PHIL - Registrar

					Philosophy
Below is a list of courses taught overseas since 2001 within your discipline. Included are course descriptions.
Any Courses listed in Blue are no longer offered overseas.
Any Courses listed in Red are new courses that weren't originally included on the list from the registrar's office.


Angers, France
  Location   Department Discipline Course Number                           Title

AF            PHIL          PHIL        323                Modern French Philosophy

AF            PHIL          PHIL        323                Philosophy of Language



AF            PHIL          PHIL        324                Modern French Philosophy II




                                                           PHIL:The Question of Existence:
AF            PHIL          SA          300
                                                           Phil 325



Athens, Greece
  Location   Department Discipline Course Number                           Title




AG            PHIL          SA          300                PHIL: Philosophy of Aristotle




AG            PHIL          SA          300                PHIL: Plato Symposium\Phaedrus
AG          PHIL       SA        300               PHIL:Good Life & Common Good




AG          PHIL       SA        300               PHIL:Greek Philosophy




AG          PHIL       SA        300               PHIL:Greek Philosophy




Cairo, Egypt
  Location   Department Discipline Course Number                Title
CE          PHIL        SA        300               Modern Philosophy




CE          PHIL        SA        300               Formal Math and Logic




Dublin - University College Dublin
  Location    Department Discipline Course Number                   Title

IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Contemporary Moral Philo


IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Ethics


IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Existentialism & Marxism


IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Intro/Greek Philosophers

IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Issues in Phil. of Mind


IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Marxism & Existentialism


IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Medieval Philosophy


IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Moral Foundations of Law


IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Morality & Civilization


IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Philosophy and Ireland

IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Philosophy of Being II


IR          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Philosophy of Mind
IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL: Philosophy of Music

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL: Philosophy of Music


IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL: Philosophy of Religion


IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL: Politics of Pleasure

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL: Predicate Logic

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL: Propositional Logic

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL: The Enlightenment

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL: The Enlightenment

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL: The Rationalists

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Aesthetics:Kant/Neitzsche

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Aquinas' Phil of God
IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Augustine's 'Confessions'

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Contemp Analytic Mtaphysc


IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Contemp Continental Phil


IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Contemp Moral Theories

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Contemp Political Philphy

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Contemp. Amer. Philosophy

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Epistemology & Metaphysic

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Intro to Modern Philosphy

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Intro to Social Philsphy

IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Intro/East & Orient Philo


IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Kant II:Morality/Aesthtic



IR   PHIL   SA   300   PHIL:Managing Business Ethics
IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Marxism & Extentialism

IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Marxism/Contemp Thought

IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Moral Foundations of Law


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophical Anthplgy


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophical Anthropolgy


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophy as Love Wisdom


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophy of Action


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophy of Being II


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophy of Imagination



IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophy of Mind



IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophy of Mind


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophy of Religion


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophy of Religion


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Philosophy of Science


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Post-Kantian Germ Phil


IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Problems in Kant

IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Propositional Logic

IR   PHIL   SA     300      PHIL:Theories of Knowledge

IR   PHIL   PHIL         322 Phenomenology
Dublin - Trinity College Dublin
  Location     Department Discipline Course Number                  Title

IR          PHIL        SA         300               PHIL:History of Philosophy


IR          PHIL        SA         300               PHIL:Logic & Philosophy


IR          PHIL        SA         300               PHIL:Topics In Phil Religion

                                                     Topics in Metaphysics and
IR          PHIL        SA                    300
                                                     Epistemology


Dublin - UND Keough Center
  Location   Department Discipline Course Number                    Title



IR          PHIL        SA         300               PHIL:Medieval Philosophy



IR          PHIL        SA         300               PHIL:Philosophy and Ireland

IR          PHIL        PHIL       332E              Philosophy in Ireland

IR          PHIL        PHIL       332               Philosophy in Ireland


Fremantle, Australia
  Location   Department Discipline Course Number                    Title




FA          PHIL        SA         100               PHIL:Intro. to Philosophy
FA   PHIL   SA   100   PHIL:Philosophy of Human Pers.




FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL: Environ Ethics & Policy




FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL: Moral Philosophy




FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL: Natural Law




FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Enviro. Ethics and Policy
FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Env't Ethics & Policy




FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Logical/Critical Thinking




FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Metaphysics
FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Metaphysics:Being/Existnc




FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Philo. of Love/Friendship




FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Philosophy Human Person




FA   PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Political Philosophy
FA          PHIL       SA        300               PHIL:Legal Philosophy




FA          PHIL       SA        300               PHIL:Logical/Critical Thinking




Innsbruck, Austria
  Location   Department Discipline Course Number                  Title




IA          PHIL       PHIL      321               Austrian Phil. Bolzano-Popper




IA          PHIL       PHIL      321               Austrian Philosophy
IA          PHIL        SA        200               PHIL: Ideas, Values & Images

IA          PHIL        SA        300               PHIL: Theodicy Problem Aspects



London Summer Program
  Location Department Discipline Course Number                     Title




LS          PHIL        PHIL      277               Philosophicl Intro to the Mind




Perth, Australia
  Location    Department Discipline Course Number                  Title




PA          PHIL        SA        100               PHIL:Key Topics in Philosophy
PA          PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Continental Philosophy




PA          PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Social Ethics:Life/Death




Puebla, Mexico


PM          PHIL   SA   200   PHIL: Esthetics



PM          PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Colonial Mexican Thought


PM          PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Contemp.Philosophy of Man




PM          PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Contemp-Transpersonalism




PM          PHIL   SA   200   PHIL:Dev. of Moral Conscious
PM            PHIL        SA         200              PHIL:Ethics

PM            PHIL        SA         200              PHIL:Journey to Self,East&West

PM            PHIL        SA         200              PHIL:Logic


PM            PHIL        SA         300              PHIL:Aesthetics



PM            PHIL        SA         300              PHIL:Professional Ethics



PM            PHIL        SA         400              PHIL:Eastern Philosophy



PM            PHIL        SA         400              PHIL:Ethics and Ecology




Rio/Sao Paul, Brazil
  Location   Department Discipline Course Number                    Title



RB            PHIL        SA                     300 Philosophy of Science




Rome, Italy
  Location    Department Discipline Course Number                   Title
RE            PHIL       PHIL       201           Intro. to Philosophy
RE          PHIL       PHIL      222               Images of Humanity: Existentialist
                                                   Themes




RE          PHIL       SA        200               Philosophies of Art and Beauty




RE          PHIL       SA        200               Philosophy of Social Science




RE          PHIL       SA        200               Contemporary Currents in
                                                   Philosophy




Santiago, Chile
  Location   Department Discipline Course Number                   Title
SC          PHIL       SA        300               PHIL: Philosophy

SC          PHIL       SA        300               PHIL: Social Philosophy


SC          PHIL       SA        300               PHIL:Foundations of Phil Anth


SC          PHIL       SA        300               PHIL:Philosophical Anthropolgy
SC          PHIL       SA        400               PHIL: Hist Philosophical Ideas

SC          PHIL       SA        400               PHIL:Philosophical Conceptions

SC          PHIL       SA        400               PHLIL: Hist Modern Philosophy



Tokyo, Japan
   Location  Department Discipline Course Number                  Title
TJ          PHIL        PHIL                 242
                                                 Basic Concepts in Polit Phil
TJ          PHIL       PHIL                  271 Christianity & World Religions




TJ          PHIL       SA                    300 Philosophical Approaches to
                                                 Buddhism




TJ          PHIL                                 Issues in Japanese Thought
TJ          PHIL       PHIL                  201 Introduction to Philosophy




Toledo, Spain
  Location   Department Discipline Course Number                  Title



SP          PHIL       PHIL      320               Spanish Philosophy




Washington DC, USA
 Location   Department Discipline Course Number                   Title
DC   PHIL   PHIL   336W   Phil Reflect Dem Ideals/Instit
luded are course descriptions.

e list from the registrar's office.



                                     Description
              French philosophy and philosophers mainly of the 17th
              and 18th centuries. May not be elected by students in      Spring 2002
              French 211. (Second Philosophy)
                                                                        Fall 2002
              After a brief survey of French philosphy since Descartes,
              this course will focus on three major contemporary
              figures: Sartre, Lévinas, and Ricoeur. Admission may be
                                                                        Spring 2003
              requested by students in ROFR 212 AF , and is open to all
              students in ROFR 214 AF and 224 AF . (Second
              philosophy)
              This course covers the main currents of philosophical
              thought on the notion of existence, including readings of
                                                                        Fall 2002
              several major texts. (Philosophy Requirement) Listed as
              PHIL 325 in Fall 2004



                                      Description
              An examination of selected works by Plato and Aristotle,
              as well as surviving fragments of certain pre-Socratic
              philosophers pertaining to meta-physics. The course
              emphasizes the philosophical development of critical       Spring 2001
              metaphysical issues but focuses on the manner in which
              Aristotle responded to Plato, especially with respect to
              problems on substance and being.

                                                                         Spring 2001
This course examines the ethical and political ideas of
classical Greek philosophy. It focuses first on Plato and
Aristotle and then attempts a comparison with Stoic and
Epicurean doctrines. Plato's Symposium and Phaedo, and
then excerpts from the Republic are explored before a
concentration on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and
Politics. The course concludes with a study of relevant
                                                           Spring 2002
Stoic and Epicurean passages from Sedley's and Long's
The Hellenistic Philosophers, vol. I. The contrast between
Hellenistic ethical and political views with the
corresponding structures of Platonic and Aristotelian
philosophers is emphasized. Students are expected to
have an eagerness to engage in philosophical discussions
and to raise appropriate questions.


This course examines the ethical and political ideas of
classical Greek philosophy. It focuses first on Plato and
Aristotle and then attempts a comparison with Stoic and
Epicurean doctrines. Plato's Symposium and Phaedo, and
then excerpts from the Republic are explored before a
concentration on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and
Politics. The course concludes with a study of relevant    Fall 2002
Stoic and Epicurean passages from Sedley's and Long's
The Hellenistic Philosophers, vol. I. The contrast between
Hellenistic ethical and political views with the
corresponding structures of Platonic and Aristotelian
philosophers is emphasized. Students are expected to
have an eagerness to engage in philosophical discussions
and to raise appropriate questions.

This course examines the ethical and political ideas of
classical Greek philosophy. It focuses first on Plato and
Aristotle and then attempts a comparison with Stoic and
Epicurean doctrines. Plato's Symposium and Phaedo, and
then excerpts from the Republic are explored before a
concentration on Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and
Politics. The course concludes with a study of relevant    Spring 2003
Stoic and Epicurean passages from Sedley's and Long's
The Hellenistic Philosophers, vol. I. The contrast between
Hellenistic ethical and political views with the
corresponding structures of Platonic and Aristotelian
philosophers is emphasized. Students are expected to
have an eagerness to engage in philosophical discussions
and to raise appropriate questions.



                       Description
Philosophical progress played an essential role in the
historical changes of the Enlightenment and the
movement of industrial society. This course focuses on
some of the major schools and figures of Modern thought,
                                                           Spring 2003
which include Rationalists such as Descartes and
Leibnitz, Empiricists such as Locke and Hume, and/or
pivotal thinkers such as Bacon, Rousseau, Hegel, Kant,
and Marx.
This course is an introduction to the ideas and methods of
mathematical logic. The basis of predicate calculus (first
order logic) will be presented in some details. More
advanced topics such as Goedel's completeness and          Spring 2003
incompleteness theorems, some of the philosophico-
mathematical problems in set theory and alternative logics
will be discussed.




                          Description
UCD course PHIL 2027. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on contemporary moral         Spring 2001
philosophy.
UCD course PHIL 2029. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on the the types and          Spring 2003
applications of ethics.
UCD course PHIL 2029. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on the the relationship       Spring 2001
between existentialism and Marxism.
UCD course PHIL 1002. This is an introductory course to
                                                          Spring 2001
Greek philosophy.
UCD course PHIL 2047. 1.5 credit course. This course
                                                          Spring 2002
deals with issues in philosophy of the mind.
UCD course PHIL 2034. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on the the relationship       Fall 2001
between existentialism and Marxism.
UCD course PHIL 2007, 1.5 credits. This is a second-
                                                          Spring 2002
year course on Medieval philosophy.
UCD course PHIL 2030. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on the moral foundations of   Fall 2001
law in society.
UCD course PHIL 2037. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on the relationship between   Spring 2001
morality and civilization.
                                                          Spring 2001
UCD course PHIL 3002. 1.5 credit course. This is a third-
                                                          Fall 2002
year course focusing on the philosophy of being.
UCD course PHIL 3002. 1.5 credit course. This is a third-
                                                          Spring 2001
year course focusing on the philosophy of the mind.
UCD course PHIL 3018. 1.5 credit course. This is a third-
                                                          Spring 2001
year course focusing on the philosophy of music.
UCD course PHIL 3018. 1.5 credit course. This is a third-
                                                          Spring 2002
year course focusing on the philosophy of music.
UCD course PHIL 3006. 1.5 credit course. This is a third-
                                                          Spring 2001
year course focusing on the philosophy of the religion.
UCD course PHIL 2038. 1.5 credit course. This is a
                                                              Spring 2002
second-year course focusing on power and discourse.
UCD course PHIL 3033. 1.5 credit course. This is a third-
                                                              Fall 2003
year course focusing on predicate logic.
UCD course PHIL 2010. 1.5 credit course. This is a
                                                              Fall 2001
second-year course focusing on propositional logic.
UCD course PHIL 2003. 1.5 credit course. This is a
                                                              Fall 2002
second-year course focusing on the Enlightenment.
UCD course PHIL 2003. 1.5 credit course. This is a
                                                              Fall 2003
second-year course focusing on the Enlightenment.
UCD course PHIL 2001. 1.5 credit course. This is a
                                                              Spring 2001
second-year course focusing on the Rationalists.
UCD course PHIL 2002?, 1.5 credits                            Spring 2004
UCD course PHIL 3019, 1.5 credits. A third-year course
                                                              Fall 2002
addressing Aquinas' philosophy about God.
                                                              Fall 2003
UCD course PHIL 3045, 1.5 credits. This is a third-year
                                                              Spring 2003
course addresses contemporary analytical metaphysics.
UCD course PHIL 3046, 1.5 credits. This third-year
course reflects on contemporary philosophy amongst            Spring 2004
continental Europe.
UCD course PHIL 3026, 1.5 credits. This third-year
                                                              Spring 2004
course reflects on contemporary moral theories.
UCD course PHIL 2022, 1.5 credits. This second-year
                                                              Spring 2004
course reflects on contemporary political philosophy.
UCD course PHIL 3017, 1.5 credits. This third-year
                                                              Spring 2002
course reflects on contemporary American philosphy.
UCD course PHIL 3030, Epistemology?                           Fall 2002
UCD course PHIL 1001, 1.5 credit course. An
                                                              Spring 2004
introductory course on modern philosophy.
UCD course PHIL 1004, 1.5 credit course. An
                                                              Spring 2004
introductory course on social philosophy.
UCD course PHIL 1007, 1.5 credit course. An
                                                              Spring 2001
introductory course on Eastern philosophy.
UCD course PHIL 2051, 1.5 credits. This second-year
course reflects on Kant's treatment of morality and           Spring 2003
aesthetics.
UCD course, BMGT 3014 Increase awareness of ethical
implications of individual and corporate decision-making
ex examining a variety of topies -- personal integrity,       Spring 2001
corporate responsibility, hiring practices, product safety,
etc.
UCD course PHIL 2044, 1.5 credits. This second-year
course reflects on the relationship between Marxism and   Fall 2002
Existentialism.
                                                          Fall 2003
UCD course PHIL 2030. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on the moral foundations of   Fall 2002
law in society.
UCD course PHIL 2004. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on philosophical              Fall 2003
Anthropology.
UCD course PHIL 2004. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on philosophical              Spring 2004
Anthropology.
UCD course PHIL 2049. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on how philosphy can be       Fall 2002
viewed as a love of wisdom.
UCD course PHIL 2050. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on the philosphical reasons   Fall 2003
behind people's actions.
UCD course PHIL 3002, 1.5 credits. This is a third-year
                                                          Fall 2003
course that builds on Philosophy of Being I.
UCD course PHIL 2005. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on the philosphy of           Spring 2003
imagination.
UCD course PHIL 2047. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on the philosphy of the
mind. (Also TCD PI4003 - Covers classical papers or       Fall 2002
some classical text in philosophy of mind in the 20th
century in the analytc and continental traditions)
UCD course PHIL 2047. 1.5 credit course. This is a
second-year course focusing on the philosphy of the       Spring 2003
mind.
UCD course PHIL 3006. 1.5 credit course. This is a third-
                                                          Fall 2002
year course focusing on the philosophy of religion.

UCD course PHIL 3006. 1.5 credit course. This is a third-
                                                          Spring 2002
year course focusing on the philosophy of religion.

UCD course PHIL 3008. 1.5 credit course. This is a third-
                                                          Fall 2003
year course focusing on the philosophy of science.
UCD course PHIL 3032/35. 1.5 credit course. This is a
third-year course focusing on post-Kantiant German        Fall 2003
philosophy.
                                                          Spring 2004
UCD course PHIL 2010. 1.5 credit course. This is a
                                                          Spring 2004
second-year course focusing on propositional logic.
UCD course PHIL 3045, 1.5 credits. This is a third-year
                                                          Spring 2004
course addressing theories of knowledge.
UCD course PHIL 3031, 1.5 credits. An introductory
                                                          Fall 2004
course about Phenomenology.
                         Description
TCD course PI1002. The course addresses ancient
philosphy, medieval philosophy, the rationalists, the       Fall 2002
empiricists (two modules).
TCD course PI3009. Course deals with the ideas of Jan
Brouwer, Cantor, Godel, and with modal logic, questions     Fall 2002
of existence, and the nature of logic itself.
TCD course PI4007. Advanced topics in philosophy of
religion from the point of view of contemporary analytic    Spring 2004
philosophy.
TCD course PI3014. A third-year philosophy seminar.         Fall 2004




                          Description
KC course. This course focuses on the contribution of the
Irish Neoplatonic philosopher John the Scot. The course
aims to treat medieval philosophy from the perspective of
                                                          Spring 2003
the Irish contribution to European culture during the so-
called "Dark Ages." (Second philosophy
requirement/philosophy major)
KC course; see PHIL 332 below.                              Spring 2002
KC course. History of philosophy in Ireland, from ancient
                                                            Fall 2002
times to the present.
KC course. History of philosophy in Ireland, from ancient
                                                            Spring 2004
times to the present.


                       Description

In PH100 we study some of the central themes of
philosophy - the nature of the good life, the nature of
knowledge and the nature of being human - by examining
a variable range of influential thinkers in the western
philosophical tradition from the ancient world to the
twentieth century. Students are encouraged to reflect on Fall 2002
these fundamental questions and to examine their own
beliefs. They increase their cultural literacy by exploring
how these great philosophers have influenced western
culture. The study of these thinkers exposes students to
different styles of thinking, requiring them to develop skills
in critically evaluating different arguments.
What does it mean to be a person? How is the self
constituted - in terms of itself and others? How do we
know the nature of being or existence? Can we still refer
                                                             Spring 2002
to the soul as a separate entity and to what degree are the
mind and body inseparable? These are the essential core
questions we will address in this unit studying a variety of
philosophers - classical and modern.

This unit provides an introduction to environmental values
and their application to policy and planning. The
philosophical underpinnings of the environmental
movement are investigated along with introductions to eco- Fall 2001
feminism and deep and shallow ecology. The unit reviews
the historical development of environmental planning and
the current policy, legal and administrative framework in
Australia and other countries.
                                                           Spring 2001
The unit will focus on the historical development of the
Natural Law tradition in the West. We will begin by looking
at the foundations of Natural Law in the Greek
Tragedians, in Plato's elaboration of the political and
ethical conflict between nature and convention, and in
Aristotle's codification of the relationship between justice
                                                             Fall 2002
and legal statutes. We will follow the development of the
themes through their stoic elaboration in Roman
jurisprudence and into their Christian setting with
particular emphasis on St. Thomas Aquinas. Finally, we
will look at the problems of Natural law in contemporary
jurisprudence
This unit is an introduction to the principles of
Environmental Science. It provides an overview of the
many environmental problems facing humanity and
describes a range of solutions. The unit covers basic
principles of environmental science - ecosystem structure,
function and balance. Also studied are the growth and        Fall 2002
impact of global population; natural resources; air and
water pollution; toxic substances, and hazardous waste.
Solutions examined include the environmental impact
process, environmental ethics and environmental
education.
This unit is an introduction to the principles of
Environmental Science. It provides an overview of the
many environmental problems facing humanity and
describes a range of solutions. The unit covers basic
principles of environmental science - ecosystem structure,
function and balance. Also studied are the growth and      Fall 2003
impact of global population; natural resources; air and
water pollution; toxic substances, and hazardous waste.
Solutions examined include the environmental impact
process, environmental ethics and environmental
education.

The emphasis in this unit is on distinguishing between
straight and crooked thinking and developing skills in
practical and applied logic. Themes to be covered will be
the relation between language and thought, distinguishing
rhetorical from dialectical and logical uses of discourse, Spring 2003
recognising informal and formal fallacies in reasoning,
testing the strength of arguments, problem solving
methodologies, use of case-studies and criteria of truth.
These tools will be applied to examples from legal and
moral discourse as well as scientific reasoning.

This course studies the development of the Philosophy of
Being [or Ontology] from the earliest Pre-Socratic
thinkers, Plato and Aristotle to the present day, examining
how many of the same themes recur in attempts by
Mediaeval Islamic, Jewish and Christian thinkers
[especially St Augustine and St Thomas Aquinas] to
reconcile theistic religion with philosophical ontology. We
examine the different criticisms directed against
                                                            Spring 2004
Augustinian and Thomist metaphysics in Late Mediaeval
Philosophy, and in Modern and Post-modern Philosophy.
We debate whether there is any future for Ontology in the
light of anti-metaphysical Positivism, and Existentialist
rejection of Essential Being. We examine Heidegger’s
‘ontology without metaphysics’, and Collingwood’s
‘metaphysics without ontology’. We conclude with the
Quest for the New Being in Marcel, Buber, Tillich, Maritain
and Levinas.
This course studies the development of the Philosophy of
Being [or Ontology] from the earliest Pre-Socratic
thinkers, Plato and Aristotle to the present day, examining
how many of the same themes recur in attempts by
Mediaeval Islamic, Jewish and Christian thinkers
[especially St Augustine and St Thomas Aquinas] to
reconcile theistic religion with philosophical ontology. We
examine the different criticisms directed against
                                                            Spring 2001
Augustinian and Thomist metaphysics in Late Mediaeval
Philosophy, and in Modern and Post-modern Philosophy.
We debate whether there is any future for Ontology in the
light of anti-metaphysical Positivism, and Existentialist
rejection of Essential Being. We examine Heidegger’s
‘ontology without metaphysics’, and Collingwood’s
‘metaphysics without ontology’. We conclude with the
Quest for the New Being in Marcel, Buber, Tillich, Maritain
and Levinas.

This unit is an introduction to philosophical issues in the
history of speculation on the themes of love and friendship
and an analysis of the varieties of love and friendship and Fall 2002
their relevance in the fields of ethics, religion, literature,
metaphysics and cosmology, theories of justice, politics,
gender, sexuality, and everyday life.

What does it mean to be a person? How is the self
constituted - in terms of itself and others? How do we
know the nature of being or existence? Can we still refer
                                                              Spring 2004
to the soul as a separate entity and to what degree are the
mind and body inseparable? These are the essential core
questions we will address in this unit studying a variety of
philosophers - classical and modern.
Many western countries have prided themselves on their
respect for liberal values. With the collapse of the Soviet
Union and agitation for rights and civil freedoms in many
Asian countries, liberalism has extended its reach as a
source of political thought and action. Its values, practices
and institutions are admired, and copied, invoked or
desired in many parts of the world. In this unit, we study    Fall 2003
the philosophical foundations of liberalism by examining
the work of its major exponents and critics from the
seventeenth century to the present. Thinkers studied will
include: Hobbes, Locke, Wollstonecraft, Mill, Marx,
Nietzsche, and two contemporary philosophers, Rorty and
Taylor.
This unit seeks to meet the foundational needs of
prospective lawyers to reason clearly and logically, and to
gain confidence in the genre of judicial rhetoric and
oratory of the law court. The unit aims to promote the
study and development of skills in informal logic, and
public speaking and rhetoric – as these relate to the Spring 2004
practice of law. The study of informal logic will focus on
the most common fallacies used in argument, and the
most common structures of valid argument. These skills
will be applied to case study legal examples. The unit will
also seek to develop practical skills and confidence in the
genre of judicial rhetoric, and oratory of the law court.

The emphasis in this unit is on distinguishing between
straight and crooked thinking and developing skills in
practical and applied logic. Themes to be covered will be
the relation between language and thought, distinguishing
rhetorical from dialectical and logical uses of discourse, Spring 2003
recognising informal and formal fallacies in reasoning,
testing the strength of arguments, problem solving
methodologies, use of case-studies and criteria of truth.
These tools will be applied to examples from legal and
moral discourse as well as scientific reasoning.



                          Description
According to Michael Dummett, the rise of analytical
philosophy is not correctly described as an Anglo-Saxon,
but rather as an Anglo-Austrian matter. Relatedly, the
(sometimes so-called) Neurath-Haller-Smith-thesis says
that one can duly talk about an "Austrian" philosophy that
differs from the mainstream German philosophies of the
19th and 20th centuries in some features, especially its
abstinence from obscure speculation, its affinity to the
natural sciences and its striving for logical clarity and
empirical grounding. One doubtless line of influence of
Austrian on Anglo-Saxon philosophy was established by Spring 2002
the emigration of numerous Austrian philosophers to the
Anglo-Saxon world during the Nazi dictatorship, but there
were some other minor lines as well (e.g. the reception of
Brentano's and Meinong's works by Russell and others,
the influence of Austrian philosophy to Polish logic and the
Anglo-Saxon reception of the latter, etc.) The course's
goal is not to defend or to reject the (still controversial)
thesis, but to offer a survey of the history of philosophy in
Austria in the 19th and 20th centuries, its cultural
backgrounds, its relations to and influences on Anglo-
                                                          Spring 2004
                                                           Spring 2001

                                                           Spring 2001




                          Description
This course will provide an introduction to the philosophy
of mind and the philosophy of psychology. The main
topics will include the concept of mind, and the relation of
the mental and the physical; the problem of
                                                             Summer
consciousness; action and the explanation of action; the
                                                             2004
view of the mind of the main schools of psychology,
including psychoanalysis and cognitive science. Set texts
will comprise relevant articles from books and learned
journals.



                         Description
This unit covers some fundamental issues which are
central in philosophy and provides an introduction to
contemporary philosophical debate. Topics studied
include, for example, whether it is reasonable to believe in
God, how people ought to live, the scope and limits of
human knowledge, the nature of art, the connections
                                                             Fall 2003
between mind and body, the influence of past
philosophers on thought patterns and values, and whether
truth is attainable. These topics are organised under a
number of thematic options. From the three or four
options available in the semester, students choose two for
detailed study.
Many of the important issues in twentieth-century
continental philosophy have to do with the nature of truth,
meaning, objectivity, perspectivism, knowledge, the self,
and the question of human existence. Related to these
concerns is the central question concerning the nature of
philosophy itself, e.g. whether philosophy as traditionally
conceived is possible, whether traditional epistemology
and metaphysics have ended or whether they travel under
another name. These issues are of importance not only to
philosophy itself but also to many studies in the
                                                            Fall 2002
humanities and social sciences.

The first part of this unit concentrates on two of the most
influential philosophers, Kant and Nietzsche, two markedly
different thinkers. Their contrasting approaches to the
above issues are not only of interest in their own right, but
also crucial in understanding and evaluating
developments in twentieth-century continental philosophy.
The second part of the unit looks at some of those
developments.
The unit deals with a number of problems in the area of
social ethics, focusing on those concerning life and death.
Topics discussed and used to introduce philosophical
                                                              Fall 2003
issues may include abortion; the value of life; the nature of
death; organ transplantation; suicide; war; and
euthanasia.




(FI 253) Introductory course on the idea of personal
creativity, knowledge of man and appreciation of the         Fall 2001
beautiful. (University philosophy requirement)
(FI 212) Aztec culture prior to conquestion, world vision of
Spanish conqueror compared to English colonists;
                                                             Fall 2003
analysis of 16th and 17th century dependence on Spain;
consolidation of nationalism.
                                                                Fall 2002
(HU 451) Study of the philosophical dimensions of the
contemporary intellectual trend
known as "transpersonalism". Viewing consciousness as
a basic principle of
existence, transpersonalism represents a reaction against
the materialistic                                         Spring 2004
assumptions often associated with Western science and
modernity. It relies on
models of the psyche that accept of non rational higher
states of awareness

                                                                Fall 2002
FI 354: Responsibility of human action within himself, in
                                                              Spring 2003
his environment, and in a social context.
                                                              Fall 2002
FI 204: Thorough presentation of traditional logic, and
                                                              Fall 2003
symbolic logic.
FI 253:Introductory course on the idea of personal
creativity, knowledge of man and appreciate of the            Spring 2002
beautiful.
(CU 351) Ethical implications in all professions.
Fundamental notions of ethics and the practical
                                                              Spring 2002
applications in situations of professional encounter. (Univ
phil req)
FI 458: Servey of the major philosophical schools in
India, and of China and Japan. Emphasis on reading            Fall 2003
primary texts in English translation.

(CU 480) Alterations and incursions into the environment
                                                              Fall 2003
and consequences of contamination. Ethical imperative
to protect life in all its manifestations, including human.



                        Description

The aim of the course is to stimulate students' reflection
on the conditions of elaboration of scientific knowledge,
                                                           Spring 2004
and to provide the conceptual basis for the understanding
of the anthropological and epistemological foundations
upon which the sciences and their methods are based.



                         Description
The course provides a historical introduction to
philosophical reflection through reading and discussion of
major works in the Western philosophical tradition. The
course requires attentive outside reading to enable the
individual student to engage him- or herself in active
classroom discussions and argumentation and thus to
progress in the learning and practicing of philosophical
analysis and thoughtful discourse.
The course aims at a phenomenological analysis,
discussion and development of the most important theme
in existential philosophy: the Self understood as
consciousness confronting a world and engaged in
human action. Beginning with selected writings by Soren
Kierkegaard, the father of Existentialism, the course will
explore issues such as freedom, responsibility decision,
finitude and alienation. These issues will be discussed in
their existential contexts as they emerge from the works
of philosophers such as F. Nietzsche, K. Jaspers, G.
Marcel, J.P. Sartre, M. Heidegger, M. Natanson, etc. A
special emphasis will be placed on the relevance and
critical significance of these issues to everyday life in
contemporary society.

The aim of the course is to give students a survey of the
main philosophical problems issuing from theories of
beauty and art. Aesthetics will result as a controversial
battlefield for philosophical analysis. Prerequisite: One
previous course in Philosophy.
The course will focus on different ways to conceive of
how society works and develops. The consequent
question will be analysed whether these perspectives can
be defined ‘scientific’, due to the fact that ‘society’ is not
an observable object.
This course exposes students to a wide range of
philosophical currents in a variety of contemporary areas
of study such as: cognitive science, social science,
philosophy of history, aesthetics and epistemology. Each
field will be examined by tracking back to its latest
historical source (as, for instance, Nietzsche or Marx
concerning philosophy of history). As the lessons
emphasize research in its prospective development, the
teaching method is therefore open-ended and partially
experimental, fostering free discussions. Therefore a
previous course in philosophy is strictly required.




                         Description
General studies of philosophy                                    Spring 2001

Study of social philosophy                                       Spring 2001
Study of philophers such as Nietzsche, Plato, Kant,
Descartes, Schiller, Freud and their thoughts on the way         Spring 2001
humans function.
Study of philophers such as Nietzsche, Plato, Kant,
Descartes, Schiller, Freud and their thoughts on the way         Fall 2003
humans function.
Study of the history of philosophical ideas                       Spring 2001

Study of philosophical conceptions                                Spring 2001

Study of the history of modern philosophy                         Spring 2001




                         Description
See POL 301.

A study of Chinese thought from the earliest times to the Ming
dynasty. Origins of Confucianism, Daoism, Moism, and
Legalism in the Zhou dynasty. Development of Confucianism as
a state doctrine in the Han dynasty. Neo-Daoism in the Six
Dynasties. Neo-Confucianism in the Song and the Ming
dynasty. Every other year (Autumn 2004).

This course offers an in-depth study of a commentary written in
the ninth century by the Japanese Buddhist priest Kukai.
Consideration of Kukai's exposition in the Benken mitsu ni kyo
ron of an esoteric approach to Buddhist traditions will also
serve as an occasion to discover the philosophical wealth of
Mahayana Buddhism. The course will also show how Japanese
beliefs and traditions might have influenced Kukai in the
formulation of his original doctrine. Finally the course will
encourage the students to use what they have learned to think
anew philosophically. Every year (Spring 2004).


See HST 439.
The purpose of this course is to explore the nature of
philosophical questions, answers, puzzles, and quests. Through
the ideas and lives of major thinkers in both Eastern and
Western traditions, the course will explore the nature of
philosophical thinking and how the pursuit of wisdom may lead
towards liberation and even joy. Every year (Spring 2004).




                         Description

Analysis of Spanish philosophy in its two most significant
periods - the 16th century and the 20th century.
                                                                  Fall 2003
Philosophers studied include Juan Luis Vives, Miguel de
Unamuno, Jose Ortega Y Gasset and Xavier Zubiri. Fall
semester only. (Second Philosophy requirement)



                         Description
Instructor, Mark Murphy. Meets Monday's 6:30-9:00 p.m.
Three (3) credit hours.
The aim of this seminar is to consider the ways in which
philosophical reflection can expand our understanding of
the ways in which democratic ideals can be mutually
supporting or mutually conflicting, and to consider the
various more or less satisfactory ways that these ideals
can be embodied in institutions. We will begin by
considering several historically realized forms of
democratic governance, drawing on David Held’s Models
of Democracy, along with the theoretical articulations of
these forms of governance offered by Aristotle, Marsilius, Fall 2004
Rousseau, Locke, Mill, and Marx. We will then turn to an
examination of an extended argument by a contemporary
thinker on democracy, Thomas Christiano’s The Rule of
the Many. We will conclude the semester by looking at the
ways in which non-representative institutions – both
governmental (e.g. the judiciary) and non-governmental
(e.g. NGO’s, corporations) – provide either helps or
hindrances to the realization of democratic ideals.
Students in the seminar will be asked to bring their
Washington internship experiences to bear, especially on
the topics dealt with in the last part of the course.

				
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