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					                              Contents
Part One                                                 Page
1. Introduction                                            3
     Background information                               3
     Guidance on delivering the training                  4
     Use of course outlines                               6
     Use of Personal Development Journals                 7
     Session Seven                                        7
     Course Evaluation                                    8
     Future developments                                  8
     Course outlines – overview                           9
     Course outlines (sessions)                          10
     Personal Development Journal (Core Sessions)        18
     Personal Development Journal (Workshop sessions)    22
     Course Evaluation Sheet (Ongoing)                   23
     Course Evaluation Sheet (Overall)                   24
2. Session One                                            27
   Trainer Notes                                         27
   OHT Handouts                                          32
   Activity Sheet                                        37
3. Session Two                                            39
   Trainer Notes                                         39
   OHT Handouts                                          43
   Activity Sheet                                        44
4. Session Three (Part 1)                                 51
   Trainer Notes                                         51
   OHT Handouts                                          59
   Activity Sheet                                        69
5. Session Three (Part 2)                                 72
   Trainer Notes                                         72
   OHT Handouts                                          78
   Activity Sheet                                        81
6. Session Four                                           85
   Trainer Notes                                         85
   OHT Handouts                                          91
   Activity Sheet                                        94
7. Session Five                                           97
   Trainer Notes                                         97
   OHT Handouts                                          101
   Activity Sheet                                        102
8. Session Six                                           111
   Trainer Notes                                         111
   OHT Handouts                                          119
   Activity Sheet                                        121
9. Session Seven                                         127
   Trainer Notes                                        127
   OHT Handouts                                         129



Part Two - The Strategy Workshop

Introduction                                             133
     Aims and Learning outcomes                         133
     Introduction and tips for Trainers sheets          135
     Feedback Options                                   136
     Summarising the Session                            136
     Personal Development Journals                      136
     Personal Development Journal (Workshop sessions)   137
Workshop One                                             139
     Trainer Notes                                      139
     OHT Handouts                                       143
     Activity Sheets                                    144
     Handout                                            145
Workshop Two                                             147
     Trainer Notes                                      147
     OHT Handouts                                       151
     Activity Sheets                                    152
     Handouts                                           153
Workshop Three                                           159
     Trainer Notes                                      159
     OHT Handouts                                       163
     Activity Sheets                                    164
     Handouts                                           165
Workshop Four                                            173
     Trainer Notes                                      173
     OHT Handouts                                       177
     Activity Sheets                                    178
     Handouts                                           184
Workshop Five                                            187
   Trainer Notes                                        187
   OHT Handouts                                         194
   Activity Sheets                                      197
Workshop Six                                             203
   Trainer Notes                                        203
   OHT Handouts                                         207
   Activity Sheets and Handouts                         211
Appendix                                                 216

                                                               2
                            Introduction

Background Information
This training course has been developed as part of the TUC led EQUAL
Project: „Developing Workplace learning‟. Its purpose is to enable trade
union education tutors and trainers to support the development of the
basic skills needed by learners on their courses. It is designed to
familiarise trade union education tutors and trainers with the literacy,
numeracy and ESOL core curricula and to extend the effectiveness and
range of strategies they use in the skills development needs of learners
attending trade union education courses.

The intention is to provide training, which ultimately will be integrated
within the new teacher qualifications framework designed to support the
development of adult literacy, language and numeracy skills. One strand
of this qualifications framework targets teachers of other subjects who
give direct, on-course support to learners attending their courses who
have development needs related to literacy, numeracy or language skills.
This includes trade union education tutors who teach representatives on
union courses who struggle with written work, chairing meetings or
understanding percentages for example. This would be categorised as a
Level 3 role, in terms of the new teacher training qualifications as it
involves on-course development of these skills, supported by a non-
specialist tutor.



The training course focuses on extending and enhancing the use of
processes and strategies which can be used to motivate, advise and
support learners attending a range of trade union education courses. It
aims to promote access, inclusion and equal opportunities, all key facets
of union policy and practice. It introduces trade union education tutors
to the national Skills for Life strategy and to the literacy, numeracy and
ESOL core curricula, developing a common understanding about standards
and achievement levels – and ways to integrate these into trade union
courses.

The work was initiated by the TUC in partnership with the Basic Skills
Agency (BSA) as part of the TUC led Equal project „ Developing
Workplace Learning‟ in which the BSA is a partner. The initial
development phase included consultation with trade union education
representatives and officers. The first programme and materials were

                                                                        3
piloted in a 4-day residential course, attended by experienced trade union
education tutors, which included specific consultation activities. Feedback
from the pilot was used to inform current content which has been revised
to be more clearly useful and relevant to trade union education.

The main development team comprised:

Pam Fleisch: Development Officer - Teacher Training Team (BSA)
Marge Bentovim: Consultant – Equal Project Manager (BSA)
Judith Swift: National Development Worker – Basic and Key Skills (TUC)



Guidance on delivering the course
Training Teams
Given the different and diverse levels of experience of trade union
education tutors it is expected that the course will be delivered by two
trainers, each taking structured and active parts in the delivery. This will
enable differentiation of needs and maximum support for participants to
relate the programme to their own contexts and experience.

This course gives rise to debate and concerns which need to be
acknowledged and addressed appropriately. It is a challenging process for
trainers and for participants. Training teams will need to plan carefully
how they will work together with the participant groups. This will involve
such things as deciding who will take the lead in each session/activity and
what roles the other trainer will play.

Planning is likely to include negotiation of the actual time allowances for
the different activities as a result of trainers‟ prior knowledge about the
participant groups and changes as the course progresses e.g. when
experience levels or knowledge appear higher or lower than expected.

Trainers will need to be at venues in good time to check delivery of
materials, preparation and room planning, etc.

The sessions
There are 7 Core Sessions in this training programme, including an “end of
course” review, application and evaluation session (Session Seven) and 6
workshop sessions. It is anticipated that most programmes will comprise
all seven core sessions and a selection of the workshops. Part Two of this



                                                                          4
training pack gives a detailed introduction to the workshops and
suggestions about how they can be used.

The course is activity-based and maximises opportunities for participants
to relate the aims and learning outcomes in the training programme to
their individual work situations and teaching on the TUC programmes.
Many of the activities will be most effective if the links between their
own situations are clear and overt. Participants will value opportunities to
network and share and compare ideas about approaches and strategies
which could work in different environments.

Summaries of the 7core sessions can be found between pages 10 and 17.
The strategy workshops have been designed to be used on a “pick and
mix” basis by trainers and summaries of these can be found at the end of
the Introduction to the workshops in Part Two. These have been included
to give trainers (and planners) a quick overview of content, to assist in
planning and organisation of the programme.

The participants
It is anticipated that groups are likely to be mixed in terms of familiarity
with the issues addressed and working practices. This underlines the
value of trainers spending time ensuring they are familiar with the range
of backgrounds and experiences represented. Trainers are advised to use
and adapt “ice-breaker” / introductory activities and feedback sessions
to suit group profiles and sizes.

Participants are likely to appreciate the varied opportunities for
comparing practices and approaches in different organisations and
exploring new ways of working in a neutral environment. Trainers are
advised to regularly check / remind participants about the need to be
aware of the different contexts represented in the group work activities.

Working with the different core curricula documents
This course introduces participants to the Adult Literacy, Adult
Numeracy and Adult ESOL core curriculum documents and refers to the
Adult Pre-Entry Curriculum Framework and Access For All. The main
focus is on the Adult Literacy and Numeracy core curricula as these are
considered those most likely to be accessed, in the first instance, by non-
specialist basic skills tutors. However, trainers will need to make sure
that participants are aware that the language support needs of ESOL




                                                                          5
learners are just as important and, in some organisations / areas, may be
a major area of interest.

A two-pronged approach - looking at needs in both trade union education
contexts and workplace application - is taken on several occasions. When
this happens, although the focus is on supporting learning and teaching on
trade union education courses the training also explores how trade union
education tutors can most effectively support the learners attending the
courses they deliver in their union roles in the workplace.

The role of union representatives who work with people who have
communication, literacy and numeracy needs at Pre-Entry levels should be
addressed in positive and constructive ways. Access For All also provides
support in the implementation of equality of opportunity policies in very
practical and observable ways in both trade union education and workplace
contexts.

Flexibility
This is a national training course and it is important that participants are
given the opportunity to consider all the topic areas as fully as possible in
order to achieve all the learning outcomes. It is recognised, however,
that groups vary in terms of such things as experience, cohesiveness,
attitude, confidence levels, familiarity with each other and knowledge of
the course content prior to the course, so adaptation may be necessary.

The breadth and cohesiveness of the course also involves managing a
great deal of paper-based materials. Trainers are advised to ensure they
are very familiar with all the paperwork and to ensure that they control
the flow, introduction and use of the materials in an organised, clearly
logical and supportive manner.

Flexibility, including enhancement or the use of alternative activities is
encouraged as long as the course maintains its integrity and participants
can be confident that they have achieved the same learning outcomes as
would have been the case if the activity had not been changed.

Use of course outlines
The course outlines which follow this section can be used by trainers to
adapt the session plans to their own requirements. The first outline gives
an overview of all the sessions in the pack, including indicative timings.




                                                                           6
This can be used to plan programme delivery patterns e.g. whether to
deliver on full / part days and the order of sessions.

This kind of delivery benefits from forward planning and ensuring that
participants are reminded about their own contributions at regular
intervals. The individual reviews give an overview of the main activities in
each session and suggested timings for the main components. The
resource box serves as a reminder about the main resources needed in
that session. Trainers can supplement these with other materials – and,
on occasions, they will need to encourage participants to supply their own
examples of materials.

Use of the Personal Development Journals
Core sessions
Following the course outlines is a copy of the Personal Development
Journal. The purpose of the journal is to help participants review what
they have experienced and learned in each of the sessions and to consider
how they can take this forward in their own working contexts. It should
help them plan and record future actions. Trainers will need to:
     Emphasise that it is only a prompt sheet i.e. the reflection starter
        questions – are only “starters” – other, more relevant questions
        may arise for particular groups and/or individuals – and these
        should be addressed
    Ensure that participants understand that this is a confidential
       document for their own use but that it can be used to contribute
       to, or support other staff development activities e.g. course /
       individual professional development reviews
    Take care to build in time for review at the end of each session and
       encourage reflection outside the session, including discussion of
       content with other people as appropriate

Workshop sessions
The workshop sessions are very short and it is unlikely that every
workshop will be included in the programmes developed (see notes on the
use of the workshops in Part Two). A shorter Journal has been designed
to reflect this. The emphasis remain on encouraging a pragmatic
approach to the use of this training.

Session Seven
The final core session has been included to give participants an
opportunity to review the complete course delivered (including both core


                                                                          7
sessions and the workshops). It will give trainers the opportunity to
obtain key messages about the overall responses to the training
programme to help in future planning and delivery.

The effectiveness of this session will be enhanced by a rigorous approach
to the completion of the relevant Personal Development Journals
throughout the course. Trainers may also find it useful to log their own
perceptions as the sessions are delivered.

Course evaluation
The course has been designed to be delivered as independent sessions
which can be delivered in different ways. It is likely that most patterns
of delivery will be a selection of full-day events but the format also lends
itself to half-day / short day / evening sessions. The core sessions can
be delivered first, followed by the workshop sessions (not necessarily all
of the workshop sessions – this will depend on choice, overall programme
purpose and design, and time / funding perameters). The workshop
sessions can also be integrated between core sessions.

Because of this flexibility in potential programme design an on-going
evaluation form is included in this pack. The intention is that this form
can be adapted by the trainers delivering the course to reflect the
patterns of delivery e.g. which sessions are delivered in each day. It is
assumed that most days will not exceed 4 sessions. The form can be
copied electronically and the session names and titles inserted before
distribution to participants or participants can be asked to write in the
session(s) which have been delivered in any particular “event”.

An end of course evaluation has also been included in the pack to support
overall evaluation.

Future developments
At the time of writing, discussions are taking place about how this
programme can be accredited and used as part of a national Continuous
Professional Development (CPD) framework. The Personal Development
Journal, if filled in fully, will be a very useful record of what the
participant experienced and learned in each session, it will also help them
consider how they can evidence achievement / application / good practice.




                                                                          8
     Trade Union Education Tutor Training (Overview of sessions)

                                Core Sessions
Session One                 2.5hrs        Session Two                    2hrs
Why are we here?                          Skills needed on trade union
Clarifies why training has been           education courses.
developed and what it hopes to            Raises awareness about the range and
achieve.                                  use of literacy, language and numeracy
                                          skills needed on trade union education
                                          courses.
Session Three (Part One) 2.5hrs           Session Three (Part Two) 2.5hrs
Introduction to the core curricula:       Introduction to the ESOL and
Finding your way round a document.        Numeracy core curricula – and to the
Introduces core curricula and begins      sample activities.
to identify how they relate to trade      Introduces more core curriculum
union education programmes. Focus on      documents and further explores how
Literacy Core Curriculum.                 they relate to trade union contexts.

Session Four                 3.5hrs       Session Five                3.75hrs
Supporting the learner: assessing         Motivation, support and signposting –
basic skills.                             the role of the trade union education
Increases familiarity with initial        tutor.
assessment approaches and procedures      Outlines and explores the
and considers implications for trade      responsibilities of trade union
union education tutors.                   education tutors and considers
                                          different models of support.
Session Six                 3.5hrs        Session Seven               0.5hrs
Integrating teaching and learning         Where to next?
strategies into trade union education     Gives participants an opportunity the
programmes.                               opportunity to reflect on the course
Suggests approaches and strategies        and to consider the impact it has had /
trade union education tutors can use in   will have on their work contexts.
own contexts to support literacy and      Includes a course evaluation.
numeracy development.

                       Strategy Workshops (all 1.5hrs)
1. How we tackle           2. Supporting writing:   3. Understanding &
spelling                   Writing Frames.          using texts: DARTS

4. Supporting reading &    5. Supporting numeracy: 6. Supporting numeracy:
writing: Text Analysis     problem solving         Using calculators.




                                                                                9
   Course Outlines (Overview of topic areas & guidance on timings)

Session One: Why are we here?
Aim: To clarify why the training has been developed and Time
what it hopes to achieve.                                    2 hrs 30 mnts
Topic area                                                   Indicative
                                                             timing
1. Introductions and domestics, Introduces course aim,       35 mnts
expected learning outcomes and rationale & course
participants to each other.
2. The Skills for life strategy and “basic skills”           35mnts
Identifies what we know already about the strategy and
basic skills - and begins to determine what they have to
do with trade union education.
3. Literacy, numeracy and language in trade union            40mnts
contexts. Underlines the importance of literacy,
numeracy and language skills in trade union contexts
4. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.       40 mnts
Introduces the professional development journal as a tool
which enables participants to get maximum benefit from
the course.
Trainer resources                      Participant resources
OHTs 1-5                               Session OHT / note sheets
Core Curricula documents (all 4)       Activity sheet 1
Flip charts                            Flip charts (group)
                                       Personal Development Journal




                                                                       10
Session Two: The skills needed on trade union education courses
Aim: To raise awareness about the range and use of Time
language, literacy and numeracy skills needed on trade 2 hours
union education programmes.
Topic area                                              Indicative
                                                          timing
1. Introduction to session. Introduces session aim,        15mnts
expected learning outcomes.
2. Audit of the basic skill needs of trade union
education programmes. Completion of an audit activity of 90mnts
trade union education programmes with opportunities for
feedback and discussion.
3. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.     15mnts
Enables participants to get maximum benefit from the
session.
Trainer resources                    Participant resources
OHTs 1                               Session OHT / note sheet
Flip charts                          Audit Activity Pack
Copies of relevant TUC ed course     Flip charts (group)
packs                                Personal Development Journal
                                     Access to / copies of TUC course
                                     packs




                                                                        11
Session Three (Part 1): Introduction to the core curricula: Finding
way round the documents
Aim: To introduce the core curricula and to identify how Time
they relate to trade union education programmes.         2 hrs 30
Topic area                                               Indicative
                                                         timing
1. Introduction to session. Introduces session aim,      35mnts
expected learning outcomes. Links the core curricula to
trade union priorities.
2. What is already known about the curricula?            10mnts
Identifies what participants already know about the core
curricula documents.
3. Finding your way around a curriculum document.        45mnts
Examines the content and referencing system of the
Adult Literacy Core Curriculum document. Relates to
organisation of other curriculum.
4. Mapping with the level of skills required in trade    45mnts
union education courses. Activities map and track skills
needed to undertake a range of activities on trade union
education courses with core curriculum elements and
descriptions.
5. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.   15mnts
Variable – see notes. Participants complete log.

Trainer resources                        Participant resources
OHTs 1-10                                Session OHT / note sheet
All core curricula documents and         Adult Literacy Core Curriculum
Access for all document                  Activity sheets 1-3
Standards (optional)                     Access to copies of material from
Union Learning Reps. Course: Stage       Material from Union Learning Reps.
2 Section 2                              Training course Stage 2 Section
Copy of „Introducing Access for All‟     and other materials from Unit 1
booklet – supporting learners with       (Frontline Advice and Guidance) or
learning difficulties and disabilities   alternatives (see notes)
across the curriculum.                   Personal Development Journal




                                                                         12
Session Three (Part 2): Introduction to the core curricula: The
ESOL and Numeracy Core Curricula – and an introduction to the
sample activities in the core curricula
Aim: To introduce the core curricula and to identify how Time
they relate to trade union education programmes.             2 hrs 15
Topic area                                                   Indicative
                                                             timing
1. Introduction to the ESOL core curriculum.                 45mnts
Introduces the ESOL core curriculum, exploring
similarities and differences with Literacy curriculum (link
to Part One), Considers ESOL issues in trade union
education programmes
2. Using the Numeracy core curriculum. Introduces the 30mnts
numeracy core curriculum and relates to trade union
education programmes and union activities in the
workplace.
3. Using the sample activities in the core curricula.        45mnts
Considers how sample activities can be used and
contextualised in trade union education programmes.
4. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.       15mnts
Enables participants to get maximum benefit from the
session by relating to developments in own skills and
contexts.
Trainer resources                      Participant resources
OHTs 11-13                             Session OHT / note sheet
All core curricula documents and       ESOL core curriculum
Access for all document                Numeracy core curriculum
Standards (optional)                   Activity sheets 4-6
                                       Personal Development Journal




                                                                          13
Session Four: Supporting the learner: assessing basic skills
Aim: To familiarise trade union education tutors with Time
initial assessment (approaches and procedures) for 3hrs 30mnts
literacy, numeracy and ESOL and to consider implications
for trade union education programmes.
Topic area                                                   Indicative
                                                             timing
1. Introduction to session aims and outcomes. Focuses 10mnts
on what it is useful to know about learner‟s abilities and
how we can identify need.
2. Taking Initial Assessment Tests. Undertaking initial      90mnts
assessment tests to experience what it is like to take the
test and consider appropriateness of this or similar
activities to trade union contexts.
3. The ESOL Perspective. Consideration of the factors        35mnts
which influence new language learning as an adult and how
these can apply to trade union contexts.
4. Applications to trade union education. Opportunity        60mnts
for trainers to draw together related issues raised so
far, make links with the core curriculum and consider
application of assessment strategies (for language,
literacy and numeracy to trade union contexts and
education.
5. Reflection, application to individual contexts and        15mnts
review. Enabling participants to get maximum benefit
from the session.
Trainer resources                      Participant resources
OHTs 1-3                               Session OHT / note sheet
Instructions for administering BSA Activity sheets 1 & 2 with related
Initial Assessment Tests in            handout
Literacy and Numeracy                  BSA Initial Assessment tests in
                                       Literacy and Numeracy and Answer
                                       sheets
                                       Personal Development Journal




                                                                     14
Session Five: Motivation, support and signposting – the      role of the
trade union education tutor
Aim: To outline the motivational, support and signposting     Time
responsibilities of trade union education tutors and to       2 hrs 45
explore models of support.
Topic area                                                    Indicative
                                                              timing
1. Introduction to session aims and outcomes.                 15mnts
Links to previous sessions and introduces this session‟s
focus on the support roles and skills of trade union
education tutors.
2. Putting the principles into practice: motivation,          75mnts
support and signposting Identifies and explores the kinds
of knowledge, approaches and skills needed to identify,
motivate and support learners in trade union education
contexts.
3. Support models for learners. Examines different            30mnts
models of support for learners attending trade union
education courses and their impact on the role of trade
union education tutors.
4. Support opportunities for trade union education            30mnts
tutors. Identifies sources of support for trade union
education tutors related to basic skills aspects of their
work.
5. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.        15mnts
Opportunity to identify future learning needs and actions.

Trainer resources                    Participant resources
OHT 1                                Session OHT / note sheet
Flip chart                           Activity Pack 1 and Activity sheet 2
                                     Personal Development Journal




                                                                           15
Session Six: Integrating teaching and learning strategies into trade
union education programmes
Aim: To suggest approaches and strategies trade union Time
education tutors can use within their own teaching and 3 hrs 30
learning programmes to support the basic skills
development needs of learners.
Topic area                                                    Indicative
                                                              timing
1. Introduction to session aims and outcomes.                 10mnts
Emphasises value of sharing ideas and practical ways to
adapt approaches and strategies to suit trade union
contexts.
2. Readability factors and features. Identifies               50mnts
features which make reading easier and more accessible
and relates this to materials used in trade union education
programmes.
3. Calculations in trade union contexts. Identifies           45mnts
needs for calculation skills in trade union education
contexts, explores different approaches and strategies
and considers the language of “maths”.
4. An Introduction to Access for all. Explores how            45mnts
Access for all is used alongside the core curricula and how
it could benefit trade union education programmes and
contexts.
5. Using the core curricula as a source of ideas.             45mnts
Explores ways sample activities in the different core
curricula and Access for all can be used, adapted and
contextualised as necessary, in trade union education
contexts
6. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.        15mnts
Opportunity to reflect on session and apply to own
contexts.
Trainer resources                     Participant resources
OHT 1                                 Session OHT / note sheet
SMOG CARD and Making Reading          Activity sheets 1-4
Easier Pamphlet                       SMOG cards & Making Reading Easier
Core Curricula documents              pamphlets
                                      Core Curricula documents
                                      Personal Development Journal




                                                                           16
Session Seven: Where to next?
Aim: To revisit the course aims and outcomes and to Time
consider how the individual sessions have contributed to 30mnts
their achievement and to complete course evaluation.
Topic area                                                Indicative
                                                          timing
1. Introduction to purpose of the session.                5mnts
Explains context of the session.

2. Reflection on sessions and application to own          20mnts
contexts. Gives participants the opportunity to review
their Personal Development Journals and to draw out key
messages, action points and examples of effective
practice.

3. Course evaluation and close.                           5mnts

Trainer resources                   Participant resources
OHT 1 -3                            Session OHT / note sheet
                                    Personal Development Journal
                                    Note paper / flip chart
                                    Course evaluation sheet




NB Workshop sessions are in Part Two



                                                                       17
Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
Personal Development Journal      (sheet 1)                                       CORE SESSIONS ONE & TWO
Reflection starter        Aspects of this session I   How can I do this?          Do I need to consult /     Likely timescale – key
questions                 need to explore or          e.g. reading, discussion,   work with anyone on this   dates, etc
                          develop further?            briefing, more training     – who?
Session One
Why are we here?
What does this course
have to do with you and
your work?

Date:                     Implications for you, TUC and your organisation / institution.



Session Two
Skills needed on trade
union courses?
What skills are needed
to get the most out of
trade union education
courses?
Date:                     Implications for you, TUC and your organisation / institution.




                                                                                                                                      18
Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
Personal Development Journal        (sheet 2)                                           CORE SESSION THREE (PARTS 1 & 2)
Reflection starter             Aspects of this session I    How can I do this?          Do I need to consult /     Likely timescale –
questions                      need to explore or develop   e.g. reading, discussion,   work with anyone on this   key dates, etc
                               further?                     briefing, more training     – who?
Session Three (Part One)
Finding your way around
the documents
Have you had enough
information and guidance
about what is in the
curriculum and how to use
it?
Session Three (Part Two)
Introduction to other
curricula and use in trade
union contexts.
How relevant are the
different curricula to trade
union contexts?
Date:                          Implications for you, TUC and your organisation / institution.




                                                                                                                                    19
Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
Personal Development Journal       (sheet 3)                                         CORE SESSIONS FOUR & FIVE
Reflection starter         Aspects of this session I   How can I do this?            Do I need to consult /     Likely timescale –
questions                  need to explore or          e.g. reading, discussion,     work with anyone on this   key dates, etc
                           develop further?            briefing, more training       – who?
Session Four: Assessing
basic skill needs.
How can we assess skills
– and how do tests „fit‟
with trade union
contexts?
Date:                      Implications for you, TUC and your organisation / institution.



Session Five:Motivation,
signposting & support.
What responsibilities do
you have to support
learners – and what do
you need to do this
effectively?
Date:                      Implications for you, TUC and your organisation / institution.




                                                                                                                                 20
Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
Personal Development Journal      (sheet 2)                                         CORE SESSION THREE (PARTS 1 & 2)
Reflection starter      Aspects of this session I     How can I do this?            Do I need to consult /     Likely timescale –
questions               need to explore or develop    e.g. reading, discussion,     work with anyone on this   key dates, etc
                        further?                      briefing, more training       – who?
Session Six:
Approaches and
strategies to support
skills development.
Can you use any of
these strategies to
support your work –
how?




Date:                   Implications for you, TUC and your organisation / institution.




                                                                                                                                21
         Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
     Personal Development Journal: Strategy Workshop sessions
    Workshop        How can I use or support Any support I need to
 & date attended    use in my own contexts    do this & people I
                                              need to work with
 1   Spelling




      Date:
 2    Writing
      Frames


      Date:
 3    DARTS




      Date:
 4    Text
      Analysis



      Date:
 5    Number
      problem
      solving

      Date:
 6    Use of
      calculators


      Date:
Implications for me, my work and TUC contexts.




                                                                22
           Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Please complete the questionnaire to indicate how satisfied you were with
the course. Please tick the appropriate boxes. In the scale 1 means
extremely satisfied and 5 means extremely dissatisfied. Add comments, if
appropriate.



1.How satisfied were you with the following aspects of the course:

                   (Extremely satisfied)
                                  1        2       3       4          5
(a) Overall organisation

(b) Venue & facilities

Comments



(c) Training methods &
   materials

(d) Pace and planning

(e) Ways issues/concerns
   addressed

Comments




2. To what extent do you feel you are now familiar with ways the Skills for
Life strategy is likely to impact on trade union education courses:

(Extremely familiar)     1   2        3        4       5




3. How useful was the exploration of initial assessment (formal and
informal):

(Extremely useful)     1      2       3        4       5




                                                                          23
4. Has your knowledge, understanding and confidence about using a range of
teaching approaches, strategies and resources to address basic skills in
trade union courses increased:

      (Very much)    1           2           3           4           5




5. Did the course increase your awareness about the range of ways you
could work with other people to support the development of basic skills:

      (Very much)    1               2           3           4       5




6. Was there sufficient focus and support on your own professional and
personal development needs in relation to this area of work:

(Extremely sufficient)       1           2           3           4       5




7. Were comments / issues raised in the on-going evaluations addressed:

      (Very much)    1           2           3           4           5




Additional Comments:




8. What is your overall assessment of the programme /course.

(Excellent)   1          2           3       4           5




                                                                             24
   Course Outlines (Overview of topic areas & guidance on timings)

Session One: Why are we here?
Aim: To clarify why the training has been developed and Time
what it hopes to achieve.                                    2 hrs 30 mnts
Topic area                                                   Indicative
                                                             timing
1. Introductions and domestics, Introduces course aim,       35 mnts
expected learning outcomes and rationale & course
participants to each other.
2. The Skills for life strategy and “basic skills”           35mnts
Identifies what we know already about the strategy and
basic skills - and begins to determine what they have to
do with trade union education.
3. Literacy, numeracy and language in trade union            40mnts
contexts. Underlines the importance of literacy,
numeracy and language skills in trade union contexts
4. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.       40 mnts
Introduces the professional development journal as a tool
which enables participants to get maximum benefit from
the course.
Trainer resources                      Participant resources
OHTs 1-5                               Session OHT / note sheets
Core Curricula documents (all 4)       Activity sheet 1
Flip charts                            Flip charts (group)
                                       Personal Development Journal




                                                                       25
             Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session 1             Why are we here?                   (2hrs 30mnts)

Notes for trainers
1.   Introductions and domestics                                 35mnts


15mnts                                Welcome and Overview of course
    Welcome & domestics
    Overview of the programme                           Outline programme as
       appropriate (i.e. which sessions being delivered – or options)
    Introduction of trainers
Course aims and outcomes                                       OHT 1-2
    Introduction to course aim & learning outcomes
    Clarification about which outcomes will addressed in this particular menu
      of modules (this will vary according to delivery patterns)
    Questions / answers as appropriate
    Link to next activity – starting with the delegates – value of finding out
      about who is working with you – for both trainers and delegates

20mnts        Who is here?
Purpose: to enable trainers and delegates to establish range of delegates
represented and their current links with “basic skills”.
    Delegates give brief personal introduction – selves, area and current
      links with “basic skills”)
    Trainer summarises range and indicates possible impact on delivery e.g.
      level of detail needed, group organisations etc
    Link to awareness / knowledge about the Skills for Life strategy

2. The Skills for Life strategy and basic skills                    35mnts
10mnts
Introduction to the Skills for Life Strategy: The Context           OHT 3
The focus in this session is on WHY there is a Skills for Life strategy.
Use the OHT to check / confirm         understanding that it is a Government
strategy:
        To improve adult literacy and numeracy skills
        To address the needs of the 7 million people identified as having
          “poor” literacy and numeracy skills, including half a million or more,
          who struggle with English because it is not their first language
        Which has an economic / employment focus e.g. impact on skills
          shortages / employability / economic growth and flexibility – all trade
          union issues




                                                                              26
        Strategy applies to all adults developing their skills – including those
         who need to improve their literacy and numeracy whilst studying
         other subjects
        Applies to all contexts including work-based learning, prisons, forces,
         NHS, colleges and community based programmes
        Incorporates      the Trade union role – to promote literacy and
         numeracy skills and offer guidance and training to members – special
         Learning Fund for Literacy and Numeracy initiatives.

5mnts                 Session aims & outcomes                    OHT 4
   Review session aims and outcomes
   Confirm       rationale for     delivering to trade union tutors and ask
      delegates to suggest reasons why improving basic skills is a union issue.
      Draw out responses such as
   Basic skills as a “rights” issue - for the workforce
   Literacy, numeracy and language underpin all formal (and most other)
      learning activities – relate to the number and variety of trade union
      education programmes and participants
   Role in increasing individual confidence / independence
   Importance of learning CAN learn – unlearning “can‟t learn”



20mnts                What do we mean by basic skills?
(Trainer should adapt according to group feedback from initial activities)
Explain that it will be useful to ensure that everyone has the same (or similar)
understanding of what we mean when we talk about “basic skills”.


Display definition of basic skills                                     OHT 5

Discuss the definition and ask for suggestions about which language,
literacy and numeracy skills are needed to get the most out of trade
union education programmes.

If appropriate, list on flip chart – but focus on overview at this point – if
necessary, explain will have the opportunity to go into more detail later.

Lead into core curricula documents?
Explain that the core curricula have been developed and are now used, as
part of the Skills for Life strategy, to describe and define adult literacy,
numeracy and language skills.
      Show each of the documents and explain that we now have National
       Standards and a curriculum for literacy, numeracy and ESOL (will
       be using the term “language” to identify ESOL).



                                                                              27
       These curricula go from Entry 1 to Level 2 to have coherence with the
        national framework for qualifications. [If appropriate, check awareness
        of levels in relation to NVQs etc.]
        There is also the Adult Pre-Entry curriculum framework for those
        learners working at levels BELOW Entry in literacy, communications or
        numeracy
       Explain will be exploring these documents in more detail in later sessions.

3. Literacy, numeracy and language in trade union contexts 40mnts
15mnts                                                     Activity sheet 1
Explain: Before looking at the core curricula participants are going to
spend a little time considering the implications of “poor” or “inadequate”
basic skills in the contexts in which they work.
       Introduce activity sheet emphasising the purpose.
       Suggest small groups (4-6) - use feedback from earlier activities to
        determine whether or not groups will have time to consider one or two of
        the roles.
       Support the activity and group work, as appropriate
       Alert to feedback requirement – suggest about 3/5 minutes per group



25mnts: Take feedback on issues and implications: ensure that issues relating
to both trade union representatives and trade union education course are raised.
Draw out the following themes, if they do not arise “naturally”:
     Employee rights & equal opportunities
     Training implications and company policies / non-policies
     Health and safety implications
     Participation in union activities
     Job security and flexibility
     Links to promotion

Other   issues which may be raised:
       Different unions have different priorities
       Varying levels of recognition of the importance of basic skills
       Ways learners can be supported on time-limited courses?
       Some companies may want to “hide” levels
       Different venues have different levels / kinds of support available – how
        to achieve a common standard?




                                                                                 28
4. Reflection, application to own contexts and session review 40mnts
15mnts: Introduce the Professional Development Journal and identify what
participants would like to get from the course.
    Introduce and check understanding of the Professional Development
       Journal (see Introduction)
    Explain the purpose of the log and what it is meant to support / achieve
    Make links with TUC professional development policies and plans
    Inform about plans to link this training to the emerging national
       Continuous Development Programme, which will include accreditation
       opportunities
    Review course outline and purpose of the sessions as outlined in the
       Professional Development Journal
    Remind participants about the variety of contexts represented in the
       group and stress the value of sharing ideas, tips and information, peer
       support and networking

10mnts:       Reflection – what would you like to achieve from this training?
Encourage participants to identify their perceived needs in relation to the
outlined training sessions (and other needs, if appropriate).

   Trainers may want to do this by asking people to share ideas with the person
   / people they are sat next to before contributing to a whole groups list.

Respond briefly to the needs and issues raised:
    Identify where issues raised are most likely to be covered

15mnts
Review session one                                                  OHT 4
    Briefly remind participants about the session aims and outcomes.
    Support completion of the relevant sections of the PDJ, allowing
      sufficient time for questions
    Encourage reflection and additions to the notes they make outside the
      session.




                                                                             29
                   Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training



Session One:                                                                 OHT 1

                                       Course Aim




To enable trade union education tutors and trainers to support the development of literacy,
numeracy and language skills of learners on trade union education programmes.




                                                                                        30
                    Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

   Session One:                                                                    OHT 2

                                       Course Outcomes

After completing all the course modules / units participants will:

   be familiar with the Skills for Life strategy and ways in which it relates to trade union
    education programmes and their own professional roles;
   have explored methods for identifying need including the use of initial assessment
   have added to their knowledge about teaching approaches, strategies and resources
    which can be to address language, literacy and numeracy needs on trade union courses
   have identified additional ways of working with colleagues / other specialists to support
    learners on trade union programmes
   have considered and clarified their own professional development needs related to
    literacy, language and numeracy support




                                                                                           31
                  Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session One:                                                                      OHT 3

                         Skills for Life Strategy: The Context

 7 million people identified as having “poor” literacy and numeracy skills, including half a
  million or more, who struggle with English because it is not their first language
 Impacts on such things as: skills shortages / employability / economic flexibility
 Strategy applies to all adults improving these skills – including those who need to improve
  their literacy and numeracy whilst studying other subjects
 Applies to all contexts including work-based, prisons, forces, NHS, colleges and
  community based programmes
 TUC has a commitment – to promote literacy and numeracy skills and offer guidance and
  training to members as part of the quality agenda.




                                                                                          32
                   Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


   Session One:                                                                     OHT 4

                                  Session Aim and outcomes


Aim: To clarify why the training has been developed and what it hopes to achieve.

Outcomes: By the end of this session participants will:
   Be able to suggest ways the Skills for Life strategy relates to their work as trade
    union education tutors
   Relate literacy, language and numeracy to own teaching contexts
   Begin to consider their own role and responsibilities in relation to the support and
    development of these skills
   Start to use a Personal Development Journal to reflect upon, log and plan their own
    professional development.




                                                                                            33
                    Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


   Session One:                                                               OHT 5

                                           Basic Skills?


By basic skills we mean:

                      „ the ability to read, write and speak in English and
                     to use mathematics at a level necessary to function
                         and progress at work and in society in general ‟




                                                                                  34
          Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session One:                                          Activity Sheet One



Purpose: To consider the importance of literacy, numeracy and
language skills in trade union contexts.

Task

   1.   In a small group consider and discuss the implications of poor or
        “inadequate” basic skills in one or more of the following contexts
        (as directed by the trainer):




                   Working as a trade union representative.



                   Taking part in a trade union course.




   2.   Consider the implications and issues for your work as a trade union
        education tutor.




   3.   List what people in your group would like to achieve from this
        course to help them respond effectively to the issues raised.




Your group will be asked to give brief feedback on the issues you
have identified for your work as a trade union education tutor and
what you hope to achieve by taking part in this course.




                                                                        35
Session Two: The skills needed on trade union education courses
Aim: To raise awareness about the range and use of Time
language, literacy and numeracy skills needed on trade 2 hours
union education programmes.
Topic area                                                 Indicative
                                                           timing
1. Introduction to session. Introduces session aim,        15mnts
expected learning outcomes.
2. Audit of the basic skill needs of trade union
education programmes. Completion of an audit activity of 90mnts
trade union education programmes with opportunities for
feedback and discussion.
3. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.     15mnts
Enables participants to get maximum benefit from the
session.
Trainer resources                    Participant resources
OHTs 1                               Session OHT / note sheet
Flip charts                          Audit Activity Pack
Copies of relevant TUC ed course     Flip charts (group)
packs                                Personal Development Journal
                                     Access to / copies of TUC course
                                     packs




                                                                        36
           Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session 2 The skills needed on trade union education courses.       2hrs

Notes for trainers

1. Introduction to session                                              15mnts

15mnts                                 Session aims and learning outcomes
      Review session aims and outcomes                                OHT 1
      Link to course aim & outcomes – to help trade union tutors become more
       aware of the demands their courses make on learners (and therefore
       more aware of which areas / skills are likely to need support)
      Stress pragmatic nature – participants will be completing a skills audit
       for ONE course with which they are familiar and considering what issues
       this raises in about such things as their assumptions and expectations
       about the abilities and skill needs of learners on their courses
      Warn that there may not be time to consider skills in great detail but
       should result in an overview of the skills needed to complete the course
       effectively and confidently
      They will have the opportunity to compare their results with colleagues
       who teach the same or similar courses
      Alert that this activity often gives people greater understanding of their
       own skill development needs – which is okay as long as (ultimately) we can
       also offer ways forward

Lead into programme audit activities
Suggest that before completing the audit it will be useful to think about why it
is important to be aware of the demands we place on learners (the main purpose
of the audit). Ask for ideas on this.
Draw out the following / or bring into a summary of a short discussion / or
provide input on this topic, as appropriate.
     It is easy to create unseen barriers, particularly for learners who have
       basic skills needs e.g. by making assumptions that they know how to do
       such things as taking minutes etc.
     By auditing a programme we can identify, define and highlight the skills
       demands a course makes on learners. This can help us can make these
       clear to colleagues and to learners
     Raises tutors awareness about the course demands – and their own
       expectations in terms of the skill levels of learners
     We are better able to evaluate the materials and methodologies we use in
       the light of this information




                                                                              37
Remind participants that we are not expecting in-depth analyses. The
questionnaires should be used to structure an initial review of the skills demands
for ONE programme they teach – and increase the understanding of these.
Recommend that most value from this kind of audit is achieved when completed
by a course team, when appropriate – and suggest they might consider repeating
this exercise, if appropriate, with team members.

2. Audit of basic skill needs of trade union education programmes 90mnts
Programme Audit                                        Audit Activity Pack
Adjust time allowance for introducing and completing the activity according
to experience of the group / approach chosen (also see feedback time).
The Audit Pack activity gives participants the opportunity to review the
range of underpinning skills in their programmes. Completion leads to
discussion about expectations and the identification of the actual skills
needed.
Trainers will need consider the experience / confidence of group members when
determining how to group / organise delegates and how to take them through
the different audit activities. (See the points in the box for alternative ways of
delivering this activity.)

      Trainers will need to plan timings carefully and are strongly advised to
       provide some samples to which participants can refer if necessary –
       ideally audits the trainer has completed on programmes they know
      However, participants should be encouraged to use their own knowledge
       as much as possible and only refer to samples if they need more guidance
      Trainers need to be clearly available for support, direction and guidance.

Examples of delivery methods:

          Trainers can decide or negotiate how these sheets are completed i.e.
           in small groups / pairs (see note on experience)
          Recommend completion for KNOWN course – if possible example
           courses can be used as reference – but this may take more time
          Decide whether groups complete all sheets at own pace
          Decide whether to take the whole group through the different skill
           areas / sheets together – giving time slots for each - to ensure all
           sheets are given consideration
          Complete the first (and last?) sheets as a whole group – provide
           example / draw together prior to feedback
          If time is short, or groups want to focus on specific skill areas in
           more depth, trainers could divide responsibility for the completion
           and ask groups to feedback on the sheets they have completed e.g.
           one group reading & writing another numeracy and speaking and
           listening etc [it is recommended that all groups covers at least two
           main skill areas. ]


                                                                                38
          Remember to allow sufficient time for feedback – of issues and
           identification of need not detailed explanation of which skills used.

Feedback (ALLOW AT LEAST 30 MNTS)
Ask each group to feedback on (1) the issues and implications and (2) when
and how needs are currently identified. Make notes on two flip chart sheets
(issues and implications and how and when needs are identified) – discourage
repetition in feedback but comment on features common to most courses).
        Briefly discuss / respond to the differences and implications for
           different courses / different levels of courses when appropriate
        Introduce and check understanding of the term “spiky profile”
        Remember to include reference to the “spiky profile” of courses as
           well as learners (many require different levels of underpinning skills)
        Explain that the skill sections in the activity correspond with the
           organisational features of the core curricula (more later)
        Ask for comments on how useful people found this activity and
           whether it produced any surprises
        Remind them that this process can be used with other courses and
           programmes.

Some examples of issues which may be raised
       Learners on a Level 1 programme may be expected to read and use a
        textbook / manual written at a higher level
       Learners are expected to write up practical work with no access to
        lists of specialist terms / words or support for spelling these
       Learners are asked to read and compare data on tables (sometimes
        different kinds) but have not been taught how to do this
       Learners are expected to know how to write notes / take minutes but
        are given no direct guidance / teaching on how to do this e.g. formats
        / length
       Skills needed / assumed for assessment activities – sometimes not
        needed to take part in the course / get a lot from it
       Philosophy of “no-one fails” – helping each other succeed –
        comradeship versus motivation to improve / develop skills
       Courses delivered in different places sometimes have different
        expectations / requirements – tutor interpretation
       Issues related to tracking information - paperwork
       Principle and practice of confidentiality

3. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.       15mnts
      Briefly review session 2 aims and outcomes              OHT 1
      Allow time and support completion of Personal Development Journal,
         include time for questions and sharing ideas
      Remind about the usefulness of adding to these notes outside the
         session.


                                                                               39
                  Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


    Session Two                                                                  OHT 1
                       Skills needed on trade union education courses


Aim: To raise awareness about the range and use of language, literacy and numeracy skills
needed on trade union education programmes.

Outcomes: By the end of this session participants will:
      Have identified and assessed the variety and levels of literacy, language and
       numeracy needed in trade union education programmes
      Be able to suggest ways (and appropriate times) of identifying group or individual
       development needs
      Have used a Personal Development Journal to help them reflect upon, map and plan
       their own professional development.




                                                                                       40
            Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session Two            Programme Audit Activity Pack

Purpose: To scrutinise a course or programme area with which you are familiar*
and to identify the demands it makes on learners when we look at expectations
and requirement for assessment.

Focus on either the *Trade Union Representatives Course Level 1 or Level 2 OR
the Health and Safety Course Levels 1 or 2.

Course Title:_____________________________________________

You will have about 45mnts to complete this activity before feedback. You
will need to make time to complete all the sheets (1-6) unless the activity is
being organised in a different way.

The audit gives the opportunity to look quite closely at a course in terms of the
underpinning literacy, language and numeracy skills and knowledge we expect
learners to be able to use and / or develop. Use your own knowledge of the
course as far as possible but refer to samples or seek advice from a trainer as
appropriate.

The audit sheets cover:
                             1   Reading
                             2   Writing
                             3   Speaking & listening
                             4   Numeracy
                             5   Other study skills
                             6   Assessment

Task
Complete the checklists (sheets 1-6) in relation to one of the trade union
education courses you deliver (see note above*). As you do this, consider and
prepare to feedback on:

           the implications of the audit for you as a trade union education tutor
            and any issues it has raised
           how and when you, as a trade union education tutor, are likely to be
            made aware of difficulties individual learners may be experiencing in
            relation to these skills.




                                                                               41
Session Two                             Programme Audit of Skills                                              Sheet 1 (Reading)

What reading skills underpin the course you are auditing? Note down examples of what participants in the course need to be able
to read – and in what detail – on the chart below. Identify how often they have to use this skill – frequently (most of the time), often,
rarely or never.
Do learners need to Examples of reading texts and contexts (check if used and at what level & add others, if appropriate)
read and                Textbooks Manuals           Worksheets                 Statistics (Graphs)             Read from: whiteboards
understand:             Journals     Handouts       Self-access materials      Notices     Instructions        OHTs / powerpoint
                        Trade literature            Work-packs                 Signs & symbols                 Websites
                        Reports                     Statistical data                                           Handwriting - others
Comprehend, use
and work with whole
texts



Identify and
understand
sentences.



Different kinds and
levels of vocabulary
– including being
able to decode new
words




                                                                                                                                      42
Session Two                            Programme Audit of Skills                                           Sheet 2 (Writing)

What writing skills underpin the course you are auditing? Write down examples of what participants in the course need to be able
to write – and in what detail in the boxes below. Consider how often learners have to use these skills on the course you are auditing
e.g. frequently (most of the time), often, rarely or never.
Do learners need to                     Examples                                      Level(s) / length, if appropriate
Write complete texts
(compositions) e.g. essays,
assignments, memos, notes, reports,
letters, instructions, descriptions
Construct sentences using
appropriate grammar and
punctuation e.g. written answers or
responses, sort descriptions, on
forms, in notes



Use appropriate vocabulary, spell
correctly / encode and write
legibly e.g. lists, responses to
questions, form filling




                                                                                                                                  43
Session Two                            Programme Audit of Skills                            Sheet 3 (Speaking and listening)

What speaking and listening skills underpin the course you are auditing? Write down examples of oral / aural skills learners need –
and to what length / complexity, if appropriate – by completing the chart below. Consider how often they have to use these skills e.g.
frequently (most of the time), often, rarely or never.
Do learners need to                     Examples of course contexts / situations                Level(s) / complexity / length if
                                                                                                appropriate
Listen and respond e.g. listen to
explanations, obtain information,
questions, requests for detail, follow
instructions, discussions, reports,
feedback, presentations, facts,
opinions, feelings, understand body
language
Speak to communicate e.g. speak
and be clearly understood easily,
make requests, express opinions, ask
questions, speak formally and
informally, to different audiences,
present information for self / others
Engage in discussion e.g. exchange
information, follow gist in
discussions, make contributions,
respect others, move things forward,
adapt to situations and audience,
support with evidence.




                                                                                                                                   44
Session Two       Programme Audit of Skills            Sheet 4 (Numeracy)

What numeracy skills underpin the course you are auditing? Write down
examples of numeracy skills learners need in the course need – and in what detail
– by completing the chart below. Consider when and how they need to use these
skills, to what level and in what contexts e.g. on the spot calculations or to
support other tasks e.g. assignments

Do learners need to use          Examples and contexts           Level(s)      if
                                                                 appropriate
Whole numbers e.g. 4 rules,
written or numeric,
estimate, calculate,
negatives, use calculator
Fractions and /or decimals
e.g. in practical situations,
calculate, use as
percentages, equivalencies
Common measures e.g. time,
length, money, weight,
capacity, calculate, record,
estimate, covert, use given
formulae
Shape and space e.g. 2D /
3D, sort, use positional
vocabulary, problem solve,
symmetry, angles, draw
diagrams, plans etc
Data and statistical
measures e.g. extract
information, collect /
represent data, compare,
interpret, find average,
range, discrete, continuous
data
Probability e.g. likelihood of
recurrence, use probability
scales, identify range of
possibilities, etc




                                                                               45
Session Two       Programme Audit of Skills             Sheet 5 (Other)

What other skills underpin the course you are auditing? Are the people who
attend your courses expected to take part in the following activities / have the
following study (or research) skills? If they do not have these skills (and would
benefit from them) have they got easy and clear access to information or
support which can help them?

Do learners need to use        If so, what for                    Support?
Libraries / study centres

Dictionaries / reference
books (general)
Dictionaries / reference
books (specialist)
Catalogues

CD Rom

Internet

IT - with on the spot
support available

IT - independently

Use a keyboard

Do basic wordprocessing

Obtain information from IT
sources
Use spreadsheets

Use databases

Communicate with others by
e-mail / internet

Other?




                                                                               46
Session Two          Programme Audit of Skills       Sheet 6 (Assessment)

What assessment methods do you use – and when? What literacy, language
and / or numeracy skills do learners need to maximise achievement / evidence of
achievement using these methods?

Task: Complete the chart below indicating which assessment methods are used
on the course you have audited, both formal and informal.
Note down which literacy, language and / or numeracy skills are used.

Prepare to feedback on the range of methods used and implications for
learners and tutors.
Assessment method           Yes     No    Skills needed – R/W/S&L/N
Pre-course activity / test

Formal tests / examinations
- interim
Formal test / examination -
final
Set assignments

Individual Projects

Group Project

Oral presentation

Demonstration / role play

Work based placement

Work based assessment

Portfolio building

Observation / questioning
by tutor (formal)
Observation / questioning
by peers (on record/formal)
Continuous assessment

Formal review(s) / report(s)




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Session Three (Part 1): Introduction to the core curricula: Finding
way round the documents
Aim: To introduce the core curricula and to identify how Time
they relate to trade union education programmes.         2 hrs 30
Topic area                                               Indicative
                                                         timing
1. Introduction to session. Introduces session aim,      35mnts
expected learning outcomes. Links the core curricula to
trade union priorities.
2. What is already known about the curricula?            10mnts
Identifies what participants already know about the core
curricula documents.
3. Finding your way around a curriculum document.        45mnts
Examines the content and referencing system of the
Adult Literacy Core Curriculum document. Relates to
organisation of other curriculum.
4. Mapping with the level of skills required in trade    45mnts
union education courses. Activities map and track skills
needed to undertake a range of activities on trade union
education courses with core curriculum elements and
descriptions.
5. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.   15mnts
Variable – see notes. Participants complete log.

Trainer resources                        Participant resources
OHTs 1-10                                Session OHT / note sheet
All core curricula documents and         Adult Literacy Core Curriculum
Access for all document                  Activity sheets 1-3
Standards (optional)                     Access to copies of material from
Union Learning Reps. Course: Stage       Material from Union Learning Reps.
2 Section 2                              Training course Stage 2 Section
Copy of „Introducing Access for All‟     and other materials from Unit 1
booklet – supporting learners with       (Frontline Advice and Guidance) or
learning difficulties and disabilities   alternatives (see notes)
across the curriculum.                   Personal Development Journal




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             Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session 3 (Part One)                                   2hrs 30mnts
 Introduction to the core curricula: Finding way round the documents

1. Introduction to session                                               35mnts
           Review session aims and outcomes                               OHT 1
           Make links with rationale of course and (possibly) items from the
            “wants list” created in Session One
            this session will do what was said in session one i.e. enable
             participants to become familiar with the structure of the
             documents – and       help them explore the different kinds of
             information they contain
            explain / discuss the curricula in relation to TU education courses
             e.g. should be approached as tools to help teachers / trainers
             identify and address literacy, numeracy and language development
             needs - within the context of teaching other subjects
            more links will be made with the Skills for Life agenda and ways it
             impacts on trade union education programmes
            will consider the relationship of the core curricula / basic skills to
             trade union education tutors

           Alert that this session often gives people greater understanding of
            their own skill levels and possible development needs

The Skills for Life learning infrastructure and “basic skills”           OHT 2
Review OHT - key features of the Skills for Life infrastructure
        Refer to the National Standards (show pack if available). Explain
           that these are the basic standards in terms of adult literacy and
           numeracy, recognised by the government
        Point to / hold up the core curricula documents – literacy, numeracy
           & ESOL (explain the ESOL curriculum incorporates the Literacy
           curriculum – was developed after the literacy and includes much
           additional information)
        Explain that the core curricula expand on the standards – define,
           describe and clarify components – “meat on the bones”
        Point to / hold up the adult Pre-Entry Curriculum framework
        Explain that it focuses on literacy, numeracy and other
           communication skills below Entry not all the wider life skills usually
           found on courses at this level
        Confirm that it helps when looking for progression in skills to Entry 1
           and is particularly useful for learners who have widely different
           strengths and development needs at this level




                                                                                49
          Show Access for All document – explain developed at the same time
           as the ESOL and Pre-Entry curricula – provides detailed guidance and
           additional strategies
          Stress that although the document was specifically designed to
           support access and equal opportunities (on all courses from Entry to
           Level 2) for learners who have learning difficulties or disabilities, it
           has a wealth of useful information for all learners (strong feedback
           from courses)
          Introduction now available as a separate document for all teachers
          Explain that new assessment materials have been developed e.g. new
           Initial Assessment (will be looking at in detail on this course) also
           diagnostic assessment materials
          Also new learning materials and new qualifications for learners on
           discrete courses – mapped to the standards and / or core curricula
          New qualifications for all teachers of basic skills

   The National Standards                                                OHT 3
   Use the OHT to check that participants are clear that:
        The levels have been set to correspond with the national
          qualifications framework
        They describe the three sub-elements of achievement within Entry
        Provide a progression framework for teachers which, used
          appropriately, can help define and clarify learning goals for learners
          and teachers
        They are nationally agreed benchmarks against which the skills of
          the adult population can be assessed through national tests and
          national qualifications
        Will be reviewed after 3 years (planned start 2004)
        Correspond to the levels of demand of other qualifications within the
          national framework
        Are aligned to key skills at Levels 1 & 2
        Are aligned to the national curriculum at Entry and Level 1

Question for discussion - ask about levels of the courses taught by group
members – and how they know / think they relate to the national standards
e.g. do their Level 1 and Level 2 courses correspond to NVQ levels?

Links with trade union issues and priorities
Explain that the next 3 slides (OHTs 4-6) raise social issues long recognised
as union concerns:
          Issues of ensuring effective education and training – and the
relationship of these to equal opportunities – class / gender            OHT 4
 Emphasise “rights” issues and how these relate to participation       OHT 5
in social and democratic activities, choice and independence, including union
activities


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          Explain the emphasis on measuring effectiveness – achievement
           OHT 6
          Discuss - how do we measure progress and progression now?
          the curricula help us describe the benchmarks - where people are at
           the start of a learning programme – and what they have achieved at
           the end – what difference has been made?
          Relate to quality assurance / achievement / retention issues in
           training contexts / organisations.

2. What is already known about the curricula?                           10mnts
Group activity: Trainers conduct a question / answer / ideas storm to find
out what is already known / impressions people have / questions people have
about the core curricula (approach likely to vary between groups).
       Purpose of the activity – to identify what participants already know
          about the curricula – and what they want to know / find out.
       Remind them that they may have different levels of understanding
          about the different curricula
       Take care not to go into detail about content - this is covered in the
          activities in the remainder of this session – explain that the activities
          have been designed to help delegates explore the documents in a
          logical and structured way.

Adapt the remainder of the activities (e.g. pace, organisation of groups and
attention to detail) in the light of the outcomes of the group activity).


3. Finding your way around a curriculum document                        45mnts
Explain that although we will be working with the literacy document the
same approach is used in all the documents.

The structure of the Literacy Core Curriculum           Literacy Core Curriculum
(If necessary, explain the rationale for a “hands-on” approach.)
Ask participants to turn to page iii
        Explain that the whole document is made up of six parts
          OHT 7
        Focus on the 3 main sessions – each skill area tracked across all levels:
           Speaking and listening
           Reading
           Writing
        Remind them about the break downs in the Audit Pack activity
          (Session Two – designed to link with the curricula documents)
        Explain - the 3 main sessions each break down into sub-sections
          OHT 8
        Emphasise that the structure supports links laterally and vertically
          i.e. across the elements and through the levels



                                                                                 51
The Curriculum page layout                                       Activity sheet 1
NB. Omit this activity if participants are familiar with the document or use
simply as an exercise to check that everyone knows the kinds of information
available – and where it can be found.
Ensure participants use copies of the core curriculum to consider layout.
Suggest they work in pairs for this activity – with one person with document
open at pages 6/7 (explanation of layout) and the other open at 124/125.
        Use pages 124-125 as an example. The activity can be used in two
           ways, depending on the level of familiarity of the group.
        Task is to find the following information.
            Standards (write to communicate…)
            Curriculum sub-section (sentence focus)
            Curriculum elements (left hand page – first column) – draw
              attention to additional details)
            Curriculum reference (Ws/L1 – alert will be learning how to
              decipher these very soon!)
            Examples (inside column – left hand page – stress they are only
              examples – examples will vary according to context of teaching)
            Sample activities (inside column – right hand page – ideas for
              teachers)
            Guidance (explain that these usually give general guidance on the
              topics addressed – often applicable to other levels)
            Key skills alignment (top-left - only ay Level 1 and Level 2 – of
              course)

      Check understanding of the referencing system using OHT 9       OHT 9
      Use OHT 10 as a practical exercise. Ask people to find.         OHT 10
      SLc/E1.1 is “speak clearly to be heard and understood in simple
       exchanges” (p.24)

Progression through the levels – how do skills change between levels.
Demonstrate progression through the levels by going through an aspect of
spelling skills using the progression chart on pages 18 and 19.
    Start with Ww/E1 – the emphasis is on some personal and key words
    Check that people understand the term „key words‟ (refer them to
        the glossary on page 39)
    Ask the group to suggest ways in which this changes as the level
        progresses. They should spot the following:
            E2 – the majority of personal and familiar words
            E3 – introduces vocational and special interest words,
                dictionaries and glossaries
            L1 – words used most often in work, study and daily life
            L2 – as above and including technical words




                                                                              52
      At Levels 1 and 2, learners should be growing in independence and
       confidence and have much more knowledge about how words are formed
      There are suggested approaches on how to learn to spell (strategies) at
       all levels


4. Mapping the level of skills required in trade union education
courses                                                     45 mnts.
The next two activities enable participants to practise mapping trade union
course related skills to elements in the Literacy Core Curriculum (an
approach that can be used with any of the curricula). The first example
should usually be completed with the whole group – to model the process.
    Stress that tracking the progression of a particular skill using the
       progression charts and information in the body of the curriculum is
       relatively easy, after practice.
    Explain that even experienced basic skills tutors often find this hard
       when they first do it.

Introduce Activity sheet 2                                   Activity sheet 2
Mapping the skills needed to prepare a report used in Section 2 of the
Union Learning Reps Course
    The purpose of Activity 2 is to give delegates an opportunity to consider
      how they can “map” their own expectations about the different levels of
      reading, writing, speaking and listening skills we expect learners to have
      when viewed in the context of course-related tasks.
    It should help them spot some of the things which happen when we look
      at tasks in specific contexts – and try to analyse the different kinds and
      levels of skills they require to complete them effectively
    It will give practise in relating the standards, as expressed in the core
      curricula, to the ones we expect learners to achieve on TUC courses
    Explain that this approach is one which can be used with any of the
      curricula documents.

Before the activity starts, discuss the following:
    Briefly review the contexts and types of reports expected when learners
      are asked to present Project Reports in Stage 2 of the Trade Union
      Representatives Course.
    Quickly review other kinds of reports in TUC programmes and trade union
      activities.
Examples may include
              - health and safety report
              - accident report
              - disciplinary report
              - minutes of meetings
              - risk assessment



                                                                              53
      suggest this activity will help them see how skills ( in the core
       curriculum) are expected to change and develop across the levels
      in this way we can start to match (or map) underpinning skills in the
       core curriculum to the contexts in which participants work

Instructions for Activity Sheet 2
    Review the purpose of the activity and link to page 5 in the workbook OR
      copied page, as appropriate
    Go over the example on the activity sheet. Refer to the progression
      charts on pages 12 and 13 of the literacy core curriculum document
    Discuss the levels and the detail in the elements e.g. are they appropriate
      / adequate in terms of the task / are all the different parts of the skill
      represented in the core curriculum / are the levels as expected?
    Look at other skill areas needed when writing a project report – in
      reading and writing - ask participants to suggest which of the elements
      in the progression charts are likely to describe these

Suggest that the progression charts on pages 10-19 in the Literacy Core
Curriculum may not always give sufficient detail for mapping. Participants
may need to read the more detailed information in the texts. Demonstrate.

Introduce Activity Sheet 3 - applying this approach to other trade union
education activities
    Suggest people work in small groups – 2s/3s
    It is recommended that each of the activities should be “mapped” by at
      least two groups – gives more information / different viewpoints
    Ask them to focus on ONE of the activities supplied – first identifying
      some of the skills needed to complete the activity effectively
    Then to check out how these skills correlate to expectations in the core
      curriculum – particularly at Levels 1 & 2
    Warn them that they are unlikely to cover all the skills needed – the aim
      of the exercise is to give them the opportunity to compare how the
      standards described in the core curriculum correlate with their
      expectations and assumptions about the skills needed by participants on
      trade union education programmes

Trainers are strongly advised to complete these activities themselves before
the course. Other activities from TUC education programmes can be used.
The examples included in the pack are taken from the TUC Manual „Union
Learning Representatives Training‟ Unit 1 Frontline Advice and Guidance:
    Pages 25-27 On-course activity – using materials provided to have a
       structured discussion and prepare to report back
    Pages 30-33 On course activity – using the PIP worksheet to support
       a problem-solving activity



                                                                               54
Feedback
Discuss what participants have learnt from this activity. Include reference to:
    Any surprises in terms of levels and / or descriptions of detail?
    Whether the underpinning skills were higher or lower than were expected
       at the different levels?
    How easy/difficult was it to compare the expectations in terms of skills
       in the trade union education context to the core curriculum?

Emphasise that the curriculum indicates progression of skills through the levels
related to the standards but many students will have “spiky profiles”.

If necessary, remind delegates what we mean by a spiky profile. A spiky profile
means that a learner is better at some skills, or sub-skills, than others e.g. they
may be better readers than writers or they may be able to complete a practical
numeracy task more easily than context-free calculations. An ESOL student
may have better speaking skills than listening skills – or may find reading much
easier than speaking. Most of us have “spiky profiles” – they become important
to acknowledge when they interfere with our learning.



5. Reflection, application to own contexts and review                   15mnts
      Briefly review session 3 (part one) aims and outcomes          OHT 1
      Support completion of Personal Development Journal, include time for
       questions and answers
       Explain that this ends Part One of Session 3 but that time spent on
       the Literacy curriculum in this session will support Session 3 Part 2
       when they have the opportunity to examine the ESOL and Numeracy
       curricula

NB. If Session 3 (Part 2) follows this session, trainers may prefer to
combine the reflection sections.




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                   Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
Session Three (Part One)                                                        OHT 1

                              Introduction to the core curricula

Aim: To introduce the core curricula and to identify how they relate to trade union
education programmes.

Outcomes: By the end of this session participants will:
   be familiar with the structure and referencing system of the core curricula
   have tracked progression of skills between Entry 1 and Level 2 and related these to the
    National Standards
   be able to relate the core curricula to trade union issues and contexts
   have made links between literacy, language and numeracy elements and trade union
    education programmes
   use a Personal Development Journal to help them reflect upon, map and plan their own
    professional development.




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                Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


 Session Three (Part One)                                               OHT 2

          The core curricula and the Skills for Life Learning Infrastructure


 The National Standards for Adult Literacy and Numeracy
 The Core Curricula for Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL and the Adult Pre-Entry
  Curriculum Framework for literacy and numeracy
 The Access for all document – guidance on making the curriculum fully accessible to
  learners who have learning difficulties and / or disabilities
 Screening, assessment and diagnostic assessment tools and guidance
 Linked learning materials, new qualifications and national tests for learners
 New qualifications for teachers




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              Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


Session Three (Part One)                                             OHT 3


                Achieving coherence – between levels and standards




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                 Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


 Session Three (Part One)                                                          OHT 4

                                    Equal opportunities?


 By the age of 37, men with low or very low basic skills were much less likely to be in full
  time employment
 Across age groups, women with low or very low basic skills had far fewer years in full
  time work than men
 58% of both men and women in the very low literacy group had never been on a training
  course.

                                                     (It doesn‟t get any better)




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                    Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


Session Three (Part One)                                                            OHT 5

                           Lifelong learning and an inclusive society?


     Women with very low literacy skills were five times more likely to be classified as
      depressed compared to those with good skills

     77% of men and 65% of women did not get involved with organisations like the PTA.
.

                                                      (It doesn‟t get any better)




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                    Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


Session Three (Part One)                                                          OHT 6


                                     Strategies & targets


     (2000) – 7 million adults estimated to have basic skills needs
     (2004) Dfes target – reduce this by 750,000 by 2004 – via the Skills for life strategy
     Focus on participation with achievement – measuring effectiveness
     New target (2003) – to improve the literacy, language and / or numeracy skills of
      1.5million adults by 2007




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                  Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


    Session Three (Part One)                                            OHT 7


                          Contents of the Literacy Core Curriculum

   Forward and Introduction – background information

   The Adult Literacy Core Curriculum section
       Progression charts for each of the curriculum sections
       The curriculum sections
           Speaking and Listening
           Reading
           Writing
      Glossary




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              Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


Session Three (Part One)                                            OHT 8


               Breakdown of the Literacy Core Curriculum Sections




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             Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session Three (Part One)                                           OHT 9


                              Reference numbers




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             Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session Three (Part One)                                           OHT 10

                               Find this element!




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        Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
           Session Three (Part One): Activity Sheet 1

Purpose: To ensure that you are aware of the different kinds of
information in the core curriculum documents – and where it is
located.



Task:    Work with a partner to find and identify the following
information on page 124-125 of the Literacy Core Curriculum.
Use the information on pages 6/7 of the document to help you do
this.



  1. Link to the national standards

  2. Title of the curriculum sub-section

  3. Curriculum elements

  4. Curriculum reference numbers

  5. Examples of application

  6. Sample activities

  7. Guidance information

  8. Key Skills alignment




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Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training                     Session Three (Part One): Activity Sheet 2

Purpose: To map the skills needed (level & detail) to complete a Project Report required in Stage 2 of the Trade Union
Representatives Course and to check how these skills match elements in the core curriculum
Task: Identify which skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening) learners need to complete the report to the level
required. Cross check / map these with elements in the Literacy curriculum – use the progression charts.

Type of report: Stage 2 Union Reps. TUC Workbook page 5 Skills needed to write a project report
  Skill / skills area    Entry 1/ 2         Entry 3                Level 1                      Level 2

Some suggested oral                            Respect turn-      State what they hope to   Find information in a range
/ aural skills to                              taking rights of      achieve SLl/r/L1.5     of situations SLc/L2.3
obtain information.                            others SLd/E3.3




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Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training                     Session Three (Part One): Activity Sheet 3
Purpose: To map the skills needed (level & detail) to complete an activity on a Trade Union Education course and to check
how these skills match elements in the core curriculum
Task: Identify which skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening) learners need to complete the task effectively.
Cross check / map these with elements in the Literacy curriculum – use the progression charts. Compare findings with
own expectations and assumptions about the kinds and levels of skills learners need.
Activity Reviewed:
  Skill / skills area        Entry 1/ 2             Entry 3                  Level 1                      Level 2




Did this activity produce any surprises e.g. in terms of skill levels / detail




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Session Three (Part 2): Introduction to the core curricula: The
ESOL and Numeracy Core Curricula – and an introduction to the
sample activities in the core curricula
Aim: To introduce the core curricula and to identify how Time
they relate to trade union education programmes.             2 hrs 15
Topic area                                                   Indicative
                                                             timing
1. Introduction to the ESOL core curriculum.                 45mnts
Introduces the ESOL core curriculum, exploring
similarities and differences with Literacy curriculum (link
to Part One), Considers ESOL issues in trade union
education programmes
2. Using the Numeracy core curriculum. Introduces the 30mnts
numeracy core curriculum and relates to trade union
education programmes and union activities in the
workplace.
3. Using the sample activities in the core curricula.        45mnts
Considers how sample activities can be used and
contextualised in trade union education programmes.
4. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.       15mnts
Enables participants to get maximum benefit from the
session by relating to developments in own skills and
contexts.
Trainer resources                      Participant resources
OHTs 11-13                             Session OHT / note sheet
All core curricula documents and       ESOL core curriculum
Access for all document                Numeracy core curriculum
Standards (optional)                   Activity sheets 4-6
                                       Personal Development Journal




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           Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session 3 (Part Two)                                            2 hrs 15mnts
Introduction to the core curricula: The ESOL and Numeracy Core Curricula
– and an introduction to the sample activities in the core curricula.

This session follows on from Part One. If it occurs some time after part 1
quickly review Part One before starting this session.

1.Introduction to the ESOL core curriculum                                45mnts
                                      Access to / view of the ESOL curriculum
Explain the differences between the Literacy and ESOL Core Curricula.
    State that people who have a first language other than English have an
       important part to play in the country‟s economy and in all other aspects
       of life – another key theme in trade unionism and trade union education
       (see foreword and Introduction to the ESOL curriculum)
    The ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) curriculum is a
       parallel curriculum to the Literacy and Numeracy core curricula designed
       to support learners with language development
    Speaking and listening skills are separated in the ESOL curriculum: the
       conscious learning of a new language involves learning to understand the
       language as spoken by others, as well as learning such things as
       pronunciation, stress and colloquialisms that we “pick up” with home /
       first language.
    Both the Literacy and the ESOL curricula have the same referencing
       system, but it has been adjusted to allow for the separation of the
       speaking and listening elements
    Review the National Standards and Level Descriptors charts on pages
       20-21 of the ESOL Core Curriculum
    Demonstrate, using question and answer strategies, how Speaking and
       Listening skills are separated and check understanding of the
       differences between the speaking and listening elements in the
       Literacy Core Curriculum
    Compare and discuss the acquisition of speaking and listening skills by
       asking for examples of participants own experiences when learning a new
       language – particularly when this is as an adult
    The other main difference is the ways the sections are organised:
            In the literacy and Numeracy core curricula, each sub-skill area
               e.g. reading or handling data, is tracked from Entry 1 to Level 2
            The ESOL curriculum is organised according to level, so that all
               the sub-skill areas are included at the appropriate level e.g.
               speaking, listening, reading and writing at level 2 will be together
            This reflects the integrated approach in ESOL learning and
               teaching.



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Exploring the ESOL Curriculum                               Activity Sheet 4
Ask each table to examine one level in the ESOL curriculum and to identify
examples of additional information.

      Review the activity sheet to ensure understanding
      Emphasise that it is a skimming and scanning activity – not reading in
       detail
      Explain that they may find it useful to compare headings with the
       Literacy Core Curriculum



Take feedback on examples. These will include:
    Additional information on linguistic and grammatical structures – and
      approaches to teaching these
    Key grammatical structures charts
    Communicative functions lists
    Fold out sheets – strategies and linguistic features e.g. formality and
      informality in English
    Different headings (incorporates Literacy – but adds ESOL elements)

Remind about glossary in the ESOL curriculum (pages 396-411) and remind that
all curricula have these – and references / bibliography.

      Sum up differences using OHT 11                                 OHT 11

Discussion points
    What are the ESOL issues in the contexts in which delegates work
    Ask for examples of when awareness of ESOL issues might impact on
       work as a trade union representative in the workplace
    ensure understanding that it is not only a question of language e.g.
       importance of having cultural awareness
    acknowledge that these are equal opportunities issues e.g. the right of
       everyone in the workplace to access training / participate in union
       activities / training
    Stress that the intention is not to suddenly expect them to be ESOL
       tutors – the new framework emphasises the importance of recognising
       specialist tutor roles and ESOL is clearly recognised as a specialism.

Link to final curriculum document which covers Entry 1 – Level 2 – Numeracy.


2. Using the Numeracy Core Curriculum                                  30mnts
                                                         Numeracy curriculum
The reference system                                                   OHT 12
Quickly review the referencing system – checking that participants clear how it
relates to Literacy and ESOL systems.


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Check understanding by asking participants to find MSS1/E2.9            OHT 13
Answer: MSS1/E2.9 = „ read simple scales to the nearest labelled division‟ (p.54)

Introduce Activity 5       Tracking skills through the levels          Activity 5
Suggest that by now participants should be getting a “feel” for the different
levels and the way the expectations related to the different level.
     Explain that this activity will help them focus on the specific changes
        detailed at the various levels
Examples might be:
     How things are added or changed as skills progress
     How skills can be subsumed within larger concepts / skill areas
     If necessary, go through the example on the sheet to illustrate
        progression
     Remind participants that skill numbers are not always consecutive i.e. the
        end number can change
     Explain that sometimes the skill looks the same on the progression chart
        and pose the question what should people do then – go to main text for
        more detailed explanation.

Take feedback on the kind of skills examined and how these relate to Trade
Union Education programmes and activities.
    Any comments on the levels and descriptions themselves
    Any comments on ease (or otherwise) of tracking – using the progression
      charts and / or texts.

3. Using sample activities in the core curricula                       45mnts
Introduce Activity 6       Using all three curricula                    Activity 6
    This activity involves using the Literacy, Numeracy and ESOL curricula
    It gives participants an opportunity to look at the kind of sample
      activities suggested in the curriculum documents
    Explain that the curricula is as context-free as possible but most, if not
      all skills, particularly in education and training, are taught for specific
      reasons – and in specific contexts
    The purpose of this activity is to help you see how you might
      “contextualise” some of the sample activities in the core curricula to your
      teaching situations



After activity take and respond to feedback
Ask for examples from each of the curricula – refer to trainer sheet with
sample activities if these have not already been raised and relate to trade
union education contexts. Ask for examples of when learners on trade union
education might need to improve these kinds of skills – and how such support
is given currently.



                                                                               72
      Stress that this is just an introduction to the documents themselves and
       that they will become more familiar as they use them
      Ask how well they are coping with new terminology – any examples they
       want to clarify at this point
      Ask about practicality of integrating support / additional activities e.g.
       use of dictionary skills in current situations




4. Reflection, application to own contexts and review                  15mnts
                                       OHT1 (from Session Three Part One)
                                             & Personal development journal
      Review session aims and outcomes using OHT 1                   OHT 1
      Support and encourage reflection and completion of PDJ.
      Suggest / ask about relationships with Literacy / Numeracy / ESOL
       experts in own contexts – ways currently liaise / work together.

NB If reflection NOT completed at the end of Session Three (Part One)
give additional time to reflection section in Part Two.




                                                                               73
 Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training         Trainer Sheet
                  Session Three (Part Two): Activity Sheet 6
Trainers may wish to use this sheet as a prompt, if needed. It has some
activities listed relating to the elements – which may be useful in trade
union education programmes.

Purpose: The purpose of activity is to help you see how you might be able to
“contextualise” some of the sample activities in the core curricula to your own
teaching situations.

Task Work in pairs / small groups
   1. Familiarise yourself with the way sample activities are allied to the
      curriculum references by finding examples from those listed below
   2. Consider whether any of activities in that element could be used
      (adapted, if appropriate) on a trade union education course.
   3. Explore the core curricula to find other sample activities which could be
      adapted or used in trade union education programmes.
   4. Try to find examples from at least 2 curricula documents

Curriculum      page       Sample activity
reference
Wt/L2.2         127        In the context of researching and organising a group
                           debate/formal discussion, plan, draft and write a
                           speech to present to the group.
Lr/L1.6(b)      289        Learners watch a video discussion and note down the
                           number of times an opinion is stated.
HD1/L1.2        81         Practise drawing simple plans (not to scale), e.g. room
                           plans, piece of equipment
Other examples found    Trainers may like to use this sheet to add their own
examples – or particularly good examples which come from the participants.




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                 Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


Session Three (Part Two)                                                       OHT 11
                           The Adult ESOL Core Curriculum
                          English for Speakers of Other Languages

 Parallel to the Adult Literacy and Numeracy Core Curricula
 Speaking skills and listening skills separated
 Divided according to level (each sub-skill area included in each level)
 Same referencing system as Literacy and Numeracy curricula but different codes when
  appropriate
 Additional features and information designed to address the needs of ESOL learners e.g.
  grammatical structures charts, linguistic features and strategies for addressing these




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                  Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


Session Three (Part Two)                                                OHT 12

                            The Numeracy Core Curriculum




                                                                                 76
               Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


Session Three (Part Two)                                             OHT 13

                                 Find the element.




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            Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
               Session Three (Part Two): Activity Sheet 4



                Becoming familiar with the ESOL Curriculum

Purpose: To explore the ESOL curriculum to identify the different kinds of
information it contains.



Task: In a small group look through ONE LEVEL in the ESOL Core
Curriculum i.e. Entry 1, Entry 2, Entry 3, Level 1 or Level 2. Make a list
of the different kinds of information you can find.

Tips:
Each level is colour coded
Pay particular attention to headings



Prepare to feedback on what you find.




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Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training                           Session Three (Part Two): Activity Sheet 5
Purpose to check how skills progress through the levels in the Numeracy Core Curriculum. Use the example to help you track a
numeracy skill (across all levels) relevant to learners on your courses.
         Entry 1                      Entry 2                       Entry 3                  Level 1                    Level 2
Example
HD1/E1.1                     HD1/E2.1                     HD1/E3.1                  HD/L1.1                    HD/L2.1
Extract simple information   Extract information from     Extract numerical         Extract and interpret      Extract discrete and
from lists.                  lists, tables, simple        information from lists,   information (e.g. in       continuous data from
                             diagrams and block graphs.   tables, diagrams and      tables, diagrams, charts   tables, diagrams, charts
                                                          simple charts,            and line graphs).          and line graphs.




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             Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
                Session Three (Part Two): Activity Sheet 6

Purpose: The purpose of activity is to help you see how you might be able to
“contextualise” some of the sample activities in the core curricula to your own
teaching situations.

Task Work in pairs / small groups

   5. Familiarise yourself with the way sample activities are allied to the
      curriculum references by finding examples from those listed below
   6. Consider whether any of activities described in that element could be
      used (adapted, if appropriate) on a trade union education course.
   7. Explore the core curricula to find other sample activities which could be
      adapted or used in trade union education programmes.
   8. Try to find examples from at least 2 curricula documents

Curriculum      Page      Sample activity
reference
Wt/L2.2



Lr/L1.6(b)



HD1/L1.2



Other examples found




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Session Four: Supporting the learner: assessing basic skills
Aim: To familiarise trade union education tutors with Time
initial assessment (approaches and procedures) for 3hrs 30mnts
literacy, numeracy and ESOL and to consider implications
for trade union education programmes.
Topic area                                                   Indicative
                                                             timing
1. Introduction to session aims and outcomes. Focuses 10mnts
on what it is useful to know about learner‟s abilities and
how we can identify need.
2. Taking Initial Assessment Tests. Undertaking initial      90mnts
assessment tests to experience what it is like to take the
test and consider appropriateness of this or similar
activities to trade union contexts.
3. The ESOL Perspective. Consideration of the factors        35mnts
which influence new language learning as an adult and how
these can apply to trade union contexts.
4. Applications to trade union education. Opportunity        60mnts
for trainers to draw together related issues raised so
far, make links with the core curriculum and consider
application of assessment strategies (for language,
literacy and numeracy to trade union contexts and
education.
5. Reflection, application to individual contexts and        15mnts
review. Enabling participants to get maximum benefit
from the session.
Trainer resources                      Participant resources
OHTs 1-3                               Session OHT / note sheet
Instructions for administering BSA Activity sheets 1 & 2 with related
Initial Assessment Tests in            handout
Literacy and Numeracy                  BSA Initial Assessment tests in
                                       Literacy and Numeracy and Answer
                                       sheets
                                       Personal Development Journal




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          Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session 4 Supporting the learner: assessing basic skills        3hrs 30mnts
Notes for trainers

1. Introduction to session aims and outcomes                        10mnts
Review the session aims and outcomes using OHT 1.                    OHT 1

Ask for brief feedback on what delegates see as the most important
principles - in relation to assessing the literacy, language or numeracy
skills of adults attending trade union education courses.
Examples should include following (draw these out, if appropriate):
    relevance
    clarity about the rationale / purpose / advantages of assessment
    ensuring that the learner is fully involved / at the centre of the process
      / willing “partner”
    relationship between assessor / tutor and learner / trust / respect
    honesty – right to know
    clarity about the uses to be made of the assessment activities / results
    confidentiality

Review the diagram on OHT 2 illustrating the assessment process OHT 2
      Explain source (from Diagnostic Assessment training) and suggest the
       process applies to many FE / adult basic education programmes
      Ask for comments on similarities and differences between this process
       and those used in trade union education programmes
      Consider possible adjustments to the model for trade union courses
       represented e.g. to reflect such things as course lengths, organisation,
       principal aims of the course / focus.
      Draw attention to the value of a common assessment vocabulary – now
       emerging as a result of the Skills for Life strategy e.g. what is the
       difference between screening / initial assessment and diagnostic
       assessment                                                     OHT 3

Check current knowledge / awareness about what (if any) assessments
learners who undertake their courses have taken.




                                                                            82
2. Taking Initial Assessment Tests                                         90mnts
10mnts               Group Activity                   Activity sheet 1 (Part A)
Explain that both in the planning and the pilot stages of the course the
development team was asked to include actual experience of undergoing an
initial assessment test as part of the course. Before undergoing the
assessments, it will be useful to consider why this experience might be useful.

Part A: In small groups, draw up suggestions about how knowing about initial
assessment procedures and processes (particularly undergoing the experience
themselves) might be useful for trade union education tutors.

      Explain that we will return to this list later on in the session.



50mnts          Undertaking literacy & numeracy assessments
                                                 Activity sheet 1 (Part B)

Introduce Initial Assessment activity
Explain that you (and the other trainer) will be conducting the assessment as
recommended in the instruction manual – a kind of group role play. As well as
taking part in the assessment participants should reflect on how the
learners they work with might react to this (or similar) assessments. There
are only two differences from the usual way these tests are conducted:

   1. There will only be a short break between the two tests.
   2. Participants will mark their own papers after both tests have been
      completed.

                                                         The Literacy Assessment
Trainers can choose to administer either Test 1 or Test 2.
    Settle the group down, explaining the importance of making this “group
       role play” as real to life as possible (if necessary)
    Use the administration notes (1-15) to support the activity and follow
       them closely – and overtly
    Give participants 20 minutes to complete the test
    Suggest that people who finish early should think about how they might
       incorporate information about these kinds of tests into their learning
       programmes

Ask people to put those papers away before distributing the numeracy test.




                                                                               83
                                                       The Numeracy Assessment

Trainers can choose to administer either Test 1 or Test 2.

      Use the administration notes (1-15) to support this activity and follow
       them closely – and obviously
      Give delegates 20 minutes to complete the test.

At the end of the tests give participants time (about 10 minutes) to mark
and analyse results, using the answer sheets in the pack. Support if
necessary.

30mnts     Reflection & discussion                             Activity 1 Part C
Allow 20 minutes for groups to complete Part C of the activity before asking for
feedback on the use and value of this experience – for trade union
education tutors.

Examples likely to include:
    A better understanding of skill levels and standards
    Increased confidence when discussing levels / standards / assessments
      with colleagues and learners
    A more realistic idea of what is expected might help when motivating
      learners (learners often better than they think)
    Value of experiential learning – not just about knowledge / knowing right
      answers but also completing in time and feelings etc
    Empathy with learners
    More confident about using, if appropriate e.g. if learners ask

3. The ESOL perspective                                                    35mnts
                                                Activity sheet 2 & Handout
Explain that currently there is no ESOL equivalent to the Literacy and
Numeracy Initial Assessment. Where these are undertaken, initial
assessments tend to form parts of initial interviews with learners.

Interviewers usually ask about the educational and linguistic backgrounds of
learners to try and informally assess familiarity with English and potential for
learning a language (e.g. how quickly they are likely to learn) as well as giving
tasks such as those undertaken in the literacy assessment.

The purpose of the next activity is to raise awareness about the range of
backgrounds and experiences of ESOL learners and to consider how useful it is
for trade union education tutors and the people attending their courses to be
aware of the kind of features which can influence ESOL learners.




                                                                                    84
This activity should be adapted according to experience within the group
Some examples:
    Question and Answer session – using the handout headings as prompts
      for a group discussion
    Small group activity e.g. ideas storm (features which make a new
      language harder / easier to learn as an adult) followed by feedback
      and reference to the handout
    Put 6 headings from the handout on a flip chart and ask groups to
      feedback on all or some of ways these the factors are likely to
      influence English use or learning – sharing out if appropriate. Check
      through handout for any other factors, if appropriate.



Summary discussion: ask about (or summarise, if appropriate e.g. if this has
arisen in the previous activity) experiences supporting ESOL learners who
attend trade union education programmes.

Draw out discussion on such things such things as:
    Range of languages / cultures represented in their teaching groups
    Any links to particular vocational areas / types of work / areas of the
      country / town
    Implications for the promotion / application of equal opportunities
      policies in terms of the trade union agenda (e.g. encouraging increased
      participation from under-represented groups)
    Delegates current knowledge about background / previous educational
      and training experiences of learners on trade union education
      programmes who have ESOL needs
    Whether delegates in the group consider that they need additional
      training to respond more effectively to learners with ESOL needs
    Do they think learners who attend trade union education courses need
      additional support or training to respond more effectively to trade union
      members (and other in the workforce) who have ESOL needs



4. Applications to trade union education                               60mnts
In whole or small groups, ask people to draw together the issues raised in
this session to share ideas and practice. Ask people to discuss such things
as:

      What kind of informal skills checks do they currently use, if any
      How might initial assessment activities (formal or informal) be fitted
       into trade union education programmes
      What are the issues – and the implications for practice?



                                                                             85
The actual topics should be determined in response to issues raised in
the course so far. It should provide time / opportunities to suggest /
discuss ways in which the core curricula can support formal or
informal assessment in trade union education contexts and / or to
discuss related issues raised so far.

Take Feedback / summarise (as appropriate)



5. Reflection, application to individual contexts and review   15mnts
Summary and reflection
    Review session aims and outcomes and respond as appropriate OHT 1
    Give time / support completion of PDJ




                                                                     86
                  Trade Union Educations Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session Four                                                                   OHT 1

Aim: to familiarise trade union education tutors with initial assessment (approaches and
procedures) for literacy, numeracy and ESOL and to consider implications for trade union
education programmes.

Outcomes: By the end of this session, participants will have:
   Experienced initial assessment “tests” for literacy and numeracy
   Discussed the impact of “language history” on ESOL learners
   Shared information about current approaches to formal and informal initial assessment
    used in trade union education programmes
   Considered how knowing about the assessment of literacy, numeracy and ESOL can be of
    value to trade union education tutors and to the people they teach
   Used Personal Development Journal to identify any personal development needs or future
    actions




                                                                                       87
               Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session Four                                                         OHT 2




                                                                             88
                     Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training


Session Four                                                                         OHT 3

Screening
General assessment to identify whether or not further assessment is useful e.g. likely need
for support


Initial Assessment
Rough guide to level(s) related to the National Standards in specific skills


Diagnostic Assessment
Detailed diagnosis of skills in one or more particular area(s) OR used to identify specific
difficulties e.g. dyslexia




                                                                                              89
          Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
                   Session Four: Activity Sheet 1
                      Initial Assessment Tests

Purpose: To experience taking the BSA Initial Assessments and to
consider the appropriateness and uses of such an assessment in trade
union education programmes; to review the value of this experience as
trade union education tutors.


Part A
How might this be a useful experience – for me and those I teach?
In small groups, draw up suggestions about how knowing about initial assessment
procedures and processes (particularly undergoing the experience themselves)
might be useful for trade union education tutors (and the people who attend
trade union education courses).


Part B         The Assessments (Literacy and Numeracy)
Undertake the assessments as directed by the trainer.

Mark own work.

Part C      Reflection and discussion
   1. Review your thoughts, feelings and experiences whilst undertaking
      the assessments.
Share information about such things as:
               Your feelings before, during and after the tests
               Why the way assessments are carried out is important
               The appropriateness of this kind of assessment for the
                  learners on trade union education courses
               Ways it might need to be adapted for trade union education
                  courses and / or if it is at all appropriate

   2. Discuss what else would you need, as a trade union education tutor,
      to establish a learner‟s needs in relation to a trade union education
      course?

   3. Re-visit the ideas generated in Part A and prepare feedback on the
   value of this experience to trade union education tutors – and,
   perhaps, to learners on trade union education programmes e.g. learning
   reps.




                                                                             90
          Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
                   Session Four: Activity Sheet 2

Purpose: The purpose of this activity is to raise awareness about the
range of backgrounds and experiences of ESOL learners and to consider
how useful it is for trade union education tutors (and the people they
teach) to be aware of the kind of features which can influence how
effectively English is used or learnt.

This activity can be completed in a number of ways, please follow
directions of the trainer

Whichever approach is used, you will be considering ways the following
factors influence language use and learning:

   1. Length of residence

   2. Place(s) of origin / habitat

   3. Proficiency in other languages – oral / aural

   4. Proficiency in other languages – reading / writing

   5. Where someone was first taught English – in which country / when
      did they start learning English and when did they finish

   6. What kind of qualifications (training / occupation) someone has
      obtained in another language and the use they are making of the
      skills and knowledge related to this qualification.

Use the handout to support discussion and / to help identify other
factors?

Discussion points
   1. What are your experiences supporting ESOL learners attending
      trade union education programmes?
   2. How might this kind of awareness assist trade union
      representatives in the workplace?




                                                                   91
Handout to accompany Activity Sheet 2
            Factors which influence language use and learning.

  1. Length of residence in the country?
  New arrivals / refugees / asylum seekers / joining family etc or long-time
  residents / people whose families have lived in Britain for several
  generations (many categories in between). Consider participation / contact /
  socialization / use of English in own contexts e.g. in union activities.
  2. Place(s) of origin / habitat?
  Differences and similarities e.g. between people from countries like India,
  Pakistan, Bangladesh or Vietnam with people from Angola, Somalia, Zaire,
  Eritrea etc OR Eastern Europe e.g. Bulgaria OR South America. Much
  depends on previous exposure to learning / training in general and other life-
  experiences / purpose of residency in Britain. How do they perceive that
  purpose and how does this relate to their need / motivation to learn English /
  participate outside own community?
  3. Proficiency in other languages – oral / aural?
  Consider own experiences of language learning – other languages spoken /
  holiday. What are the different skills needed to speak and to listen to a
  language. Not just words / grammar forms – confidence / opportunities to
  practice / can you cope with varieties e.g. of dialects / speeds of talking /
  expectations of others in another country.
  4. Proficiency in other languages – reading / writing?
  Consider own experiences e.g. how did you learn (like to learn) school French
  / Welsh as a first / second language / experience with non-Roman based
  languages e.g. Japanese / Gujurati? Consider the frustration of learners who
  may be extremely proficient in reading – but find oral/aural communication
  very difficult. People who are literate in their “home” language usually
  learner faster than people who aren‟t literate in any language.
  5. Where English was first taught – in which country / when / starting
      or ending at what age?
  Widespread use of English / varieties of English spoken in the world.
  Different attitudes / regulations re. schooling / compulsory attendance and
  expectations. Sometimes “unlearning” is necessary as a result of this or,
  more commonly, a recognition that there are several varieties of English and
  ways of using the language.
  6. Qualifications obtained in another language – use being made of those
      skills currently e.g. engineers, builders, motor mechanic, doctors,
      teachers.
  These qualifications (and related experience) are reflected at all levels of
  occupation and training. Not always just qualification – may also be
  differences in common practices e.g. health and safety / relationships with
  supervisors / peers. Workforce / TUC issue?




                                                                             92
Session Five: Motivation, support and signposting – the      role of the
trade union education tutor
Aim: To outline the motivational, support and signposting     Time
responsibilities of trade union education tutors and to       2 hrs 45
explore models of support.
Topic area                                                    Indicative
                                                              timing
1. Introduction to session aims and outcomes.                 15mnts
Links to previous sessions and introduces this session‟s
focus on the support roles and skills of trade union
education tutors.
2. Putting the principles into practice: motivation,          75mnts
support and signposting Identifies and explores the kinds
of knowledge, approaches and skills needed to identify,
motivate and support learners in trade union education
contexts.
3. Support models for learners. Examines different            30mnts
models of support for learners attending trade union
education courses and their impact on the role of trade
union education tutors.
4. Support opportunities for trade union education            30mnts
tutors. Identifies sources of support for trade union
education tutors related to basic skills aspects of their
work.
5. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.        15mnts
Opportunity to identify future learning needs and actions.

Trainer resources                    Participant resources
OHT 1                                Session OHT / note sheet
Flip chart                           Activity Pack 1 and Activity sheet 2
                                     Personal Development Journal




                                                                           93
          Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
Session 5 Motivation, support and signposting – the role of the trade
union education tutor.                                 2hrs 45mnts

Notes for trainers

1.Introduction to session aims and outcomes                             15mnts
    Review the aim and outcomes                                          OHT 1
    Intention – to explore practical ways in which trade union education
      tutors can ensure that learners who have literacy, language or numeracy
      development needs are encouraged to do something about it
    Acknowledge that teachers do this as part of their general teaching role
      and confirm that this session gives an opportunity to explore any
      additional features which need to be present on trade union education
      courses to ensure that learners with these needs are fully supported
    Agree definitions of motivation, support and signposting. Write the
      words on a flip chart – and ask for words /phrases which describe what
      tutors already do (or know they can do) to support learners who have
      literacy, language or numeracy development needs. Examples might be:
            Motivate – encourage / help believe it‟s possible / stress how
              common these learning / development needs are as part of
              explanations/ ensure regular reviews
            Support – build in on-course support e.g. additional activities to
              be completed outside the course or alternative activities
              especially to support/address activities known to cause problems
              – skills building exercises which the tutor managers
            Signposting – referring learners to additional sources of support
              e.g. self-access resources, support sessions or additional classes

2. Putting principles into practice                                      75mnts
Motivation, support and signposting                                    Activity 1
Purpose: to explore the skills teachers use to motivate, encourage, advise and
support learners in trade union education contexts – with the focus on those
learners who may not take up opportunities for development – or who are under-
achieving as a result of “poor” literacy, language or numeracy skills.

Go over the activity sheet and ensure understanding
    Explain that there will be (up to*) 5 groups – each looking at and
      reporting back on a different aspect of their role in relation to
      identifying, motivating and supporting learners in trade union
      education contexts.

*Trainers can choose to reduce the number of groups, as appropriate – or give
choices to participants in relation to priorities / issues raised.


                                                                              94
   This approach (people examining and feeding back on different aspects)
   maximises the coverage of key issues – by sharing the detailed work
   between people in the group.

      Point to – and underline what is required in the feedback session:
            NOT a summary of the discussion / activity
            IS – an evaluation of the content and appropriateness of the
              issues raised in the discussion / activity for people working in
              their roles and contexts
            Opportunity to highlight key approaches and strategies
            Opportunity to start to address what THEY need in order to
              operate in the ways suggested

      Give time frame – allowing at least 25 minutes for feedback.

Take and respond to feedback
    Summarise any key issues or concerns
    Link to previous sessions – the impact of national standards - familiarity
      with the core curricula as tools to help us be clear about what are the
      “basic” skills for trade union education learners
    Underline the value to learners, tutors and managers of being able to
      identify evidence of quality – including approaches to what are often
      referred to as “un-measurable” qualities such as confidence building,
      motivation, increasing self-esteem and preparedness to seek rights.
    Link to such things as college self-assessment regimes / quality
      definitions / course evaluations

Lead into exploring models of support – for learners and for
teacher/trainers.

3.Support models for learners                                       30mnts
                                                                   Activity 2
Introduce activity and purpose. Discourage discussion about their own needs at
this point – that‟s in the next activity! Allow time for feedback.

Feedback:
    Identify the most common/ popular / useful models – and ask why so?
    Ask if this activity has raised any issues in relation to expanding the
      number of support options in specific contexts
    Ask if any other models could be added to this list
    Relate (briefly) to learners preferred learning styles and modes of
      learning e.g. on own / in group




                                                                               95
4. Support opportunities for trade union education tutors.               30mnts
Explain that the purpose of this activity is to identify sources of support for
trade union education tutors for these aspects of their work.
    This includes working with literacy, language and numeracy specialists
       (adult literacy, numeracy and ESOL)
    Suggest links with key skills support and related colleagues. (Discuss the
       differences between key skills and basic skills if this is an issue – point to
       joint assessment banks and remind about common standards)

The Task: As whole group / smaller groups
Ideas-storm and / or draw up a mind-map (spidergram) of the different kinds
of people and organisations who can support trade union education tutors in
their work with learners who have literacy, language and numeracy
development needs.

   1.   Within their organisation
   2.   Local or regional networks or organisations
   3.   Trade union networks / interest groups
   4.   National organisations

Draw to a close by encouraging the development of own networks at different
levels and signposting to useful information e.g. in the back of Access For All /
useful websites.

5. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.                     15mnts
Review achievement of aims and outcomes using OHT 1                        OHT 1
Support completion of PDJ




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                  Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
Session Five                                                               OHT 1

    Motivation, support and signposting – the role of the trade union education tutor

Aim: To outline the motivational, support and signposting responsibilities of trade union
education tutors and to explore models of support.

Outcomes: By the end of this session participants will have:
   Identified the motivation, support and signposting responsibilities of trade union
    education tutors for learners in their groups who have literacy, numeracy or language
    development needs
   Considered the impact of these responsibilities on course organisation and management
    and identified sources of support for themselves
   Reviewed models of support and considered which are most appropriate to them in their
    individual contexts
   Used Personal Development Journal to identify future needs and actions




                                                                                        97
            Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
             Session Five: Activity Sheet 1A (Group One)

Exploring the skills needed by teachers, trainers and others responsible
for motivating and supporting learners on trade union education courses.

Purpose: To identify the kinds of knowledge, approaches and skills needed
to identify, motivate and support learners in trade union contexts.


         Focus Group One: Identifying and Motivating Learners

In groups of 5-7, take about 30 minutes to review the topics in the box
below. Discuss these in relation to the work you do, your current roles
and responsibilities.

Group 1.             Identifying and motivating learners



      What are the „signs‟ that a person might be interested in
       developing their literacy, language or numeracy skills?
      In what situations are you involved in encouraging take-up of
       opportunities on offer?
      What information do you have in your organisation / working
       context to help you offer advice about options / signpost?
      How can you promote take-up of options and develop a learner‟s
       self-confidence in trade union education contexts?


Feedback areas:

      The significance of these issues to trade union education




      Effective approaches and strategies which could be used to address
       these issues on trade union education programmes




      What trade union education tutors need to support this aspect of
       their work or to develop the kind of skills identified.



                                                                            98
            Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
             Session Five: Activity Sheet 1B (Group Two)

Exploring the skills needed by teachers, trainers and others responsible
for motivating and supporting learners on trade union education courses.

Purpose: To identify the kinds of knowledge, approaches and skills needed
to identify, motivate and support learners in trade union contexts.


               Focus Group Two: Giving advice to learners

In groups of 5-7, take about 30 minutes to review the topics in the box
below. Discuss these in relation to the work you do, your current roles
and responsibilities.

Group 2.     Giving advice to learners on trade union education
programmes who have literacy, language or numeracy difficulties.

      Do learners on your courses have opportunities to talk about these
       skill needs or concerns? When and where?
      Can you give them clear and complete information about the options
       open to them in your organisation / context?
      Have learners got a choice about the ways they can develop these
       skills?
      Are there clear, practical links with services which can support this
       kind of learning at the end of their course?


Feedback areas:

      The significance of these issues to trade union education




      Effective approaches and strategies which could be used to address
       these issues on trade union education programmes




      What trade union education tutors need to support this aspect of
       their work or to develop the kind of skills identified.



                                                                            99
            Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
             Session Five: Activity Sheet 1C (Group Three)

Exploring the skills needed by teachers, trainers and others responsible
for motivating and supporting learners on trade union education courses.

Purpose: To identify the kinds of knowledge, approaches and skills needed
to identify, motivate and support learners in trade union contexts.


  Focus Group Three: Developing trust in tutor-student relationships

In groups of 5-7, take about 30 minutes to review the topics in box below.
Discuss the content of the box in relation to the work you do, your current
roles and responsibilities.

Group 3.The importance of trust when working with learners who have
literacy, language or numeracy difficulties on trade union education
programmes.

      Is it clear to learners that if and when they discuss their learning
       needs, the discussion will be responded to in a respectful way?
      What are your responses in relation to actual or perceived barriers
       to learning because of fears of a loss of status in the eyes of their
       peers and others? How is this issue addressed?
      What features in your work situation and / or organisation support
       an atmosphere of trust in these situations?

Feedback areas:

      The significance of these issues to trade union education




      Effective approaches and strategies which could be used to address
       these issues on trade union education programmes




      What trade union education tutors need to support this aspect of
       their work or to develop the kind of skills identified.




                                                                          100
            Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
             Session Five: Activity Sheet 1D (Group Four)

Exploring the skills needed by teachers, trainers and others responsible
for motivating and supporting learners on trade union education courses.

Purpose: To identify the kinds of knowledge, approaches and skills needed
to identify, motivate and support learners in trade union contexts.


       Focus Group Four: Active listening and “challenging” learners

In groups of 5-7, take about 30 minutes to complete the tasks in the box
below.     Do this in relation to the work you do, your current roles and
responsibilities.

Group 4 Skills involved when interviewing, motivating and supporting
learners who have literacy, numeracy or language development needs:
Active listening and challenging*.

      In your group discuss the items on the accompanying checklist in
       the context of supporting learners on trade union education
       programmes who have basic skills development needs.
      Consider and report back on approaches and strategies which
       ensure that:
           The boundaries of your role are clear and overt
           The phrases and language you use are appropriate
           You have the time to listen actively
           You challenge constructively

*Adapted from the TUC Learning Representatives training.

Feedback areas:

      The significance of these issues to trade union education




      Effective approaches and strategies which could be used to address
       these issues on trade union education programmes



      What trade union education tutors need to support this aspect of
       their work or to develop the kind of skills identified.


                                                                          101
A summary of Active Listening Skills1

Active listening skills
Active listening is an important skill. It is much more than just hearing. It
involves:
     Understanding
     Checking
     Memorising
     Selecting relevant points
     Verbal and non-verbal responses
     Summarising

Active listening is important in helping to:
    Create the kind of atmosphere which helps an individual feel at ease
    Receive and check information
    Work out appropriate responses to enquiries and comments

Five key steps to active listening are:
1. Concentrate on what the other person is saying – avoid making assumptions.
2. Recognise any positive or negative feelings you may have about the individual,
and try and set these aside.
3. Find ways of checking your own understanding directly with the individual by
summarising (and agreeing) what has been said.
4. Try to keep your own speaking to a minimum – do not monopolise the
conversation.
5. Learn to close down discussions satisfactorily.

Barriers to active listening:
    Preconceived ideas about the interviewee
    Thinking about other things
    Being distracted by emotive words
    Disagreeing with a particular point of view or idea
    Listening for flaws in the other person‟s argument
    Wanting to express your thoughts and views
    Prejudice
    Lack of time.

Challenging
Challenging does not mean having an argument. It means questioning an
individual‟s response or attitude when you think it might help. Carried out
wrongly it can have a negative result – the person may clam up or become
aggressive. But a constructive challenge may move things along. An example
might be: „Don‟t you think you‟re underestimating what you can do?‟



1
    Adapted from the a TUC Learning Representatives training pack


                                                                                102
             Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
              Session Five: Activity Sheet 1E (Group Five)

Exploring the skills needed by teachers, trainers and others responsible
for motivating and supporting learners on trade union education courses.

Purpose: To identify the kinds of knowledge, approaches and skills needed
to identify, motivate and support learners in trade union contexts.

                   Focus Group Five: Questioning skills

In groups of 5-7, take about 30 minutes to complete the tasks in the box
below. Discuss the content of the box in relation to the work you do, your
current roles and responsibilities.

Group 5. Skills involved when interviewing, motivating and supporting
learners who have literacy, numeracy or language development needs:
Questioning skills.

          In your group discuss the items on the Questioning skills
           checklist in the context of supporting learners on trade union
           programmes who have basic skills development needs*.
          List an example of each type of question which you might ask a
           learner who has literacy, language or numeracy development
           needs related to trade union activities or education. Display
           these on a flipchart to be used in feedback.
          Report any strategies identified which might be used in your
           own contexts to improve questioning skills - of tutors or
           learners

*NB Checklist adapted from the TUC Learning Reps. course

Feedback areas:

      The significance of these issues to trade union education



      Effective approaches and strategies which could be used to address
       these issues on trade union education programmes



      What trade union education tutors need to support this aspect of
       their work or to develop the kind of skills identified.



                                                                          103
A summary of Questioning Skills 2
A person‟s first question may not be the most useful or important one. There are
a number of questioning techniques which will help you explore initial requests
for information or advice further:

Open questions: An open question does not presuppose a yes or no answer.
Examples of open questions might be “What else can you tell me that might
help?” or “What other alternatives have you thought of?”
Questions like these help to draw out more information, and assist the individual
in exploring and clarifying their ideas further.

Paraphrasing: Paraphrasing involves putting briefly into your own words the
individual‟s question or statement. This helps to clarify what has been said and
to encourage the individual to give more information. It shows you have been
listening carefully, and have understood what the individual has been saying. An
example of paraphrasing might be: “So you‟d like to do a City and Guilds
qualification, but you are worried about whether you would fit in?”
When paraphrasing, care needs to be taken when dealing with issues which may
be sensitive to the individual. Paraphrasing can help focus on some of these, but
they may need to be raised more directly with the individual.

Reflecting back: Reflecting is the act of replacing rephrasing a statement or
question and sending it – or reflecting it – back to the other person. It is
especially helpful in clarifying points, obtaining more information and checking
mutual understanding. An example might be: “ So you want to improve your IT
skills, but you‟re worried about whether the course will be too advanced? What
makes you say that?”

Closed questions: A question that is closed will most likely be answered by the
individual with a just a yes or no. An example might be: “Do you know where the
study support centre is?” A closed question both summarises and helps to bring
a conversation back on course if it has wandered. It can help you close down one
topic and move on to the next. It also helps to check mutual understanding
quickly.

Specific questions: There is usually only one answer to a specific question. For
example “ What is the qualification you want to achieve at the end of the
course?” The use of specific questions can be a particularly useful approach
when you have a talkative individual. In this situation the only way of being sure
you get the facts you need is to ask directly.




2
    Adapted from the a TUC Learning Representatives training pack



                                                                              104
Leading questions: In a leading question, the required answer is indicated by
the question itself. An example might be: “As you have experience as a builder,
will you want to get qualifications in construction?” Leading questions should be
used with considerable care, otherwise there is a real danger of enforcing your
own ideas and not learning enough about the individual‟s needs.

The above questions all demonstrate specific questioning techniques which you
need to be aware of and use tactically as necessary. However, much of your
questioning will come naturally and is likely to involve the use of a combination of
approaches.

Can you identify any ones you think you might want to use more?




Clarifying and summarising skills
Clarifying and summarising means checking mutual understanding and agreement.
Effective clarifying and summarising can:

      Help in identifying individual needs
      Ensure mutual understanding about what has been said
      Help individuals who are confused or unclear
      Pull back a discussion that appears to be wandering
      Reassure an individual that their ideas have been understood
      Provide an opportunity to check and correct any misunderstandings
      Help end a discussion by highlighting key points and providing
       confirmation of the next steps

To be able to clarify and summarise effectively, it is important to:
    Adopt questioning techniques which encourage and enable individuals to
       share and further explore their ideas
    Listen carefully to what the individual is saying
    Empathise with the needs of the individual, and reflect back sensitive
       issues carefully and discreetly.




                                                                                105
            Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
       Session Five: Activity Sheet 2 Support models for learners

Purpose: To explore support models for learners on trade union education
programmes and identify related signposting responsibilities, practices and
opportunities for trade union education tutors.

Task
Work with one or more colleagues to identify the benefits and
drawbacks of different kinds of basic skills support available to trade
union education learners. Consider the value of any of the
alternatives below not yet accessible in your own contexts.

Use the grid below (list of different models) to support your discussion.
                Benefits                                     Drawbacks
Bolt-on courses for the duration of the       Bolt-on courses for the duration of the
course                                        course




Additional courses in the same college or     Additional courses in the same college or
organisation – available outside the course   organisation – available outside the course




Access to courses near home / community       Access to courses near home / community
settings                                      settings




Courses in workplace settings                 Courses in workplace settings



Self-assessment materials or study packs      Self-assessment materials or study packs




On-line learning / CD ROMs                    On-line learning / CD ROMs




Other e.g. in-class support, mentors?         Other e.g. in-class support, mentors?




                                                                                        106
Session Six: Integrating teaching and learning strategies into trade
union education programmes
Aim: To suggest approaches and strategies trade union Time
education tutors can use within their own teaching and 3 hrs
learning programmes to support the basic skills 30mnts
development needs of learners.
Topic area                                                    Indicative
                                                              timing
1. Introduction to session aims and outcomes.                 10mnts
Emphasises value of sharing ideas and practical ways to
adapt approaches and strategies to suit trade union
contexts.
2. Readability factors and features. Identifies               50mnts
features which make reading easier and more accessible
and relates this to materials used in trade union education
programmes.
3. Calculations in trade union contexts. Identifies           45mnts
needs for calculation skills in trade union education
contexts, explores different approaches and strategies
and considers the language of “maths”.
4. An Introduction to Access for all. Explores how            45mnts
Access for all is used alongside the core curricula and how
it could benefit trade union education programmes and
contexts.
5. Using the core curricula as a source of ideas.             45mnts
Explores ways sample activities in the different core
curricula and Access for all can be used, adapted and
contextualised as necessary, in trade union education
contexts
6. Reflection, application to own contexts and review.        15mnts
Opportunity to reflect on session and apply to own
contexts.
Trainer resources                     Participant resources
OHT 1                                 Session OHT / note sheet
SMOG CARD and Making Reading          Activity sheets 1-4
Easier Pamphlet                       SMOG cards & Making Reading Easier
Core Curricula documents              pamphlets
                                      Core Curricula documents
                                      Personal Development Journal




                                                                           107
           Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session 6 Integrating teaching and learning strategies into trade
union education programmes.                       3hrs 30mnts

Notes for trainers
1. Introduction to session aims and outcomes                            10mnts
      Review the aim and outcomes                                         OHT 1
      Intention – to share ideas and find practical ways in which trade union
       education tutors can adapt and apply approaches and strategies used in
       basic skills courses to enhance trade union education programmes
      Will include considering ways in which they can use the core curricula
      Stress commonalities – adults returning to learn after a long gap / with
       few qualifications, if any / often assess themselves as “non-academic” /
       may feel “rejected” or “neglected” by conventional educational routes
      Acknowledge that this doesn‟t only apply to those with basic skills needs –
       is a feature of adult education generally including trade union education
      Similarly, adult learner groups often contain learners with very different
       levels of skills, abilities and needs
      This session will address ways in which teachers can recognise and
       address differentiation in literacy, language and numeracy



2. Readability factors and features                                  50mnts
SMOG                                                               SMOG cards
The purpose of this part of the session is to demonstrate and consider the use
of SMOG analysis (Simplified Measure of Gobbedlygook) and to identify
features which make reading easier.
    Use the Ready Reckoner card to introduce the SMOG formula
    Emphasise its appropriateness in the post-16 context and situations when
      “reading age” is an inappropriate / offensive term
    Check that everyone knows how to count syllables (make this a light / fun
      activity) e.g. focus on the names of people there / local places / names in
      the news or terms used in trade union circles e.g. dispute, negotiation,
      agenda, agreement, complaint



Making Reading Easier                                      Activity Sheet 1
                                                 Trade union course samples
                                            Making reading easier pamphlets
      Demonstrate the formula using an exert from Making Reading Easier or
       other relevant text e.g. TUC leaflet of own choice
      Ask participants to do a SMOG analysis on one of the texts suggested




                                                                              108
     Then to share the results with one or two colleagues and to use the
      information in the pamphlet to suggest other factors which made the
      chosen text easy or difficult
   Suggested samples:
              Page 104 Union Learning Representatives Training Manual
                 (Case Studies information sheet)
              Article from „The Learning Rep‟ Winter 2002 – page 11 [can
                 use others but make sure they have 10 sentences]
              Task Sheet from Stage 2 Trade Union representatives
                 Course: Employment Law Unit – page 25 (Case Study task)
              Notes from Stage 1 Health and Safety Representatives
                 Course page 45: Empowering safety reps: better enforcement
              Notes from Stage 2 Trade Union Representatives Course page
                 18

Tip for trainers. Complete SMOG analyses for the texts you are going to use
before the course to find likely „problem‟ words or areas (e.g. which may need
clarity or decision about number of syllables – where might need to decide what
is a sentence e.g. a bulleted point – suggest treat as a sentence (image) rather
than grammatical accuracy.

Take feedback and discuss the points below if they have not been raised:
    Have people working on the same materials got the same result?
    Stress that SMOG is not a science – it is a rough and ready measure but
      can be useful for checking out differences between levels
    Emphasise that readability is dependent on more than reading level and
      quickly review / draw out the main points in the Making Reading Easier
      pamphlet if they have not already been addressed:

           The importance of design and appropriate spacing
           That some font styles and sizes are easier to read than others
           The debate about the use and non-use of upper and lower case
           The use of illustrations, layout and colour – how they can help or
            hinder readability
           The importance of sentence length
           The need to use appropriate (not just simple) words

      Ask how the results from the different levels compare and how well
       the materials compare with the indicators in the core curriculum?
      Was this as expected?
      Ask participants to suggest examples from their own programmes
       where readability may need to be addressed
      Consider the impact of TUC house-style on readability.




                                                                             109
3. Calculation in trade union contexts                                   45mnts
Ask for examples of when doing “on the spot” maths calculations might be
part of the work of a union representative, a learner on a trade union
education course – or the work of a trade union education tutor?

Explain the purpose of this part of the session - to consider the approaches and
strategies people use when faced with “on the spot” calculations and to explore
the everyday and specialist words and phrases we use when talking about number
and calculations.

First: Ask for responses from the group – how do they / their learners
feel about the idea of having to do “mental arithmetic/maths”?

You may find it useful to give them a starter word or phrase e.g. panic, keen to
try out.

Explain that:
    This activity places participants in a situation where they have to do
       „mental maths‟ i.e. maths “in their head” – a skill which examiners and
       assessors (and, often tutors) suspect many learners lack
    How much participants enjoy this activity is likely to be depend very
       much on how confident they feel about their own numeracy skills

Stress that individuals use different strategies and it is not the purpose of this
exercise to suggest everyone adopts specific approaches or strategies.

The important points to note, for the purpose of this exercise are:
    Which strategies were used by most people in the group
    how effective they were – in terms of correctness and speed
    what happened as they did this exercise – how did they feel? Did things
      get better as they “warmed up”? Did they “give up”?
    did they understand the language?



Before starting the activity tell people that they will be completing a maths
activity in two ways. Ask them to work individually for both activities and
explain that we will be discussing results after both activities have been
completed.

Maths activity (1) Maths “in the head”
Introduce the exercise – a test to see what strategies you use when you have to
do maths “in your head”.




                                                                              110
Instructions: For each “sum”
   1. Listen carefully to the trainer
   2. Complete the “calculation” in your head
   3. Write down the answer
   4. Make a note of the strategies you used

Trainer should read the following test questions – as they are written (or
use a range of words for the same kind of calculation.

          a)   10,000 take away 10 equals?
          b)   25 multiplied by 19 is?
          c)   What is 5% of 86?
          d)   248 minus 99 comes to?
          e)   Give me half of 378
          f)   Add 1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and 5 and 6 and 7 and 8 and 9 and 10 and 11

Maths activity (2) Maths – show how you did it               Activity Sheet 2
The purpose of this activity is to compare the strategies participants used when
doing maths in their head with those they used when presented with calculations
on paper and are instructed to show their working out on paper.

Allow 5 minutes for this activity – and give people this time frame.
Remind them to be aware of how they feel completing this exercise.

Go over the answers and take feedback
    What were the different strategies used in each of the activities?
    Which did people prefer – and why?
    Did any of the exercises annoy or frustrate – why?
    How did people feel about being told they must do the calculations in a
      certain way?

Review the language used – specialist and general
    Point out and expand, as appropriate, that we often use different words
      for the same procedures / calculations
    Ask what the impact of such words as “difference / total / sum / count
      on / larger / largest / times / goes into and share might be to people
      unfamiliar with the English language
    Demonstrate how the glossary in the Numeracy Core Curriculum can be
      used to check definitions
    Discuss specialist words and phrases in trade union education studies –
      ask for examples - and how these can give rise to similar problems.

Ask participants to identify or suggest ways in which they do or could
reinforce the learning of specialist terms, words or phrases in trade union
education programmes.


                                                                                111
List ideas on a flip chart.                                            Flip chart

      Examine the word sections of the Literacy and ESOL core curricula and
       see if there are any activities there which could be adopted on trade
       union education programmes. (Are some already used?)

4. An Introduction to Access for All                                         45mnts
Introduce the document.                                                   OHT 2
    Skills for life. The national strategy for improving adult literacy and
      numeracy skills is one of the government‟s highest priorities
    To impact fully, this strategy needs to address the development needs of
      all adult learners who need basic skills development whatever their
      context / aspirations
    People who have learning difficulties or disabilities play an important role
      in all aspects of life, including the workforce an unions,
    If Britain is to become a fully inclusive society, everyone should to able
      to fulfil his or her potential – and gain the skills they need to participate
      and contribute
    The Learning and Skills Act 2000 contained a clause which states that
      the LSC has a duty to promote equality of opportunity between
      disabled and non-disabled learners
    The Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001 states that
      provider of post-16 education have a duty not to treat disabled learners
      „less favourably‟ and to provide „ reasonable adjustments‟ when a
      disabled learner is likely to be at a substantial disadvantage in relation to
      a learner who is not disabled
    Two documents were published as part of the Skills for Life strategy.
      One of these is the Adult Pre-Entry Curriculum Framework, which
      specifically relates to learners with learning difficulties and approaches
      to the development of literacy, communications and numeracy skills below
      Entry 1 (with some overlap between the top Milestone and Entry 1 – to
      support progression)
    The other document, the Access for All manual, was written to give
      tutors who teach basic skills practical information and strategies that
      will help implement policies of inclusion and widening participation
    Stress the value of becoming familiar with the document for trade union
      education tutors - can be applied to all learners with basic skills
      development needs – whatever their programme of learning – from Entry
      to Level 2
    Suggest that many of the strategies provided for the specific areas of
      difficulty addressed in the document are of generic value – can be useful
      approaches across all areas of teaching and learning
    Examples might be – spelling and the improvement of short-term memory
      strategies for learners who have dyslexia, and the use IT for partially
      sighted people


                                                                               112
      Inform that the Introduction has now been produced as a guidance
       document in its own right for use by all teachers and staff working in
       the post-16 curriculum.


How to use Access for All                                    Activity sheet 3
Demonstrate the way to use Access for All alongside the core curricula and
check that participants are aware of the common referencing system.
    Explain that not all the elements are addressed (see page 3 in Access for
      All for an explanation).
    Distribute the sample pages OR supply copies of Access for All for all
      participants (people to work in 2s/3s – and will need access to all sheets
      for feedback)
    Ensure all samples have at least two “groups” working on them

TIP for trainers – if you are not familiar with Access for All you will find it
useful to complete this exercise before delivering this session.

Feedback
    Review differences (e.g. headings for columns – and information they
      contain) and similarities (e.g. layout referencing – including guidance
      boxes).

      Focus on the relevance in trade union contexts, particularly for
       learners with disabilities AND those having difficulty with
       underpinning skills.

      Discuss how the document might help learners attending trade union
       education courses – by raising awareness of approaches / impact of
       disabilities and learning difficulties in workplace contexts.

      Remind participants that this document will be a useful tool for all
       learners, not only those with learning difficulties or disabilities and
       at all stages in the learning process and programme.

      Inform about future on-line version of the training
      Inform about the interactive Literacy and Numeracy Curriculum CD-
       ROMS

5.Using the Core Curricula as a source of ideas                      45mnts
                                                            Activity Sheet 4
Remind participants that the core curricula include suggested strategies and
guidance about teaching and supporting the development of skills. This activity
will give them an opportunity to explore the curricula further to see if they
might be able to use them as a source of ideas in the future.


                                                                            113
      Introduce the activity and ask people to work in small groups (@3)
      Encourage them to look at the curriculum documents which most interest
       them – and to consider how they could differentiate the activities
      If participants are unsure what skimming and scanning are, refer them to
       the box on page 73 of the Literacy Core Curriculum (provide support the
       explanation as appropriate)
      Remind them / advise them about the use of the reference sheet which
       accompanies the activity
      Ask participants to prepare to feedback on:

       a) when, why and how trade union education tutors could integrate
          one of the activities they have found into their sessions
       OR
       b) how they would explain the value and relevance of this activity to
          learners on a trade union education programme

Conduct feedback and respond to issues as appropriate.



6. Reflection, application to own contexts and review                15mnts
Review achievement of aims and outcomes using OHT 1                    OHT 1
Support completion of PDJ




                                                                           114
                   Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session Six                                                                    OHT 1

Integrating teaching and learning strategies into trade union education programmes

Aim: To suggest approaches and strategies trade union education tutors can use within
their own teaching and learning programmes to support the basic skills development needs of
learners.

Outcomes: By the end of this session participants will have:
   Identified approaches and strategies which will help them support good practice
   Explored the use of the core curricula as a resource in their own contexts and work
    situation
   Considered how the Access for All document can be used to support their work
   Completed a Personal Development Log in relation to individual needs and contexts




                                                                                        115
                   Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session Six                                                                     OHT 2

                      An Introduction to Access For All: Key Acts

   The Learning and Skills Act 2000
   LSCs have a duty to promote equality of opportunity between disabled
      o and non-disabled learners

   The Special Educational Needs Disability Act 2001
   Providers of post-16 education have a duty not to treat disabled learner
   „less favourably‟ and to provide „reasonable adjustments‟ when a disabled
       o learner is likely to be at a substantial disadvantage




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           Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
               Session Six: Activity Sheet 1 Readability

Purpose: To use a SMOG analysis to measure of readability of course or
other relevant material and to identify how the text compares with the
Literacy core curriculum text elements (reading).

Task

   1. Complete a SMOG analysis for a given piece of work.




   2. Share your results with one or more colleagues




   3. In a small group, consider what other factors make the text easy
      or difficult to read. Refer to the Making Reading Easier Pamphlet.




   4. Between you, consider what level of textual reading the text might
      be in terms of the Literacy Core Curriculum.




   5. Check this out by comparing the text with the appropriate reading
      (text) elements




   6. Feedback your results




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            Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
          Session Six: Activity Sheet 2 Show how you did the sum

Purpose: To compare the strategies you used when asked to perform
numerical operations on paper – and show how you did them – with the
strategies you used in the mental maths activity.


Task

Using paper and pencil show how you reach the answer.



a.   10 000                                       f. 1
      - 10                                           2
     _______                                         3
     _______                                         4
                                                     5
                                                     6
b.        25                                         7
        X 19                                         8
       _______                                       9
                                                    10
                                                  + 11
c.     5% of 86                                 _______
                                                _______

d.       248
        - 99
       _____




        ________
e.      2) 378




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            Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
                      Session Six: Activity Sheet 3
         Using Access for all in conjunction with the core curricula


The purpose of this activity is to find out what is similar and what is
different between the core curriculum documents and Access for All
and to consider ways the document might be used in trade union
education contexts.

Work in 2s / 3s and look at the double page spread allocated to your
team. Compare these with the relevant page in the appropriate core
curriculum document.

Compare these pages from AFA           with these pages from the curricula

Pages 69 – 69                      ESOL Core Curriculum 202 & 212
Speaking and Listening: Listen and (listening) & 176 (speaking)
respond                            OR
Entry 3                            Literacy Core Curriculum 32-34
Pages 204 – 205                    Literacy Core Curriculum 126-127
Writing: Text Focus                OR
Level 2                            ESOL Core Curriculum 372-375
Pages 254 – 255                    Numeracy Core Curriculum 38-39
Number 2: Fractions, decimals
and percentages
Level 1
Use the table below to note down what is similar and what is
different between the curriculum document(s) and Access For All, to
and to suggest 1-3 examples of how and when the information might
be of use to trade union education tutors / contexts.
Similarities



Differences



Uses of Access for All in trade union education contexts




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              Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
                        Session Six: Activity Sheet 4

Using the core curricula as a source of ideas and strategies for use in trade
union education programmes

Purpose. To give participants the opportunity to explore the core curricula
and consider how they might use it in the future.

Task

   1. In pairs / small groups identify one or two underpinning basic skill areas
      which learners on trade union education courses often find difficult

   2.   Use your skimming and scanning skills to find strategies or activities
        in the core curricula which might be able to use or adapt for use *

   3. List 2-4 of the suggested activities (state reference and page
      number) and say how you might use or adapt them

   4. Suggest ways this activity might be differentiated to support different
      skills levels

Feedback on:

        c) when, why and how trade union education tutors could integrate
           one of the activities your group has found into their sessions
        OR
        b) how you would explain the value and relevance of one of the
        activities to learners on trade union education programmes




   * Use the attached reference sheet for ideas / starting points, if you wish




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           Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training
            Session Six: Activity Sheet 4: Reference Sheet

Some possible starting points for strategies to support basic skills
in trade union education courses. Remember – strategies and approaches are
not exclusive to level. They can usually be used at all levels.
Speaking and Listening
p.35 SLlr/E3.5 - conventions of questions and responses
p.39 SLd/E3.3 - getting a word in edgeways activity
p.43 SLc/L1.2        - preparing for communications
p.45 SLd/L1.1        - use of video discussions
p.51    SLc/L2.3 - On The Spot talk game
p.53 SLd/L2.5 – observing body language and behaviour
Literacy core curriculum Reading
p.71 Rt/E3.3            - approaches to instructions
p.73 Rt/E3.6-9          - different techniques for reading
p.75 Rs/E3.1            - identifying and signalling key sentences
p.77 Rw/E3.1             - work with own lists of key specialist words
p.81 Rt/L1.3             - use of highlighting to support explanation
p.85 Rw/L1.1            - texts with words omitted
p.86-88 Example of an integrated activity
Literacy core curriculum: Writing
p.115 Wt/E3.1           - use of pre-prepared outline spider diagram
p.117 Guidance box – what is grammar – basic for discussion (adapted)?
p.119 Ww/E3.1           - use of personal spelling dictionary
p.121 Wt/L1.4           - guided discussion to address “audience”
p.123 Wt/L1.6           - proof reading strategies
p.125 Ww/L1.2            - basis for addressing issues of legibility?
p.127 & 129 Guidance on the use of word processors
Numeracy core curriculum: Number
p.29 Guidance box – strategies for mental multiplication
p.31 Guidance box – language in solving problems
p.33 Guidance box – using a calculator
p.39 N2/L1.3         - using a spreadsheet to investigate connections
                       between percentages and decimal fractions
p.41 N2/L1.11        - comparing how % key works on different calculators
p.43 N2/L2.4         - match expressions in words and symbols
Numeracy core curriculum: Handling Data
p.79 Guidance box – collecting and presenting data – group activity
p.81 Guidance box – Interpreting and processing data
p.83 HD2/L1.1       - approaches to probability / use of everyday examples
p.85 HD1/L2.2       - explore different graphic representations on a
                      spreadsheet
p.87 HD2.L2.1       - use of tree diagrams



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Session Seven: Where to next?
Aim: To revisit the course aims and outcomes and to Time
consider how the individual sessions have contributed to 30mnts
their achievement and to complete course evaluation.
Topic area                                                Indicative
                                                          timing
1. Introduction to purpose of the session.                5mnts
Explains context of the session.

2. Reflection on sessions and application to own          20mnts
contexts. Gives participants the opportunity to review
their Personal Development Journals and to draw out key
messages, action points and examples of effective
practice.

3. Course evaluation and close.                           5mnts

Trainer resources                   Participant resources
OHT 1 -3                            Session OHT / note sheet
                                    Personal Development Journal
                                    Note paper / flip chart
                                    Course evaluation sheet




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            Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session 7               Where to next?                      (30mnts)

Notes for trainers
1. Introduce purpose of the session                             5mnts
    Explain purpose of this session                           OHT 1
    Quickly remind /review course aims & outcomes             OHT 2-3
      (If appropriate, confirm which sessions delivered.)
Negotiate / confirm process to be used for review

 2. Reflection on sessions and application to own contexts    20mnts
Trainers will need to decide how they want to facilitate this activity.
Much will depend on the group and group preferences for working. Some
options are indicated in the box but these are not exclusive.

NB. All of the suggested approaches rely on the effective use of the
Personal Development Journal in previous sessions

Options for reflection and action planning activities.
   Paired participants review PDJ individually, note down key
      messages, action points and good ideas – share with partner(s)
   Small groups (3-5) discuss the main features / messages identified
      in their PDJs – identify common themes / messages /actions
   Groups (5-8) ideally having completed individual reviews before
      the session e.g. over break /lunch, list the common key messages /
      issues and actions for trade union education tutors – and display on
      flip chart for viewing by trainers and other group member
   Participants complete individual reviews, using PDJs and write key
      messages and actions on cards. Trainers collect shortly before the
      end of this part of the session and feedback results, identifying
      key themes / common issues and good ideas.

      Trainers will need to decide if and how they are going to manage
       group commentary / feedback at the end of the activity
      A summary of key messages for the TUC and tutor training is likely
       to be appreciated – and an update on initiatives, as appropriate

   3. Course evaluation                                     5mnts
   Trainers close session as appropriate – and ask participants to
   complete course evaluation.


                                                                       123
4. Reflection, application to own contexts and session review 40mnts
15mnts: Introduce the Professional Development Journal and identify what
participants would like to get from the course.
    Introduce and check understanding of the Professional Development
       Journal (see Introduction)
    Explain the purpose of the journal and what it is meant to support /
       achieve
    Make links with TUC professional development policies and plans
    Inform about plans to link this training to the emerging national
       Continuous Development Programme, which will include accreditation
       opportunities
    Review course outline and purpose of the sessions using as outlined in
       the Professional Development Journal
    Remind participants about the variety of contexts represented in the
       group and stress the value of sharing ideas, tips and information, peer
       support and networking

10mnts:       Reflection – what would you like to achieve from this training?
Encourage participants to identify their perceived needs in relation to the
outlined training sessions (and other needs, if appropriate).

   Trainers may want to do this by asking people to share ideas with the person
   / people they are sat next to before contributing to a whole groups list.

Respond briefly to the needs and issues raised:
    Identify where issues raised are most likely to be covered

15mnts
Review session one                                                  OHT 4
    Briefly remind participants about the session aims and outcomes
    Support completion of the relevant sections of the PDJ, allowing
      sufficient time for questions
    Encourage reflection and additions to the notes they make outside the
      session




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                  Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session Seven:                                                                     OHT 1
                                 Purpose of this session

  to revisit the course aims and outcomes and to consider to what extent they have been
   achieved

  to provide an opportunity to review the core and workshop sessions and to identify key
   messages and actions points in relation to future work situations

  to complete a course evaluation which will contribute to future delivery and development
   of the course




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                  Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

Session Seven:                                                                  OHT 2

                                      Course Aim



To enable trade union education tutors and trainers to support the development of
literacy, numeracy and language skills of learners on trade union education programmes.




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                   Trade Union Education Tutors: Basic Skills Training

 Session Seven:                                                                     OHT 3

                                      Course Outcomes

After completing the course participants will:

   be familiar with the Skills for Life strategy and ways in which it relates to trade union
    education programmes and their own professional roles;
   have explored methods for identifying need including the use of initial assessment
   have added to their knowledge about teaching approaches, strategies and resources
    which can be to address language, literacy and numeracy needs on trade union courses
   have identified additional ways of working with colleagues / other specialists to support
    learners on trade union programmes
   have considered and clarified their own professional development needs related to
    literacy, language and numeracy support




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