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									                                         US History
                                    Unit I - Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11

Day 1
First Day Lesson Plan
Check Out Books
Discuss Outline Requirements
Discuss Vocabulary Requirements
Independent Work
        6.1 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 6 - The Expansion Of American Industry, 1850-1900
               Section 1 - A Technology Revolution, pages 226-235 (10)
Outline 6.1
Vocabulary 6.1
Optional Homework
Reading Check p.227, 231, 234
Viewing History p.229, 231, 232, 234, 235
Section 1 Assessment #1-6 p.235
Define Key Terms p.226
Download 6.1 Notes

Day 2
Objective 1.1 Identify the economic issues that faced the United States
6.1 Reading Quiz
Current Events
Discuss Research Paper General Requirements
Discuss Oral History Project General Requirements
6.1 Homework - Discuss/Collect
6.1 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
       1. Why did people’s daily lives change in the decades following the Civil War?
               -new forms of entertainment – movies, pictures, recorded music
               -new methods of transportation – cars, better and faster trains, subways
               -new forms of communication include telegraph, telephone, and eventually radio
               -new inventions that make people’s lives easier – iron, refrigerator, washing
                        machine, vacuum cleaner
               -cheaper steel made everything cheaper
               -electricity lit the cities at night
               -gas and diesel engines allow automobiles to be produced
       2. How did advances in electric power and communication affect life for people and
               businesses?
               -allows people to work at night and year around
               -telegraph allows instantaneous communication between vast distances
       3. What effects did the development of railroads have on industrial growth?
               -faster and easier to transport people and goods
       4. What was the impact of the Bessemer process on American culture?
               -cheaper steel makes railroads are cheaper, bridges are longer and stronger,
and
                        skyscrapers are built to allow cities to grow up instead of out
       patent
       productivity
       Edwin L. Drake
       Thomas Edison
       George Westinghouse
                                        US History                                         2
                                       Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11

        Samuel F.B. Morse
        Alexander Graham Bell
        transcontinental railroad
        Promontory Summit
        Bessemer process
        mass production
        John A. Roebling
Possible Activities
Mass Production Simulation
Monopoly Simulation
Video – 1900s
Video – The Story of Nikola Tesla (parts 1-6, 10 min. each)
6.1 Guided Reading WS
Complete 6.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.226
Independent Work
        6.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Study For 6.1 Quiz
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 6 - The Expansion Of American Industry, 1850-1900
                Section 2 – The Growth Of Big Business, pages 237-242 (6)
Outline 6.2
Vocabulary 6.2
Optional Homework
Reading Check p.239
Interpreting Political Cartoons p.240
Interpreting Diagrams p.241
Section 2 Assessment #1-5 p.242
Define Key Terms p.237
Download 6.2 Notes

Day 3
Objective 1.1 Identify the economic issues that faced the United States
       1-Describe the differences between various business leaders, e.g. “robber barons” and
               “captains of industry.”
Media Center – Journal Review & Book Review Search
6.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
Research Paper Topic Due
Oral History Topic Due
Discuss Oral History Pre-Interview Worksheet/Location
Discuss Journal Review Requirements
6.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
6.2 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
       1. Why were American industrialists of the late 1800s called both “robber barons” and
               “captains of industry?”
               robber barons – people who used criminal methods to acquire their fortunes
               captains of industry – use their wealth to help their nation and its people
       2. How did social Darwinism affect American’s views on big business?
               -the wealthy and powerful businesses were seen as being destined by God to be
                        successful – the only reason people were poor was because they were
                        lazy, stupid, or destined to be poor
                                          US History                                           3
                                         Lesson Plans
                                         Term 1, 10-11

        3. In what ways did big business differ from smaller businesses?
                -Big business made products faster, more efficiently, and cheaper on a large
                        scale – economies of scale
        4. How did industrialists gain a competitive edge over their rivals?
                -new inventions
                -new business configurations
                -government corruption
        robber barons
        captains of industry
        philanthropy
        John D. Rockefeller
        Andrew Carnegie
        social Darwinism
        oligopoly
        monopoly
        cartel
        vertical integration
        economies of scale
        horizontal consolidation
        trust
        Sherman Antitrust Act
Possible Activities
Monopoly Simulation
Video – 1900s
Video – Carnegie (Hippocampus)
Video – Rockefeller (Hippocampus)
Video – Titanic (Excerpts)
6.2 Great Debates WS – How Should Business Leaders Affect The Economy
6.2 Guided Reading WS
Complete 6.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.237
Independent Work
        6.3 Reading & Homework
        6.4 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 6 - The Expansion Of American Industry, 1850-1900
                Section 3 – Industrialization And Workers, pages 243-246 (4)
Outline 6.3
Vocabulary 6.3
Optional Homework – 6.3
Reading Check p.245
Viewing History p.243, 245 246
Interpreting Graphs p.244
Viewing Fine Art p.245
Section 3 Assessment #1-5 p.246
Define Key Terms p.243
Download 6.3 Notes

Day 4
Objective 1.1 Identify the economic issues that faced the United States
       2-Summarize the worker’s responses to factory employment, e.g., Knights of Labor,
               American Federation of Labor, socialism, etc.
                                         US History                                             4
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

6.3 Reading Quiz
Current Events
Discuss Book Review Requirements
6.3 Homework – Discuss/Collect
6.3 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
        1. What factors led to a growing American work force between 1860 and 1900?
                -immigration from other countries
                -movement from the farm to the city
        2. What was factory work like at the turn of the century?
                -ruled by the clock
                -repetitive
                -boring
                -dangerous
                -very strict
        3. Why was it necessary for entire families to work?
                -in some families children had to work, everyone worked in order to house and
                         feed the family
        Contract Labor Act
        Drought of 1887
        piecework
        sweatshop
        Frederick W. Taylor
        division of labor
        Jacob Riis
        child labor
Possible Activities
Mass Production Simulation
Monopoly Simulation
Video – Gangs of New York
Video – Triangle Shirtwaist Factory
Video – Hard Times
Video – 1900s
6.3 Literature WS – Horatio Alger
6.3 Primary Source WS – Tenement Factories
6.3 Guided Reading WS
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 6 - The Expansion Of American Industry, 1850-1900
                Section 4 – The Great Strikes, pages 247-253 (7)
Outline 6.4
Vocabulary 6.4
Optional Homework – 6.4
Reading Check p.250, 251, 252
Viewing History p.247, 251, 252, 253
Section 4 Assessment #1-6 p.253
Define Key Terms p.247
Download 6.4 Notes

Day 5
Objective 1.2 Identify the social issues that faced the United States
       3-Describe the geographic and economic factors behind the internal migration from farm
               to city.
                                           US History                                              5
                                          Lesson Plans
                                          Term 1, 10-11

6.4 Reading Quiz
Current Events
Discuss Research Paper Question & Criteria Requirements
6.4 Homework – Discuss/Collect
6.4 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
       1. What impact did industrialization have on the gulf between rich and poor?
                -rich became richer and the poor became poorer
       2. What were the goals of the early labor unions in the United States?
                -to provide for members in bad times
                -eventually unions became the voice of the workers
                -demanded shorter work days, higher wages, and better working conditions
       3. Why did Eugene V. Debs organize the American Railway Union?
                -initially to prevent strikes and violence caused by greed and corruption
                -to organize all workers, skilled and unskilled into one union to protect wages and
                          the rights of workers
       4. What were the causes and outcomes of the major strikes in the late 1800s?
                -Great Railroad Strike of 1877 - army called in to break up
                -Haymarket Strike 1886 – dozens killed at a rally – 4 anarchists hanged –
                          Knights of Labor ceases to be an effective union
                -Homestead, 1892 – gunfights between Pinkertons and union workers killing
                          several, attempt to assassinate manager Henry Frick fails and public
                          turns against union, strike ends and steel mill reopens under militia
                          protection
                -Pullman 1894 – workers strike and ask the A.R.U. for help. The mail is
                          disrupted and the courts order the strike to end. Federal troops intervene
                          to end strike. For the next 30 years all union activity is limited by the
                          federal government and the courts
       socialism
       Karl Marx
       Friedrich Engels
       labor union
       Knights of Labor
       Terrence Powderly
       Jay Gould
       Samuel Gompers
       American Federation of Labor
       craft union
       collective bargaining
       Industrial Workers of the World (Wobblies)
       The Great Railroad Strike of 1877
       Eugene V. Debs
       American Railway Union
       industrial union
       scab
       anarchist
       Haymarket Riot
       Homestead Strike
       Henry Frick
       Pinkertons
       Pullman Strike
Possible Activities
Mass Production Simulation
                                          US History                                           6
                                         Lesson Plans
                                         Term 1, 10-11

Monopoly Simulation
Video – Ludlow Massacre
Video – 1900s
6.4 Biography WS – Mary Kenney O’Sullivan
6.4 Comparing Primary Resources WS – On Labor Unions
6.4 Visual Learning WS – Noble Face Of Labor
6.4 Guided Reading WS
Complete 6.3 & 6.4 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.243 & 247
Independent Work
       7.1 Reading & Homework
       Study For Chapter 6 Quiz
Homework
Study For Chapter 6 Quiz
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
       Chapter 7 - Looking To The West, 1860-1900
                Section 1 – Moving West, pages 258-260 (3)
Outline 7.1
Vocabulary 7.1
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.258, 260
Section 1 Assessment #1-4 p.260
Define Key Terms p.258
Download 7.1 Notes

Day 6
Objective 1.2 Identify the social issues that faced the United States
        1-Analyze patterns of immigration in terms of volume, ethnicity, religion, language,
               national origin, settlement locations, and motives for emigrating from their
               homelands
Review For Chapter 6 Quiz
Chapter 6 Quiz
Collect Chapter 6 Outlines & Vocabulary
Current Events
Review Requirements/Up Coming Due Dates For Following Assignments
        Oral History Project
        Research Paper
        Book Review
        Journal Review
7.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
7.1 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
        1. What conditions lured people to migrate to the west?
           -Civil War had displaced many who sought to start a new life
           -farmland in the east was scarce and expensive
           -African Americans sought to escape the South
           -anyone seeking a second chance or new opportunity
           -those seeking religious freedom (Mormons)
           -others who sought freedom from repression (Irish)
        2. Where did the western settlers come from?
           -mainly white easterners
           -German, Irish, and Italian immigrants
           -European Jews, Chinese, and Mexicans
        3. How did the American frontier shift westward?
                                           US History                                                7
                                          Lesson Plans
                                          Term 1, 10-11

           -the frontier was the line between where people lived and where no-one lived. As
               more and more people moved west this line moved west until it finally
               disappeared in 1890

        push-pull factors – events and conditions that either force (push) people to move
                 elsewhere or strongly attract (pull) them to do so
        Pacific Railway Acts map
        Morrill Land-Grant Act
        land speculator
        Homestead Act – act signed by President Lincoln in 1862 that gave settlers 160
                 acres of land for a small fee if they were 21 years old or a head of a family,
                 were a citizen or filing for citizenship, built a house, lived there six months
                 out of the year, and farmed the land for five years
        Exoduster
Possible Activities
Video – 1900s
Video – The Cowboys
Video – The Virginian
7.1 Primary Source WS – African American Settlers
7.1 Guided Reading WS
Complete 7.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.258
Independent Work
        7.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 7 - Looking To The West, 1860-1900
                  Section 2 – Conflict With The Native Americans, pages 261-267 (7)
Outline 7.2
Vocabulary 7.2
Optional Homework
Viewing Fine Art p.261
Reading Check p.262
Viewing History p.261, 267
Map Skills p.264
Interpreting Charts p.266
Section 2 Assessment #1-5 p.267
Define Key Terms p.261

Day 7
Objective 1.2 Identify the social issues that faced the United States
       5-Explain factors influencing the lives of Native American peoples, e.g., industrialization
                in the west, broken treaties, military activity, Dawes Severalty Act of 1887,
                Boarding Schools, etc.
7.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
Oral History Pre-Interview Worksheets Due
Research Paper Question & 3 Criteria Due
Journal Review #1 Due
7.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
7.2 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
    1. What caused changes in the life of the Plains Indians?
       -the introduction of horses allowed tribes to follow their food sources more efficiently
                                           US History                                                 8
                                          Lesson Plans
                                          Term 1, 10-11

         -horses also caused the rise of warfare and a decline in village life as raiding increased
    2. How did government policies and battlefield challenges affect the Indian wars?
         -tribes were moved to S.D. and Oklahoma or onto reservations
         -white settlers violated the treaties and reservations causing frustration & anger on
                 behalf of the Native Americans
         -government discards treaties and war erupts
         -both sides lack strategy, Native Americans lack guns and Army lacks resources &
                 soldiers due to Reconstruction in South
         -Native Americans seek revenge after Sand Creek Massacre
         -Army seeks revenge after Little Bighorn
         -Army resorts to brutal massacres to force Native Americans onto reservations
         -Native Americans succumb to disease, starvation, and lack of shelter
    3. What changes occurred in federal Indian policies by 1900?
         -reservations, Dawes Act, Indian Schools, opening up of reservation lands
    Great Plains map
    nomad
    Native American reservation map – federal lands set aside for Native Americans to
         live on
    Bureau of Indian Affairs
    Indian Wars map – wars that erupted between Native American tribes and the U.S.
         government over control of land, violation of treaties, and reluctance of Native
         Americans to move onto reservations
    Sand Creek Massacre
    Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868
    Black Hills Gold Strike map
    Red Cloud
    Sitting Bull
    Crazy Horse
    George Armstrong Custer
    Battle of Little Bighorn
    Ghost Dance
    Massacre at Wounded Knee
    Helen Hunt Jackson A Century of Dishonor
    Native American Boarding Schools
    Assimilation – the process by which one society becomes a part of another, more
         dominant society by adopting its culture
    Dawes Severalty Act (Dawes Act)
    Indian Territory/Oklahoma Territory
    boomers
    sooners
Possible Activities
Video – The Cowboys
Video – The Virginian
Video – Little BigHorn
Video – Custer’s Last Stand
Video – Far And Away
Video – Wounded Knee
Video – 1900s
Wounded Knee Document Activity
Complete 7.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.261
Independent Work
         7.3 Reading & Homework
                                          US History                                              9
                                         Lesson Plans
                                         Term 1, 10-11

Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 7 Looking To The West, 1860-1900
               Section 3 – Mining, Ranching, And Farming, pages 268-276 (9
Outline 7.3
Vocabulary 7.3
Optional Homework
Reading Check p.270,
Viewing History p.268, 272, 273, 275
Map Skills p.269, 271
Interpreting Charts 274
Section 3 Assessment #1-6 p.276
Define Key Terms p.268

Day 8
Objective 1.1 Identify the economic issues that faced the United States
        3-Explain the conflicts among farmers, ranchers, and miners that arose during the
                 settlement of the “last frontier.”
7.3 Reading Quiz
Current Events
Book Review Titles Due
Discuss Research Paper Source List
Media Center 3A To Learn About Noodle Tools
7.3 Homework – Discuss/Collect
7.3 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
    1. How did mining spread in the West?
        -iron ore is mined in huge quantities to help with the increased use of steel
        -gold – the gold rush in California, Colorado, Alaska,
        -copper mined in Nevada & Utah
        -tin was used for everything plastic is used for today
        -Chinese immigrants and Irish immigrants did most of the mining in the west
        -spread of industry caused the need for more mining and more resources
    2. What caused the western cattle boom?
        -demand for beef skyrocketed during the Civil War
        -all normal sources of beef were exhausted
        -entrepreneurs took wild cattle in Texas and drove them north to the railroad sites in
                 Nebraska and Kansas and were paid handsomely
    3. What was life like for a cowboy on the Chisholm Trail?
-       -boring, dangerous, famine, thirst, little sleep, Native Americans
    4. How did settlers overcome barriers in farming the plains?
        -hot, isolated, hard work, drought, dust storms, grasshoppers, mental illness, harvest,
        church
    Sutter’s Mill, California
    Comstock Lode
    placer mining
    cow town
    Chisholm Trail
    long drive
    cowboy
    cattle barons
    homesteader
    soddie
                                         US History                                         10
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

    dry farming
    bonanza farm
    Turner thesis
    dime novel
    stereotype
    Myth of the West
    Juliette Low – Girl Scouts of America
Possible Activities
Video – 1900s
Video – The Cowboys
Video – The Virginian
Video – The Donner Party http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/films/donner/
Complete 7.3 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.268
Independent Work
        7.3 Reading & Bookwork
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 7 - Looking To The West, 1860-1900
                Section 4 – Populism, pages 277-282 (6)
Outline 7.4
Vocabulary 7.4
Optional Homework
Interpreting Charts p. 277
Reading Check p. 278
Viewing History p. 280, 282
Map Skills p. 281
Section 4 Assessment #1-5
Define Key Terms p. 277

Day 9
Objective 1.1 Identify the economic issues that faced the United States
       4-Identify the political activities of the Greenbacks, Grangers, and Populists.
       5-Analyze the issues and results of the 1896 election as a turning point in American
                politics.
7.4 Reading Quiz
Media Center – Source List For Research Paper
Current Events
7.4 Homework – Discuss/Collect
7.4 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
    1. Why did farmers complain about federal post-Civil War economic policies?
       -farmers were encouraged to take out loans to expand agricultural production during the
                Civil War
       -after the war prices fell and farmers were unable to make the payments on their loans
       -banks called in loans because they didn’t have enough money to pay for withdrawals
                from bank
       -farmers were kicked off of farms and their property sold by banks
       -government did nothing to help farmers
       -in fact, governmental tariffs helped factory owners but hurt farmers
       -government also favored a gold policy that hurt farmers
    2. How did the government respond to organized protests by farmers?
       -farmers began with the Grange movement to help them get better prices on goods
                purchased and sold
                                      US History                                            11
                                     Lesson Plans
                                     Term 1, 10-11

     -eventually the Grange associations turned in political Farm Alliances that attacked the
             railroads and their unfair practices
     -farmers tried to get government to pass laws to help farmers through alliances
     -eventually, the Alliances try to elect officials to change policies for them
     -big business tried to block the farmers wherever they could
     -eventually government passes the Interstate Commerce Act to regulate railroads and
             the Sherman Antitrust Act to break up big business – both were only moderately
             successful in achieving their goals
3. What were the Populists’ key goals?
     -increased circulation of money (more paper money)
     -progressive income tax
     -government ownership of communication and transportation (railroads especially)
     -unlimited minting of silver coins
     -eight hour work day
4. What was the main point of William Jennings Bryan’s Cross of Gold speech?
     -the government and big business could not treat the farmers like the Romans had
     treated Jesus. If they did, they would be forced to pay much like those who crucified
     Christ.
5. What was the legacy of Populism?
     -with new gold strikes in South Africa, the Yukon, and Alaska the amount of gold in
     circulation rose driving farm prices up moderately (and helping farmers) (the free silver
     movement died)
     -even though Populism died, the idea of reforming government did not – these ideas
     spread to workers and people living in the cities. These new reformers, armed with
     many of the Populist’s ideas) would begin a new movement that would transform
     America at the beginning of the new century.
Panic of 1873
Panic of 1893
Tariff – tax on goods coming into the United States, mainly to protect US industries
money supply – the amount of money available to spend
inflation
deflation
monetary policy
Gold Bugs
gold standard – when all of the money in circulation (being spent) is based upon the
     value of gold
bimetallic standard - when all of the money in circulation (being spent) is based upon
     the value of gold and silver
silverites
free silver – the unlimited coining of silver dollars to increase the money supply
Greenback Party
Bland-Allison Act
Sherman Silver Purchase Act
Patrons of Husbandry - The Grange
Farmers’ Alliance
Mary Elizabeth Lease
Interstate Commerce Act
Populists – people who wanted an increase in the money supply, unlimited coinage
     of silver, a progressive income tax, government ownership of communication and
     transportation industries, and an 8-hour work day
William Jennings Bryan – Nebraskan who ran for president as a candidate for both
     the Populists and the Democrats in 1896
                                          US History                                          12
                                         Lesson Plans
                                         Term 1, 10-11

    Cross of Gold speech
    Presidential Election of 1896 – election where Populists challenged, but failed to
         change the political order in favor of farmers and eastern factory workers.
         Republicans maintained the upper hand.
Possible Activities
Video – 1900s
Audio – Cross of Gold speech
Epworth Park - search
Activity/Video - Wizard of Oz
Complete 7.4 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.277
Independent Work
         8.1 Reading & Homework
         Study For Chapter 7 Quiz
Homework
Study For Chapter 7 Quiz
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
         Chapter 8 - Politics, Immigration, and Urban Life, 1870-1915
                 Section 1 – Politics In The Gilded Age, pages 290-296 (7)
Outline 8.1
Vocabulary 8.1
Optional Homework
Interpreting Political Cartoons p. 290
Reading Check p. 291
Interpreting Diagrams p. 292
Interpreting Graphs p. 293
Map Skills p. 296
Section 1 Assessment #1- p.296
Define Key Terms p. 290

Day 10
Objective 1.1 Identify the economic issues that faced the United States
        5-Analyze the issues and results of the 1896 election as a turning point in American
                politics.
Objective 2.1 Describe how the progressives and other addressed the problems of industrial
        capitalism, urbanization, and political corruption.
        2-Describe state and federal attempts to regulate big business, curb labor, protect the
                rights of workers and consumers, protect the environment, and restructure the
                financial system of the United States.
Review For Chapter 7 Quiz
Chapter 7 Quiz
Collect Chapter 7 Outlines & Vocabulary
Current Events
8.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
8.1 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
        1. How did big business influence politics during the Gilded Age?
           -government played a limited role in business affairs (laissez-faire)
           -however, business used its wealth to influence government by bribing officials or
                through patronage
           -credit mobilier
           -Jay Gould and the New York Erie Railroad Company
        2. In what ways did government reform the spoils system and regulate railroads?
           -Rutheford B. Hayes began reform of the spoils system by not using patronage and
                                            US History                                             13
                                           Lesson Plans
                                           Term 1, 10-11

              instead hiring well qualified political independents to cabinet posts and by firing
              unneeded employees
          -murder of president Garfield caused public outcry over spoils system and the
              Pendleton Civil Service Act was passed as a result in 1883
          -in Munn v. Illinois the Supreme Court allows the states to regulate railroads within
              their borders but then reversed itself in the Wabash case (interstate commerce)
          -Congress passed Interstate Commerce Act in 1887 to regulate railroads, abolished
              rebates, and set up the Interstate Commerce Commission to monitor railroads
       3. What effect did the transition from depression to prosperity have on politics in the
          1890s?
          -during the bad times voters tended to elect more Democrats, but when prosperity
          returned the voters began electing Republicans “A Full Dinner Pail”

         Gilded Age – term coined by Mark Twain to describe the post-Reconstruction era.
                  The implication was that everything was gold and shiny on the outside but
                  inside it was rotten (corrupt) to the core.
         Laissez-fair – government played a limited role in business affairs
         Credit Mobilier Scandal – Credit Mobilier built the actual tracks that the Union Pacific laid
                  and charged the Union Pacific (and the government far more than was actually
                  necessary) Politicians were given stock in the company to continue funding the
                  scheme
         subsidy – money given by the government to business to encourage a certain type of
                  activity (railroad building for instance)
         blue law
         civil service
         Pendleton Civil Service Act
         Ma, Ma, where’s my Pa? – reference to Grover Cleveland’s child born out of wedlock
         Mugwumps – independent Republicans that did not support James G. Blaine (Algonquin
                  word meaning “renegade chief”)
         rebate – price reduction given by business
         Munn v. Illinois
         Wabash Case
         Depression of 1893
         Coxey’s Army
Possible Activities
Video – 1910s
Activity/Video - Wizard of Oz
Complete 8.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.290
Independent Work
         8.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
         Chapter 8 - Politics, Immigration, and Urban Life, 1870-1915
                  Section 2 – People On The Move, pages 297-303 (7)
Outline 8.2
Vocabulary 8.2
Optional Homework
Viewing History p. 298
Interpreting Graphs p. 299
Reading Check p. 302
Viewing History p. 302, 303
Section 2 Assessment #1- p.303
                                             US History                                              14
                                            Lesson Plans
                                            Term 1, 10-11

Define Key Terms p. 297

Day 11
Objective 1.2 Identify the social issues that faced the United States
        2-Describe how immigrants adapted to life in a new country
        4-Analyze the role of laws, policies, and the federal judiciary in instituting racial inequality
                 and in disfranchising various racial groups, e.g. Chinese Exclusion Act, Yick Wo
                 v. Hopkins, Plessy v. Ferguson, Jim Crow Laws, etc.
8.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
8.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
8.2 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
        1. What were the experiences of immigrants in the late 1800s and early 1900s?
        2. What different challenges did immigrants from Europe, Asia, and Mexico face?
        immigration
        pogrom
        steerage
        tuberculosis
        quarantine
        ghetto
        restrictive covenant
        Chinese Exclusion Act
        Ellis Island or “The Golden Door”
        Angel Island
        Gentleman’s Agreement
        alien
Possible Activities
Video Segment - Gangs of New York (Irish Immigrants Leaving Boat)
Video Segment – Titanic (steerage scenes)
Web Page – Waverly Hills Sanitorium
Jacob Riis Handout – Gangs of New York
Immigration Simulation
Video – 1910s
Complete 8.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.297
Independent Work
        8.3 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 8 - Politics, Immigration, and Urban Life, 1870-1915
                 Section 3 – The Challenge Of The Cities, pages 304-309 (6)
Outline 8.3
Vocabulary 8.3
Optional Homework
Viewing Fine Art p. 305
Interpreting Diagrams p. 307
Reading Check p. 308
Interpreting Political Cartoons p. 309
Section 3 Assessment #1-5 p.309
Define Key Terms p. 304

Day 12
Objective 1.2 Identify the social issues that faced the United States.
                                         US History                                          15
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

        3-Describe the geographic and economic factors behind the internal migration from farm
                to city.
8.3 Reading Quiz
Current Events
8.3 Homework – Discuss/Collect
8.3 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
        1. Why did cities expand in the late 1800s and early 1900s?
        2. What new developments helped cities grow?
        3. How did living conditions in cities change?
        4. What were the results of city growth?
        suburb
        cable car
        Elisha Graves Otis
        tenement
        Great Chicago Fire of 1871
        dumbbell tenement
        Jacob Riis How the Other Half Lives
        political machine
        graft
        William Marcy “Boss” Tweed
        Tammany Hall
        Thomas Nast
Possible Activities
Video – 1910s
Video – The Gangs of New York
Video – Titanic
Complete 8.3 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.304
Independent Work
        8.4 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 8 - Politics, Immigration, and Urban Life, 1870-1915
                Section 4 – Ideas For Reform, pages 311-315 (5)
Outline 8.4
Vocabulary 8.4
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.312, 313
Reading Check p. 313, 314
Interpreting Political Cartoons p. 314
Section 4 Assessment #1-6 p.315
Define Key Terms p. 311

Day 13
Objective 1.2 Identify the social issues that faced the United States.
Objective 2.1 Describe how the progressives and other addressed the problems of industrial
       capitalism, urbanization, and political corruption.
8.4 Reading Quiz
Current Events
8.4 Homework – Discuss/Collect
8.4 Notes/Terms/Topic Presentations
       1. How did different movements help the needy?
       2. How and where did sociology develop?
                                         US History                                          16
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

        3. What efforts were made to control immigration and personal behavior in the late
                1800s?
        Charity Organization Society
        social gospel movement
        settlement house
        Jane Addams & Ellen Gates Starr
        sociology
        nativism
        American Protective Association
        Immigration Restriction League
        temperance movement
        Women’s Christian Temperance Union
        prohibition
        vice
        Comstock Laws
Possible Activities
Political Spectrum Activity
Video – 1910s
Complete 8.4 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.311
Independent Work
        9.1 Reading & Homework
        Study For Chapter 8 Quiz
Homework
Study For Chapter 8 Quiz
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 9 - Life At The Turn Of The Twentieth Century, 1870-1915
                Section 1 – The Expansion Of Education, pages 320-325 (6)
Outline 9.1
Vocabulary 9.1
Optional Homework
Reading Check p. 321
Interpreting Graphs p. 322
Viewing History p. 322, 323, 325
Section 1 Assessment #1-6 p.325
Define Key Terms p. 320
                                        US History                                        17
                                       Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11




Day 13
Objective 1.2 Identify the social issues that faced the United States.
Objective 2.1 Describe how the progressives and other addressed the problems of industrial
        capitalism, urbanization, and political corruption.
Review For Chapter 8 Quiz
Chapter 8 Quiz
Collect Chapter 8 Notes
Current Events
9.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
9.1 Notes & Terms
        1. How and why did public schools expand during the late 1800s?
        2. How did opportunities for higher education increase after the Civil War?
        3. What were the views of Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois regarding African
                 American education?
        public school
        Laura Ingalls Wilder
        literacy
        assimilation
        Americanization
        Leland Stanford
        philanthropist
        “unmarriageable”
        Wilberforce University
        Booker T. Washington
        W.E.B. Du Bois
        “Atlanta Compromise”
        The Souls of Black Fold
        Niagara Movement
Possible Activities
Video – 1910s
Complete 9.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.320
Independent Work
        9.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 9 - Life At The Turn Of The Twentieth Century, 1870-1915
                 Section 2 – New Forms Of Entertainment, pages 327-331 (5)
Outline 9.2
                                            US History                                              18
                                           Lesson Plans
                                           Term 1, 10-11

Optional Homework
Viewing History p.329, 331
Reading Check p. 330
Section 2 Assessment 1-6 p.331
Define Key Terms p. 327

Day 14
Objective 1.2 Identify the social issues that faced the United States.
9.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
9.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
9.2 Notes & Terms
       1. What new kinds of performances and recreation did Americans enjoy at the turn of
           the century?
       2. What were people reading for information and entertainment?
       3. How was American music changing?

        vaudeville
        “blackface”
        The Great Train Robbery
        yellow journalism
        Joseph Pulitzer
        William Randolph Hearst
        Mark Twain
        Negro spiritual
        Ragtime
        blues
Possible Activities
Video Segment – Newsies
Video – The Legend of 1900
Video – 1910s
Complete 9.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.327
Independent Work
        9.3 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 9 - Life At The Turn Of The Twentieth Century, 1870-1915
                Section 3 – The World Of Jim Crow, pages 332-336 (5)
Outline 9.3
Optional Homework
Viewing History p. 332
Interpreting Charts p. 333
Interpreting Political Cartoons p. 333
Interpreting Graphs p. 334
Reading Check p.335
Section 3 Assessment 1-5 p.336
Define Key Terms p. 332

Day 15
Objective 1.2 Identify the social issues that faced the United States
       4-Analyze the role of laws, policies, and the federal judiciary in instituting racial inequality
               and in disfranchising various racial groups, e.g. Chinese Exclusion Act, Yick Wo
                                       US History                                  19
                                      Lesson Plans
                                      Term 1, 10-11

                v. Hopkins, Plessy v. Ferguson, Jim Crow Laws, etc.
9.3 Reading Quiz
Current Events
9.3 Homework – Discuss/Collect
9.3 Notes & Terms
       1. How were African Americans discriminated against after Reconstruction?
       2. How did African Americans resist this discrimination?
       Reconstruction
       Populists
       poll tax
       grandfather clause
       segregation (de jure)
       Jim Crow
       Civil Rights Cases of 1883
       Plessy v. Ferguson
       lynching
       Great Migration
       segreagation (de facto)
       National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
       Crisis
       Young Men’s and Young Women’s Christian Associations
       National Urban League
Possible Activities
Video – 1910s
Complete 9.3 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.332
Independent Work
       9.4 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
       Chapter 9 - Life At The Turn Of The Twentieth Century, 1870-1915
                Section 4 – The Changing Roles Of Women, pages 337-341 (5)
Outline 9.4
Possible Homework
Viewing History p. 340
Reading Check p.340
Section 4 Assessment #1-5 p.341
Define Key Terms p. 337

Day 16
Objective 1.2 Identify the social issues that faced the United States
9.4 Reading Quiz
Current Events
9.4 Homework – Discuss/Collect
9.4 Notes & Terms
       1. What were the issues in the debate over women’s equality?
       2. How did women’s work in the home change at the turn of the century?
       3. How did stores and catalogs serve women’s new role as consumers?
       4. What kind of work did women do outside the home?
       The Cost of Cleanliness
       department store
       chain store
       rural free delivery (RFD)
                                         US History                                          20
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

        mail-order catalog
        New Women
        Margaret Sanger
Possible Activities
Video – 1910s
Complete 9.4 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.337
Independent Work
        9.4 Reading & Homework
        Study For Unit 2 Test
Homework
Study For Unit 2 Test
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 10 - Becoming A World Power, 1890-1915
                Section 1 – The Pressure To Expand, pages 352-356 (5)
Outline 10.1
Optional Homework
Viewing History p. 352
Reading Check p. 354
Interpreting Graphs p. 355
Interpreting Political Cartoons p. 356
Section 1 Assessment #1-5 p.356
Define Key Terms p. 352

Day 17
Objective 2.2 Describe the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs.
        1-Describe the reasons for American Imperialism, e.g., describe the commercial basis of
                U.S. foreign policy.
Review For Unit 2 Test
Unit 2 Test
Collect Chapter 9 Notes
Current Events
10.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
10.1 Notes & Terms
        1. What factors led to imperialism around the world?
        2. In what ways did the US begin to expand its interests abroad in the late 1800s?
        3. What arguments were made in favor of United States expansion in the 1890s?
        imperialism
        nationalism
        annex
        Monroe Doctrine
        Manifest Destiny
        foreign policy
        “Seward’s Folly”
        banana republic
        economic imperialism
        Alfred T. Mahan – The Influence of Sea Power Upon History
        Frederick Jackson Turner – The Turner Thesis
        social Darwinism
        “heathen”
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
Reading – The Turner Thesis
                                          US History                                             21
                                         Lesson Plans
                                         Term 1, 10-11

Video – The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century
Complete 10.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.352
Independent Work
        10.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 10 - Becoming A World Power, 1890-1915
               Section 2 – The Spanish-American War, pages 357-364 (8)
Outline 10.2
Optional Homework
Viewing History p. 357
Reading Check p. 358, 361, 362
Interpreting Tables p. 359
Map Skills p. 360
Interpreting Political Cartoons p. 361, 364
Map Skills p. 363
Section 2 Assessment #1-5 p.364
Define Key Terms p. 357

Day 18
Objective 2.2 Describe the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs.
       2-Analyze U.S. foreign policy objectives in Central and South America, the Phillipines,
                and Asia, e.g., evaluating the causes and consequences of the Spanish-
                American War.
10.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
10.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
10.2 Notes & Terms
   1. How did the activities of the United States in Latin America set the stage for war with
       Spain?
   2. What were the events leading up to and following the Spanish-American War?
   3. What challenges did the United States face after the war?
   4. Why did the United States seek to gain influence in the Pacific?
   arbitration
   “reconcentration”
   Jose Marti
   yellow journalism
   jingoism
   de Lome letter
   battleship Maine
   Spanish American War
   Rough Riders
   Treaty of Paris 1898
   Emiliano Aguinaldo
   Teller Amendment
   Platt Amendment
   Queen Liliuokalani
   Sanford P. Dole
   sphere of influence
   Open Door Policy
   Boxer Rebellion
Possible Activities
                                         US History                                          22
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

Imperialism Simulation
Video – The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century
Complete 10.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.357
Independent Work
        10.3 Reading & Homework
        10.4 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 10 - Becoming A World Power, 1890-1915
                Section 3 – A New Foreign Policy, pages 366-371 (6)
Outline 10.3
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 10 - Becoming A World Power, 1890-1915
               Section 4 – Debating America’s New Role, pages 372-375 (4)
Outline 10.4
Optional Homework – 10.3
Map Skills p.367, 370
Interpreting Political Cartoons p.368
Reading Check p.368
Section 3 Assessment #1-4 p.371
Define Key Terms p. 366
Optional Homework – 10.4
Interpreting Political Cartoons p.372
Reading Check p.373, 374
Viewing Fine Art p.374
Section 4 Assessment #1-5 p.375
Define Key Terms p. 372

Day 19
Objective 2.2 Describe the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs.
       2-Analyze U.S. foreign policy objectives in Central and South America, the Philippines,
                and Asia, e.g., evaluating the causes and consequences of the Spanish-
                American War.
10.3 & 10.4 Reading Quiz
Current Events
10.3 & 10.4 Homework – Discuss/Collect
10.3 Notes & Terms
   1. Why did the United States want to build the Panama Canal?
   2. What were the goals of Theodore Roosevelt’s “big stick” diplomacy?
   3. In what ways did the foreign policies of Presidents Taft and Wilson differ from those of
       President Roosevelt?
   concession
   Panama Canal
   “big stick” diplomacy
   Roosevelt Corollary
   Russo-Japanese War
   dollar diplomacy
   General Victoriano Huerta
   Venustiano Carranza
   Pancho Villa
   John J. “Blackjack” Pershing
10.4 Notes & Terms
                                         US History                                          23
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

    1. What were the main arguments raised by the anti-imperialists?
    2. Why did imperialism appeal to many Americans?
    3. How was American imperialism viewed from abroad?
    General Douglas MacArthur
    racism
    compulsory
    Samuel Gompers
    Great White Fleet
    “Yankee, Go Home!”
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
Video – The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century
Complete 10.3 & 10.4 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.366 & 372
Independent Work
        11.1 Reading & Homework
        Study For Chapter 10 Quiz
Homework
Study For Chapter 10 Quiz
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 11 - The Progressive Reform Era, 1890-1920
                Section 1 – The Origins Of Progressivism, pages 382-387 (6)
Outline 11.1
Optional Homework
Reading Check p.384, 385, 386
Interpreting Political Cartoons p.384
Viewing History p.385, 386
Section 1 Assessment #1-5 p.387
Define Key Terms p. 382

Day 20
Objective 2.1 Describe how the progressives and other addressed the problems of industrial
        capitalism, urbanization, and political corruption.
        1-Identify the goals of progressivism.
Review For Chapter 10 Quiz
Chapter 10 Quiz
Collect Chapter 10 Notes
Current Events
11.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
11.1 Notes & Terms
    1. What were the key goals of Progressives?
    2. How did the ideas of progressive writers help to inspire new reform movements?
    3. What reform organizations and what women reformers took up Progressive causes?
    4. Why did Progressive reforms meet with resistance?
        Upton Sinclair – The Jungle
    Progressive Era
    progressivism
    muckraker
    Lincoln Steffens
    Ida Tarbell
    injunction
    National Consumers’ League
    Florence Kelley
                                          US History                                              24
                                         Lesson Plans
                                         Term 1, 10-11

    Mary Harris “Mother” Jones
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
The Virginian Activity
Complete 11.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.382
Reading – Upton Sinclair The Jungle
Independent Work
        11.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 11 - The Progressive Reform Era, 1890-1920
                Section 2 – Progressive Legislation, pages 389-395 (7)
Outline 11.2
Optional Homework
Reading Check p.390
Viewing History p.391
Interpreting Diagrams p.392
Interpreting Charts p.394
Section 2 Assessment #1-5 p.395
Define Key Terms p. 389

Day 21
Objective 2.1 Describe how the progressives and other addressed the problems of industrial
       capitalism, urbanization, and political corruption.
       2-Describe state and federal attempts to regulate big business, curb labor, protect the
               rights of workers and consumers, protect the environment, and restructure the
               financial system of the United States.
       4-Evaluate the importance and impact of Progressive Era reforms, e.g., describe the
               16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th amendments to the U.S. Constitution, Jacob Riis, Jane
               Addams.
11.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
11.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
11.2 Notes & Terms
   1. How did Progressives wish to expand the role of government?
   2. What municipal and state reforms did Progressives achieve?
   3. What federal reforms did Theodore Roosevelt champion as President?

   Triangle Shirtwaist fire
   social welfare program
   reform
   municipal
   home rule
   Galveston, Texas hurricane
   Robert M. La Follette
   direct primary
   initiative
   referendum
   recall
   Seventeenth Amendment
   Muller v. Oregon
   United Mine Workers Strike of 1902
                                          US History                                             25
                                         Lesson Plans
                                         Term 1, 10-11

    holding company
    1906 Hepburn Act
    Pure Food & Drug Act
    Meat Inspection Act
    Gifford Pinchot
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
The Virginian Activity
Complete 11.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.389
Independent Wrokd
        11.3 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 11 - The Progressive Reform Era, 1890-1920
                Section 3 – Progressivism Under Taft And Wilson, pages 396-402 (7)
Outline 11.3
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.396, 401
Interpreting Political Cartoons p.397
Map Skills p.399, 400
Section 3 Assessment #1-5 p.402
Define Key Terms p. 396

Day 22
Objective 2.1 Describe how the progressives and other addressed the problems of industrial
       capitalism, urbanization, and political corruption.
       2-Describe state and federal attempts to regulate big business, curb labor, protect the
               rights of workers and consumers, protect the environment, and restructure the
               financial system of the United States.
       3-Analyze progressive responses to issues raised by African-Americans, women, and
               Native Americans.
       5-Summarize the 1912 presidential election platforms.
11.3 Reading Quiz
Current Events
11.3 Homework – Discuss/Collect
11.3 Notes & Terms
   1. What political conflicts marked the presidency of William Howard Taft?
   2. Who were the contenders in the Election of 1912, and what was the outcome?
   3. What major policies did President Woodrow Wilson help put in place?
   4. In what ways were the achievements of progressivism limited?
   Payne-Aldrich Tariff
   conservationist
   Ballinger-Pinchot Affair
   New Nationalism
   Progressive “Bull Moose” Party
   Mann-Elkins Act
   Woodrow Wilson
   New Freedom
   Presidential Election of 1912
   Underwood Tariff
   Clayton Antitrust Act
   Federal Trade Commission (FTC)
                                           US History                                               26
                                          Lesson Plans
                                          Term 1, 10-11

    Federal Reserve Act
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
The Virginian Activity
Complete 11.3 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.396
Independent Work
        11.4 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 11 - The Progressive Reform Era, 1890-1920
                 Section 4 – Suffrage At Last, pages 403-407 (5)
Outline 11.4
Optional Homework
Interpreting Cartoons p.403
Reading Check p.404
Viewing History p.406
Map Skills p.407
Section 3 Assessment #1-5 p.407
Define Key Terms p. 403

Day 23
Objective 2.1 Describe how the progressives and other addressed the problems of industrial
         capitalism, urbanization, and political corruption.
         3-Analyze progressive responses to issues raised by African-Americans, women, and
                 Native Americans.
         4-Evaluate the importance and impact of Progressive Era reforms, e.g., describe the
                 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th amendments to the U.S. Constitution, Jacob Riis, Jane
                 Addams.
11.4 Reading Quiz
Current Events
11.4 Homework – Discuss/Collect
11.4 Notes & Terms
    1. In what ways were Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton a “bridge” to the
         twentieth-century suffrage effort?
    2. What two main strategies did suffrage leaders pursue?
    3. What was the status of the suffrage movement by the turn of the century?
    4. Why was a new generation of national leaders needed in the suffrage effort?
    5. What factors led to a final victory for suffrage?
    Lucretia Mott
    Elizabeth Cady Stanton
    civil disobedience
    National American Woman Suffrage Association (NAWSA)
    Carrie Chapman Catt
    Alice Paul
    Congressional Union (CU)
    Eighteenth Amendment
    Nineteenth Amendment
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
The Virginian Activity
Complete 11.4 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.403
Independent Work
                                         US History                                     27
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

       12.1 Reading & Homework
       Study For Chapter 11 Quiz
Homework
Study For Chapter 11 Quiz
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
       Chapter 12 - The World War I Era, 1914-1920
               Section 1 – The Road To War, pages 414-419 (6)
12.1 Outline
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.414, 417, 419
Reading Check p.415
Map Skills p.415,416
Section 1 Assessment #1-5 p.419
Define Key Terms p. 414

Day 24
Objective 2.2 Describe the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs.
         3-Describe the reasons for U.S. entry into WWI, e.g., explain causes of WWI.
Review For Chapter 11 Quiz
Chapter 11 Quiz
Collect Chapter 11 Notes
Current Events
12.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
12.1 Notes & Terms
    1. What were the main causes of World War I?
    2. How did the conflict expand to draw in much of Europe?
    3. In what ways did the United States respond to the war in Europe?
    Archduke Francis Ferdinand
    Gavrilo Princip
    militarism
    nationalism
    alliance
    mobilization
    Schlieffen Plan
    Central Powers
    Allies
    stalemate
    blockade
    Kaiser Wilhelm II
    propaganda
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
Video – The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century
Video – The Lost Battalion
Video – All Quiet On The Western Front
Complete 12.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.414
Independent Work
         12.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
         Chapter 12 - The World War I Era, 1914-1920
                 Section 2 – The United States Declares War, pages 421-424 (4)
                                         US History                                    28
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

Outline 12.2
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.422, 423
Reading Check p.423
Section 2 Assessment #1-4 p.424
Define Key Terms p. 421

Day 25
Objective 2.2 Describe the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs.
        3-Describe the reasons for U.S. entry into WWI, e.g., explain causes of WWI.
12.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
12.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
12.2 Notes & Terms
    1. How did Germany’s use of submarines affect the war?
    2. What moves did the United States take toward war in early 1917?
    U-boat
    Lusitania
    Sussex pledge
    Zimmerman note
    autocrat
    Russian Revolution
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
Video – The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century
Video – The Lost Battalion
Video – All Quiet On The Western Front
Complete 12.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.421
Independent Work
        12.3 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 12 - The World War I Era, 1914-1920
                Section 3 – Americans On The European Front, pages 425-431 (7)
Outline 12.3
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.425, 426
Map Skills p.427
Interpreting Diagrams p.428
Reading Check p.428
Section 3 Assessment #1-5 p.431
Define Key Terms p. 425

Day 26
Objective 2.2 Describe the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs.
       4-Analyze the impact of WWI on the U.S. from multiple perspectives.
12.3 Reading Quiz
Current Events
12.3 Homework – Discuss/Collect
12.3 Notes & Terms
   1. How did the United States prepare to fight in World War I?
   2. In what ways did American troops help turn the tide of war?
                                         US History                                          29
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

    3. What were conditions like in Europe and in the United States at the end of the war?
    Selective Service Act
    American Expeditionary Force (AEF)
    convoy
    doughboy
    Bolsheviks
    dogfight
    zeppelin
    armistice
    influenza/Spanish flu
    “trenchfoot”
    genocide
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
Video – The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century
Video – The Lost Battalion
Video – All Quiet On The Western Front
Video – Spanish Flu
Pandemic Simulation
Complete 12.3 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.425
Independent Work
         12.4 Reading & Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
         Chapter 12 - The World War I Era, 1914-1920
                Section 4 – Americans On The Home Front, pages 432-436 (5)
Do – 12.4 Homework
         Viewing History p.432, 433, 434
         Section 4 Assessment #1-4 p.436
         Define Key Terms p. 432

Day 27
Objective 2.2 Describe the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs.
        4-Analyze the impact of WWI on the U.S. from multiple perspectives.
12.4 Reading Quiz
Current Events
12.4 Homework – Discuss/Collect
12.4 Notes & Terms
   1. What steps did the government take to finance the war and manage the economy?
   2. How did the government enforce loyalty to the war effort?
   3. How did the war change the lives of Americans on the home front?
   homefront
   Liberty Bonds
   War Industries Board
   War Trade Board
   National War Labor Board
   War Labor Policies Board
   price controls
   rationing
   daylight saving time
   Committee on Public Information
   Robert Prager
   sedition
                                         US History                                            30
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

    vigilante
    Great Migration
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
Video – The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century
Video – The Lost Battalion
Video – All Quiet On The Western Front
Complete 12.4 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.432
Independent Work
         12.5 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
         Chapter 12 - The World War I Era, 1914-1920
                 Section 5 – Global Peacemaker, pages 437-441 (5)
Outline 12.5
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.437
Interpreting Tables p.438
Reading Check p.439
Map Skills p.440
Section 5 Assessment #1-6 p.441
Define Key Terms p. 437

Day 28
Objective 2.2 Describe the changing role of the U.S. in world affairs.
        5-Evaluate Wilson’s leadership, the League of Nations, the Treaty of Versailles, the
                Fourteen Points, and neutrality.
12.5 Reading Quiz
Current Events
12.5 Homework – Discuss/Collect
12.5 Notes & Terms
    1. What expectations did Wilson and the Allies bring to the paris Peace Conference?
    2. What were the important provisions of the peace treaty?
    3. How did the federal government and ordinary Americans react to the end of the war?
    Fourteen Points
    self-determination
    spoils
    League of Nations
    war guilt
    reparations
    Versailles Treaty
    irreconcilables
    reservationists
    Alice Lord O’Brian
Possible Activities
Imperialism Simulation
Video – The Great War and the Shaping of the Twentieth Century
Video – The Lost Battalion
Video – All Quiet On The Western Front
Complete 12.5 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.437
Independent Work
        Study For Unit 3 Test
                                        US History                                           31
                                       Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11

       13.1 Reading & Homework
Homework
Study For Unit 3 Test
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
       Chapter 13 - Postwar Social Change, 1920-1925
               Section 1 – Society In The 1920s, pages 452-458 (7)
Outline 13.1
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.452, 453, 458
Reading Check p.454
Map Skills p.455, 456, 457
Section 1 Assessment #1-4 p.458
Define Key Terms p. 452

Day 29
Objective 3.1 Describe changes in culture during the 1920s and 1930s.
        1-Explain the effects of social tensions, e.g., KKK, Red Scare, etc.
        2-Analyze the impact of media on creating a popular culture.
        3-Explain the conflicts between traditional values and new ideas.
Study For Unit 3 Test
Unit 3 Test
Collect Chapter 12 Notes
13.1 Reading Quiz
Current Events
13.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
13.1 Notes & Terms
        1. How were women’s roles changing during the 1920s?
        2. How were the nation’s cities and suburbs affected by Americans on the move from
                rural areas?
        3. Who were some American heroes of the 1920s? What made them popular with the
                American public?
        flapper
        bobbed hair
        Sheppard-Towner Act of 1921
        Equal Rights Amendment
        Jeannete Rankin
        demographics
        Great Migration
        barrio
        Charles Lindbergh
        Amelia Earhart
        Jack Dempsey
        Jim Thorpe
        Babe Ruth
        Gertrude Ederle
Possible Activities
Video – 1920s
Complete 13.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.452
Independent Work
        13.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
                                         US History                                         32
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

        Chapter 13 - Postwar Social Change, 1920-1925
                Section 2 – Mass Media And The Jazz Age, pages 459-465 (7)
Outline 13.2
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.459, 463
Interpreting Diagrams p.461
Reading Check p.461
Section 2 Assessment #1-5 p.465
Define Key Terms p. 459

Day 30
Objective 3.1 Describe changes in culture during the 1920s and 1930s.
       2-Analyze the impact of media on creating a popular culture.
       3-Analyze the emergence of distinctive American art and literature in periods known as
                the Jazz Age and Harlem Renaissance.
13.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
13.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
13.2 Notes & Terms
       1. How did the mass media help create common cultural experiences?
       2. Why are the 1920s called the Jazz Age, and how did the jazz spirit affect the arts?
       3. How did the writers of the Lost Generation respond to the popular culture?
       4. What subjects did the Harlem Re]naissance writers explore?
       Hollywood
       mass media
       The Jazz Singer
       tabloid
       Guglielmo Marconi
       National Broadcasting Company (NBC)
       Jazz Age
       Cotton Club
       Jelly Roll Morton
       Georgia O’Keefe
       Sinclair Lewis
       F. Scott Fitzgerald
       Gertrude Stein
       Ernest Hemingway
       Lost Generation
       Harlem Renaissance
       James Weldon Johnson
       Alain Locke
       Zora Neale Hurston
       Claude McKay
       Countee Cullen
       Langston Hughes
Possible Activities
Video – 1920s
Complete 13.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.459
Independent Work
       13.3 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
                                          US History                          33
                                         Lesson Plans
                                         Term 1, 10-11

       Chapter 13 - Postwar Social Change, 1920-1925
              Section 3 – Cultural Conflicts, pages 467-473 (7)
Outline 13.3
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.468, 469, 470, 473
Reading Check p.472
Section 3 Assessment #1-7 p.473
Define Key Terms p. 467

Day 31
Objective 3.1 Describe changes in culture during the 1920s and 1930s.
       1-Explain the effects of social tensions, e.g., KKK, Red Scare, etc.
13.3 Reading Quiz
Current Events
13.3 Homework – Discuss/Collect
13.3 Notes & Terms
       1. What were the effects of Prohibition on society?
       2. What issues of religion were at the core of the Scopes trial?
       3. How did racial tensions change after World War I?
       prohibition
       18th Amendment
       Volstead Act
       bootleggers
       speakeasies
       “racket”
       “protection”
       Al Capone/Scarface
       Federal Bureau of Investigation
       J. Edgar Hoover
       fundamentalism
       evolution
       Scopes Trial
       William Jennings Bryan
       Clarence Darrow
       “Red Summer”
       William J. Simmons
       Ku Klux Klan
       Marcus Garvey
       “black pride” movements
Possible Activities
Video – 1920s
Video – The Untouchables
Complete 13.3 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.467
Independent Work
       Study For Chapter 13 Quiz
       14.1 Reading & Homework
Homework
Study For Chapter 13 Quiz
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
       Chapter 14 – Politics And Prosperity, 1920-1929
                Section 1 – A Republican Decade, pages 480-489 (10)
                                          US History                                      34
                                         Lesson Plans
                                         Term 1, 10-11

Outline 14.1
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.480, 484, 486
Interpreting Political Cartoons p.482, 489
Reading Check p.482
Interpreting Graphs p.485, 487
Section 1 Assessment #1-5 p.489
Define Key Terms p. 480

Day 32
No School – Girls State Basketball

Day 33
Objective 3.1 Describe changes in culture during the 1920s and 1930s.
        1-Explain the effects of social tensions, e.g., KKK, Red Scare, etc.
Objective 3.3 Evaluate the foreign policies of the 1920s and 1930s.
        1-Summarize attempts to create a lasting peace in the 1920s.
Review For Chapter 13 Quiz
Chapter 13 Quiz
Collect Chapter 13 Notes
Current Events
14.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
14.1 Notes & Terms
        1. What events fueled the Red Scare of the early 1920s?
        2. What conflicts led to the major labor strikes of 1919?
        3. How did Republican leadership during the Harding and Coolidge presidencies shape
                the 1920s?
        4. What issues influenced the presidential election of 1928?
        Warren G. Harding
        “Return To Normalcy”
        USSR
        communism
        Joseph Stalin
        Red Scare
        Schenck v. U.S.
        Gitlow v. New York
        A. Mitchell Palmer
        “subversive”
        anarchist
        Sacco and Vanzetti
        Boston Police Strike
        United States Steel Corporation Strike
        United Mine Workers Strike
        isolationism
        disarmament
        Washington Naval Conference of 1921
        Fordney-McCumber Tariff
        Dawes Plan
        nativism
        immigration quota
        National Origins Act of 1924
        Teapot Dome scandal
                                        US History                              35
                                       Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11

        Albert Fall
        Calvin Coolidge
        laissez faire
        arms limitations
        Kellogg-Briand Pact
Possible Activities
Video – 1920s
Video - Reds
Video – Reefer Madness
Stock Market Simulation
Red Scare Simulation
Complete 14.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.480
Independent Work
        14.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 14 – Politics And Prosperity, 1920-1929
                Section 2 – A Business Boom, pages 491-497 (7)
Outline 14.2
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.491, 495
Interpreting Tables p.492
Reading Check p.493
Interpreting Diagrams p.494
Section 2 Assessment #1-5 p.497
Define Key Terms p. 491

Day 34
Objective 3.2 Summarize the causes and effects of the Great Depression.
       1. Analyze the causes and consequences of the 1929 stock market crash.
14.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
14.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
14.2 Notes & Terms
       1. What role do businesses and consumers play in a consumer economy?
       2. How were Henry Ford and the automobile important to the 1920s?
       3. In what ways did industrial growth affect the economy of the 1920s?
       4. Why did the economic boom bypass some people and benefit others?
       fast-food
       shopping mall
       consumer economy
       installment plan
       “new” advertising
       productivity
       Gross National Product (GNP)
       Henry Ford
       assembly line
       vertical consolidation
       “motor hotel”
       J.P. Morgan
Possible Activities
Video – 1920s
                                         US History                                           36
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

Stock Market Simulation
Complete 14.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.491
Independent Work
        14.3 Reading & Homework
        Study For Chapter 14 Quiz
        15.1 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 14 – Politics And Prosperity, 1920-1929
                Section 3 – The Economy In The Late 1920s, pages 498-501 (4)
Outline 14.3
Study For Chapter 14 Quiz
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 15 – Crash And Depression, 1929-1933
                Section 1 – The Stock Market Crash, pages 508-512 (5)
Outline 15.1
Optional Homework – 14.3
Interpreting Diagrams p.500
Viewing History p.501
Section 3 Assessment #1-4 p.501
Define Key Terms p. 498
Optional Homework – 15.1
Viewing History p.508
Reading Check p.509
Interpreting Diagrams p.510
Interpreting Graphs p.511
Interpreting Political Cartoons p.512
Section 1 Assessment #1-7 p.512
Define Key Terms p. 508

Day 35
Objective 3.2 Summarize the causes and effects of the Great Depression.
        1. Analyze the causes and consequences of the 1929 stock market crash.
Current Events
14.3 & 15.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
14.3 Notes & Terms
        1. Why did the economy of the late 1920s appear healthy to most Americans?
        2. What danger signs were present in the economy of the late 1920s?
        Herbert Hoover
        rugged individualism
        welfare capitalism
        speculation
        buying on margin
        “ripple effect”
        McNary-Haugen Farm Relief Bill
Study For Chapter 14 Quiz
Chapter 14 Quiz
Collect Chapter 14 Notes
15.1 Notes & Terms
        1. What events led to the stock market’s Great Crash in 1929?
        2. Why did the Great Crash produce a ripple effect throughout the nation’s economy?
        3. What were the main causes of the Great Depression?
                                         US History                                       37
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

       Dow Jones Industrial Average
       Black Tuesday
       Great Crash/Stock Market Crash of 1929
       business cycle
       risky loan
       consumer borrowing
       bank run
       bank failure
       unemployment
       economic contraction
       Gross National Product (GNP)
       Great Depression
       collateral
       Federal Reserve System
Possible Activities
Video – 1930s
Video – Cinderella Man
Video – The Grapes of Wrath
Depression Simulation
Complete Target 14.3 & 15.1 Reading Skill As Closure p.498 & 508
Independent Work
       15.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
       Chapter 15 – Crash And Depression, 1929-1933
                Section 2 – Social Effects Of The Depression, pages 513-518 (6)
Outline 15.2
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.513, 514, 518
Map Skills p.515
Reading Check p.516
Section 2 Assessment #1-5 p.518
Define Key Terms p. 513

Day 36
Objective 3.2 Summarize the causes and effects of the Great Depression.
       2-Compare the economic policies of Hoover and Roosevelt
       3-Describe life during the depression years.
       4-Analyze the effects of the Great Depression on Native Americans, African Americans,
               Asian Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and European Americans.
15.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
15.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
15.2 Notes & Terms
   1. How did poverty spread during the Great Depression?
   2. What social problems were caused by poverty in the 1930s?
   3. How did some people struggle to survive hard times?
   Hooverville
   Dust Bowl
   Government relief
   “women’s work”
   Father Divine
                                         US History                                         38
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

    “Scottsboro Boys”
    soup kitchen/soup line
Possible Activities
Video – 1930s
Video – Cinderella Man
Video – The Grapes of Wrath
Depression Simulation
Complete 15.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.513
Independent Work
        15.3 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 15 – Crash And Depression, 1929-1933
                Section 3 – Surviving The Great Depression, pages 520-523 (4)
Outline 15.3
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.520, 523
Reading Check p.521, 522
Interpreting Political Cartoons p.522
Section 3 Assessment #1-4 p.523
Define Key Terms p. 520

Day 37
Objective 3.2 Summarize the causes and effects of the Great Depression.
         2-Compare the economic policies of Hoover and Roosevelt
         3-Describe life during the depression years.
         4-Analyze the effects of the Great Depression on Native Americans, African Americans,
                Asian Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and European Americans.
15.3 Reading Quiz
Current Events
15.3 Homework – Discuss/Collect
15.3 Notes & Terms
    1. In what ways did Americans pull together to survive the Great Depression?
    2. What signs of change did Americans begin to notice in the early 1930s?
    penny auction
    “foreclosure moratorium law”
    riding the rails
    hobos
    Monopoly (the game)
    Presidential Election of 1932
    role of government
    Twenty-first Amendment
    Empire State Building
Possible Activities
Video – 1930s
Video – Cinderella Man
Video – The Grapes of Wrath
Depression Simulation
Complete 15.3 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.520
Independent Work
         15.4 Reading & Homework
Homework
                                        US History                                         39
                                       Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11

Read - America: Pathways To The Present
       Chapter 15 – Crash And Depression, 1929-1933
               Section 4 – The Election Of 1932, pages 524-529 (6)
Outline 15.4
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.524, 525, 527
Reading Check p.526, 528
Map Skills p.529
Section 4 Assessment #1-5 p.529
Define Key Terms p. 524

Day 38
Objective 3.2 Summarize the causes and effects of the Great Depression.
        2-Compare the economic policies of Hoover and Roosevelt
        3-Describe life during the depression years.
        4-Analyze the effects of the Great Depression on Native Americans, African Americans,
                 Asian Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and European Americans.
        5-Evaluate the impact of the New Deal
15.4 Reading Quiz
Current Events
15.4 Homework – Discuss/Collect
15.4 Notes & Terms
    1. How did President Hoover respond to the Great Depression?
    2. What did Roosevelt mean when he offered Americans a “new deal”?
    3. Why was the election of 1932 a significant turning point for American politics?
    Agricultural Marketing Act of 1929
    Hoover Dam
    Hawley-Smoot tariff
    Reconstruction Finance Corporation (RFC)
    Home Loan Bank Act
    “direct relief/direct aid”
    John Maynard Keynes
    Bonus Army
    General Douglas MacArthur
    FDR
    New Deal
    Presidential Election of 1932
    Eleanor Roosevelt
    role of government
Possible Activities
Video – 1930s
Video – Cinderella Man
Video – The Grapes of Wrath
Depression Simulation
Complete 15.4 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.524
Independent Work
        Study For Chapter 15 Quiz
        16.1 Reading & Homework
Homework
Study For Chapter 15 Quiz
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 16 – The New Deal, 1933-1941
                                        US History                                         40
                                       Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11

               Section 1 – Forging A New Deal, pages 536-544 (9)
Outline 16.1
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.536, 537, 538
Map Skills p.541
Reading Check p.541, 543
Interpreting Charts p.543
Section 1 Assessment #1-5 p.544
Define Key Terms p. 536

Day 39
Objective 3.2 Summarize the causes and effects of the Great Depression.
        2-Compare the economic policies of Hoover and Roosevelt
        3-Describe life during the depression years.
        4-Analyze the effects of the Great Depression on Native Americans, African Americans,
                Asian Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and European Americans.
        5-Evaluate the impact of the New Deal
Review For Chapter 15 Quiz
Chapter 15 Quiz
Collect Chapter 15 Notes
Current Events
16.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
16.1 Notes & Terms
    1. How did Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt work to restore the nation’s hope?
    2. What major new Deal programs were created in the first hundred days, and who were
        some of FDR’s key players in these programs?
    3. What caused the New Deal to falter?
    4. What were the key goals and accomplishments of the Second New Deal?
    5. What did the outcome of the 1936 election indicate?
    “lame duck”
    Twentieth Amendment
    New Deal
    hundred days
    bank holiday
    Emergency Banking Act
    FDIC
    Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
    gold standard
    public works program
    Civil Works Administration (CWA)
    Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC)
    Indian Reorganization Act
    Dawes Act
    National Recovery Administration (NRA)
    Public Works Administration (PWA)
    Home Owners’ Loan Corporation (HOLC)
    Federal Housing Administration (FHA)
    Agricultural Adjustment Act (AAA)
    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)
    “brain trust”
    Frances Perkins
    Mary McLeod Bethune
                                        US History                                        41
                                       Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11

    “black cabinet”
    Eleanor Roosevelt
    Supreme Court and the New Deal
    Second New Deal
    Rural Electrification Act (REA)
    Wagner Act
    closed shop
    NLRB v. Jones and Laughlin (1937)
    Fair Labor Standards Act
    minimum wage
    organized labor
    Social Security system
    1936 Presidential Election
Possible Activities
Video – 1930s
Video – Cinderella Man
Video – The Grapes of Wrath
Depression Simulation
Complete 16.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.536
Independent Work
        16.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 16 – The New Deal, 1933-1941
               Section 2 – The New Deal’s Critics, pages 545-551 (7)
Outline 16.2
Optional Homework
Interpreting Political Cartoons p.545, 548, 551
Viewing History p.546
Reading Check p.547, 548
Section 2 Assessment #1-5 p.551
Define Key Terms p. 545

Day 40
Objective 3.2 Summarize the causes and effects of the Great Depression.
       2-Compare the economic policies of Hoover and Roosevelt
       3-Describe life during the depression years.
       4-Analyze the effects of the Great Depression on Native Americans, African Americans,
               Asian Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and European Americans.
       5-Evaluate the impact of the New Deal
16.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
16.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
16.2 Notes & Terms
   1. What were some of the shortcomings and limits of the New Deal?
   2. What were the chief complaints of FDR’s critics inside and outside of politics?
   3. How did the court-packing fiasco harm FDR’s reputation?
   “head of the family”
   affect of the New Deal on women
   affect of the New Deal on African Americans
   American Liberty League
   demagogue
                                        US History                                        42
                                       Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11

    Father Coughlin
    Nationalization
    Huey Long
    criticism of the New Deal
    deficit spending
    ideology
    free market
    court packing
    Southern Democrats
Possible Activities
Video – 1930s
Video – Cinderella Man
Video – The Grapes of Wrath
Depression Simulation
Complete 16.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.545
Independent Work
         16.3 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
         Chapter 16 – The New Deal, 1933-1941
                 Section 3 – The Last Days Of The New Deal, pages 553-559 (7)
Outline 16.3
Optional Homework
Viewing History p.553, 555
Interpreting Graphs p.554
Reading Check p.555, 558
Viewing Fine Art p.558
Section 3 Assessment #1-5 p.559
Define Key Terms p. 553

Day 41
Objective 3.2 Summarize the causes and effects of the Great Depression.
       2-Compare the economic policies of Hoover and Roosevelt
       3-Describe life during the depression years.
       4-Analyze the effects of the Great Depression on Native Americans, African Americans,
               Asian Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, and European Americans.
       5-Evaluate the impact of the New Deal
16.3 Reading Quiz
Current Events
16.3 Homework – Discuss/Collect
16.3 Notes & Terms
   1. What factors led to the recession of 1937, and how did the Roosevelt administration
       respond?
   2. What triumphs and setbacks did unions experience during the New Deal era?
   3. What effects did the New Deal have on American culture?
   4. What lasting effects can be attributed to the New Deal?
   recession
   national debt
   balanced budget
   revenue
   Roosevelt Recession of 1937
   organized labor
                                         US History                                43
                                        Lesson Plans
                                        Term 1, 10-11

    John L. Lewis
    Congress of Industrial Organizations
    coalition
    collective bargaining
    sit-down strike
    Memorial Day Massacre
    Grapes of Wrath
    Mass Media in the 1930s
    The Wizard of Oz
    Orson Welles – War of the Worlds Broadcast
    legacy of the New Deal
Possible Activities
Video – 1930s
Video – Cinderella Man
Video – The Grapes of Wrath
Depression Simulation
Complete 16.3 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.553
Independent Work
         Study For Unit 4 Test
         17.1 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
         Chapter 17 – World War II: The Road To War
                Section 1 – The Rise of Dictators, pages 568-574 (7)
Outline 17.1
Optional Homework
Map Skills p. 569, 572
Viewing History p. 570, 572, 573
Viewing Fine Arts p. 574
Section 1 Assessment #1-6 p.574
Define Key Terms #1-6 p. 568

Day 42
Objective 3.3 Evaluate U.S. foreign policies of the 1920s and 1930s.
        2-Identify the reasons for the rise of fascism, Nazism, and Communism.
Study For Unit 4 Test
Unit 4 Test
Collect Chapter 16 Notes
Current Events
17.1 Homework – Discuss/Collect
17.1 Notes & Terms
    1. How did Stalin change the government and the economy of the Soviet Union?
    2. What were the origins and goals of Italy’s fascist government?
    3. How did Hitler rise to power in Germany and Europe in the 1930s?
    4. What were the causes and results of the Spanish Civil War?
    Adolf Hitler
    totalitarianism
    dictator
    Benito Mussolini
    fascism
    Joseph Stalin
    collectivization
                                        US History                  44
                                       Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11

    forced labor
    industrialization
    purge
    mare nostrum
    Ethiopia
    Nazism
    Mein Kampf
    Aryan race
    Reichstag fire
    Enabling Bill
    Der Fuhrer
    autobahn
    lebensraum
    Axis Powers
    Anschluss
    Sudetenland
    Neville Chamberlain
    appeasement
    Spanish Civil War
    Francisco Franco
    Condor Legion/Guernica
    International Brigade
Possible Activities
Video – 1940s
Video – Swing Kids
Video – The Wave
Video – Pearl Harbor
Video – Saving Private Ryan
Video – Patton
Video – Schindler’s List
Munich Conference Simulation
Review For Final
Complete 17.1 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.568
Independent Work
        17.2 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 17 – World War II: The Road To War
                Section 2 – Europe Goes To War, pages 575-579 (5)
Outline 17.2
Optional Homework
Interpreting Political Cartoons p. 576
Map Skills p. 577
Viewing History p. 578
Section 2 Assessment #1-7 p.579
Define Key Terms #1-4 p. 575

Day 42
17.2 Reading Quiz
Current Events
17.2 Homework – Discuss/Collect
17.2 Notes & Terms
                                           US History                                           45
                                          Lesson Plans
                                          Term 1, 10-11

       1. How did the German invasion of Poland lead to war with Britain and France?
       2. What wartime victories and setbacks did Germany experience in western Europe?
       3. Why was the Battle of Britain an important victory for Britain?
       Neville Chamberlain
       Munich Conference
       Sudetenland
       Nazi-Soviet Nonaggression Pact
       blitzkrieg
       phony war or sitzkrieg
       Maginot Line
       Dunkirk
       Luftwaffe
       collaboration
       Resistance
       Allies
       The Blitz
       RAF
       Winston Churchill
Possible Activities
Video – 1940s
Video – Swing Kids
Video – The Wave
Video – Pearl Harbor
Video – Saving Private Ryan
Video – Patton
Video – Schindler’s List
Munich Conference Simulation
Review For Final
Complete 17.2 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.575
Independent Work
       17.3 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
       Chapter 17 – World War II: The Road To War
                Section 3 – Japan Builds An Empire, pages 581-584 (4)
Outline 17.3
Optional Homework
Viewing History p. 581
Map Skills p. 583
Reading Check p. 583
Section 3 Assessment #1-4 p.584
Define Key Terms #1-4 p. 581

Day 43
Objective 3.3 Evaluate U.S. foreign policies of the 1920s and 1930s.
       3-Analyze the racial, ethnic, economic, and political factors that contributed to U.S.
               foreign policy to 1941
       4-Describe growing tensions between Japan and the United States.
17.3 Reading Quiz
Current Events
17.3 Homework – Discuss/Collect
17.3 Notes & Terms
                                        US History                                        46
                                       Lesson Plans
                                       Term 1, 10-11

    1. What were the causes and effects of Japan’s growing military power?
    2. Why was the Manchurian Incident a turning point for Japan’s civilian government?
    3. What was the initial outcome of Japan’s war against China?
    4. Why did Japan look beyond China for future expansion?
    Matthew Perry and Tokyo Bay (1853)
    Washington Naval Conference
    Samurai/Bushido/Japanese Military
    Japanese Imperialism/Militarism
    Manchurian Incident
    puppet state
    “Rape of Nanking” (Nanjing)
    quarantine
    Neutrality Acts
    Burma Road
    Mao Zedong
    Greater East Asia Co-Prosperity Sphere
Possible Activities
Video – 1940s
Video – Swing Kids
Video – The Wave
Video – Pearl Harbor
Video – Saving Private Ryan
Video – Patton
Video – Schindler’s List
Munich Conference Simulation
Review For Final
Complete 17.3 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.581
Independent Work
        17.4 Reading & Homework
Homework
Read - America: Pathways To The Present
        Chapter 17 – World War II: The Road To War
                Section 4 – From Isolationism To War, pages 585-589 (5)
Outline 17.4
Optional Homework
Viewing History p. 585, p. 587
Interpreting Political Cartoons p. 586
Reading Check p. 587
Map Skills p. 588
Section 4 Assessment #1-4 p.589
Define Key Terms #1-4 p. 585

Day 44, Monday, March 17
17.4 Reading Quiz
Current Events
17.4 Homework – Discuss/Collect
17.4 Notes & Terms
       1. Why did the United States choose neutrality in the 1930s?
       2. How did American involvement in the European conflict grow from 1939 to 1941?
       3. Why did Japan’s attack on Pearl Harbor lead the United States to declare war?
       isolationism
       neutrality
                                       US History     47
                                      Lesson Plans
                                      Term 1, 10-11

       Neutrality Acts
       cash and carry
       America First Committee
       Charles Lindbergh
       Wendell Wilkie
       Lend-Lease Act
Possible Activities
Video – 1940s
Video – Swing Kids
Video – The Wave
Video – Pearl Harbor
Video – Saving Private Ryan
Video – Patton
Video – Schindler’s List
Munich Conference Simulation
Review For Final
Complete 17.4 Target Reading Skill As Closure p.585
Independent Work
       Review For Chapter 17 Quiz
       Review For Final
Homework
Read - None
Review For Chapter 17 Quiz
Review For Final Exam
Optional Homework
None

Day 45, Tuesday, March 18
Chapter 17 Quiz
Collect Chapter 17 Notes
Review For Final Exams

Day 46, Wednesday, March 19
No Class

Day 47, Friday, March 20
Final Exam

								
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