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					• All who have meditated on the art of
  governing mankind have been
  convinced that the fate of empires
  depends on the education of youth.
•
• Aristotle
   TAKS CAMP

  Preparing your
students for TAKS
          Presentation Note
• Parts of this presentation are designed to be
  taken to the class and used with the students
  in your class, so much of the material is aimed
  at the student.
• Some of the strategies presented here are
  contradictory. Use your judgment as to which
  strategies you believe will work best with your
  students.
• Note: This material is also designed to raise
  the level of student concern about the test.
              Agenda
• TAKS Review
• Reviewing skills for students
• The Test
• The Questions
• What to Review
   What will the test look like.
• More charts and graphs application-
  not just reading and pulling information
  from.
• Students will be expected to interpret
  these and “apply” the information in
  order to get the correct answer.
  What will the test look like.
• More use of primary sources.
• Such as:
  –   Newspaper Articles   Speeches

  –   Diaries              Reports

  –   Journals             Pictures

  –   Speeches             Letters
   What will the test look like.
• Both content and skill will be integrated into
  most of the questions.
   – Notice the directions to both examples.


• Critical Thinking Skills are a major focus.
    TAKS Review – The TEKS
• 8.5 History. The student understands
  the challenges confronted by the
  government and its leaders in the early
  years of the Republic.
• B) summarize arguments regarding
  protective tariffs, taxation, and the
  banking system;
   TAKS Review – The TEKS
• US.8 Geography. The student uses
  geographic tools to collect, analyze,
  and interpret data.
• B) pose and answer questions
  about geographic distributions and
  patterns shown on maps, graphs,
  charts, models, and databases.
     TAKS Review – The TEKS
• WH 23 The student understands how major
  scientific and mathematical discoveries and
  technological innovations have affected
  societies throughout history.
• A) give examples of major mathematical and
  scientific discoveries and technological
  innovations that occurred at different periods
  in history and describe the changes
  produced by these discoveries and
  innovations;
     A look at the Objectives
• (B) trace the spatial diffusion of a
  phenomenon and describe its
  effects on regions of contact such
  as the spread of bubonic plague,
  the diffusion and exchange of
  foods between the New and Old
  Worlds, or the diffusion of
  American slang.
A look at the Objectives – The Textbook

  • 11th Grade
    – (A) trace the historical development of
      the civil rights movement in the 18th,
      19th, and 20th centuries, including the
      13th, 14th, 15th amendments;


    – Most Text books place the Civil Rights
      Movement from 1954-1968!
         Taking the Test
• The best way to prepare for the
  test is to prepare for the test.
• *Remember that the TAKS Test is
  not a race. You get no points for
  finishing first or ―early.‖
• You get more points for taking your
  time and going slowly!
   Reviewing Before the Test
1. Plan reviews as part of your regularly
   weekly study schedule; consequently,
   you review over a longer period rather
   than just at exam time.

   Teachers can help by setting aside
   some organized study time with
   specific tasks for students.
   Reviewing Before the Test
2. Reviews are much more than reading and
   rereading all assignments. You need to read
   over your lecture notes and ask yourself
   questions on the material you don't know
   well. (If your notes are relatively complete
   and well organized, you may find that very
   little rereading of the textbook for detail is
   needed.) You may want to create a study
   group for these reviews to reinforce your
   learning.
   2. Study Group Guidelines
A. Usually three to a group- Select carefully
B. Divide material up to be researched based
   on what the student knows ―best.‖
C. Create outlines for each other
   *Outline-TAKS Information Book

D. Spend half of the time clarifying information
   for each other and half of the time quizzing
   each other over material
   2. Study Group Guidelines

E. Use a regular study area.
   Your body knows where you are.
   When you use the same place to
   study, day after day, your body
   becomes trained. When you arrive at
   that particular place, it will
   automatically sense that it's time to
   study. You will focus your
   concentration more quickly.
   2. Study Group Guidelines
F. Don't get too comfortable.
   Put yourself into a situation where your
   mind is alert.
G. Use the library.
   Libraries are designed for learning. Entering
   a library is a signal to your body to quiet
   the mind and get to work. Most students
   can get more done in a shorter time at the
   library.
   Reviewing Before the Test
3. Review for several short periods rather
   than one long period. You will find
   that you retain information better and
   get less fatigued.
   Reviewing Before the Test
4. Do Not ―Cram for the Exam‖
    The night before an exam when you are
    more anxious than usual is one of the least
    effective times for study. Your ability to deal
    with concepts and synthesize material is
    greatly reduced, and even your ability to
    memorize is impaired by marked anxiety.
    Cramming only serves to make you more
    frantic about the exam and, hence, less
    prepared to do your best.

Spend time reviewing what you know!
   Reviewing Before the Test
5. Take in no new material the night
    before an exam.
    You want to build confidence by
    reinforcing what you know rather than
    running the risk of scaring yourself by
    discovering something you don't
    know. Also, you want to avoid a
    temptation to cram.
   Reviewing Before the Test
6. Turn the main points of each topic or
    heading into questions and check to
    see if the answers come to you quickly
    and correctly. Try to predict
    examination questions; then outline
    your answers.
     6. Main Points Examples
• Objective 1 – US1.C
• (C) explain the significance of the following
  dates: 1898, 1914-1918, 1929, 1941-1945,
  [and 1957].
• ―What major event(s) happened in 1898 and
  what was its political, social and economic
  effect on America.‖
• ―Who were the major characters involved in
  this event?‖
   Reviewing Before the Test
7. DON'T GO TO THE MOVIES. Don't get
    involved in any activities that might
    either interfere with what you have
    been learning or make you feel so
    guilty that you come home to study
    far into the night to make up for lost
    time. Review and relax.
  Reviewing Before the Test
8. It may seem "old-fashioned", but
   flashcards may be a helpful way to
   review in courses that have many
   unfamiliar terms.
   Review the cards in random order
   using only those terms that you have
   difficulty remembering.
What to Review?
             What to review?
• TAKS Information Booklets -
 http://www.tea.state.tx.us/student.assessment/taks/booklets/in
 dex.html
  – The T3’S (TAKS Testable TEKS)
  – For your information


• 8th Grade TAKS Review Activities-
 http://socialstudies.tea.state.tx.us/downloads/pdf/taas_2/TAKS_
 Obj4_Rev_Activities.pdf
         What to review?
• WG/WH Clarifying Strategies
• http://socialstudies.tea.state.tx.us/
  downloads/pdf/taas_2/wgwhguide.
  pdf
   What TEKS to emphasize:
       The Blue Prints
• See page 8. Look at the information on
  this page and identify the number of
  Student Expectations (SE’s) from each
  objective at each grade level that will
  be tested.
• With a partner discuss which areas your
  students need to concentrate on the
  most.
          The Blue Print (8th)
•   Objectives Proposed Number of Items
•   Objective 1—History 13
•   Objective 2—Geography 6
•   Objective 3—Economic and Social Influences 9
•   Objective 4—Political Influences 12
•   Objective 5—Social Studies Skills 8
•   Total number of items: 48
•   Correct answers to pass: 19
         The Blue Print (10th)
•   Objectives Proposed Number of Items
•   Objective 1—History 7
•   Objective 2—Geography 12
•   Objective 3—Economic and Social Influences 7
•   Objective 4—Political Influences 12
•   Objective 5—Social Studies Skills 12
•   Total number of items: 50
•   Correct answers to pass: 23
         The Blue Print (11th)
•   Objectives Proposed Number of Items
•   Objective 1—History 13
•   Objective 2—Geography 9
•   Objective 3—Economic and Social Influences 13
•   Objective 4—Political Influences 9
•   Objective 5—Social Studies Skills 11
•   Total number of items 55
•   Correct answers to pass: 22
   What YOUR students need!
• Go through the TAKS Testable TEKS in the
  Information Books and identify those TEKS that
  you have not had a chance to cover in the depth
  that you would like.
• Write these down on a sheet of paper by Objective
  and TEKS # (You will need this later.)
• Now look at your “Blue Print” and look at the
  objectives that will be tested most.
• Highlight the TEKS that you need to focus the
  most on.
• The one real object of education is to
  have a man in the condition of
  continually asking questions.

• Creighton, Bishop Mandell
         Taking the Test
• The best way to prepare for the
  test is to prepare for the test.
• *Remember that the TAKS Test is
  not a race. You get no points for
  finishing first or ―early.‖
• You get more points for taking your
  time and going slowly!
            During the Test
1. First, read the directions carefully!!

   Many points have been lost because
   students didn't follow the directions.
          During the Test
2. Do a mind dump.
  Before you begin the test make notes of
  anything you think you might forget.
  Write down things that you used in
  learning the material that might help
  you remember.
• Write your notes in the margins, front
  or back of the test booklet.
            During the Test
3. Answer the easy questions first.

   This will give you the confidence and
   momentum to get through the rest of the
   test. You are sure these answers are correct.
   Note: unlike most other standardized tests
   TAKS questions will not increase in difficulty
   throughout the test. The various levels of
   difficulty are spread throughout the test.
          During the Test
4. Go back to the difficult questions.
   While looking over the test and doing
   the easy questions, your subconscious
   mind will have been working on the
   answers to the harder ones. Also, later
   items on the test might give you
   useful or needed information for
   earlier items.
             During the Test
4. Go back to the difficult questions.(cont.)

   Be sure to circle any skipped question in your
   test booklet and to put a ―light‖ pencil mark
   next to the question on the ―Answer
   Document‖ (Scantron). (Be sure to erase this
   as you answer the question.)
          During the Test
5. Ask the instructor to explain any
   items that are not clear.
   Do not ask for the answer, but phrase
   your question in a way that shows the
   instructor that you have the
   information but are not sure what the
   question is asking for.
.
           During the Test
5. Example: Some of the cities are
    located in the Syrian desert so is this a
    bad question or are they looking for
    the best answer.
.
            During the Test
6. Answer all questions.

    There is no penalty on TAKS for guessing,
    yet if you are going to guess:
      a. Follow the test taking strategies that you have
      learned to narrow down the choices.

.
         During the Test
7. As you answer the questions mark
   through the answers that you know
   are incorrect.
   This reduces reading time and and
   confusion.

.
           During the Test
8. Use the margin to explain why you
    chose the answer if the question does not
    seem clear or if the answer seems
    ambiguous.
• In other words, try to work it out through
    writing about it.
• Look at #4 in the TAKS Prep Test


.
            During the Test
9. Circle key words in difficult questions.

•   This will force you to focus on the central
    point.

•   Look at #6 in the TAKS Prep Test




.
          During the Test
10. Express difficult questions in your
   own words.

   Rephrasing can make it clear to you, but be
   sure you don't change the meaning of the
   question.

   Look at #12 in the TAKS Prep Test
         During the Test
11. Use all of the time allotted
  for the test.

    If you have extra time, cover up
    your answers and actually rework
    the questions.
.
         During the Test
12. Follow the 5 question rule.

  Stop after each 5 questions to
  make sure you have not miss-
  marked any of your answers.
(Or don’t mark the scantron until you
  are completely done.)
            After the Test
 At the end of the test review your test and
 make sure you haven't left out any answers
 or parts of answers. This is difficult to do
 under the stress of exams, but it often keeps
 you from making needless errors.

Check for: Stray marks
           Double marked answers
           Blank answers
         Taking the Test
• The best way to prepare for the
  test is to prepare for the test.
• *Remember that the TAKS Test is
  not a race. You get no points for
  finishing first or ―early.‖
• You get more points for taking your
  time and going slowly!
          The Questions
• The following are strategies for
  approaching specific types of questions.

• Key: Use the strategy that works best
  for you.
   Answering Multiple Choice
          Questions
1. Read the entire question, including all
   answer choices before trying to
   answer the question.
   Answering Multiple Choice
          Questions
2. For questions that have reading
    selections:
    a. Read the selection
    b. Read the selection again
    c. Read the question and answer
    choices
   Answering Multiple Choice
          Questions
3. For questions that have graphics
    (charts, maps, graphic organizers,
    tables, pictures, etc.:
    a. Study the graphic (Title and
    overview)
    b. Study the graphic again (Detail)
    c. Read the question and answer
    choices
   Answering Multiple Choice
          Questions
4. Read each question with the intention
    of answering the question without the
    answer choices which follow.
• Focus on finding an answer without
    the help of the answer choices.
• This will increase your concentration
    and help you read the question more
    clearly.
   Answering Multiple Choice
          Questions
5. Use the process of elimination when
    you do not know the answer for sure.
• Eliminate two alternatives quickly and
    then make the decision between the
    two remaining. This increases your
    probability to 50/50.
• TASS v. TAKS - distracters
   Answering Multiple Choice
          Questions
6. Another helpful method of elimination
   is to use the true-false method. When
   you can determine a likely false
   alternative, eliminate it. The true-false
   elimination method is particularly
   helpful when more that one answer is
   possibly true.
• TAKS Prep Test# 14.
   Answering Multiple Choice
          Questions
7. If there is specific detail in the
   statement, it may also tend to be true.
   For example, the statement "There
   are 980 endangered species
   worldwide" has specific detail and is
   likely to be true.

TAKS??
   Answering Multiple Choice
          Questions
8. When two very similar answers appear,
   it is likely that one of them is the
   correct choice. Test makers often
   disguise the correct option by giving
   another option that looks very much
   like the correct one.

TAKS??
   Answering Multiple Choice
          Questions
9. Watch out for negative words in the
   instructions or in the main question.
   You may have been told to select an
   option that is not true. Remember to
   reverse your procedure and eliminate
   truth, not falsehood. When looking for
   negative options look for extreme
   modifiers that make them false
   (always, never, all, etc.)
• Education today, more than ever
  before, must see clearly the dual
  objectives: education for living and
  education for making a living.

• Wood, James Mason
Question Types
   Attack Skills
                                     Based on QAR:
                                  Question Answer Relation

                                    RIGHT THERE
                              B      easy to find, in the same sentence
                              O       (who, what, when, where)
                                    THINK AND SEARCH
                              O      in the reading but not in the same
                              K      sentence (how to do, how many)
                                    AUTHOR AND ME
                                     not in the reading; I must think
                              B      how to use clues from the
1. Read the question first.   R      text to figure out the answer.
2. Decide which of the        A     ON MY OWN
    4 QAR methods to use.            not there; I don’t need the reading
                              I      to answer the question. I already
3. Find the answer in the
                              N      know the answer from my
   text OR use my
                                     background knowledge.
   thinking skills OR
   use my memory.
             TAKS Application
•  Look at each of the assessment items on
   ―TAKS Prep Test‖ and identify whether the
   answer can be found:
1. In the item
2. In the graphic or reading selection that goes
   with the item
3. With clues from the text/graphic AND the
   student’s knowledge
    •   Identify the clues.
4. Strictly from prior knowledge
             Quotation Attack Skills
“I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to
say it.”
         Voltaire.

  Look at question 9 on the TAKS Prep Test
1. Read the question. What is the question
  .
   asking?
2. Determine the historical issue/event in the quote.
3. LOOK FOR Location reference
                      Time reference
                      Gender
                      Race
                      Religion
                      Ethnicity
                      Point of View
4. Read the answers and eliminate the wrong choices.
5. Choose the MOST CORRECT answer.
Drawing Conclusions from Multiple Speakers P. 6

1. Use QAR. Read the question to identify which speaker(s) is needed to
   answer the question.
2. Read only the speaker(s) needed to answer the question.
3. Read ALL the possible answers CAREFULLY.
4. Eliminate the answers that do not apply to the speaker(s).
5. Choose the answer that is MOST CORRECT. (Look for key words/synonyms)

 Speaker A: In A Vindication of the Rights of Women, I            Which speaker had the greatest
    presented an argument for the education of women. I           impact on Thomas Jefferson as
    also declared that women should have the same
    political rights as men.                                      he drafted the Declaration of
                                                                  Independence?
 Speaker B: As an aristocratic philosopher I was devoted to
    the study of political liberty. In my famous book On the
    Spirit of the Laws, I proposed that separation of powers        A. Speaker A.
    would keep any individual or group from gaining total
    control of a government.
                                                                    B. Speaker B.
  Speaker C: I strongly disagree with other philosophers on
     a number of matters. For instance, although most
     philosophers believe that reason, science, and art             C. Speaker C.
     improve the lives of all people, I argue that civilization
     corrupts people’s natural goodness.
                                                                    D. Speaker D.
 Speaker D: I think people are reasonable beings. I support
    self-government and argue that the purpose of
    government is to protect the natural rights of people. If
    government fails to protect these natural rights citizens
    have the right to overthrow it.
         Drawing Conclusions & Making
                  Inferences
1. Read the selection carefully to understand all of the facts.
2. Decide the meaning of the selection.
3. Try to find facts in the selection that support your choice for
   the answer.

P. 4, #11 in Handout and P. 3
#9 in TAKS Prep Test
•Underline key terms in
reading selection.
•List key terms that link the
answer to the question.
•What terms are similar or
synonyms?

• Read to see what is suggested
by the facts, but may not actually
be stated.
                Comparing / Contrasting Multiple Charts
1. Identify what the question is asking. 2. Read the titles on the Chart.
3. Read the data in the charts & look for relationships. 4. Circle “Similarities”
5. Underline “Contrasts” 6. Box the answer choices that have no data.




American Revolution      French Revolution       How were the American and French
                                                 Revolutions similar?
Belief in              Belief in Enlightenment
Enlightenment values, values, such as natural    A. Both had a large executions by the
such as natural rights rights                    government
Tradition of limited   Tradition of strong,      B. Both revolutions had fixed social
government             central authority         classes.
Relative cooperation   Social upheaval and    C. Both embodied the beliefs of the
among social groups    struggle among classes Enlightenment.
Experience in self-    Little experience in self- D. Both involved heavy fighting in the
government through     government by popular capital city
colonial assemblies    assemblies
              Comparing / Contrasting Multiple Visuals
1. Use QAR. Identify what the question is asking.
2. Read the titles on the visuals.
3. Examine the data in the visuals & look for relationships.
4. Eliminate the wrong answers.
5. Choose the MOST CORRECT answer.
                                                         An inference that can be
                                                         drawn from examining
                                                         the visuals is
                                                         A. All industrial centers had
                                                         tremendous growth.
                                                         B. Only centers near both
                                                         iron and coal deposits
                                                         grew.
                                                         C. All industrial centers on
                                                         the coast grew the most.
                                                         D. Location of iron and coal
                                                         caused many industrial
                                                         centers to grow.
How to handle questions that have
    info you have never seen
1. DO NOT PANIC! Do not focus on the “info” you do not recognize.
2. Focus only on the “info” you do know.
3. Focus on the information you have been given to help you answer
   the item.
4. What is the question asking?
5. Eliminate the answers that do not apply.

               Xenophone Expounds on a Woman’s Duties
1. Assume larger portion of       From Xenophone’s
                                     philosophy, it can be
affection for newborn babies than    inferred that a woman’s
the man.                             position in the family was--
                                            -
2. Receive the incomings.              A.   That of breadwinner
                                       B.   That of accountant
3. See, too, that the dry corn is in   C.   That of caretaker
good condition for making food.        D.   That of cook

4. See that any servant who is ill
is cared for.                          The correct answer is C.
Look at Questions 4 and 5 on
   p. 1 of your handout.
                    Using the       OPTIC             system
The five letters in the word OPTIC (pertaining to the eye) provide a system for
   remembering the five steps for analyzing a visual:

O is for overview
     •Conduct a brief overview of the visual.
P is for parts
    • Focus on the parts of the visual.
    • Read all labels.
    • Notice any details that seem important.
T is for title
    • Read the title of the visual for a clear understanding of the subject.
I   is for interrelationships
     • Use the title to help identify the main idea or the big umbrella that
    connects the parts of the visual.

C is for conclusion
    • Draw a conclusion about the visual as a whole.
         What does it mean? -- Why was is included?
    • Summarize the visual in one or two sentences.
      Interpreting graphics.
• In questions that have pictures, graphs,
  charts, graphic organizers, political
  cartoons, etc.:
• Study the graphic first- Observe
  – Title, subtitles, labels, shading
  – Think about what the graphic represents
     • What does it show and why does it show it?
    Political Cartoon Questions
1. Title       2. Captions & Labels
3. Symbols 4. Caricatures
5. Stereotyping 6. MAIN IDEA
                                                       Reading a Graph
100
 90
 80
 70
                                                 200


                                                 150
                                                                                             Bar Graph
                                                                                             Line Graph
 60                                     East                                        North
                                                                                                                              1st Qtr
 50                                     West     100                                West
                                                                                                                              2nd Qtr
 40                                     North                                                                                 3rd Qtr
                                                                                    East
 30
                                                 50                                                                           4th Qtr
 20




                                                                                            Circle Graph
 10
                                                  0
  0
                                                  1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr
      1st Qtr 2nd Qtr 3rd Qtr 4th Qtr




Graphs (Charts) are combinations of symbols, words, and numbers that
                                                show information in a clear and simple way.

                       Look at item # 8 on p. 3 of your handout.
                                                                                                 1. Read the title.
                                                                                                 2. Identify the main idea.
                                                                                                 3. Identify the symbols.
                                                                                                 4. Look for the legend.
                               (On line graphs & bar graphs: Read the x and y descriptors.)
  Hints for a pie graph:                                                                          1st Qtr
                                                                                                  2nd Qtr
    * the circle represents the whole.
                                                                                                  3rd Qtr
    * the slices represent parts of the whole (subgroups).
                                                                                                  4th Qtr




                                                   100
Hints for a bar graph:
   * They commonly measure quantities or             50                                               East
     amounts of data.                                                                                 West
   * They make it easy to compare information.           0                                            North




                                                                            3rd
                                                               1st
   * Carefully read x and y axes -
     and what they represent.

Hints for a line graph:
                                                   100
                                                    90
                                                    80
* They commonly measure quantities                  70
                                                    60                                                   East
     or amounts of data.                            50                                                   West

*They are used to make more specific comparisons.
                                                    40                                                   North
                                                    30
* Carefully read x and y axes -                     20
                                                    10
    and what they represent.                         0
                                                             1st Qtr   2nd Qtr    3rd Qtr   4th Qtr
                   Cause and Effect
1.   Read the question carefully - Is it asking for cause or effect?
2.   Predict an answer.
3.   Read all the choices carefully.
4.   Pay close attention to words such as:

                                   CAUSE:               EFFECT:
                                   because              consequently
                                   as basis for         leading to
                                   due to               resulted in
                                   since                major result
                                   therefore            affect / effect
                                   before               in response to
                                   if                   then
                                                        after
5. Be sure to notice negative words, such as: except for, is not,
    excluding.
6. Choose the MOST CORRECT answer.

Look at #6 on page 2 0f your handout.
            Cause & Effect Example
    When Chandra Gupta came to
the throne in 375 the Gupta Empire        How did Chandra Gupta’s
stretched along the north of India
                                          conquests help his empire?
from the mouth of the Ganges River
at the Bay of Bengal to central        A. It increased the population.
India. In just over a decade,
Chandra Gupta had conquered the        B. It gave him control of important
land of the Sakas to the west.
          As a result of these            trade routes.
victories, the empire gained the       C. It introduced them to Buddhism
important cities of Gujarat and
Ujjain. Gujarat was one of several        and Christianity.
important ports on the Arabian Sea.
Due to taking them, the Gupta          D. It provided better land for
Empire now had access to the rich         agricultural uses.
trade of Southwest Asia and points
west. Trade goods moved north
from these ports to Ujjain. However,   Correct Answer is B
this ancient city was more than just
an important trading center. It was
one of the 7 sacred cities of
Hinduism.
                     Identifying Trends
         These questions involve historical changes over time. These are
          “big picture” concepts that bridge more than one time period.

       Individual                                                      Mass
       Craftsman                                                    Production

     Use historical people, events, and important dates as clues to help you
        identify the time period.
       Example:
1.       Domestic Systems (1600’s)                      Factory System (1800’s)
          (Production in the home)                    (Production in a central
                                                       location)


      Key words are words that imply change, such as:
2.
         “has led to”            “account for”           “best supported by”.

         Look for descriptive words that describe the feelings of that time.
3.                              Look for emotional words.
4.   The BEST answer will logically answer the question.

                  HINT: Does your answer make sense?
       Page # 4 & 5 in “Examples”
                 How To Read a Timeline
Timelines are lines that are divided into time periods (eras)
  where events are placed in chronological order (when it
  happens.)
Note: Timelines can be broken down into:
        decades = 10 years
        century = 100 years
        age/era = period of time that has specific
                  characteristics that sets it apart
Activity example on page 7/8 and 15/16of “Examples.”

Steps to Follow:                     Be Aware of:
1. Read the title.                   Time-Frame:
                                     • the beginning & ending of a timeline
2. Identify the sequence [Be sure
                                            •2 year sections
   to determine the events listed
                                             •5 year sections, etc.
   according to when it happened.]
3. Look for the spaces on the        Layout:
   timeline. [Each division on the   • Timeline can be vertical or horizontal.
   timeline should reflect a set     • Some events will cover more than one
  amount of time.]                     year.
                                     • Sometimes events are shown with
                                       arrows.
  How to Read a Flow Chart
                 Germany
  The U.S.                             The U.S.
                 must institute
  wants to                             declares
  stay out of
  WWI
                 unrestricted
                 submarine
                                       war on
                                       Germany
                                                         ?
                 warfare to win
                 the war

               A flow chart is a multiple cause and effect
               question. The first statement is a cause of the
       second statement; the second statement becomes the
       cause of the third statement and so forth. The
       statements are all related. A question presented in a
       flow chart wants you to determine what the next most
       logical step would be. In this case, the answer could
       be “U.S. entry tips the balance of power to the Allies.”
Look at example #9 on page 4 of your handout.
That was all good, yet I
  do not have time to
teach all of those skills!
The 4 steps of Critical Analysis
 There are four possible steps in critical analysis:
 1. Observation.
 What do you observe? This does not involve
 interpretation.
 2. Inference.
 This involves interpretation, based on observations.
 3. Evidence.
 What is the evidence you detect for your inference?
 This step requires the integration of prior knowledge
 with observations.
 4. Conclusion.
 What is your conclusion? Explain
             OIEC Examples
Question # 6 on page 2 of your handout.
• Cover the question and just look at the diagram.
• Cover the picture and just look at the directions
   and question.
1. Observe: What is the diagram? What type of
   question is being asked by the diagram?
2. Infer: Social, Economic or Political; relationship
   between boxes
3. Evidence: In directions, in stem, in graphic
4. Conclusion: Answer
              OIEC Examples
Question # 7 on page 3 of your handout. (p. 64 TIB)
Cover the question and just look at the picture.
Cover the picture and just look at the directions and
    the question.
Observe: What is the picture? What type of question
    is being asked? Compare? Inference?
Infer: Social, Economic or Political; relationship
    between picture and question
Evidence: In directions, in stem, in picture (Is there
    enough evidence for this to be the answer?)
Conclusion: Answer
             OIEC Examples
Question # 8 on page 3 of your handout.
Cover the question and just look at the graph.
Cover the graph and just look at the directions and
    the question.
Observe: What is the graph about? What type of
    information is given? X & Y
Infer: What relationships exist between the countries
    on the graph? What is the question type?
Evidence: In directions, in stem, in graph (Is there
    enough evidence for this to be the answer?)
Conclusion: Answer
    Review Activities
• Some review activities are
  available
• Others will have to be
  created
Activities already available
• Go to the Region 10 Social Studies
            Home Page at
 WWW.ednet10.net/socialstudies and
               click on
  • TAKS Review Activities and
             Strategies
      What TEKS to Review
        The Blue Prints
• See page 8. Look at the information on
  this page and identify the number of
  Student Expectations (SE’s) from each
  objective at each grade level that will
  be tested.
• With a partner discuss which areas your
  students need to concentrate on the
  most.
   What YOUR students need!
• Go through the TAKS Testable TEKS in the
  Information Books and identify those TEKS that
  you have not had a chance to cover in the depth
  that you would like.
• Write these down on a sheet of paper by Objective
  and TEKS #
• Now look at your “Blue Print” and look at the
  objectives that will be tested most.
• Highlight the TEKS that you need to focus the
  most on.
           Activities Creation
• Goals:
  – Prepare activities to help students master
    TAKS Objectives
  – Help teachers develop TEKS/TAKS
    alignment skills
  – Develop a set of review activities for all
    teachers/students to use.
        Activities Creation
• Look at the examples in the ―Examples
  Handouts‖
• Notice the clear alignment to the TEKS
  Student Expectation
• Notice the variety of stimuli used to
  present the activites.
         Activities Creation
• Working with a partner
• Select a Student Expectation from
  Objectives 1, 2, 3 or 4, and a skill from
  Objective 5 create a review activity to
  use with your students. (PAGE 9)

• Remember that [Bracketed] information
  is not tested.
  Activities Creation - Step one
• Look Closely at the TEKS.
• What vocabulary will the students need to
  know? (Action verbs and content!)
• What is it asking the student to do?
• Example - US.11A
  – List examples of events associated with
    population growth
  – List (identify) possible effects of these events
Activities Creation - Step Two
• Look at the TEKS in Objective 5 and
  determine which skill you can
  incorporate into the activity.
Activities Creation - Step Three
• Set up strategy
  – Use Cause and Effect Graphic Organizer
  – Use T-Chart
  – Use Flow Chart
  – Etc.
  – See example page 10 of main handout.
Activities Creation - Step Four
• Teacher Directions: Be specific so that
  the outcome of the activity focuses on
  the desired alignment to SE.
• Student directions, if necessary, should
  be step by step.
Activities Creation - Step Four
• Design the activity so that ―any‖
  teacher could use it.
• Write clearly and neatly.
• Look at the ―Examples‖ for ideas for
  stimuli.
• Time for activity should be no longer
  than 10-15 minutes.
Activities Creation – Step Five
• Review for clarity.
  – Pass to another group for proofing.


• Ask yourself: ―If my students
  successfully complete this activity will
  they have mastered the TEKS that it is
  associated with?‖
Success on Social Studies
      TAKS Exams
            • TEKS taught
 TEKS
            • TEKS taught in such a
            way that students will
            remember what they
            learned
            •TEKS taught at the
            appropriate level of
            Bloom’s
            • TEKS assessed at the
            same level of Bloom’s
                 Online info
• Student PowerPoint -
  http://www2.ednet10.net/socialstudies/dow
  nload.htm

• TAKS Activities -
  http://www2.ednet10.net/socialstudies/ >>
  Click on: TAKS Review Activities and
  Strategies

• Reach me at: davidj@esc10.ednet10 .net
• The one real object of education is to
  have a man in the condition of
  continually asking questions.

• Creighton, Bishop Mandell

				
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