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					  Sonnets

A Form of Poetry
                 Sonnets
• Sonnets are a form of poetry.

• Sonnets come from the Italian word,
  “sonneto” which translates into “little
  song”.
                Sonnets
• Sonnets is a form of poetry that praises a
  person, object or an idea.

• Many sonnets are written about the
  emotions that humans feel, especially
  love.
                Sonnets
• Sonnets always have 14 lines of poetry.

• Sonnets follow a certain rhythmic pattern.
  (abbaabbacdcdcd) or (abbaabbacdecde)
  or (ababcdcdefefgg)
           Book Definition
• Turn to pg. 847 in the book and read the
  definition of a sonnet on pg. 847.
          Rhyming Patterns
• In connection with sonnets, you are going
  to see lines like these.

• (abba abba cdcd cd) or (abba abba cdec
  de) or (abab cdcd efef gg)
The Rhyming Patterns of Sonnets
•   When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes,
•   I all alone beweep my outcast state,
•   And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,
•   And look upon myself and curse my fate,

•   Wishing me like to one more rich in hope,
•   Featured like him, like him with friends possessed,
•   Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope,
•   With what I most enjoy contented least.

•   Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,
•   Haply I think on thee, and then my state,
•   Like to the lark at break of day arising
•   From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate;

•   For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings
•   That then I scorn to change my state with kings.

•   By William Shakespeare
                      abab cdcd efef gg
•   When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, (A)
•   I all alone beweep my outcast state, (B)
•   And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, (A)
•   And look upon myself and curse my fate, (B)

•   Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, (C)
•   Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, (D)
•   Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope, (C)
•   With what I most enjoy contented least. (D)

•   Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, (E)
•   Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (F)
•   Like to the lark at break of day arising (E)
•   From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate; (F)

•   For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings (G)
•   That then I scorn to change my state with kings. (G)

•   By William Shakespeare
      What do those letters mean?
•   When in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, (A)
•   I all alone beweep my outcast state, (B)
•   And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, (A)
•   And look upon myself and curse my fate, (B)

•   Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, (C)
•   Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, (D)
•   Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope, (C)
•   With what I most enjoy contented least. (D)
•   Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising, (E)
•   Haply I think on thee, and then my state, (F)
•   Like to the lark at break of day arising (E)
•   From sullen earth, sings hymns at heaven's gate; (F)

•   For thy sweet love remembered such wealth brings (G)
•   That then I scorn to change my state with kings. (G)

•   By William Shakespeare
         Rhyming Patterns
• Those letters at the end of each line
  represent the rhyming pattern of the
  sonnet.
• It relates to how each end of the line
  rhymes and how the sonnet is broken up
  into stanzas and couplets.
 • When I consider how my light is spent
Ere half my days, in this dark world and wide,
And that one talent which is death to hide,
Lodged with me useless, though my soul more bent
To serve therewith my Maker, and present
My true account, lest he returning chide;
"Doth God exact day-labor, light denied?"
I fondly ask; but Patience to prevent
That murmur, soon replies, "God doth not need
Either man's work or his own gifts; who best
Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state
Is Kingly. Thousands at his bidding speed
And post o'er land and ocean without rest;
They also serve who only stand and wait."
                abbaabbacdecde
• When I consider how my light is spent (a)
   Ere half my days, in this dark world and wide, (b)
   And that one talent which is death to hide, (b)
   Lodged with me useless, though my soul more bent (a)
  To serve therewith my Maker, and present (a)
   My true account, lest he returning chide; (b)
   "Doth God exact day-labor, light denied?" (b)
   I fondly ask; but Patience to prevent (a)
• That murmur, soon replies, "God doth not need (c)
   Either man's work or his own gifts; who best (d)
   Bear his mild yoke, they serve him best. His state (e)
  Is Kingly. Thousands at his bidding speed (c)
  And post o'er land and ocean without rest; (d)
  They also serve who only stand and wait." (e)
 What is the rhyming of this sonnet?

• When I consider how my light is spent
• Ere half my days, in this dark world and
  wide,
• And that one talent which is death to hide,
• Lodged with me useless, though my soul
  more bent
          Rhyming Pattern
• When I consider how my light is spent (a)
  Ere half my days, in this dark world and
  wide, (b)
• And that one talent which is death to
  hide, (b)
• Lodged with me useless, though my soul
  more bent
  (a)
  “Harriet Beecher Stowe” by Paul
          Laurence Dunbar
• “Harriet Beecher Stowe” is a sonnet by
  Paul Laurence Dunbar.

• It is obvious from this poem that Dunbar
  greatly admires Harriet Beecher Stowe
  and this sonnet is a praise for the work
  done by Stowe.
  Read “Harriet Beecher Stowe”
• Turn to pg. 853 and read “Harriet Beecher
  Stowe”, a sonnet written by Paul Laurence
  Dunbar.
Sonnet – Assignment – 20 Points
• Sonnets are written about people that the author
  admires. But, we are going to do the opposite.

• Following the structure of a sonnet; 14 lines and
  the rhyming of lines and stanzas, create a sonnet
  about your least favorite class.

• Follow the instructions of the worksheets.
Assignment – Titles/Rhyme Structure

• All of your sonnets must have a title
  relating to your least favorite class.

• Your sonnet must have a rhyme structure.

• You will be graded on the rhyme structure
  and creativity.
 Assignment Example - Sonnets
• Make sure your sonnet has a rhyme
  structure.
          • I Already Speak English
• All these words I will never use (a)
• Grammar rules, put a comma here (b)
• Boring stories my teacher abuse (a)
• I’m hoping the end of class is near (b)

				
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