ton International Dump Truck                                               1          $82,500               0%          100%
Chevy 1 1/4 Stake Dump Truck                                                 1          $35,000               0%          100%
Chevy Full Size Pick up                                                      1          $20,500               0%          100%
Chevy 1 1/4 Pick Up                                                          1          $32,000               0%          100%
Case 990 Backhoe Trailer                                                     1          $42,000               0%          100%
Service Truck 1 Ton Chevy                                                    1          $38,000               0%          100%
Portable Welder w/Trailer                                                    1            $8,000              0%          100%
Backhoe                                                                      1          $75,000               0%          100%

                                                                           265       $5,337,800

*Source: Imperial County Garage. Does not include vehicles for Fire or Sheriff.
**Share provided by the County.


Countywide Area

Countywide General Government Vehicles– LOS Analysis
Based on the proportionate share analysis in Figure 26, residential development creates 89%
of the demand for general government vehicles countywide, with nonresidential
development accounting for 11% of the demand. The current general government vehicle
LOS for residential development is calculated as follows: ((246 vehicles x 89%)/145,935
persons) = .0015 vehicles per person. This calculation is repeated for nonresidential
development resulting in a LOS of .0006 vehicles per job ((246 vehicles x 11%)/47,062 jobs)
= .0006 vehicles per job.




                                                                                                                           57
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 39: Countywide General Government Vehicles LOS Standards
                                     Cntywide          # of           Unit
                                                                                         Total   Countywide Share of
 Vehicle                             Allocation       Units         Replac.
                                                                                  Replac. Cost          Replac. Cost
                                                          *          Cost**
 Midsize Sedan                               96%         98         $17,000         $1,734,000             $1,666,000
 Full-size Sedan Non
                                                          29        $22,000           $638,000              $638,000
 Police                                    100%
 Midsize Pickup                              91%          42        $18,500           $851,000              $777,000
 Full-size Pickup                          100%           15        $20,500           $307,500              $307,500
 1 Ton Trucks                              100%            1        $28,000            $28,000               $28,000
 Midsize SUV                               100%            8        $24,000           $192,000              $192,000
 Mini Vans 7-Passenger                     100%           37        $20,000           $740,000              $740,000
 Full-size Van 15-
                                                           9        $22,000           $198,000              $198,000
 Passenger                                 100%
 Full-size SUV                             100%            7        $29,000           $203,000              $203,000
                        TOTAL                           246                                                $4,749,500


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                                              89%
 Nonresidential                                                           11%


 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                                         145,935
 Employees                                                           47,062


 LOS
 Residential - vehicles per
                                                                          .0015
 person
 Nonresidential - vehicles
                                                                          .0006
 per job
*Imperial County Garage. Does not include vehicles for Fire or Sheriff.
** Imperial County Garage

Countywide General Government Vehicles– Cost Analysis
As shown in Figure 39, the County’s Garage estimates the countywide share of the current
fleet of vehicles (excluding Sheriff and Fire vehicles) to have a total value of $4,749,500 for
an average of $19,306.91 per unit ($4,749,500/246 units = $19,306.91). This results in a
cost factor of $28.20 per person and $11.06 per job. For residential development, this is
calculated by multiplying the current residential LOS of .0015 vehicles per person by
$10,661.54 per unit (.0015 x $19,306.91 = $28.20). This calculation is repeated for
nonresidential development resulting in a cost per job for general government vehicles of
$10.92 (.0006 x $19,306.91) = $11.06).




                                                                                                                        58
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 40: Countywide General Government Vehicles Cost Standards
 LOS
 Residential–vehicles per person                    .0015
 Nonresidential-vehicles per job                    .0006


 Cost Factor
 Cost per vehicle                              $19,306.91


 Cost
 Per Person                                        $28.20
 Per Job                                           $11.06


Unincorporated Area

Unincorporated Area General Government Vehicles– LOS Analysis
Based on the proportionate share analysis in Figure 27, residential development creates 87%
of the demand for general government vehicles in the unincorporated area, with
nonresidential development accounting for 13% of the demand. The current general
government vehicle LOS for residential development is calculated as follows: ((19 vehicles x
87%)/28,798 persons) = .0006 vehicles per person. This calculation is repeated for
nonresidential development resulting in a LOS of .0002 vehicles per job ((19 vehicles x
13%)/11,016 jobs) = .0002 vehicles per job.




                                                                                         59
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 41: Unincorporated Area General Government Vehicles LOS Standards
                                                        Unit
                                         # of                             Total           Unincorporated
 Vehicle                                              Replac.
                                       Units*                      Replac. Cost      Share of Replac. Cost
                                                       Cost**
 Midsize Sedan
                                              4       $17,000         $1,734,000                  $68,000
 Midsize Pickup
                                              4       $18,500             $851,000                $74,000
 New Holland Trencher
 MT 330                                       1       $38,300              $38,300                $38,300
 Ford 225 Skip Loader                         1       $45,000              $45,000                $45,000
 Dodge Boom Truck 1 Ton                       1       $30,000              $30,000                $30,000
 5-Ton International Dump
 Truck                                        1       $82,500              $82,500                $82,500
 Chevy 1 1/4 Stake Dump
 Truck                                        1       $35,000              $35,000                $35,000
 Chevy Full Size Pick up                      1       $20,500              $20,500                $20,500
 Chevy 1 1/4 Pick Up                          1       $32,000              $32,000                $32,000
 Case 990 Backhoe Trailer                     1       $42,000              $42,000                $42,000
 Service Truck 1 Ton
 Chevy                                        1       $38,000              $38,000                $38,000
 Portable Welder
 w/Trailer                                    1         $8,000              $8,000                  $8,000
 Backhoe                                      1       $75,000              $75,000                $75,000
 TOTAL                                      19                                                   $588,300


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                              87%
 Nonresidential                                           13%


 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                             28,798
 Employees                                              11,016


 LOS
 Residential - vehicles per person                       .0006
 Nonresidential - vehicles per job                       .0002
*Imperial County Garage. Does not include vehicles for Fire or Sheriff.
** Imperial County Garage

Unincorporated Area General Government Vehicles– Cost Analysis
As shown in Figure 41, the County’s Garage estimates the unincorporated area’s share of the
current fleet of vehicles (excluding Sheriff and Fire vehicles) to have a total value of
$588,300 for an average of $30,963.15 per unit ($588,300/19 units = $30,963.15). This
results in a cost factor of $17.87 per person and $6.69 per job. For residential development,
this is calculated by multiplying the current residential LOS of .0006 vehicles per person by
$30,963.15 per unit (.0006 x $30,963.15 = $17.87). This calculation is repeated for
nonresidential development resulting in a cost per job for general government vehicles of
$6.69 (.0002 x $30,963.15) = $6.69).


                                                                                                             60
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 42: Unincorporated Area General Government Vehicles Cost Standards
 LOS
 Residential–vehicles per person                    .0006
 Nonresidential-vehicles per job                    .0002


 Cost Factor
 Cost per vehicle                              $30,963.15


 Cost
 Per Person                                        $17.87
 Per Job                                            $6.69




IMPACT FEE STUDY
The cost of preparing the General Government Impact Fee is also included in the fee
calculations. The County should update its impact fees every three years to ensure the
methodologies, assumptions, and cost factors used in the calculations are still valid and
accurate. TischlerBise has included the cost of preparing the current General Government
Impact Fee in the fee calculations in order to create a source of funding to conduct this
regular update.
This cost ($22,900) is allocated between the countywide and unincorporated components of
the fee. The cost is then allocated to the projected increase in population and jobs over the
next three years in the two areas. As the unincorporated area represents 21% of the
County’s population and jobs (41,206 people and jobs in 2005 in the unincorporated area /
196,997 people and jobs in 2005 in the County as a whole = 21%), 21% of the fee, or
$4,809, is allocated to the unincorporated area. The remainder ($18,091) is allocated to the
countywide portion of the fee. A three year period is used since this is the period of time at
which the impact fee methodology should be revisited. This results in a consultant fee cost
per demand unit of $.88 per person and per job for the countywide area ($18,091/20,599
people and jobs= $.88). The consultant cost per demand unit is $1.33 per person and per job
for the unincorporated area ($4,809/3,620 people and jobs = $1.33).


CREDITS
The County issued a bond in 1999 for the construction or remodeling of a number of
general government facilities, including the Brawley Administration Center, the El Centro
Courthouse and health facilities. To avoid potential double payments, the impact fee
methodology includes a future debt service credit for future bond payments. Excluded from
the calculation are principal payments for roads, the Calexico courthouse and the Heber
Essential Services facility. Ownership of the Calexico facility is being transferred to the City,
and payments toward the Heber Essential Services facility are included under the Fire fee.
This leaves a total remaining principal of $5.2 million. Of this, 79% of the principal is
allocated to the countywide service area, and 21% is allocated to the unincorporated area.
This allocation is consistent with that used for the impact fee study cost, which is described
in the paragraph above. To determine the credits, a net present value discount of 4.5% (the


                                                                                              61
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


True Interest Cost of the remaining debt service) is amortized over the remainder of the
debt service for each service area. The credit calculations are shown in Figures 43a and 43b
below.
Figure 43a: 1999 COPS – Countywide Service Area
1999 Cops                   Principal                               Countywide
                          Minus Roads, Share of Principal   Proportionate  Proportionate   Projected   Projected  Payment/    Payment/
  Fiscal    Principal    Calexico Ct.     Countywide           Share          Share       Countywide Countywide Demand Unit Demand Unit
   Year                     & Heber                  80%     Residential   Nonresidential Population     Jobs     Population    Jobs
   2006       $845,000          $551,894         $441,515         $393,722       $47,794       153,624     48,853       $2.56        $0.98
   2007       $880,000          $574,754         $459,803         $410,030       $49,773       159,406     50,620       $2.57        $0.98
   2008       $920,000          $600,879         $480,703         $428,668       $52,036       165,187     52,409       $2.60        $0.99
   2009       $950,000          $620,473         $496,378         $442,646       $53,732       170,968     54,199       $2.59        $0.99
   2010     $1,005,003          $656,117         $524,894         $468,075       $56,819       176,749     55,989       $2.65        $1.01
   2011       $250,000          $201,675         $161,340         $143,875       $17,465       182,531     57,779       $0.79        $0.30
   2012       $260,000          $209,742         $167,794         $149,630       $18,163       188,312     59,568       $0.79        $0.30
   2013       $275,000          $221,843         $177,474         $158,263       $19,211       194,093     61,358       $0.82        $0.31
   2014       $285,000          $229,910         $183,928         $164,018       $19,910       199,875     63,148       $0.82        $0.32
   2015       $305,000          $246,044         $196,835         $175,528       $21,307       205,656     64,938       $0.85        $0.33
   2016       $320,000          $258,144         $206,515         $184,160       $22,355       211,437     66,727       $0.87        $0.34
   2017       $335,000          $270,245         $216,196         $192,793       $23,403       217,219     68,517       $0.89        $0.34
   2018       $350,000          $282,345         $225,876         $201,425       $24,451       223,000     70,307       $0.90        $0.35
   2019       $364,997          $294,533         $235,626         $210,120       $25,506       228,781     72,097       $0.92        $0.35
 TOTAL      $7,345,000        $5,218,596       $4,174,877       $3,722,951      $451,926

                                                                                       Discount Rate                   4.5%          4.5%
                                                                                   Net Present Value                 $16.31         $6.25

Figure 43b: 1999 COPS – Unincorporated Service Area
1999 Cops                   Principal                           Unincorporated
                          Minus Roads, Share of Principal Proportionate  Proportionate Projected Projected   Payment/     Payment/
  Fiscal    Principal    Calexico Ct.    Unincorporated      Share          Share       Unincorp. Unincorp. Demand Unit Demand Unit
   Year                     & Heber                  20%   Residential   Nonresidential Population  Jobs     Population     Jobs
   2006       $845,000          $551,894         $110,379        $96,555        $13,824     29,963   11,277         $3.22        $1.23
   2007       $880,000          $574,754         $114,951      $100,555         $14,396     30,750   11,538         $3.27        $1.25
   2008       $920,000          $600,879         $120,176      $105,125         $15,051     31,537   11,799         $3.33        $1.28
   2009       $950,000          $620,473         $124,095      $108,553         $15,541     32,324   12,059         $3.36        $1.29
   2010     $1,005,003          $656,117         $131,223      $114,789         $16,434     33,111   12,320         $3.47        $1.33
   2011       $250,000          $201,675          $40,335        $35,284         $5,051     33,898   12,581         $1.04        $0.40
   2012       $260,000          $209,742          $41,948        $36,695         $5,254     34,684   12,842         $1.06        $0.41
   2013       $275,000          $221,843          $44,369        $38,812         $5,557     35,471   13,103         $1.09        $0.42
   2014       $285,000          $229,910          $45,982        $40,223         $5,759     36,258   13,364         $1.11        $0.43
   2015       $305,000          $246,044          $49,209        $43,046         $6,163     37,045   13,625         $1.16        $0.45
   2016       $320,000          $258,144          $51,629        $45,163         $6,466     37,832   13,885         $1.19        $0.47
   2017       $335,000          $270,245          $54,049        $47,280         $6,769     38,619   14,146         $1.22        $0.48
   2018       $350,000          $282,345          $56,469        $49,397         $7,072     39,406   14,407         $1.25        $0.49
   2019       $364,997          $294,533          $58,907        $51,529         $7,377     40,192   14,668         $1.28        $0.50
 TOTAL      $7,345,000        $5,218,596       $1,043,719

                                                                                         Discount Rate                 4.5%          4.5%
                                                                                  Net Present Value                  $21.30         $8.19




MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE GENERAL GOVERNMENT IMPACT
FEE
Figures 44 and 45 provides a summary of the level of service standards used to calculate
impact fees for general government buildings, land and vehicles for the countywide area and
the unincorporated area. General government impact fees are calculated for both residential
and nonresidential land uses. As shown in the bottom of Figure 44, the net capital costs per
demand unit are $399.33 per person and $92.38 per employee for the countywide area.



                                                                                                                                       62
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 45 shows the net capital costs per demand unit of $126.10 per person and $15.43 per
employee in the unincorporated area.
Figure 44: General Government Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary –
Countywide
     Countywide

                                                    Standards:
Persons Per Housing Unit
    Single Family                                                  3.38
    Multi Family                                                   2.65
    Mobile Home                                                    2.27
Employees Per 1,000 Square Feet
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                               2.86
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                               2.50
820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                              2.22
820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                                 2.00
710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                                4.15
710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                                 3.91
710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                                3.69
720 Medical-Dental Office                                                          4.05
610 Hospital                                                                       3.38
770 Business Park                                                                  3.16
110 Light Industrial                                                               2.31
140 Manufacturing                                                                  1.79
150 Warehousing                                                                    1.28
520 Elementary School                                                              0.92
Other Nonresidential
320 Lodging (per room)                                                             0.44
565 Day Care (per student)                                                         0.16
620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                                         0.36
Level Of Service                                           Per Person     Per Employee
    General Government Facilities                            $357.02            $79.12
    General Government Land                                   $29.47             $7.64
    General Government Vehicle Cost                           $28.20            $11.06
    Impact Fee Study                                            $0.85            $0.85
    Principal Payment Credit                                 ($16.22)           ($6.30)
    Net Capital Cost per Demand Unit                         $399.33            $92.38




                                                                                          63
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 45: General Government Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary -
Unincorporated
Unincorporated

                                                        Standards:
Persons Per Housing Unit
           Single Family                                             2.78
           Multi Family                                              2.13
           Mobile Home                                               1.90
Employees Per 1,000 Square Feet
       820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                         2.86
       820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                         2.50
       820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                        2.22
       820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                           2.00
       710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                          4.15
       710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                           3.91
       710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                          3.69
       720 Medical-Dental Office                                                    4.05
       610 Hospital                                                                 3.38
       770 Business Park                                                            3.16
       110 Light Industrial                                                         2.31
       140 Manufacturing                                                            1.79
       150 Warehousing                                                              1.28
       520 Elementary School                                                        0.92
Other Nonresidential
       320 Lodging (per room)                                                      0.44
       565 Day Care (per student)                                                  0.16
       620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                                  0.36
Level Of Service                                               Per Person Per Employee
           General Government Facilities                         $125.70        $14.99
           General Government Land                                  $2.50         $0.62
           General Government Vehicle Cost                        $17.87          $6.69
           Impact Fee Study                                         $1.33         $1.33
           Principal Payment Credit                              ($21.30)       ($8.19)
           Net Capital Cost per Demand Unit                      $126.10        $15.43


Figure 46 contains a schedule of the impact fees for general government buildings, land and
vehicles in the countywide area. For residential land uses, persons per housing unit (3.38 for
a single family unit) are multiplied by the net capital cost per person ($399.33), for an impact
fee per unit of $1,350. For nonresidential land uses, such as a commercial shopping center
less than 50,000 square feet, the number of employees per 1,000 square feet (2.86) is
multiplied by the net capital cost per employee ($92.38), for a fee of $264 per 1,000 square
feet.




                                                                                             64
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 46: General Government Impact Fee Schedule – Countywide
Maximum Supportable Impact Fee
   Residential                                      Per Housing Unit
   Single Family                                             $1,350
   Multi Family                                              $1,057
   Mobile Home                                                 $906
   Nonresidential                                                   Per 1,000 Sq Ft
   Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                           $264
   Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                           $231
   Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                          $205
   Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                             $185
   Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                            $383
   Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                             $361
   Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                            $341
   Medical-Dental Office                                                      $374
   Hospital                                                                   $312
   Business Park                                                              $292
   Light Industrial                                                           $213
   Manufacturing                                                              $165
   Warehousing                                                                $118
   Elementary School                                                           $85
   Nonresidential
   Lodging (per room)                                                         $41
   Day Care (per student)                                                     $15
   Nursing Home (per bed)                                                     $33


Figure 47 contains a schedule of the impact fees for general government facilities, land and
vehicles serving the unincorporated area of the County. This fee schedule reflects those
general government services provided only in the unincorporated area of the County.
For residential land uses in the unincorporated area, for example, persons per housing unit
(2.78 for a single family unit) is multiplied by the net capital cost per person ($126.10) from
Figure 45, for a total per unit of $350. For nonresidential land uses in the unincorporated
area, such as a commercial shopping center less than 50,000 square feet, the number of
employees per 1,000 square feet (2.86) is multiplied by the net capital cost per job ($15.43),
for a total of $44 per 1,000 square feet.




                                                                                            65
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 47: General Government Impact Fee Schedule – Unincorporated Area
Maximum Supportable Impact Fee
        Residential                                     Per Housing Unit
        Single Family                                              $350
        Multi Family                                               $268
        Mobile Home                                                $240
        Nonresidential                                                     Per 1,000 Sq Ft
        Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                              $44
        Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                              $39
        Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                             $34
        Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                                $31
        Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                               $64
        Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                                $60
        Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                               $57
        Medical-Dental Office                                                         $62
        Hospital                                                                      $52
        Business Park                                                                 $49
        Light Industrial                                                              $36
        Manufacturing                                                                 $28
        Warehousing                                                                   $20
        Elementary School                                                             $14
        Nonresidential
        Lodging (per room)                                                            $7
        Day Care (per student)                                                        $2
        Nursing Home (per bed)                                                        $6


Figure 47 contains a schedule of the impact fees for general government in the
unincorporated area of the County. As new development in the unincorporated area of the
County benefits from the general government services provided both countywide and in the
unincorporated area, Figure 48 reflects a combination of the two fees.




                                                                                             66
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 48: General Government Impact Fee Schedule – Combined Countywide and
Unincorporated Area Fee
Maximum Supportable Impact Fee
        Residential                                    Per Housing Unit
        Single Family                                           $1,699
        Multi Family                                            $1,324
        Mobile Home                                             $1,145
        Nonresidential                                                    Per 1,000 Sq Ft
        Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                            $309
        Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                            $271
        Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                           $240
        Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                              $216
        Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                             $449
        Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                              $423
        Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                             $399
        Medical-Dental Office                                                       $438
        Hospital                                                                    $366
        Business Park                                                               $342
        Light Industrial                                                            $250
        Manufacturing                                                               $194
        Warehousing                                                                 $138
        Elementary School                                                           $100
        Nonresidential
        Lodging (per room)                                                          $48
        Day Care (per student)                                                      $17
        Nursing Home (per bed)                                                      $39




                                                                                            67
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006



Fire

METHODOLOGY
The Fire Impact Fee uses an incremental expansion cost approach to determine the need for
fire facilities, land and vehicles and equipment. The Imperial Fire Department serves
residential and non-residential development in the County, providing fire protection and
emergency medical services to residents and businesses. As shown in Figure 49, this impact
fee is allocated on a per capita basis for residential development. For nonresidential
development, the fee methodology allocates the capital cost on a per employee basis. As Fire
services are limited to the County’s unincorporated area, fees are calculated using demand
indicators for the unincorporated area.




                                                                                         68
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 49: Fire Impact Fee Methodology



           Residential Development                      Nonresidential Development




           Persons Per Housing Unit                             Employees
                                                       Per 1,000 Sq. Ft. of Floor Area


                multiplied by                                  multiplied by
          Net Capital Cost Per Person                  Net Capital Cost Per Employee


           Fire Stations and Facilities                  Fire Stations and Facilities
                Cost Per Person                              Cost Per Employee


   plus Land for Fire Stations and Facilities     plus Land for Fire Stations and Facilities
               Cost Per Person                              Cost Per Employee


         plus Vehicles and Equipment                    plus Vehicles and Equipment
               Cost Per Person                               Cost Per Employee


             less Principal Payment                         less Principal Payment
                Credit per Person                            Credit Per Employee


PROPORTIONATE SHARE FACTORS
The Fire Impact Fee uses a functional population concept to allocate capital costs to
residential and nonresidential development. Figure 3 distinguishes time at home (2/3 of a
day, 16 hours) versus time at work (1/3 of a day, 8 hours) and accounts for commuting
patterns in Imperial County.
Unincorporated Area
Figure 50 presents the proportionate share factors for the unincorporated area of Imperial
County. The analysis shows that residential development accounts for 87% of the demand
for Fire facilities, land and vehicles and equipment in the unincorporated area of the County
and nonresidential development accounts for 13% of the demand.


                                                                                               69
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 50: Proportionate Share Factors – Unincorporated Area
                                                                                                  Demand       Person
Residential                                                              Demand Units in 2000    Hours/Day     Hours
   Household Population in Unincorporated County (2000)1                27,487

   Residents Not Working                                                           18,925                24     454,200
   Workers Living in Unincorporated Imperial County2                                8,562

   Unincorporated County Residents Working in Imperial County.3                           7,139           16    114,224
   Unincorporated County Residents Working outside of Imperial County                     1,423           16     22,768
                                                                                        Residential Subtotal    591,192
                                                                                                                   87%
Nonresidential
   Jobs Located in Unincorporated Imperial County (2000) 4                         10,580

   Unincorporated County Residents Working in Imperial County.3                           7,139            8     57,112
   Non-Resident Workers                                                                   3,441            8     27,528
                                                                                     Nonresidential Subtotal     84,640
                                                                                                                   13%
                                                                                                    TOTAL       675,832

   1
       2000 household population excluding group quarters population.

   2
       Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the total number of workers living in unincorporated County.
   3
    Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the number of Imperial County residents working in Imperial
   County.
   4
    Job estimate for 2000 based on estimate of .89 jobs for every 1 housing unit in 2005. Estimate calculated by using
   2005 business data from ESRI Business Information Solutions.


FIRE FACILITIES
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the facilities component of the
Fire Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis determines the current level-of-service (LOS)
being provided to existing development in the unincorporated area of the County. The
second step involves determining the cost per person and per employee to provide this LOS.

Fire Facilities in the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis
Figure 51 lists the current Fire facilities that serve the unincorporated area, totaling 15,386
square feet in size. The facilities listed are the Fire Stations serving the unincorporated area
of the County: Imperial City and Heber. The Seeley station is not included in the analysis as
the facility is leased, and the rent is minimal ($1/year). The Palo Verde station is not
included because it is a small facility in an area in which minimal growth is expected. Based
on the unincorporated area proportionate share analysis in Figure 50, residential
development creates 87% of the demand for Fire facilities, with nonresidential development
accounting for 13% of the demand in the unincorporated area. The current unincorporated
Fire facility LOS for residential development is calculated as follows: ((15,386 square feet x
87%)/28,798 persons) = .47 square feet per person. The current unincorporated Fire facility
LOS for nonresidential development is calculated as follows: ((15,386 square feet x
13%)/11,016 employees) = .17 square feet per employee.




                                                                                                                        70
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 51: Fire Facilities LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area
                                                          Square              Replacement         Replacement
 Facility                                                 Footage             Cost/Sq. Ft.*       Cost
 Fire Station #1 (Imperial)**                                    10,976                $342            $3,757,406
 Fire Station #2 (Heber)                                          4,410                $342            $1,509,672
 Total/Average                                                   15,386                $342            $5,267,078


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                     87%
 Nonresidential                                  13%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                    28,798
 Employees                                     11,016

 LOS
 Residential – sq. ft. per person                  .47
 Nonresidential – sq. ft. per
 employee                                          .17
*Source: Driver-Alliant Insurance County Property Schedule - 2006 Estimate of Replacement Value for Heber. The same cost
per square foot is used for Imperial City.
**The Imperial Station is shared with Imperial City. The Imperial County Fire Department estimates that the City uses 2% of
the facility. That portion is not included in the analysis.
***Imperial County’s Seeley facility is not listed here as it is a leased facility. The Palo Verde station is not included because it is a
small facility in an area in which minimal growth is expected.


Fire Facilities in the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis
The County’s Fire Department estimates its facilities serving the unincorporated area have
an average replacement of $342.33 per square foot, for a total replacement cost of
$5,267,078 (15,386 square feet x $342.33 per square foot = $5,267,078). The cost per person
is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .47 square feet per person by $342.33 per
square foot which results in a cost factor of $159.99 per person. The cost per employee is
calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .17 square feet per employee by $342.33 per
square foot which results in a cost factor of $59.88 per employee.




                                                                                                                                      71
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 52: Fire Facilities Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area
 LOS
 Residential - square feet per person                 .47
 Nonresidential - square feet per employee            .17


 Cost Factor
 Cost per Square Foot                             $342.33


 Cost
 Per Person                                       $159.99
 Per Employee                                      $59.88



LAND FOR FIRE FACILITIES
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the land component of the Fire
Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis determines the current level-of-service (LOS)
being provided to existing development in the unincorporated area of the County. The
second step involves determining the cost per person and per employee to provide this LOS.

Fire Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis
Figure 53 lists the current Fire land that serves the unincorporated area, totaling 4.69 acres.
Based on the unincorporated area proportionate share analysis in Figure 50, residential
development creates 87% of the demand for Fire land, with nonresidential development
accounting for 13% of the demand in the unincorporated area. The current Fire land LOS
for residential development is calculated as follows: ((4.69 acres x 87%)/28,798 persons) =
.0001 acres per person. The current Fire land LOS for nonresidential development is
calculated as follows: ((4.69 acres x 13%)/11,016 employees) = .00005 acre per employee.




                                                                                            72
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 53: Fire Land LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area
                                        Acreage            Acquisition      Acquisition
 Site                                                      Cost/Acre*       Cost
 Fire Station #1 (Imperial)                         3.0         $200,000          $600,000
 Fire Station #2 (Heber)                            1.7         $200,000          $338,000
 Total/Average
                                                   4.69         $200,000          $938,000

 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                      87%
 Nonresidential                                   13%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                     28,798
 Employees                                      11,016

 LOS
 Residential - acres per person                   .0001
 Nonresidential - acres per
 employee                                       .00005
*Imperial County estimate of land acquisition cost in unincorporated area

Fire Land Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis
The County estimates it costs $200,000 an acre to acquire improved land for County
functions that serve the unincorporated area. This estimate is based on a recent sale of
improved commercial land in the City of Brawley. This results in a total acquisition cost of
$938,000 ($200,000 x 4.69 acres = $938,000) for Fire land serving the unincorporated area.
The cost per person is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .0001 acre per person by
$200,000 an acre which results in a cost factor of $28.49 per person. The cost per employee
is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .00005 acre per employee by $200,000 per
acre which results in a cost factor of $10.66 per employee.


Figure 54: Fire Land Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area
 LOS
 Residential - acres per person                                    .0001
 Nonresidential - acres per employee                              .00005


 Cost Factor
 Cost per Acre                                                  $200,000


 Cost
 Per Person                                                       $28.49
 Per Employee                                                     $10.66




                                                                                             73
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


FIRE VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the vehicles and equipment
component of the Fire Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis determines the current
level-of-service (LOS) being provided to existing development in the unincorporated area of
the County. The second step involves determining the cost per person and per employee to
provide this LOS.

Unincorporated Fire Vehicles and Equipment – LOS Analysis
Based on the proportionate share analysis in Figure 50, residential development creates 87%
of the demand for Fire vehicles and equipment in the unincorporated area, with
nonresidential development accounting for 13% of the demand. The current Fire vehicle
and equipment LOS for residential development is calculated as follows: ((41 vehicles and
equipment x 87%)/28,798 persons) = .0012 vehicles per person. This calculation is repeated
for nonresidential development resulting in a LOS of .0005 vehicles/equipment per
employee ((41 vehicles and equipment x 13%)/11,016) = .0005 vehicles/equipment per
employee).




                                                                                        74
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 55: Unincorporated Fire Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards
 Vehicle       Vehicle/Equipment                     # of      Unit Replac.   Total Replac.
 Type                                              Units*            Cost**           Cost
 Engine        GMC                                   1             $250,000      $250,000
 Engine        Chevrolet                             1             $250,000      $250,000
 Engine        Ford                                  7             $286,000     $2,002,000
 Engine        Freightliner                          8             $457,600     $3,660,800
 Pickup        Chevy 4X4                             1              $28,000        $28,000
 Staff         Ford Expedition                       2              $36,000        $72,000
 Pickup        Dodge                                 1              $33,000        $33,000
 Pickup        Ford                                  2              $33,000        $66,000
 Rescue        Ford 250                              1             $190,000      $190,000
 Rescue        Ford 450                              1             $190,000      $190,000
 Crash         Oshkosh                               1             $500,000      $500,000
 HazMat        Freightliner                          1             $220,000      $220,000
 Bomb
 Unit          Chevrolet Van                         1              $66,000        $66,000
 Tender        Chevrolet                             1             $210,000      $210,000
 Tender        International                         2             $244,800      $489,600
  Rescue       Jaws of Life                          7              $25,000      $175,000
  Engine       Duplex                                1             $250,000      $250,000
  Engine       Pierce Arrow                          2             $250,000      $500,000
 TOTAL                                               41                         $9,152,400

 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                                           87%
 Nonresidential                                                        13%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                                          28,798
 Employees                                                           11,016

 LOS
 Residential - vehicles per person                                    .0012
 Nonresidential - vehicles per employee                               .0005
*Imperial County Fire Department
** Imperial County Fire Department

Unincorporated Fire Vehicles and Equipment – Cost Analysis
As shown in Figure 55, the County’s Fire Department the current fleet of vehicles and
equipment to have a total value of $9,152,400 for an average of $223,229.26 per unit
($9,152,400/41 units = $223,229.26). This results in a cost factor of $278.01 per person and
$104.05 per employee. For residential development, this is calculated by multiplying the
current residential LOS of .0012 vehicles/equipment per person by $223,229.26 per unit
(.0012 x $ 223,229.26 = $278.01). This calculation is repeated for nonresidential
development resulting in a cost per employee for Fire vehicles and equipment of $104.47
(.0005 x $223,229.26) = $104.47).


                                                                                              75
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006




Figure 56: Unincorporated Fire Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards
 LOS
 Residential–vehicles/equip. per person                         .0012
 Nonresidential-vehicles/equip. per employee                    .0005


 Cost Factor
 Cost per vehicle/equipment                              $223,229.26


 Cost
 Per Person                                                  $278.01
 Per Employee                                                $104.05

CREDITS
The County issued a bond in 1999 for the construction of a number of government facilities,
including the Heber Essential Services facility which houses a fire station. To avoid potential
double payments, the impact fee methodology includes a future debt service credit for future
bond payments. To determine the credit, a net present value discount of 4.5% (the True
Interest Cost of the remaining debt service) is amortized over the remainder of the debt
service for the facility. The credit calculation is shown in Figure 57 below.


Figure 57: Fire Credit
                          Proportionate Proportionate     Projected      Projected        Payment/        Payment/
  Fiscal       Heber         Share         Share         Unincorp.       Unincorp.       Demand Unit     Demand Unit
   Year                    Residential  Nonresidential   Population        Jobs           Population        Jobs
   2006         $38,976         $34,094         $4,881          29,645          11,171             $1.15         $0.44
   2007         $40,590         $35,506         $5,083          30,113          11,327             $1.18         $0.45
   2008         $42,435         $37,120         $5,314          30,582          11,482             $1.21         $0.46
   2009         $43,819         $38,331         $5,488          31,050          11,637             $1.23         $0.47
   2010         $46,355         $40,550         $5,805          31,519          11,793             $1.29         $0.49
   2011         $48,325         $42,273         $6,052          31,987          11,948             $1.32         $0.51
   2012         $50,258         $43,964         $6,294          32,456          12,103             $1.35         $0.52
   2013         $53,158         $46,500         $6,657          32,924          12,258             $1.41         $0.54
   2014         $55,091         $48,191         $6,899          33,393          12,414             $1.44         $0.56
   2015         $58,957         $51,573         $7,384          33,861          12,569             $1.52         $0.59
   2016         $61,856         $54,109         $7,747          34,330          12,724             $1.58         $0.61
   2017         $64,756         $56,646         $8,110          34,798          12,880             $1.63         $0.63
   2018         $67,655         $59,182         $8,473          35,267          13,035             $1.68         $0.65
   2019         $70,464         $61,639         $8,825          35,735          13,190             $1.72         $0.67
 TOTAL         $742,693

                                                      Discount Rate                               4.5%           4.5%
                                                   Net Present Value                            $14.08          $5.40


IMPACT FEE STUDY
The City should update its impact fees every three years to ensure the methodologies,
assumptions, and cost factors used in the calculations are still valid and accurate.
TischlerBise has included the cost of preparing the current Fire Impact Fee in the fee
calculations in order to create a source of funding to conduct this regular update. The cost


                                                                                                                   76
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


of this component ($14,600) is allocated to the projected increase in population and
employees over the next three years in the unincorporated area. This results in a consultant
fee cost per demand unit of $6.32 per person and per employee ($14,600/2,309 people and
employees).

MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE FIRE IMPACT FEE
Figure 58 provides a summary of the level of service standards used to calculate the Fire
Impact Fees. Fire Impact Fees are calculated for both residential and nonresidential land
uses in the unincorporated area. Developers may be eligible for site-specific credits or
reimbursements only if they provide system improvements that have been included in the
Fire Impact Fee calculation schedule. Project improvements normally required as part of the
development approval process are not eligible for credits against impact fees.
As shown in the bottom of Figure 58, the net capital costs per demand unit are $458.74 per
person and $175.51 per employee.




                                                                                         77
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 58: Fire Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary - Unincorporated
Area
                                                            Standards:
Persons Per Housing Unit
    Single Family                                                        2.78
    Multi Family                                                         2.13
    Mobile Home                                                          1.90
Employees Per 1,000 Square Feet
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                                     2.86
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                                     2.50
820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                                    2.22
820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                                       2.00
710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                                      4.15
710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                                       3.91
710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                                      3.69
720 Medical-Dental Office                                                                4.05
610 Hospital                                                                             3.38
770 Business Park                                                                        3.16
110 Light Industrial                                                                     2.31
140 Manufacturing                                                                        1.79
150 Warehousing                                                                          1.28
520 Elementary School                                                                    0.92
Other Nonresidential
320 Lodging (per room)                                                                   0.44
565 Day Care (per student)                                                               0.16
620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                                               0.36
Level Of Service                                                   Per Person   Per Employee
    Incremental Fire Stations and Facilities Cost                    $159.99          $59.88
    Incremental Land for Fire Stations and Facilities                 $28.49          $10.66
    Incremental Vehicle and Equipment Cost                           $278.01         $104.05
    Impact Fee Study                                                    $6.32          $6.32
    Principal Payment Credit                                         ($14.08)         ($5.40)
    Net Capital Cost per Demand Unit                                 $458.74         $175.51


Figure 59 contains a schedule of the impact fees for fire. For residential land uses, persons
per housing unit (2.78 for a single family unit) are multiplied by the net capital cost per
person ($458.74), for an impact fee per unit of $1,273. For nonresidential land uses, such as
a commercial shopping center less than 50,000 square feet, the number of employees per
1,000 square feet (2.86) is multiplied by the net capital cost per employee ($175.51), for a fee
of $501 per 1,000 square feet.




                                                                                                78
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 59: Fire Impact Fee Schedule – Unincorporated Area


Maximum Supportable Impact Fee
    Residential                                               Per Housing Unit
    Single Family                                                      $1,273
    Multi Family                                                         $977
    Mobile Home                                                          $872
    Nonresidential                                                            Per 1,000 Sq Ft
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                                    $501
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                                    $438
820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                                   $389
820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                                      $351
710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                                     $728
710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                                      $686
710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                                     $647
720 Medical-Dental Office                                                               $710
610 Hospital                                                                            $593
770 Business Park                                                                       $554
110 Light Industrial                                                                    $405
140 Manufacturing                                                                       $314
150 Warehousing                                                                         $224
520 Elementary School                                                                   $161
Other Nonresidential
320 Lodging (per room)                                                                  $77
565 Day Care (per student)                                                              $28
620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                                              $63




                                                                                                79
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Parks and Recreation

METHODOLOGY
The components of this fee include parkland, park amenities, community center and
recreational facilities, and vehicles and equipment. The incremental expansion methodology
is used for all components of this fee. This will allow the County to maintain its current level
of service as it grows.
All capital costs have been allocated to residential development only and standards have
been shown on a per capita basis. As parks are used by residents throughout the County,
fees are calculated using demand indicators for the countywide area. Persons per housing
unit is used to differentiate the impact fees by type of housing (see Appendix 1 for
demographic information).


Figure 60: Parks and Recreation Impact Fee Methodology Chart



                          Residential Development




                          Persons Per Housing Unit




                                multiplied by
                           Capital Cost Per Person


                                                      Parkland
                                                   Cost Per Person

                                                   Park Amenities
                                                   Cost Per Person

                                          Comm. Center and Rec. Facilities
                                                Cost Per Person

                                               Vehicle and Equipment
                                                 Cost Per Person




                                                                                             80
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


PARKLAND
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the parkland component of the
Parks and Recreation Fee. The first step of calculating the incremental expansion
methodology measures the current level-of-service (LOS) being provided to existing
development. The second step involves determining the cost per person to provide this
LOS.

Countywide Parkland – LOS Analysis
Figure 61 shows the County’s parks that serve the county as a whole. Red Hill Marina is not
included in this section of the analysis as it is leased, though the County-funded park
improvements to this park are listed under “community centers and recreational facilities”
and “park amenities.” Ocotillo Park is not included as it is a neighborhood park, while all
others listed in Figure 61 serve the countywide population. The County’s remaining parkland
(249.82 acres) serve the current population of 149,935 persons. Residential development
creates 100% of the demand for parkland, thus a residential proportionate share factor of
100% is used. To calculate the current parkland LOS, the total park acreage for the listed
parks, 249.82 acres, is multiplied by a residential demand of 100%. That number, 249.82, is
divided by the current population of 149,935. This results in .0017 acres of parkland per
person.


Figure 61: Parkland LOS Standards – Countywide
                                                  # of   Acquisition   Acquisition
 Park                                            acres    Cost/Acre*         Cost
 Palo Verde Park                                  10.0       $30,000      $300,000
 Weist Lake                                       70.1       $30,000    $2,103,300
 Sunbeam Lake                                    148.7       $30,000    $4,461,300
 Pioneer's County Park                            21.0       $30,000      $630,000
 TOTAL/AVERAGE                                 249.82        $30,000    $7,494,600


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                    100%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                   149,935

 LOS
 Acres per person                                .0017
*Source: Imperial County

Countywide Parkland – Cost Analysis
The cost analysis for parkland includes a component for raw land and a component for
preparing the land for improvements. The County estimates it costs $30,000 to acquire an
acre of raw land for parkland. Figure 62 lists the average cost per acre of $31,517 for
preparing raw parkland. This figure is based on the planned costs for improvements to the


                                                                                        81
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Ocotillo Park now under construction. This brings the total parkland cost to $61,517 an
acre.
The total cost per person to provide additional parkland for new residential development is
$102.48. This is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .0017 acres per person by
$61,517 per acre (.0017 x $61,517 = $102.48).


Figure 62: Parkland Improvement Costs Per Acre
                       Item                              Per Acre*
 Grade, Grub and Level                                        $10,015

 Sidewalk                                                          $314

 Infrastructure                                               $21,178

 TOTAL                                                        $31,517
*Imperial County Parks Department, based on costs to develop Ocotillo Park, costs inflation adjusted.


Figure 63: Parkland Cost Standards - Countywide
 Level of Service
 Acres per person                             .0017

 Cost Factor
 Cost per acre                             $61,517

 Cost
 Per Person                                $102.48



PARK AMENITIES
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the park amenities component
of the Parks and Recreation Fee. The first step of this analysis determines the current level-
of-service (LOS) being provided to existing development. The second step involves
determining the cost per person to provide this LOS.




                                                                                                        82
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Park Amenities – LOS Analysis
Figure 64 lists the City’s current inventory of park amenities including picnic tables, BBQ
grills, boat ramps and ball fields. Residential development creates 100% of the demand for
park amenities, thus a residential proportionate share factor of 100% is used. To calculate
the current park amenities LOS, 268 amenities is multiplied by 100% residential demand.
That number, 268, is divided by 149,935 persons. This results in .0018 units per person.


Figure 64: Park Amenities LOS Standards
                                                     # of              Replacement          Replacement
 Amenity                                             amenities         Cost/Unit*           Cost
 Picnic tables                                             201               $1,088              $218,600
 BBQ grills                                                  55                $717               $39,442
 Boat ramps                                                   8             $69,000              $552,000
 Ball fields                                                  4             $73,440              $293,760
 TOTAL                                                         268               $4,119        $1,103,801


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                                 100%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                               149,935

 LOS
 Amenities per person                                        .0018
*Unit costs from Ocotillo and Salton Sea park construction plans, adjusted for inflation.

Park Amenities – Cost Analysis
The County estimates the current inventory of park amenities to have a total replacement
value of $1,103,801. This results in an average of $4,118.66 per unit ($1,103,801/268 units =
$4,118). The cost per person is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .0018 park
amenities per person by $4,118.66 per amenity which results in a cost factor of $7.36 per
person.
Figure 65: Park Amenities Cost Standards
 Level of Service
 Amenities per person                                                .0018

 Cost Factor
 Cost per amenity                                               $4,118.66

 Cost
 Per Person                                                          $7.36




                                                                                                            83
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


COMMUNITY CENTERS AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the community centers and
recreational facilities component of the Parks and Recreation Fee. The first step of this
analysis determines the current level-of-service (LOS) being provided to existing
development. The second step involves determining the cost per person to provide this
LOS.

Countywide Community Centers and Recreational Facilities – LOS Analysis
Figure 66 lists the County’s community centers and recreational facilities. Residential
development creates 100% of the demand for community centers and recreational facilities,
thus a residential proportionate share factor of 100% is used. To calculate the current
community centers and recreational facilities LOS, 36,561 square feet of community
center/recreational facility space is multiplied by 100% residential demand. That number,
36,561, is divided by 149,935 persons. This results in .24 square feet per person.




                                                                                      84
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 66: Community Centers and Recreational Facilities LOS Standards -
Countywide
                                                                 Square          Replacement       Replacement
 Facility                                                           Feet       Cost Per Sq. Ft.*          Cost
 Weist Lake Recreational Hall                                      2,646                    $60        $158,008
 Sunbeam Lake Recreation Hall and Ranger's
                                                                       2,440
 Office                                                                                     $75        $182,347
 Sunbeam Lake Concession Stand & Mess Hall                             2,380                $64        $152,380
 Sunbeam Lake Shop                                                       837                $48         $40,105
 Sunbeam Lake Storage                                                    858                $53         $45,357
 Sunbeam Lake - Little League Snack Bar                                  135                $70          $9,476
 Sunbeam Lake - Scorers Booth/Snack Bar                                  512                $65         $33,362
 Sunbeam Lake - Scorers Booth/Equipment
                                                                        576
 Storage                                                                                    $61         $35,163
 Palo Verde Storage                                                      60                 $32          $1,939
 Red Hill Marina Office                                                 962                 $86         $82,468
 Red Hill Marina Fish Cleaning Shed                                     312                 $63         $19,629
 Restrooms (All Parks)                                                 3,819               $123        $469,466
 Shelters (All Parks)                                                 21,024                $21       $443,817
   TOTAL                                                              36,561                         $1,673,517


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                                          100%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                                      149,935

 LOS
 Square feet per person                                                  .24
*Source: Driver-Alliant Insurance Property Schedule – 2005 Estimate

Countywide Community Centers and Recreational Facilities – Cost Analysis
As shown in Figure 66, the County’s property insurance firm estimates the County’s
community and recreational facilities have a total replacement cost of $1,673,517, resulting in
an average replacement value of $45.77 per sq. ft. The cost per person is calculated by
multiplying the current LOS of .24 square feet of community center and recreational facility
space per person by $45.77 per square feet which results in a cost factor of $11.16 per
person.




                                                                                                             85
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 67: Community Centers and Recreational Facilities Cost Standards -
Countywide
 Level of Service
 Square feet per person                               .24

 Cost Factor
 Cost per square foot                              $45.77

 Cost
 Per Person                                        $11.16

VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the vehicles and equipment
component of the Parks and Recreation Fee. The first step of this analysis determines the
current level-of-service (LOS) being provided to existing development. The second step
involves determining the cost per person to provide this LOS.

Countywide Vehicles and Equipment – LOS Analysis
Figure 68 lists the County’s current inventory of park vehicles and equipment. Residential
development creates 100% of the demand for vehicles and equipment, thus a residential
proportionate share factor of 100% is used. To calculate the current vehicles and equipment
LOS, 28 units is multiplied by 100% residential demand. That number, 28, is divided by
149,935 persons. This results in .0002 units per person.




                                                                                        86
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 68: Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards - Countywide
                                                             # vehicles/     Unit            Total
                                                             equipment       Replacement     Replacement
 Vehicles/Equipment                                                          Cost*           Cost
 CASE 990 SKIP LOADER                                                   1          $65,000         $65,000
 CASE 1170D CRAWLER                                                     1          $77,900         $77,900
 UTILITY TRUCK 1 TON                                                    1          $32,000         $32,000
 5000 GALLON POTABLE WATER TANK W/PUMP
 (TRAILER)                                                              2          $50,000        $100,000
 MISC. EQUIPMENT (mowers, chainsaws, weed eaters,
 etc…)                                                                  1          $30,000         $30,000
 MICHIGAN LOADER (EQUIVALENT TO CAT 930)                                1          $80,000         $80,000
 CHEVY 5 TON DUMP (6 WHEELER)                                           1          $45,000         $45,000
 TWIN ENGINE WORK BOAT 20' METAL OUTBOARD
 W/TRAILER                                                              1         $65,000          $65,000
 3 TON INTERNATIONAL STAKE BED TRUCK                                    1         $40,000          $40,000
 WIEST LAKE EMERGENCY GENERATOR 10 KW                                   1         $11,000          $11,000
 40' SEMI VAN TRAILER                                                   1         $15,000          $15,000
 CAT LOADER (EQUIVALENT CAT 920)                                        1         $60,000          $60,000
 INTERNATIONAL 13 SPEED TRACTOR                                         1         $85,000          $85,000
 INTERNATIONAL LOADER                                                   1         $80,000          $80,000
 40' KALIN 5TH WHEEL FLATBED                                            1         $16,500          $16,500
 FORKLIFT TRUCK #1 ALL TERRAIN                                          1         $40,000          $40,000
 VACUUM SWEEPER TRUCK                                                   1         $60,000          $60,000
 1980 LINE MAINTENANCE AUGUR TRUCK                                      1        $140,000         $140,000
 4 WHEEL DRIVE FORKLIFT (SMALL)                                         1         $45,000          $45,000
 EMERGENCY MOBILE POTABLE WATER PLANT                                   1        $180,000         $180,000
 LOWBOY TRAILER 40'                                                     1         $35,000          $35,000
 FORKLIFT TRUCK #2 10 TON                                               1         $60,000          $60,000
 CHIPPER CONTRACTOR HEAVY DUTY MODEL                                    1         $46,900          $46,900
 3 TON TRUCK W/TOMMY GATE                                               1         $45,000          $45,000
 5 TON 4 WHEEL DRIVE FLATBED TRUCK                                      1        $110,000         $110,000
 ROAD GRADER                                                            1        $140,000         $140,000
 MILITARY 6X6 DUMP TRUCK                                                1        $110,000         $110,000
 TOTAL                                                                 28                       $1,814,300

 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                                        100%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                                        149,935

 LOS
 Vehicles and equipment per person                                   .0002
*Source: Imperial County


                                                                                                 87
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Countywide Vehicles and Equipment – Cost Analysis
As shown in Figure 68, the County estimates the current inventory of park vehicles and
equipment to have a total replacement value of $1,814,300. This results in an average of
$64,796.42 per unit ($1,814,300/28 units = $64,796.42). The cost per person is calculated
by multiplying the current LOS of .0002 units per person by $64,796.42 per unit which
results in a cost factor of $12.10 per person.
Figure 69: Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards - Countywide
 Level of Service
 Park vehicles and equipment per person                     .0002

 Cost Factor
 Cost per vehicle/equipment                            $64,796.42

 Cost
 Per Person                                                $12.10



IMPACT FEE STUDY
The County should update its impact fees every three years to ensure the methodologies,
assumptions, and cost factors used in the calculations are still valid and accurate.
TischlerBise has included the cost of preparing the current Parks and Recreation Impact Fee
in the fee calculations in order to create a source of funding to conduct this regular update.
The cost of preparing the Parks and Recreation Impact Fee is included in the fee
calculations. The cost of this component ($10,000) is allocated to the projected increase in
population over the next three years in the countywide area. This results in a consultant fee
cost per demand unit of $.64 per person ($10,000/15,720 people).


MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE PARKS AND RECREATION IMPACT
FEE
Figure 70 provides a summary of the cost factors used to calculate the Parks and Recreation
Impact Fee. Developers may be eligible for site-specific credits or reimbursements only if
they provide system improvements that have been included in the Parks and Recreation
Impact Fee calculation schedule. Project improvements normally required as part of the
development approval process are not eligible for credits against impact fees. As shown at
the bottom of Figure 70, the total capital cost per person is $133.74.




                                                                                           88
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 70: Parks and Recreation Impact Fee Cost Summary
Persons Per Housing Unit
Single Family                                             3.38
Multi-Family                                              2.65
Mobile Home                                               2.27

Cost Factors

Parkland                                               $102.48

Park Amenities                                            $7.36

Community Centers and Recreational Facilities            $11.16

Park Vehicles and Equipment                              $12.10

Impact Fee Study                                          $0.64

Capital Cost Per Person                                $133.74



Figure 71 contains a schedule of Parks and Recreation Impact Fees for Imperial County.
Persons per housing unit is multiplied by the capital cost per person for each of the fee
components. The fee components are then added together for the total impact fee per unit
for each category of housing. Using single family housing units as an example, 3.38 persons
per housing unit is multiplied by the cost per person for each of the components. These
amounts are then added together which yields a Parks and Recreation Impact Fee of $452
per single family housing unit ($346+$25+$38+$41+$2 = $452). This calculation is
repeated for the other housing categories.


Figure 71: Parks and Recreation Impact Fee Schedule
 Impact Fees
                                                     Community         Vehicles
                                                     Centers and       and
                                       Park          Recreational      Equip.     Impact Fee
                           Parkland    Amenities     Facilities                   Study         TOTAL
                                $346           $25               $38       $41             $2        $452
 Single Family
                                $271           $19               $30       $32             $2        $354
 Multi-Family
                                $233           $17               $25       $27             $1        $304
 Mobile Home




                                                                                                89
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006



Libraries

METHODOLOGY
The Imperial County Free Library (ICFL) provides library services for all of the
unincorporated areas of the county and for the cities of Calipatria, Holtville and
Westmorland. The cities of Brawley, Calexico, El Centro and Imperial are not part of the
County library system. Capital costs for the Library Impact Fee have been allocated to
residential development served by the library system and standards have been shown on a
per capita basis. Persons per housing unit is used to differentiate the impact fees by type of
housing (see Appendix 1 for demographic information).
The Library Impact Fee includes components for library facilities, land and collections. All
components are calculated using an incremental expansion methodology which is based on
the ICFL service district’s existing LOS. The service district will extend to new growth the
same LOS it is currently providing existing development via the impact fee.


Figure 72: Library Impact Fee Methodology



                                    Residential Development




                                   Persons Per Housing Unit




                                         multiplied by
                                    Capital Cost Per Person


           Facilities cost        plus Land for library facilities   plus Collection cost
            per person                   cost per person                  per person




LIBRARY FACILITIES
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the library facilities component
of the Library Impact Fee. The first step of this analysis determines the current level-of-
service (LOS) being provided to existing development. The second step involves
determining the cost per person to provide this LOS.




                                                                                            90
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Library Facilities – LOS Analysis
The library system currently has eleven locations, with two locations – the Headquarters
Library and space in the Heber Essential Services Building – being owned by the County.
The other nine locations are leased by the County. The two owned facilities account for
3,143 square feet of library facilities serving the current population of areas served by the
library system of 40,489 persons. The leased facilities account for 8,860 square feet of
library space.
Residential development creates 100% of the demand for library facilities, thus a residential
proportionate share factor of 100% is used. To calculate the library facility LOS, the total
square footage for owned and leased library space – 12,003 square feet – is multiplied by
100% residential demand. That number, 12,003, is then divided by 40,489 persons (the
population in the area served by the library system). This results in .30 square feet of library
space per person.


Figure 73: Library Facilities LOS Standards
                                 Square Ft.
 Headquarters Library                2,500
 Heber Essential Service Bldg.         643
 Calipatria                          2,460
 Desert Shores                         600
 Holtville                           2,500
 Niland                              1,100
 Ocotillo                              300
 Salton City                           600
 Seeley                                200
 Westmoreland                          800
 Winterhaven                           300
 TOTAL                               12,003


 Proportionate Share
    Residential                      100%

 Demand Units 2005
   Population of library
   service area                      40,489

 Level of Service
    Square Feet Per Person              .30

Library Facilities – Cost Analysis
To provide additional library facilities to new residential development, the County estimates
comparable library facilities to cost $300 per square foot. This cost is based on estimated
cost in El Centro and recent cost for new library space in Calipatria. This results in a cost
factor of $88.93 per person. This is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .30 square
feet per person by $300 per square foot (.30 x $300 = $88.93).



                                                                                             91
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 74: Library Facilities Cost Standards

 Level of Service
 Population - square feet per person                        0.30

 Cost Factor
 Project cost per square foot                              $300

 Cost
 Per person in service area                               $88.93




LAND FOR LIBRARY FACILITIES
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the land component of the
Library Impact Fee. The first step of this analysis determines the current level-of-service
(LOS) being provided to existing development. The second step involves determining the
cost per person to provide this LOS.

Land for Library Facilities – LOS Analysis

The library system currently has eleven locations, with two locations – the Headquarters
Library and space in the Heber Essential Services Building – being owned by the County.
The nine locations that are leased are not included in the land component of the fee. The
County reports that the headquarters library occupies .8 acre of land. TischlerBise estimates
that the library facility at the Heber Essential Services Building is on .5 acre of land, for a
total of 1.3 acres. Residential development creates 100% of the demand for land for library
facilities, thus a residential proportionate share factor of 100% is used.

To calculate the land for library facility LOS, the owned acreage of 1.3 acres is multiplied by
100% residential demand. That number, 1.3, is then divided by 40,489 persons (the
population in the area served by the library system) and multiplied by 1,000. This results in
.03 acre of land for libraries per 1,000 residents in the library service area.




                                                                                            92
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 75: Land for Library Facilities LOS Standards
                                       Acreage

 Headquarters Library                            0.8
 Heber Essential Service Bldg.                    .5
 TOTAL                                           1.3


 Proportionate Share
      Residential                          100%

 Demand Units 2005
     Population of library service
     area                                 40,489

 Level of Service
       Acres Per 1,000 Population                .03

Library Land – Cost Analysis
The County will need additional land for library facilities to serve new growth. Based on the
land size for the libraries the county owns, the current LOS is .03 acres per 1,000 persons.
This results in a cost factor of $6.42 per person. This is calculated by multiplying the current
LOS of .03 acres per 1,000 persons by $200,000 per acre (.03 x $200,000). This number is
divided by 1,000, resulting in a cost per person in the library service district of $6.42.


Figure 76: Land for Library Facilities Cost Standards
 Level of Service
 Acre per 1,000 persons                                    0.03

 Cost Factor
 Average cost per acre                                 $200,000

 Cost
 Per Person                                               $6.42




LIBRARY COLLECTIONS
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the library collections
component of the Library Impact Fee. The first step of this analysis determines the current
level-of-service (LOS) being provided to existing development. The second step involves
determining the cost per person to provide this LOS.

Library Collections – LOS Analysis
Figure 77 lists the County’s current inventory of 64,094 units of library collections (books,
DVDs, CDs, etc). Residential development creates 100% of the demand for library
collections, thus a residential proportionate share factor of 100% is used. To calculate the
library collections LOS, the number of library materials – 64,094 – is multiplied by 100%,


                                                                                             93
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


representing the residential demand. That number, 64,094, is then divided by 40,489 persons
(the population in the area served by the library system). This results in 1.58 library materials
per person in the library service district.


Figure 77: Library Collections LOS Standards
                                                                 # of Units
 Library Materials                                                  64,094
 TOTAL                                                              64,094


 Proportionate Share
     Residential                                                     100%

 Demand Units 2005
     Population of library
     service area                                                   40,489

 Level of Service
  Population – library materials
             per person                                                1.58



Library Collections – Cost Analysis
The County’s Library District estimates the current collection of library materials to have a
total value of $1,589,370, at an average of $24.80 per unit ($1,589,370/64,094 units =
$24.80). The cost per person is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of 1.58 materials
per person by $24.80 per unit which results in a cost factor of $39.25 per person.


Figure 78: Library Collections Cost Standards
 Library Materials                   # of units     Cost/unit*   Total Cost
 Collection (Printed Materials)            61,500         $25           $1,537,500
 Video / DVDs                               1,180         $14              $16,520
 Books on Tape                              1,414         $25              $35,350
 Total                                     64,094                       $1,589,370


 Average cost per unit                                                        $24.80


 LOS
 Residential - library materials per person                                     1.58


 Cost factor
 Ave. cost per unit of library materials                                      $24.80


 Cost
 Per person                                                                   $39.25
*Imperial County Libraries



                                                                                              94
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


IMPACT FEE STUDY
The County should update its impact fees every three years to ensure the methodologies,
assumptions, and cost factors used in the calculations are still valid and accurate.
TischlerBise has included the cost of preparing the current Library Impact Fee in the fee
calculations in order to create a source of funding to conduct this regular update. This cost
($10,400) is allocated to the projected increase in population in the library service district
over the next three years. This results in an impact fee study cost per demand unit of
$5.33 per person in the library service district ($10,400/1,952 people).

MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE LIBRARY IMPACT FEE
Figure 79 provides a summary of the level of service standards used to calculate the Library
Impact Fee. As discussed previously, these impact fees are calculated for residential land
uses only. Developers may be eligible for site-specific credits or reimbursements only if they
provide system improvements that have been included in the Library Impact Fee calculation
schedule. Project improvements normally required as part of the development approval
process are not eligible for credits against impact fees.
As shown at the bottom of Figure 79, the capital cost per person unit is $139.93 per person.


Figure 79: Library Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary
                                    Standards:
Persons Per Housing Unit
          Single Family                           2.77
          Multi-Family                            2.63
          Mobile Home                             2.00
Level Of Service                        Per Person
          Land Cost                              $6.42
          Building Cost                        $88.93
          Collection Cost                      $39.25
          Impact Fee Study                       $5.33
          Capital Cost                        $139.93


Figure 80 contains a schedule of Library Impact Fees for the Imperial County Free Library
District. For residential land uses, persons per housing unit is multiplied by the capital cost
per person for each of the fee components which are then added together to determine the
total impact fee per unit. Using single family as an example, 2.77 persons per housing unit
multiplied by $139.93 equals $387 per single family housing unit.




                                                                                            95
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 80: Library Impact Fee Schedule
 Impact Fees
                                                               Impact Fee
                           Land       Facility    Collection   Study         TOTAL
                                $18       $246          $109           $15     $387
 Single Family
                                $17       $234          $103           $14     $368
 Multi-Family
                                $13       $178           $78           $11     $280
 Mobile Home




                                                                                      96
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006



Public Works

METHODOLOGY
Public Works provides road maintenance and solid waste services to the residents of the
unincorporated area of the County. Thus, the Public Works Fees are developed using the
unincorporated area of the County as the demand base.
As shown in Figure 81, the Public Works Impact Fee uses different demand indicators for
residential and nonresidential development. Residential impact fees are calculated on a per
capita basis and then converted to an appropriate amount by type of housing based on
household size. To calculate nonresidential impact fees, nonresidential vehicle trips are used
as the demand indicator for Public Works facilities.
The Public Works Impact Fee utilizes the incremental expansion methodology for public
work office space, shop and storage facilities, land for public works facilities and public
works vehicles and equipment. These costs are allocated to residential and nonresidential
development based on the proportionate share factors presented in Figure 82. In the case of
solid works vehicles, as the demand base in residential, these vehicles are allocated 100% to
residential.




                                                                                           97
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 81: Public Works Impact Fee Methodology



             Residential Development                          Nonresidential Development




            Persons Per Housing Unit                          Nonresidential Vehicle Trips
                                                             Per Square Foot of Floor Area


                   multiplied by                                       multiplied by
              Capital Cost Per Person                              Capital Cost Per Trip


   Public Works Office, Shop & Storage Space          Public Works Office, Shop & Storage Space
                Cost Per Person                                    Cost Per Trip


            plus Land for PW facilities                        plus Land for PW facilities
                 Cost Per Person                                     Cost Per Trip


          plus Road Vehicles and Equip.                      plus Road Vehicles and Equip.
                 Cost Per Person                                     Cost Per Trip


       plus Solid Waste Vehicles and Equip.
                  Cost Per Person



PROPORTIONATE SHARE FACTORS
The Public Works Impact Fee uses a functional population concept to allocate capital costs
to residential and nonresidential development. Figure 82 distinguishes time at home (2/3 of
a day, 16 hours) versus time at work (1/3 of a day, 8 hours) and accounts for commuting
patterns in unincorporated Imperial County.         The analysis shows that residential
development accounts for 87% of the demand for Public Works facilities, land and vehicles
and equipment in the unincorporated area of the County and nonresidential development
accounts for 13% of the demand.




                                                                                             98
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 82: Proportionate Share Factors – Unincorporated Area
                                                                                                  Demand       Person
Residential                                                              Demand Units in 2000    Hours/Day     Hours
   Household Population in Unincorporated County (2000)1                27,487

   Residents Not Working                                                           18,925                24     454,200
   Workers Living in Unincorporated Imperial County2                                8,562

   Unincorporated County Residents Working in Imperial County.3                           7,139           16    114,224
   Unincorporated County Residents Working outside of Imperial County                     1,423           16     22,768
                                                                                        Residential Subtotal    591,192
                                                                                                                   87%
Nonresidential
   Jobs Located in Unincorporated Imperial County (2000) 4                         10,580

   Unincorporated County Residents Working in Imperial County.3                           7,139            8     57,112
   Non-Resident Workers                                                                   3,441            8     27,528
                                                                                     Nonresidential Subtotal     84,640
                                                                                                                   13%
                                                                                                    TOTAL       675,832

   1
       2000 household population excluding group quarters population.

   2
       Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the total number of workers living in unincorporated County.
   3
    Source: Census 2000 Table P26 from STF3, detailing the number of Imperial County residents working in Imperial
   County.
   4
    Job estimate for 2000 based on estimate of .89 jobs for every 1 housing unit in 2005. Estimate calculated by using
   2005 business data from ESRI Business Information Solutions.


PUBLIC WORKS OFFICE, SHOP AND STORAGE SPACE
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the office, shop and storage
space component of the Public Works Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis determines
the current level-of-service (LOS) being provided to existing development. The second step
involves determining the cost per person and nonresidential vehicle trip to provide this LOS.

Public Works Facilities in the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis
Figure 83 lists the current Public Works office, shop and storage space which total 63,088
square feet in size. Based on the unincorporated area proportionate share analysis in Figure
82, residential development creates 87% of the demand for Public Works office, shop and
storage space, with nonresidential development accounting for 13% of the demand. The
current Public Works facility LOS for residential development is calculated as follows:
((63,088 square feet x 87%)/28,798 persons) = 1.92 square feet per person. This calculation
is repeated for nonresidential development resulting in a LOS of .24 square feet per
nonresidential vehicle trip (63,088 square feet x 13%/32,720 nonresidential vehicle trips =
.24).




                                                                                                                        99
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 83: Public Works Facilities LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area
                                                      Square     Replacement      Replacement
 Facility                                             Footage    Cost/Sq. Ft.*    Cost
 Public Works Training Office/Bldg &
                                                        19,402            $129        $2,506,978
 Grounds Shop - 155 S. 11th St.
 Garage Pump Shade Shelter and Office Unit -
                                                         1,980             $22            $44,012
 1414 State St.
 Heber Office/Shop Building                              3,038             $72          $217,829
 Bard Rd. Yard - Shop Building and Carport               2,000             $88          $176,764
 Brawley Rd. Yard Shop Bldg.                             3,302             $69          $229,477
 Brawley Rd. Yard Storage Shed                             120             $42            $4,995
 Brawley Rd. Yard Warehouse                                425             $57           $24,184
 Brawley Office and Shed                                 5,017             $43          $217,525
 Brawley Rd. Yard - Oil Shed                             1,025             $20           $20,886
 Holtville Office and Shop                               6,216             $52          $324,468
 Holtville Rd. Yard - Auto Garage                          325             $75           $24,217
 Holtville Rd. Yard - Parking Garage                     1,260             $47            $59,846
 Holtville Rd. Yard - Storage Trailer                      528             $64            $33,600
 Holtville Rd. Yard - Parking
                                                         1,680             $16            $26,842
 Shelter/Warehouse
 Holtville Rd. Yard - Warehouse                            408             $57           $23,155
 Holtville Rd. Yard - Equipment Shelter                  1,222             $20           $24,812
 Holtville Rd. Yard - Storage Shelter                      750             $18           $13,167
 Imperial Rd. Yard - Shop Bldg.                          2,011             $64          $129,542
 Imperial Rd. Yard Vehicle Repair                        2,800             $89          $247,846
 Imperial Rd. Yard Warehouse #1                          1,274             $41           $52,683
 Imperial Rd. Warehouse #2                                 425             $39           $16,514
 Imperial Rd. Yard Equipment Parking                     2,200             $29           $62,730
 Imperial Rd. Yard Warehouse #3                          2,600             $85          $219,805
 Palo Verde Rd. Yard Shop Building                       1,080             $59           $63,311
 Salton City Road Yard**                                 2,000             $88          $176,764
 Total/Average                                          63,088          $78.33        $4,941,952


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                   87%
 Nonresidential                                13%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                 28,798
 Nonresidential Vehicle Trips               32,720

 LOS
 Residential – sq. ft. per person                1.92
 Nonresidential – sq. ft. per trip                .24
*Source: 2005 Property Replacement Value for Driver Alliant CJPIA Property Schedule for Imperial County
**Salton City Road Yard is comparable in size and scope to Bard Road Yard. Bard Road Yard's size and cost figures
are used for Salton City as well.
***Excludes five houses for resident supervisors




                                                                                                               100
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Public Works Facilities in the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis
The County’s property insurance firm, Driver Alliant CJPIA, estimates a total replacement
cost of $4,941,952 for the County’s public work facilities. This equates to an average of
$78.33 per square foot to expand the current Public Works facilities ($4,941,952/63,088
square feet = $78.33 per square foot). This results in a cost factor of $150.12 per person and
$18.92 per nonresidential vehicle trip. For residential development, this is calculated by
multiplying the current residential LOS of 1.92 square feet per person by $78.33 per square
foot (1.92 x $78.33 = $150.12). This calculation is repeated for nonresidential development
resulting in a cost per trip for Public Works office space of $18.92 (.24 x $78.33 = $18.92).


Figure 84: Public Works Facilities Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area
 LOS
 Residential - square feet per person                 1.92
 Nonresidential - square feet per nonres trip          .24

 Cost Factor
 Cost per Square Foot                               $78.33

 Cost
 Per Person                                       $150.12
 Per Nonresidential Vehicle Trip                   $18.92

LAND FOR PUBLIC WORKS FACILITIES
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the land component of the
Public Works Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis determines the current level-of-
service (LOS) being provided to existing development in the unincorporated area of the
County.

Public Works Land for Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis
Figure 85 lists the current Public Works land that serves the unincorporated area, totaling
27.88 acres. Based on the unincorporated area proportionate share analysis in Figure 82,
residential development creates 87% of the demand for Public Works land, with
nonresidential development accounting for 13% of the demand in the unincorporated area.
The current Public Works land LOS for residential development is calculated as follows:
((27.88 acres x 87%)/28,798 persons) = .0008 acres per person. The current Public Works
land LOS for nonresidential development is calculated as follows: ((27.88 acres x
13%)/32,720 nonresidential vehicle trips) = .0001 acres per trip.




                                                                                          101
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 85: Public Works Land LOS Standards – Unincorporated Area
                                     Acreage       Acquisition    Acquisition
 Site                                              Cost/Acre*     Cost
 Heber                                      7.32        $30,000         $219,600
 Winterhaven                                2.00        $30,000          $60,000
 Imperial                                   4.41        $30,000         $132,300
 Salton City                                4.55        $30,000         $136,500
 Brawley                                    2.07        $30,000          $62,100
 Holtville                                  5.53        $30,000         $165,900
 Palo Verde                                 2.00        $30,000          $60,000
      Total/Average                        27.88        $30,000         $836,400


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                               87%
 Nonresidential                            13%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                               28,798
 Nonresidential Vehicle Trips             32,720

 LOS
 Residential - acres per person            .0008
 Nonresidential - acres per trip           .0001
*Imperial County


Public Works Land for Facilities Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis
The County estimates it costs $30,000 an acre to acquire raw, unimproved land such as that
needed for road yards or parkland. Based on this estimate, Public Works land is estimated to
have a total acquisition cost of $697,000 (27.88 acres x $30,000/acre = $836,400). The cost
per person is calculated by multiplying the current LOS of .0008 acre per person by $30,000
an acre which results in a cost factor of $25.41 per person. The cost per trip is calculated by
multiplying the current LOS of .0001 acre per trip by $30,000 per acre which results in a cost
factor of $3.20 per trip.
Figure 86: Public Works Land Cost Standards – Unincorporated Area
 LOS
 Residential - acres per person                           .0008
 Nonresidential - acres per nonres trip                   .0001

 Cost Factor
 Cost per Acre                                         $30,000

 Cost
 Per Person                                             $25.41
 Per Nonresidential Vehicle Trip                         $3.20




                                                                                           102
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


PUBLIC WORKS VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT - ROADS
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the road vehicles and
equipment component of the Public Works Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis
determines the current level-of-service (LOS) being provided to existing development in the
unincorporated area of the County.

Public Works Road Vehicles and Equipment Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis
Based on the proportionate share analysis in Figure 82, residential development creates 87%
of the demand for Public Works road vehicles and equipment in the unincorporated area,
with nonresidential development accounting for 13% of the demand. The current Public
Works road vehicle and equipment LOS for residential development is calculated as follows:
((175 vehicles and equipment x 87%)/28,798 persons) = .0053 vehicles/equipment per
person. This calculation is repeated for nonresidential development resulting in a LOS of
.0007 vehicles/equipment per nonresidential vehicle trip ((175 vehicles and equipment x
13%)/32,720 trips) = .0007 vehicles/equipment per trip.




                                                                                          103
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 87: Public Works Road Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards –
Unincorporated Area
           Vehicle/Equipment                   # of Units*         Unit Replac. Cost**   Total Replac. Cost

           Private Passenger Cars                             4                $25,000            $100,000
           Light Trucks (1 Ton or Less)                      46                $28,000           $1,288,000
           Flat Racks (2.5 Tons)                              6                $55,000            $330,000
           Trucks/Striping Machine                            1              $140,000             $140,000
           Dump Trucks                                       8               $140,000            $1,120,000
           Moving Trucks                                     2               $120,000             $240,000
           Truck Tractor/Bottom Dumps                        17                $95,000           $1,615,000
           Bottom Dump Trailers                              18                $85,000           $1,530,000
           Pup Trailers                                       4                $45,000            $180,000
           Equipment/Low Bed Trailers                         2                $95,000            $190,000
           Equipment/Utility Trailers                         4                $40,000            $160,000
           Arrow Board Trailers                               2                $35,000             $70,000
           Tact Trailer                                       2                $30,000             $60,000
           Aerial Left Trailer                                1                $26,000             $26,000
           Vacuum Broom                                      1               $110,000             $110,000
           Self Propelled Brooms                              2                $45,000             $90,000
           Graders                                           12              $280,000            $3,360,000
           Dozers                                            2               $310,000             $620,000
           Loaders                                           4               $260,000            $1,040,000
           Backhoes                                          4               $100,000             $400,000
           Small Skip Loader                                  1                $40,000             $40,000
           Steel Rollers                                      3                $90,000            $270,000
           Rubber Rollers                                     2                $60,000            $120,000
           Pull Rollers                                      4                 $15,000             $60,000
           Tractors                                          2                 $80,000            $160,000
           Dragline                                          1               $250,000             $250,000
           Conveyor Screen                                   3               $160,000             $480,000
           Conveyor Stackers                                 2                 $40,000             $80,000
           Forklifts                                          7                $60,000            $420,000
           Pavement Breaker Arrow                             1                $50,000             $50,000
           Vacuum Sweeper Truck                              1                 $70,000             $70,000
           Sheep Feet Roller                                 1                 $10,000             $10,000
           Portable Water Pump                               1                 $35,000             $35,000
           Portable Water Tank Trailer                        1                 $2,500               $2,500
           6" Wood Chipper Vermeer                            1                $18,000             $18,000
           Portable Steel Roller                             1                  30,000               30,000
           Trailer Tank                                       1                $50,000             $50,000




                                                                                                   104
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


 TOTAL                                                    175                              $14,814,500

 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                             87%
 Nonresidential                                          13%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                            28,798
 Nonresidential Vehicle Trips                          32,720

 LOS
 Residential - vehicles per person                       .0053
 Nonresidential - vehicles per nonres trip               .0007
*Imperial County Public Works Department

Public Works Road Vehicles and Equipment Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis
As shown in Figure 87, the County’s Public Works Department estimates the
unincorporated share of the current fleet of road vehicles and equipment to have a total
value of $14,814,500 for an average of $84,654.28 per unit ($14,169,000/175 units =
$84,654.28). This results in a cost factor of $450.00 per person and $56.70 per
nonresidential vehicle trip. For residential development, this is calculated by multiplying the
current residential LOS of .0053 vehicles/equipment per person by $84,654.28 per unit
(.0053 x $84,654.28 = $450.00). This calculation is repeated for nonresidential development
resulting in a cost per trip for Public Works road vehicles and equipment of $56.70 (.0007 x
$84,654.28) = $56.70).


Figure 88: Public Works Road Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards –
Unincorporated Area
 LOS
 Residential–vehicles/equip. per person               .0053
 Nonresidential-vehicles/equip. per nonres trip       .0007


 Cost Factor
 Cost per vehicle/equipment                       $84,654.28


 Cost
 Per Person                                         $450.00
 Per Nonresidential Vehicle Trip                     $56.70

PUBLIC WORKS VEHICLES AND EQUIPMENT – SOLID WASTE
The incremental expansion methodology is used to calculate the solid waste vehicles and
equipment component of the Public Works Impact Fee. The first step of the analysis
determines the current level-of-service (LOS) being provided to existing development in the
unincorporated area of the County.




                                                                                              105
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Public Works Solid Waste Vehicles and Equipment Serving the Unincorporated Area – LOS Analysis
Residential development creates 100% of the demand for solid waste services, thus a
proportionate share factor of 100% residential is used for this section of the fee. The
current Public Works solid waste vehicle and equipment LOS for residential development is
calculated as follows: ((22 vehicles and equipment x 100%)/28,798 persons) = .0008
vehicles/equipment per person.


Figure 89: Public Works Solid Waste Vehicles and Equipment LOS Standards –
Unincorporated Area

               Vehicle/Equipment               # of Units*       Unit Replac. Cost**   Total Replac. Cost
               Light Trucks (1 Ton or Less)              13                  $28,000            $364,000
               Flat Racks (2.5 Tons)                         1               $55,000              $55,000
               Truck / Roll Back                             1               $95,000              $95,000
               Truck Tractor/Moving Trucks                   2             $120,000             $240,000
               Equipment Trailers                            2               $95,000            $190,000
               Transfer Trailer                              1               $30,000              $30,000
               Graders                                    2                $280,000              $560,000
               TOTAL                                     22                                    $1,534,000


 Proportionate Share
 Residential                                          100%

 Demand Units 2005
 Population                                          28,798

 LOS
 Residential - vehicles per person                    .0008
*Imperial County Public Works Department

Public Works Solid Waste Vehicles and Equipment Serving the Unincorporated Area – Cost Analysis
As shown in Figure 89, the County’s Public Works Department estimates the current fleet of
solid waste vehicles and equipment have a total value of $1,534,000 for an average of
$69,727.27 per unit ($1,534,000/22 units = $69,727.27). This results in a cost factor of
$53.27 per person. This is calculated by multiplying the current residential LOS of .0008
vehicles/equipment per person by $69,727.27 per unit (.0008 x $69,727.27 = $53.27).




                                                                                                 106
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 90: Public Works Solid Waste Vehicles and Equipment Cost Standards –
Unincorporated Area
 LOS
 Residential–vehicles/equip. per person             .0008


 Cost Factor
 Cost per vehicle/equipment                     $69,727.27


 Cost
 Per Person                                        $53.27




IMPACT FEE STUDY
The cost of preparing the Public Works Impact Fee is also included in the fee calculations.
The County should update its impact fees every three years to ensure the methodologies,
assumptions, and cost factors used in the calculations are still valid and accurate.
TischlerBise has included the cost of preparing the current Public Works Impact Fee in the
fee calculations in order to create a source of funding to conduct this regular update. This
cost ($11,800) is allocated to the projected increase in population and nonresidential vehicles
trips over the next three years in a growing community. A three year period is used since
this is the period of time at which the impact fee methodology should be revisited. This
results in a consultant fee cost per demand unit of $3.73 per person and trip ($11,800/3,168
people and trips).


MAXIMUM SUPPORTABLE PUBLIC WORKS IMPACT FEE
Figure 91 provides a summary of the level of service standards used to calculate impact fees
for Public Works. Public Works Impact Fees are calculated for both residential and
nonresidential land uses. Developers may be eligible for site-specific credits or
reimbursements only if they provide system improvements that have been included in the
Public Works Impact Fee calculation schedule. Project improvements normally required as
part of the development approval process are not eligible for credits against impact fees.
As shown in the bottom of Figure 91, the capital costs per demand unit are $682.52 per
person and $82.54 per nonresidential vehicle trip.




                                                                                           107
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 91: Public Works Impact Fee Level of Service Standard Summary
                                                                   Standards:
Persons Per Housing Unit
    Single Family                                                               2.78
    Multi-Family                                                                2.13
    Mobile Home                                                                 1.90
Average Weekday Vehicle Trip Ends per 1,000 Sq Ft
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                                      86.56
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                                      67.91
820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                                     53.28
820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                                        41.80
710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                                       18.35
710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                                        15.65
710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                                       13.34
720 Medical-Dental Office                                                                 36.13
610 Hospital                                                                              17.57
770 Business Park                                                                         12.76
110 Light Industrial                                                                       6.97
140 Manufacturing                                                                          3.82
150 Warehousing                                                                            4.96
520 Elementary School                                                                     14.49
Average Weekday Vehicle Trip Ends
320 Lodging (per room)                                                                     5.63
565 Day Care (per student)                                                                 4.48
620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                                                 2.37
Trip Adjustment Factors
    Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                                       26%
    Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                                       29%
    Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                                      32%
    Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                                         35%
    All Other Nonresidential                                                               50%
Level Of Service                                                         Per Person    Per Trip
    Public Works Office Space, Shop and Storage Space                      $150.12      $18.92
    Land for Public Works Office Space, Shop and Storage Space              $25.41       $3.20
    Public Works Vehicle & Equipment Cost - Roads                          $450.00      $56.70
    Public Works Vehicle & Equipment Cost - Solid Waste                     $53.27       $0.00
    Impact Fee Study                                                          $3.73      $3.73
    Capital Cost per Demand Unit                                           $682.52      $82.54



Figure 92 contains a schedule of the impact fees for Public Works. For residential land uses,
persons per housing unit (2.78 for a single family unit) are multiplied by the capital cost per
person ($682.52), for an impact fee per unit of $1,894. For nonresidential land uses, such as
a commercial shopping center less than 50,000 square feet, the number of trips per 1,000
square feet (86.56) is multiplied by the corresponding trip adjustment factor (26%) and then
multiplied by the capital cost per nonresidential vehicle trip ($82.54), for a fee of $1,857 per
1,000 square feet.




                                                                                            108
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure 92: Public Works Impact Fee Schedule
Maximum Supportable Impact Fee
    Residential                                                    Per Housing Unit
    Single Family                                                           $1,894
    Multi-Family                                                            $1,453
    Mobile Home                                                             $1,297
Nonresidential                                                                        Per 1,000 Sq Ft
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,000 SF or less                                                          $1,857
820 Com / Shop Ctr 50,001-100,000 SF                                                          $1,625
820 Com / Shop Ctr 100,001-200,000 SF                                                         $1,407
820 Com / Shop Ctr over 200,000 SF                                                            $1,207
710 Office / Inst 25,000 SF or less                                                             $757
710 Office / Inst 25,001-50,000 SF                                                              $645
710 Office / Inst 50,001-100,000 SF                                                             $550
720 Medical-Dental Office                                                                     $1,491
610 Hospital                                                                                    $725
770 Business Park                                                                               $526
110 Light Industrial                                                                            $287
140 Manufacturing                                                                               $157
150 Warehousing                                                                                 $204
520 Elementary School                                                                           $598
Other Nonresidential
320 Lodging (per room)                                                                         $232
565 Day Care (per student)                                                                     $184
620 Nursing Home (per bed)                                                                      $97




                                                                                                 109
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Appendix 1: Demographic Estimates and Development Projections
As specified in Task 1 of our Work Scope, TischlerBise has prepared documentation on
current demographic estimates and development projections that will be used in the
Imperial County impact fee study. The demographic data estimates are for 2005 and are
used in calculating current levels-of-service (LOS).
The development projections are used primarily for the purpose of having an understanding
of the possible future pace of service demands, impact fee revenues, and capital
expenditures. TischlerBise’s recommended approach is to use Southern California
Association of Governments (SCAG) household projections for Imperial County and for
non-residential growth, forecasting employment by place of work. All other demand factors
are then derived from these key demand indicators.
Imperial County provides some services on a county-wide basis while others are provided
only in the unincorporated area. Demand for services varies in these two geographic areas,
with the unincorporated area having a significantly smaller demand base. The following
demographic estimates and development projections are presented in two parts –
countywide and unincorporated – to reflect the demand base for each.

ESTIMATES AND PROJECTIONS - COUNTYWIDE
Persons Per Housing Unit - Countywide
A differentiation by type of housing is necessary to make residential impact fees
proportionate and reasonably related to the demand for public facilities. Persons per
housing unit is an important demographic factor that helps account for variations in service
demand by type of housing. The best source of this data is the 2000 U.S. Census, Summary
File 3. The data for Imperial County is shown in Figure A1 below. Three housing unit
categories are recommended based on County demographic characteristics: single-family
(detached and attached), multi-family and mobile homes.




                                                                                        110
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure A1: Persons Per Housing Unit in Imperial County


Persons By Housing Unit Type - April 1, 2000


                                                Total         Distrib        Occupied        Vacant                        Persons
                                              Housing        of Housing      Housing        Housing                          Per
           Dwelling Unit Type                   Units          Types          Units           Units         Population    Hsg. Unit
Single Family Detached and Attached                27,049          63.3%          25,460          1,589          91,426            3.38
Multi-Family                                        9,108          21.3%           8,422              686        24,098            2.65
Mobile Home                                         6,606          15.4%           4,989          1,617          14,994            2.27
Total                                              42,763         100.0%          38,871          3,892         130,518            3.05


Occupancy Rate                                                     90.9%
Vacancy Rate                                                        9.1%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 STF 3; Tables H30, H32, and H33. Exlcudes 1,128 housing units classified as RVs, boats, and other units. The group
quarters population, including the county's prison population, is not included in the analysis.




Housing Unit Estimates and Projections – Countywide


The State of California Department of Finance estimated the number of housing units in
Imperial County in 2000 to be 43,891. The State’s 2000 estimate is slightly higher that the
U.S. Census figure presented in Figure A1 (by 1,128 units) as the State estimate includes
housing units classified as RV, boats and other units. As shown in Figure A2, the State
estimates that the number of housing units in the County grew to 48,495 by January 1, 2005.


Figure A2: Estimated Housing Units 2000-2005
                                                          Apr. 2000 Jan. 2001 Jan. 2002 Jan. 2003 Jan. 2004 Jan. 2005
Single Family Attached and Detached                         27,069       27,367   27,912    28,607   29,548     30,589
Multi-Family                                                 9,124        9,131     9,402     9,616    9,804    10,130
Mobile Home                                                  7,698        7,720     7,721     7,721    7,734      7,776
TOTAL                                                       43,891       44,218   45,035    45,944   47,086     48,495
Source: California Department of Finance E-5 Housing Unit Estimates



Based on the Southern California Council of Government’s projection of 69,336 households
in Imperial County in 2020, 76,919 housing units are projected for the County in 2020. The
State estimated an occupancy rate of 90.1% in 2005, and for the purpose of projections, this
rate is kept constant. This equates to an annual housing growth rate of 3.91% over the
period.
Future growth is allocated to single-family and multi-family units, which the State estimated
to have grown 13% and 11%, respectively, over the 2000-2005 period. The distribution
between single-family and multi-family units in 2005 was 75% single-family and 25% multi-
family, excluding the mobile home housing type, according to State estimates. Over time, as
the cost of land and housing increases, there will be increasing demand for multi-family
units. Thus it is projected that 66% of new units in the County will be single-family and 34%



                                                                                                                                                111
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


multi-family. Single-family units include detached and attached units, and multi-family
includes duplexes, 4-plexes and larger complexes. This distribution reflects that nearly all
new units constructed during the 2000 to 2005 period were either single family or multi-
family units, according to State estimates. The mix of new housing units in the
unincorporated area of the County is expected to be largely single-family (85% single-family,
15% multi-family), while the mix in the incorporated area is expected to include a larger
share of multi-family units (60% single-family, 40% multi-family).
Figure A3 shows housing unit projections for the countywide area through 2020 by housing
type. No growth is projected for the mobile home housing type. The State estimates that this
category grew only modestly over the 2000-2005 period (1%), as shown in Figure 2.
Escalating land value is expected to limit future mobile home development.


Figure A3: Countywide Housing Unit Projections
                                                                                Five-year increments
                                          2006     2007     2008     2009     2010        2015       2020
TOTAL HOUSING UNITS
Single Famly--Detached and Attached     31,847    33,105   34,364   35,622   36,880   43,171      49,463
Multi-Family                            10,767    11,403   12,040   12,677   13,314   16,497      19,681
Mobile Home                              7,776     7,776    7,776    7,776    7,776    7,776       7,776
TOTAL                                   50,390    52,285   54,180   56,075   57,970   67,445      76,919
Difference                                1895      1895     1895     1895     1895     1895        1895




Population Estimate & Projections - Countywide


The State estimated 2005 household population in Imperial County as 149,935 persons. This
figure does not include the inmate population in the County’s two state prison facilities.
To determine population by housing type for future population projections, TischlerBise
multiplied the person per housing unit figure from the 2000 Census for each category of
housing (in Figure A1) by the estimated and projected number of occupied housing units for
each category of housing (in Figure A3). Using single family detached housing units in 2006
as an example, 31,847 times 3.38 persons per housing unit equals 107,644 persons. This
calculation is repeated for each category of housing for each year. These figures are added to
the 2005 population estimate to determine the household population projection. Figure A4
presents household population projections through 2020 by housing type.




                                                                                                     112
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure A4: Projected Countywide Population
                                                                                      Five-year increments
                                       2006      2007      2008      2009      2010          2015          2020
Household Population By Housing Type
Single Famly--Detached and Attached    107,644   111,897   116,150   120,403   124,656     145,920      167,185
Multi-Family                            28,487    30,171    31,856    33,540    35,225      43,648       52,071
Mobile Home                             17,650    17,650    17,650    17,650    17,650      17,650       17,650
Total                                  153,780   159,718   165,655   171,593   177,530     207,218      236,905


NONRESIDENTIAL MULTIPLIERS - COUNTYWIDE
In addition to data on residential development, the calculation of impact fees requires data
on nonresidential construction in Imperial County. To convert employment projections to
gross floor area of nonresidential development, average square feet per employee multipliers
are used. The multipliers shown in Figure A5 are derived from national data published by
the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) and the Urban Land Institute (ULI).
These multipliers are also used to calculate the number of average weekday vehicle trips
from nonresidential development in Imperial County. The multipliers used in the
Imperial County study are based on existing development types in the County, and are
shown in grey. The multipliers used are in the categories of commercial/retail, general office
(private and public sector) and light industrial (goods production).




                                                                                                             113
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure A5: Floor Area Per Employee and Nonresidential Trip Rates
ITE                 Land Use / Size           Demand      Wkdy Trip Ends Wkdy Trip Ends     Emp Per      Sq Ft
Code                                            Unit      Per Dmd Unit*    Per Employee*   Dmd Unit**   Per Emp
Commercial / Shopping Center
820          25K gross leasable area        1,000 Sq Ft       110.32              na          3.33        300
820          50K gross leasable area        1,000 Sq Ft       86.56               na          2.86        350
820          100K gross leasable area       1,000 Sq Ft       67.91               na          2.50        400
820          200K gross leasable area       1,000 Sq Ft       53.28               na          2.22        450
820          400K gross leasable area       1,000 Sq Ft       41.80               na          2.00        500
General Office
710          10K gross floor area           1,000 Sq Ft       22.66             5.06          4.48        223
710          25K gross floor area           1,000 Sq Ft       18.35             4.43          4.15        241
710          50K gross floor area           1,000 Sq Ft       15.65             4.00          3.91        256
710          100K gross floor area          1,000 Sq Ft       13.34             3.61          3.69        271
Industrial
770          Business Park***               1,000 Sq Ft       12.76             4.04          3.16       317
151          Mini-Warehouse                 1,000 Sq Ft         2.50            56.28         0.04      22,512
150          Warehousing                    1,000 Sq Ft         4.96            3.89          1.28       784
140          Manufacturing                  1,000 Sq Ft         3.82             2.13         1.79       558
110          Light Industrial               1,000 Sq Ft         6.97             3.02         2.31       433
Other Nonresidential
720          Medical-Dental Office          1,000 Sq Ft        36.13             8.91         4.05        247
620          Nursing Home                       bed             2.37             6.55         0.36         na
610          Hospital                       1,000 Sq Ft       17.57             5.20          3.38        296
565          Day Care                         student           4.48            28.13         0.16         na
530          High School                      student           1.71            19.74         0.09         na
520          Elementary School                student           1.29            15.71         0.08         na
520          Elementary School              1,000 Sq Ft       14.49             15.71         0.92       1,084
320          Lodging                           room             5.63            12.81         0.44         na
* Trip Generation, Institute of Transportation Engineers, 2003.
** Employees per demand unit calculated from trip rates, except for Shopping Center
data, which are derived from Development Handbook and Dollars and Cents
of Shopping Centers, published by the Urban Land Institute.
*** According to ITE, a Business Park is a group of flex-type buildings
served by a common roadway system. The tenant space includes a variety of uses
with an average mix of 20-30% office/commercial and 70-80% industrial/warehousing.

Job & Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates – Countywide
TischlerBise obtained employment data for jobs located in the County from ESRI Business
Information Solutions, a private firm specializing in demographic and market data. ESRI
estimates indicate that 47,062 persons are employed in the County in 2005. For purposes of
the impact fee study, TischlerBise further allocated these jobs into the categories of
retail/commercial, office, public sector/government and goods production. Using the
employment density multipliers in the far right column of Figure A5, the number of jobs for
each category was converted into nonresidential square footage. TischlerBise estimates there
is 16,866,154 square feet of nonresidential development in Imperial County.




                                                                                                            114
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure A6: Job and Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates
                                                                                             2005
                                           2005            Percent of        Sq Ft       NR Floor Area
                                                     1                               2                  3
                                      Employment         Employment        Per Emp       Imperial Co.
Retail/Commerical
Retail Trade                                   8,650
Services (50%)                                 8,839
   Subtotal                                   17,489         37.2%               400         6,995,400
Office
Finance/Ins./Real Estate                       1,454
Services (50%)                                 8,839
   Subtotal                                   10,293         21.9%               256         2,634,880
Public Sector
Government                                      6,287
   Subtotal                                     6,287        13.4%               256         1,609,472
Goods Production
Agriculture                                       2504
Construction                                   1,484
Manufacturing                                  1,962
Wholesale Trade                                5,085
Comm, Trans, & Utilities                       1,959
  Subtotal                                    12,994         27.6%               433         5,626,402
Total                                         47,062        100.0%                          16,866,154


1
    Business data provided by ESRI Business Information Solutions.
2
    Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) and Urban Land Institute (ULI)
3
 NR=nonresidential. NR Floor Area determined by multiplying employment estimate for Imperial County by ITE and ULI
ratio of average number of square feet of nonresidential floor space per employee.


Job & Nonresidential Square Footage Projections - Countywide
Figure A7 lists the projected number and type of jobs as well and projected nonresidential
square footage over the next fifteen years.
To project the future number of jobs in the County, TischlerBise assumed the current ratio
of nonresidential development to residential development would remain constant and the
number of jobs would increase proportionally. The County’s current job to housing ratio is
.97 (47,062 jobs/48,495 housing units). This ratio is used to project the future number of
jobs in the County based on the housing projections from Figure A3 (and summarized in
Figure A7). Using the employment density multipliers from Figure A5, the projected
number and type of future jobs are converted into nonresidential square footage projections.




                                                                                                                115
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure A7: Job and Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates and Projections
                                                                                                                               Five year increments
                                                                 2005       2006       2007       2008       2009       2010          2015            2020
JOBS
Jobs                                                              47,062     48,901     50,716     52,554     54,393     56,231        65,421          74,612
Housing Units                                                     48,495     50,390     52,285     54,180     56,075     57,970        67,445          76,919
Jobs to Housing Ratio                                                0.97       0.97       0.97       0.97       0.97       0.97          0.97            0.97

                                                                                                                               Five year increments
JOB DISTRIBUTION                                                 2005       2006       2007       2008       2009       2010          2015            2020
Retail/Commercial                                                  17,489    18,172     18,846     19,530     20,213     20,896        24,311          27,726
Office                                                             10,293    10,695     11,092     11,494     11,896     12,298        14,308          16,318
Public Sector/Government                                            6,287     6,533      6,775      7,021      7,266      7,512         8,740           9,967
Goods Production                                                   12,994    13,502     14,003     14,510     15,018     15,526        18,063          20,601
TOTAL                                                              47,062    48,901     50,716     52,554     54,393     56,231        65,421          74,612

NONRES SQUARE FOOTAGE (x 1,000)                                                                                                Five year increments
                                                   SF per Job    2005       2006       2007       2008       2009       2010          2015            2020
Retail/Com KSF**                                           400      6,995     7,269      7,539      7,812      8,085      8,358         9,724          11,090
Office KSF**                                               256      2,635     2,738      2,839      2,942      3,045      3,148         3,663           4,177
Public Sector/Government KSF***                            256      1,609     1,672      1,734      1,797      1,860      1,923         2,237           2,552
Goods Production KSF**                                     433      5,626     5,846      6,063      6,283      6,503      6,723         7,821           8,920
TOTAL                                                              16,866    17,525     18,176     18,835     19,493     20,152        23,446          26,739
** KSF = square feet of floor area in thousands.



Average Daily Vehicle Trip Estimates - Countywide
Figure A8 below provide a summary of the residential and nonresidential vehicle trip
calculations used in this analysis.
Average Weekday Vehicle Trip Ends are from the reference book, Trip Generation,
published by the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE), in 2003. A “trip end”
represents a vehicle either entering or exiting a development (as if a traffic counter were
placed across a driveway). Trip rates have been adjusted to avoid overestimating the number
of actual trips because one vehicle trip is counted in the trip rates of both the origination and
destination points. A simple factor of 50% has been applied to the residential,
government/institutional, office and goods production categories. The commercial category
has a trip factor of less than 50% because this type of development attracts vehicles as they
pass-by on arterial and collector roads. For example, when someone stops at a convenience
store on their way home from work, the convenience store is not their primary destination.
The ITE Manual indicates that on average 41% of the vehicles entering shopping centers are
passing by on the way to some other primary destination and 59% of the attraction trips has
the shopping center as their primary destination. Therefore, the adjusted trip factor is 29%
(0.59 x 0.50).
For example, to calculate the number of trips generated by 1,000 square feet of
retail/commercial space in Imperial County on an average weekday end, 6,995 (x1,000)
square feet of retail/commercial space is multiplied by a trip rate of 67.91. This figure,
475,030, is multiplied by the adjusted trip factor of 29%, resulting in a total of 137,767
average weekday trip ends for retail/commercial businesses. This calculation is repeated for
each category of non-residential uses, along with each category of housing, to reach the total
number of average weekday trips ends.
There is an average of 390,393 vehicle trips generated by existing development in Imperial
County on an average weekday. As the table below indicates, residential development
generates 199,806 vehicle trips and nonresidential development generates 190,587 vehicle
trips on an average weekday.


                                                                                                                                                        116
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure A8: Average Daily Trips
Residential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday (2005)
Residential Units                                  Assumptions
Single Family Detached and Attached                   30,589
Multi-Family                                          10,130
Mobile Home                                             7,776 Adjustment
Average Weekday Trip Ends per Unit*                Rate         Factor
Single Family Detached and Attached                      9.57        50%
Multi-Family                                             6.72        50%
Mobile Home                                              4.99        50%
Residential Vehicle Trip Ends Average Weekday
Single Family Detached and Attached                              146,368
Multi-Family                                                      34,037
Mobile Home                                                       19,401
Total Residential Trips                                          199,806

Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday (2005)
Nonresidential Gross Floor Area (1,000 sq.ft.)**   Assumptions
Retail/Commercial                                       6,995
Office                                                  2,635
Public Sector                                           1,609
Goods Production                                        5,626 Adjustment
Average Weekday Ends per 1,000 sq. ft.*            Rate         Factor
Retail/Commercial                                       67.91        0.29
Office                                                  15.65        0.50
Public Sector                                           15.65         50%
Goods Production                                         6.97         50%
Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday
Retail/Commercial                                                137,767
Office                                                            20,618
Public Sector                                                     12,594
Goods Production                                                  19,608
Total Nonresidential Trips                                       190,587

TOTAL TRIPS                                                      390,393

**Trip rates are from the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation Manual (2003)
*Floor area estimates were derived using sq. ft. per employee factors from ITE and ULI




SUMMARY OF DEVELOPMENT ESTIMATES AND
PROJECTIONS 2005-2020 - COUNTYWIDE
Annual demographic and development estimates projections for the impact fee study are
summarized in Figure A9 below. The 2005 demographic estimates will be used to derive
current levels-of-service (LOS).
The development projections are used primarily for the purpose of having an understanding of
the future pace of service demands and cash flows resulting from revenues and expenditures
associated with those service demands.



                                                                                                      117
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Imperial County is projected to add approximately 1,895 housing units and 5,798 persons
per year over the next sixteen years. From 2005 to 2020, TischlerBise projects an average
annual increase in employment of 1,837 jobs and approximately 658,000 square feet of
nonresidential floor area. However, actual nonresidential construction is often built in
irregular intervals compared to residential development, with minor construction followed
by large-scale projects.
Figure A9: Development Projections 2005-2020
                                                                                                                                       Future      Average
                                                                                                             Five Year Increments     Growth       Annual
             Demand Factor                   2005         2006          2007         2008         2009        2010          2020     2005-2020     Change
               Population1
Population in Households                     149,935        138,620     159,718      165,655      171,593     177,530      236,905       86,970        5,798
Total Population                             161,621        150,306     171,404      177,341      183,279     189,216      248,591       86,970        5,798
             Housing Units1
Single Family                                 30,589         31,847      33,105       34,364       35,622      36,880       49,463       18,874        1,258
Multi-Family                                  10,130         10,767      11,403       12,040       12,677      13,314       19,681        9,551          637
Mobile Home                                    7,776          7,776       7,776        7,776        7,776       7,776        7,776          -            -
Total Housing Units                           48,495         50,390      52,285       54,180       56,075      57,970       76,919       28,424        1,895
              Employment2
Employment                                    47,062         48,901      50,716       52,554       54,393      56,231       74,612       27,550        1,837
       Nonresidential Space3
Retail/Com (000s)                              6,995          7,269        7,539       7,812        8,085        8,358      11,090        4,095         273
Office (000s)                                  2,635          2,738        2,839       2,942        3,045        3,148       4,177        1,542         103
Public Sector (000s)                           1,609          1,672        1,734       1,797        1,860        1,923       2,552          942          63
Goods Production (000s)                        5,626          5,846        6,063       6,283        6,503        6,723       8,920        3,294         220
Total (000s)                                  16,866         17,525      18,176       18,835       19,493      20,152       26,739        9,873         658
        Avg. Daily Vehicles Trips 4
Single Family                                146,368        137,365     142,793      148,220      153,647     159,074      213,346       66,977        4,465
Multi-Family                                  34,037         32,610      34,538       36,466       38,395      40,323       59,607       25,571        1,705
Mobile Home                                   19,401         17,488      17,488       17,488       17,488      17,488       17,488       (1,913)        (128)
           Subtotal Residential              199,806        187,463     194,819      202,175      209,530     216,886      290,441       90,635        6,042
Retail/Com (000s)                            137,767        143,150     148,464      153,845      159,226     164,607      218,414       80,647        5,376
Office (000s)                                 20,618         21,424      22,219       23,024       23,829      24,635       32,688       12,070          805
Public Sector (000s)                          12,594         13,086      13,572       14,064       14,556      15,048       19,967        7,372          491
Goods Production (000s)                       19,608         20,374      21,131       21,896       22,662      23,428       31,086       11,478          765
        Subtotal Nonresidential              190,587        198,034     205,386      212,830      220,273     227,717      302,155      111,568        7,438
Total Average Daily Trips                    390,393        385,497     400,205      415,004      429,803     444,603      592,596      202,203       13,480


1
  Source: California Department of Finance 2005 E5 City/County population and housing estimate for population and housing data. Population and
housing unit projection based on SCAG 2020 household projection, which assumes a 2005 vacancy rate of 9.9%. Distribution of housing changes during the
2005 to 2020 period to reflect that nearly all new units constructed during the 2000 to 2005 period were either single family detached or multi-family units.
Population projections based on applying 2000 U.S. Census data number of persons per housing unit by housing unit type.
2
  2005 Employment estimate provided by ESRI Business Information Solutions. Projection determined by holding jobs to housing ratio constant over study
period.
4
  Nonresidential space estimate based on distribution of jobs reported by ESRI and employees per 1,000 square foot ratios published by the Institute for
Transportation Engineers (ITE) and Urban Land Institute (ULI).
4
  Average daily trip rates published by Institute for Transportation Engineers in Trip Generation (2003).




                                                                                                                                                       118
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


ESTIMATES AND PROJECTIONS - UNINCORPORATED AREA

As some County services are provided only in the unincorporated area, the following
illustrates the demand base for the unincorporated area of Imperial County only.

Persons Per Housing Unit – Unincorporated Area
Estimated persons per housing unit for Imperial County’s unincorporated area is shown in
Figure A10 below. The persons per housing unit figure in the County’s unincorporated area
– 2.38 persons per housing unit – is significantly smaller than that of the County as a whole
where there are on average 3.05 persons per housing unit.


Figure A10: Persons per Housing Unit in Imperial County’s Unincorporated Area

Persons by Housing Unit Type - April 1, 2000

                                             Total          Distrib     Occupied      Vacant                      Persons
                                            Housing       of Housing    Housing       Housing                      Per
           Dwelling Unit Type                Units           Types       Units         Units       Population    Hsg. Unit
Single Family Detached and Attached               6,033        53.5%          5,131          902        16,742         2.78
Multi-Family                                        536         4.8%            386          150         1,141         2.13
Mobile Home                                       4,709        41.8%          3,221        1,488         8,948         1.90
Total                                            11,278       100.0%          8,738        2,540        26,831         2.38



Occupancy Rate                                                               77.5%
Vacancy Rate                                                                 22.5%



Source: U.S. Census Bureau; 2000 STF 3; Tables H30, H32, and H33. Persons by housing unit analysis exlcudes housing units classified as
RVs, boats, and other units. The group quarters population, including the county's prison population, is not included in the analysis.


Housing Unit Estimates and Projections – Unincorporated Area
The State of California Department of Finance estimated the number of housing units in
Imperial County’s unincorporated area in 2000 to be 11,917. The State’s 2000 estimate is
slightly higher that that presented in Figure A10 as the State estimate includes housing units
classified as RV, boats and other units. As shown in Figure A11, the State estimates that the
number of housing units in the County grew to 12,408 by January 1, 2005. The State
estimates that 50% of the units in 2005 are single-family, 6% are multi-family and 44% are
mobile homes.




                                                                                                                                     119
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure A11: Estimated Housing Units in the Unincorporated Area, 2000-2005
                                         Apr. 2000 Jan. 2001 Jan. 2002 Jan. 2003 Jan. 2004 Jan. 2005
Single Family Detached and Attached           5,987      6,016     6,057     6,075     6,098     6,208
Multi-Family                                    532        532       628       628       628       733
Mobile Home                                   5,398      5,419     5,419     5,414     5,426     5,467
TOTAL                                       11,917      11,967    12,104    12,117    12,152    12,408
Source: California Department of Finance E-5 Housing Unit Esimates



Imperial County is a recreational location that attracts a seasonal population during the
winter months. The public facilities in the County’s unincorporated areas are utilized by both
year-round and seasonal residents. To account for this, a seasonal, or peak, population will
be used to examine the residential demand base. TischlerBise projected the peak population
by decreasing the unincorporated area vacancy from the 2000 Census rate of 22.5% in the
unincorporated area to 9% to accommodate for occupied second homes and rentals. Nine
percent is the average countywide vacancy rate reported by the State of California for
Imperial County in 2005.
Based on the Southern California Council of Government’s projection of 13,550 households
in Imperial County’s unincorporated area in 2020, 15,032 housing units are projected for the
County in 2020. This equates to an annual growth rate of 1.4% over the period.
Future growth is allocated to single-family and multi-family units, which the State estimated
to have grown 4% and 38%, respectively, over the 2000-2005 period. Single-family units
include detached and attached units, and multi-family includes duplexes, 4-plexes and larger
complexes. TischlerBise anticipates that most new housing units that are built in the
unincorporated County (on un-annexed land) will be single-family. Thus it is projected that
85% of new units in the unincorporated area will be single-family and 15% multi-family.
Figure A12 shows housing unit projections through 2020 by housing type. No growth is
projected for the mobile home housing type. The State estimates that this category grew only
modestly over the 2000-2005 period (1%), as shown in Figure A11. Escalating land value is
expected to limit future mobile home development.


Figure A12: Housing Units Projections in the Unincorporated Area
                                                                                            Five Year Increments
                                        2005     2006      2007        2008      2009      2010       2015       2020
TOTAL HOUSING UNITS
Single Famly--Detached and Attach     6,208     6,357     6,505       6,654     6,803     6,951     7,695     8,438
Multi-Family                            733       759       785         812       838       864       995     1,127
Mobile Home                           5,467     5,467     5,467       5,467     5,467     5,467     5,467     5,467
Total                                12,408    12,583    12,758      12,933    13,108    13,283    14,157    15,032
Difference                                         175       175         175       175       175       175       175



The State estimated the 2005 household population in Imperial County’s unincorporated
areas to be 28,798. This figure excludes the group quarters population.
For the future population projections, TischlerBise multiplied the person per housing unit
from the 2000 Census for each category of housing (in Figure A10) by the projected number



                                                                                                                120
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


of housing units for each category of housing (in Figure A12). Using single family housing
units in the unincorporated area in 2006 as an example, 6,357 housing units times 2.78
persons per housing unit equals 16,640 persons. This calculation is repeated for each
category of housing for each year. These figures are added to the 2005 population estimate
to determine the household population projection in the unincorporated area.


Figure A13: Population Projections for the Unincorporated Area
                                                                                   Five year increments
                                          2006     2007     2008     2009      2010       2015          2020

Single Family - Detached and Attached     17,640   18,053   18,466    18,878   19,291      21,354      23,417
Multi-Family                               1,616    1,672    1,728     1,784    1,840       2,119       2,398
Mobile Home                               10,388   10,388   10,388    10,388   10,388      10,388      10,388
Total                                     29,645   30,113   30,582    31,050   31,519      33,861      36,204




NONRESIDENTIAL MULTIPLIERS – UNINCORPORATED AREA
In addition to data on residential development, the calculation of impact fees requires data
on nonresidential construction in Imperial County’s unincorporated area. To convert
employment projections to gross floor area of nonresidential development, average square
feet per employee multipliers are used. The multipliers shown in Figure A5 are derived from
national data published by the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) and the Urban
Land Institute (ULI).
These multipliers are also used to calculate the number of average weekday vehicle trips
from nonresidential development in Imperial County’s unincorporated area. The multipliers
used in this analysis are based on existing development types in the County, and are shown
in grey in Figure A5. The multipliers used are in the categories of commercial/retail, general
office (private and public sector) and light industrial (goods production).

Job & Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates – Unincorporated Area
TischlerBise obtained employment data for jobs located in the County from ESRI Business
Information Solutions, a private firm specializing in demographic and market data. ESRI
estimates indicate that 11,016 persons are employed in the County’s unincorporated area in
2005. For purposes of the impact fee study, TischlerBise further allocated these jobs into the
categories of retail/commercial, office, public sector/government and goods production.
Using the employment density multipliers in the far right column of Figure A5, the number
of jobs for each category was converted into nonresidential square footage. TischlerBise
estimates there are 3,991,668 square feet of nonresidential development in Imperial County’s
unincorporated area.




                                                                                                          121
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure A14: Job and Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates
                                                                                   2005
                                   2005        Percent of     Sq Ft          NR Floor Area
                               Employment     Employment    Per Emp 2      Imperial (Unincorp )3
Retail/Commerical
Retail Trade                            788
Services (50%)                        1,431
     Subtotal                         2,219     20.1%                400                  887,400
Office
Finance/Ins./Real Estate                180
Services (50%)                        1,431
   Subtotal                           1,611     14.6%                256                  412,288
Public Sector
Government                            2,373
   Subtotal                           2,373     21.5%                256                  607,488
Goods Production
Agriculture                            1053
Construction                            492
Manufacturing                           377
Wholesale Trade                       2,315
Comm, Trans, & Utilities                577
     Subtotal                         4,814     43.7%                433               2,084,462
Total                                11,016     100.0%                                 3,991,638


1
     ESRI Business Information Solutions, 2005.
2
    Institute of Transportation Engineers and Urban Land Institute
3
 NR=nonresidential. NR Floor Area determined by multiplying employment estimate for
Imperial County by ITE ratio of average number of square feet of nonresidential floor space
per employee.

Job & Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates and Projections – Unincorporated Area
Figure A15 lists the projected number and type of jobs as well and projected nonresidential
square footage in the unincorporated area over the next fifteen years.
To project the future number of jobs in the County, TischlerBise assumed the current ratio
of nonresidential development to residential development would remain constant and the
number of jobs would increase proportionally. The current job to housing ratio for the
County’s unincorporated area is .89 (11,016 jobs/12,408 housing units). This ratio is used to
project the future number of jobs in the County’s unincorporated area based on the housing
projections from Figure A12 (and summarized in Figure A15).
Using the employment density multipliers from Figure A5, the projected number and type of
future jobs are converted into nonresidential square footage projections.



                                                                                                    122
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006




Figure A15: Job and Nonresidential Square Footage Estimates and Projections
                                                                                   Five Year Increments
                                       2005    2006     2007     2008     2009     2010      2015    2020

JOBS
Jobs                                 11,016   11,171   11,327   11,482   11,637   11,793   12,569   13,346
Housing Units                        12,408   12,583   12,758   12,933   13,108   13,283   14,157   15,032
Jobs to Housing Ratio                  0.89     0.89     0.89     0.89     0.89     0.89     0.89     0.89

New Jobs                                        155      155      155      155      155      155      155

JOB DISTRIBUTION
Retail/Commercial Jobs                2,219    2,250    2,281    2,312    2,344    2,375    2,531    2,688
Office Jobs                           1,611    1,633    1,656    1,679    1,701    1,724    1,838    1,951
Public Sector/Government Jobs         2,373    2,406    2,440    2,473    2,507    2,540    2,708    2,875
Goods Production Jobs                 4,814    4,882    4,950    5,018    5,085    5,153    5,493    5,832
TOTAL                                11,016   11,171   11,327   11,482   11,637   11,793   12,569   13,346



NONRES. SQ. FOOTAGE (X1,000)
                           SQ/Job
Retail/Commercial             400       887      900      912      925      937      950    1,013    1,075
Office                        256       412      418      424      430      436      441      470      499
Public Sector/Government      256       607      616      625      633      642      650      693      736
Goods Production              433     2,084    2,114    2,143    2,173    2,202    2,231    2,378    2,525
TOTAL                                 3,992    4,048    4,104    4,160    4,217    4,273    4,554    4,836


Average Daily Vehicle Trip Estimates – Unincorporated Area
Figure A16 below provide a summary of the residential and nonresidential vehicle trip
calculations used in this analysis.
There is an average of 78,529 vehicle trips generated by existing development in Imperial
County’s unincorporated area on an average weekday. As the table below indicates,
residential development generates 45,808 vehicle trips and nonresidential development
generates 32,720 vehicle trips on an average weekday in the unincorporated area.




                                                                                                      123
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Figure A16: Average Daily Trips in the Unincorporated Area
Residential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday (2005)
Residential Units                                  Assumptions
Single Family                                             6,208
Multi-Family                                                 733
Mobile Home                                               5,467 Adjustment
Average Weekday Trip Ends per Unit*                Rate            Factor
Single Family                                               9.57        50%
Multi-Family                                                6.72         50%
Mobile Home                                                 4.99         50%
Residential Vehicle Trip Ends Average Weekday
Single Family                                                          29,705
Multi-Family                                                            2,463
Mobile Home                                                            13,640
Total Residential Trips                                                45,808



Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday (2005)
Nonresidential Gross Floor Area (1,000 sq.ft.)**   Assumptions
Retail/Commercial                                           887
Office                                                      412
Public Sector/Government                                    607
Goods Production                                          2,084 Adjustment
Average Weekday Ends per 1,000 sq. ft.*            Rate            Factor
Retail/Commercial                                         67.91          29%
Office                                                    15.65          50%
Public Sector/Government                                  15.65          50%
Goods Production                                            6.97         50%
Nonresidential Vehicle Trips Average Weekday
Retail/Commercial                                                      17,476
Office                                                                  3,226
Public Sector/Government                                                4,754
Goods Production                                                        7,264
Total Nonresidential Trips                                             32,720

TOTAL TRIPS                                                            78,529

**Trip rates are from the Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) Trip Generation Manual (2003)
*Floor area estimates were derived using sq. ft. per employee factors from ITE and ULI




SUMMARY OF DEVELOPMENT PROJECTIONS 2005-2020 –
UNINCORPORATED AREA
Annual demographic and development estimates and projections for the impact fee study are
summarized in Figure A17 below. Imperial County’s unincorporated area is projected to add
approximately 175 housing units and 494 persons per year over the next sixteen years. From
2005 to 2020, TischlerBise projects an average annual increase in employment of 155 jobs
and approximately 56,000 square feet of nonresidential floor area. However, actual



                                                                                                      124
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


nonresidential construction is often built in irregular intervals compared to residential
development, with minor construction followed by large-scale projects.


Figure A17: Development Projections 2005-2020 in Unincorporated Area


                                                                                                                        Future     Average
                                                                                            Five Year Increments        Growth     Annual
           Demand Factor               2005      2006      2007      2008       2009     2010      2015      2020      2005-2020    Change
            Population1
Population in Group Quarters            5,964     5,964    5,964       5,964    5,964     5,964    5,964      5,964            0           0
Population in Households                28,798    29,645   30,113      30,582   31,050    31,519   33,861     36,204       7,406         494
Total Population                        34,762    35,609   36,077      36,546   37,014    37,483    39,825    42,168       7,406         494
          Housing Units1

Single Family                           6,208     6,357     6,505      6,654     6,803    6,951     7,695     8,438        2,230         149
Multi-Family                              733       759       785        812       838      864       995     1,127          394           26
Mobile Home                             5,467     5,467     5,467      5,467     5,467    5,467     5,467     5,467          -           -
Total Housing Units                    12,408    12,583    12,758     12,933    13,108   13,283    14,157    15,032        2,624         175
          Employment2

Employment                             11,016    11,171    11,327     11,482    11,637   11,793    12,569    13,346        2,330         155
        Nonresidential Space3
Retail/Com (000s)                         887       900       912        925       937      950     1,013     1,075          188          13
Office (000s)                             412       418       424        430       436      441       470       499           87           6
Public Sector (000s)                      607       616       625        633       642      650       693       736          128           9
Goods Production (000s)                 2,084     2,114     2,143      2,173     2,202    2,231     2,378     2,525          441          29
Total (000s)                            3,992     4,048     4,104      4,160     4,217    4,273     4,554     4,836          844          56
    Avg. Daily Vehicles Trips 4
Single Family                          29,705    30,417    31,128     31,840    32,551   33,263    36,820    40,378       10,672         711
Multi-Family                            2,463     2,551     2,639      2,727     2,816    2,904     3,345     3,785        1,322           88
Mobile Home                            13,640    13,640    13,640     13,640    13,640   13,640    13,640    13,640          -           -
         Subtotal Residential          45,808    46,608    47,408     48,207    49,007   49,807    53,805    57,803       11,995         800
Retail/Com (000s)                      17,476    17,723    17,969     18,216    18,462   18,708    19,940    21,172        3,696         246
Office (000s)                           3,226     3,272     3,317      3,363     3,408    3,454     3,681     3,908          682          45
Public Sector (000s)                    4,754     4,821     4,888      4,955     5,022    5,089     5,424     5,759        1,005          67
Goods Production (000s)                 7,264     7,367     7,469      7,572     7,674    7,776     8,288     8,801        1,536         102
      Subtotal Nonresidential          32,720    33,182    33,643     34,104    34,566   35,027    37,333    39,640        6,920         461
Total Average Daily Trips              78,529    79,790    81,051     82,312    83,573   84,834    91,138    97,443       18,914       1,261

1
  Source: California Department of Finance 2005 E5 City/County population and housing estimate for population and housing data.
Population and housing unit projectiond based on SCAG 2020 household projection, assuming a 2005 countywide vacancy rate of 9.86%.
Distribution of housing changes during the 2005 to 2020 period to reflect that nearly all new units constructed during the 2000 to 2005 period
were either single family detached or multi-family units. Population projections based on applying 2000 U.S. Census data on number of
persons per housing unit by housing unit type.
2
  2005 Employment estimate provided by ESRI Business Information Solutions. Projection determined by holding jobs to housing ratio
constant over study period.
3
  Nonresidential space estimate based on distribution of jobs reported by ESRI and employees per 1,000 square foot ratios published by the
Institute for Transportation Engineers and Urban Land Institute.
4
  Average daily trip rates published by Institute for Transportation Engineers in Trip Generation (2003)




                                                                                                                                        125
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


Appendix 2: Implementation and Administration
T




This section of the report contains recommendations for adoption and administration of a
development impact fee program based on this study, and for the interpretation and
application of impact fees recommended herein. Statutory requirements for the adoption
and administration of fees imposed as a condition of development approval are found in the
Mitigation Fee Act (Government Code Sections 66000 et seq.).

ADOPTION
The form in which development impact fees are adopted, whether by ordinance or
resolution, should be determined by the City Attorney. Typically, it is desirable that specific
fee schedules be set by resolution to facilitate periodic adjustments. Procedures for adoption
of fees subject to the Mitigation Fee Act, including notice and public hearing requirements,
are specified in Government Code Section 66016. Such fees do not become effective until
60 days after final action by the Governing body. Actions establishing or increasing fees
subject to the Mitigation Fee Act require certain findings, as set forth in Government Code
Section 66001 and discussed in Section 1 of this report summarized below.

ADMINISTRATION
Several requirements of the California Mitigation Fee Act (Government Code Sections
66000 et seq.) address the administration of impact fee programs, including collection and
accounting procedures, refunds, updates and reporting. References to code sections in the
following paragraphs pertain to the California Government Code.

Imposition of Fees. Pursuant to the Mitigation Fee Act, when the City imposes an impact
fee upon a specific development project, it must make findings to :

        1.      Identify the purpose of the fee;
        2.      Identify the use of the fee; and
        3.      Determine that there is a reasonable relationship between:
                a.      The use of the fee and the development type on
                        which it is imposed;
                b.      The need for the facility and the type of development on which the
                        fee is imposed; and
                c.      The amount of the fee and the facility cost
                        attributable to the development project.


Most of those findings would normally be based on an impact fee study, and this study is
intended to provide a basis for all of the required findings. According to the statute, the use
of the fee (2., above) may be specified in a capital improvement plan, the General Plan, or
other public document. This study is intended to serve as a public document identifying the
use of the fees.




                                                                                           126
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


In addition, Section 66006, as amended by SB 1693, provides that a local agency, at the time
it imposes a fee for public improvements on a specific development project, "... shall identify
the public improvement that the fee will be used to finance." For each type of fee calculated
in this report, the improvements to be funded by the impact fees are identified.
Consequently, this report provides a basis for the notification required by the statute. The
City Attorney should be consulted as to the specific method of notification to be provided.

Collection of Fees. Section 66007, provides that a local agency shall not require payment
of fees by developers of residential projects prior to the date of final inspection, or issuance
of a certificate of occupancy, whichever occurs first. However, "utility service fees" (not
defined) may be collected upon application for utility service. In a residential development
project of more than one dwelling unit, the agency may choose to collect fees either for
individual units or for phases upon final inspection, or for the entire project upon final
inspection of the first dwelling unit completed.

An important exception allows fees to be collected at an earlier time if they will be used to
reimburse the agency for expenditures previously made, or for improvements or facilities for
which money has been appropriated. The agency must also have adopted a construction
schedule or plan for the improvement. These restrictions on the time of collection do not
apply to non-residential development.

Notwithstanding the foregoing restrictions, many cities routinely collect impact fees for all
facilities at the time building permits are issued, and builders often find it convenient to pay
the fees at that time. In cases where the fees are not collected upon issuance of building
permits, Section 66007 provides that the city may require the property owner to execute a
contract to pay the fee, and to record that contract as a lien against the property until the
fees are paid.

Credit for Improvements provided by Developers. If the City requires a developer, as a
condition of project approval, to construct facilities or improvements for which impact fees
have been, or will be, charged, the impact fee imposed on that development project, for that
type of facility, should be adjusted to reflect a credit for the cost of those facilities or
improvements. If the reimbursement would exceed the amount of the fee to be paid by the
development for that type of facility, the City may wish to negotiate a reimbursement
agreement with the developer.

Credit for Existing Development. If a project involves replacement, redevelopment or
intensification of previously existing development, impact fees should be applied only to the
portion of the project which represents an increase in demand for City facilities, as measured
by the demand variables used in this study. Since residential service demand is normally
estimated on the basis of demand per dwelling unit, an addition to a single family dwelling
unit typically would not be subject to an impact fee if it does not increase the number of
dwelling units in the structure. If a dwelling unit is added to an existing structure, no impact
fee would be charged for the previously existing units. A similar approach can be used for
other types of development.

Earmarking of Fee Revenue. Section 66006 specifies that fees shall be deposited with
other fees for the improvement in a separate capital facilities account or fund in a manner to


                                                                                            127
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


avoid any commingling of the fees with other revenues and funds of the local agency, except
for temporary investments. Fees must be expended solely for the purpose for which the fee
was collected. Interest earned on the fee revenues must also be placed in the capital account
and used for the same purpose.

The language of the law is not clear as to whether depositing fees "with other fees for the
improvement" refers to a specific capital improvement or a class of improvements (e.g.,
street improvements). We are not aware of any city that has interpreted that language to
mean that funds must be segregated by individual projects. As a practical matter, that would
make it exceedingly difficult to accumulate enough funds to construct any improvements
funded by impact fees. Common practice is to maintain separate funds or accounts for
impact fee revenues by facility category (i.e., streets, traffic signals, or park improvements),
but not for individual projects. We recommend that approach.

Reporting. As amended by SB 1693 in 1996, Section 66006 requires that once each year,
within 180 days of the close of the fiscal year, the local agency must make available to the
public the following information for each separate account established to receive impact fee
revenues:

    1. The amount of the fee;
    2. The beginning and ending balance of the account or fund;
    3. The amount of the fees collected and interest earned;
    4. Identification of each public improvement on which fees were expended and the
       amount of the expenditures on each improvement, including the percentage of the
       cost of the public improvement that was funded with fees;
    5. Identification of the approximate date by which the construction of a public
       improvement will commence, if the City determines sufficient funds have been
       collected to complete financing of an incomplete public improvement;
    6. A description of each inter-fund transfer or loan made from the account or fund,
       including interest rates, repayment dates, and a description of the improvement on
       which the transfer or loan will be expended;
    7. The amount of any refunds or allocations made pursuant to Section 66001,
       paragraphs (e) and (f).
That information must be reviewed by the City Council at its next regularly scheduled public
meeting, but not less than 15 days after the statements are made public.

Findings and Refunds. Prior to the adoption of Government Code amendments
contained in SB 1693, a local agency collecting impact fees was required to expend or
commit the fee revenue within five years or make findings to justify a continued need for the
money. Otherwise, those funds had to be refunded. SB 1693 changed that requirement in
material ways.

Now, Section 66001 requires that, for the fifth fiscal year following the first deposit of any
impact fee revenue into an account or fund as required by Section 66006, and every five



                                                                                            128
Imperial County, California – Impact Fee Study – August 17, 2006


years thereafter, the local agency shall make all of the following findings for any fee revenue
that remains unexpended, whether committed or uncommitted:

    1. Identify the purpose to which the fee will be put;
    2. Demonstrate the reasonable relationship between the fee and the purpose for which
       it is charged;
    3. Identify all sources and amounts of funding anticipated to complete financing of
       incomplete improvements for which impact fees are to be used;
    4. Designate the approximate dates on which the funding necessary to complete
       financing of those improvements will be deposited into the appropriate account or
       fund.
Those findings are to be made in conjunction with the annual reports discussed above. If
such findings are not made as required by Section 66001, the local agency must refund the
moneys in the account or fund. Once the agency determines that sufficient funds have been
collected to complete an incomplete improvement for which impact fee revenue is to be
used, it must, within 180 days of that determination, identify an approximate date by which
construction of the public improvement will be commenced. If the agency fails to comply
with that requirement, it must refund impact fee revenue in the account according to
procedures specified in the statute.

Costs of Implementation. The ongoing cost of implementing the impact fee program is
not included in the fees themselves. Implementation costs would include the staff time
involved in applying the fees to specific projects, accounting for fee revenues and
expenditures, preparing required annual reports, updating the fees, and preparing forms and
public information handouts. We recommend that those costs be included in user fees
charged to applicants for processing development applications.

Annual Update of the Capital Improvement Plan. Section 66002 provides that if a local
agency adopts a capital improvement plan to identify the use of impact fees, that plan must
be adopted and annually updated by a resolution of the governing body at a noticed public
hearing. The alternative is to identify improvements in other public documents. Since
impact fee calculations in this study include costs for future facilities to be funded by impact
fees, we believe it is to the City’s advantage to use this report as the public document in
which the use of impact fees is identified. In that event, we believe the City would not be
required to update its CIP annually to satisfy Section 66002.

Indexing of Impact Fee Rates. The fees recommended in this report are stated in
current dollars. Fees should be adjusted annually to account for construction cost escalation.
The Engineering News Record Building Cost Index is recommended as the basis for indexing
the cost of yet to be constructed projects. It is desirable that the ordinance or resolution
establishing the fees include provisions for annual escalation.

Updates of This Study. Generally, impact fees should be reviewed and updated about
                                 T




every five years, unless significant changes in land use or facility plans make it necessary to
update the fees more often.  T




                                                                                            129

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:11
posted:10/4/2011
language:English
pages:129