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Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Integrated Strategic by liuqingyan

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									Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Integrated
Strategic Tourism Plan
Strategic Plan


Prepared for the:
       Clare and Gilbert Valleys Councils
       The Barossa Council
       Barossa & Light Regional Development Board Inc
       Mid North Regional Development Board Inc
       Regional Council of Goyder
       Light Regional Council
       South Australian Tourism Commission

April 2005




                        Kristine Peters Project Management




Consultant Contact: Angela Hazebroek
Urban and Regional Planning Solutions
Level 1, 211a The Parade
Norwood SA 5067
Telephone: (08) 8333 3335
Email: angela@pp.net.au
                                                                         Strategic Plan
                                                                              Contents




 CONTENTS



 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                                                       i - ix

 HOW TO READ THIS DOCUMENT AND ACCOMPANYING

 REPORTS

 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS



1 INTRODUCTION                                                           1
 1.1        Scope and Purpose of This Project                            1
 1.2        Project Partners                                             4
 1.3        Study Team                                                   5
 1.4        Study Approach                                               5

2 CURRENT SITUATION AND RATIONALE FOR CHANGE                             7
 2.1        Who is Currently Visiting the Region?                        7
 2.2        The Economic Contribution of Tourism to the Regions          8
 2.3        Tourism Product Analysis                                    14
 2.4        Environmental Analysis                                      22
 2.5        Social Analysis                                             26

3 ALIGNMENT                                                             29

4 VISION, GOALS AND STRATEGIC ACTIONS                                   32
 4.1        Target Market Identification                                32
 4.2        Positioning and Branding the Regions                        36
 4.3        Marketing Material That Reflects Positioning and Branding   42
 4.4        Develop and/or Reinvigorate Our Core Products               44
 4.5        Cross Regional Links and Partnerships                       57
 4.6        Building a Culture of Tourism Across the Regions            59
 4.7        Environmental Management Framework                          63
 4.8        Planning Policy Improvements                                67

5 IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY                                               70




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                                                                              Contents




ACCOMPANYING DOCUMENTS

  1. Statement of Investigations

  2. Consultation Report



APPENDICES

  1. Literature Review

  2. Audit of Regional Attractions and Family Friendly Attractions

  3. Tourism Market Analysis

  4. Environmental Management Framework

  5. Tourism Market Segmentation Systems and Their Application to Barossa and Clare
    Valley Regions

  6. Food and Wine Product Development Proposals

  7. Health and Wellbeing Product

  8. Cultural Tourism and Heritage

  9. Product for Families with Children




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                                                                         Executive Summary




EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

WHAT DISTINGUISHES THE BAROSSA AND CLARE VALLEY FROM OTHER
REGIONS?

The Barossa is Australia’s best known wine region. It is internationally recognised as
the home of premium shiraz.

The strong association of the Riesling grape variety with the Clare Valley is reflected in
the widespread recognition of the Riesling Trail. While the Clare Valley Wine Area is
less well known than the Barossa, it is gaining a strong reputation for the quality and
diversity of its wine.

Both regions have other special and distinguishing characteristics that add to their
appeal to visitors. These qualities have been attracting day visitors and domestic
interstate and intrastate and international overnight visitors for decades.

The core products identified in the Strategy demonstrate the strongest regional
differentiation and market appeal to make the region competitive, and are the most
difficult for competitors to copy. Core product is used to focus and drive regional
positioning and branding.

The core products provide experiences that use wine, food, cultural heritage and
landscape as the platforms for meaningful connections. They are:

        tasting and interaction at family owned cellar doors;

        tasting and interaction at iconic cellar doors with high brand recognition;

        guided immersion into a winery;

        welcoming country pubs;

        eating locally grown food prepared using traditional methods;

        heritage immersion;

        the Barossa Vintage Festival;

        the Riesling Trail.

The purpose of this Strategy is not to shift the emphasis away from the core attributes
of the Barossa and Clare Valley regions but to better position them so they appeal to
those we want to attract who not currently visiting the regions.




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This Regional Strategic Plan is aligned with the State Tourism Plan and will assist in
achieving its objectives at the Regional level.




RATIONALE FOR CHANGE

Research for the project has demonstrated that there is no room for complacency if the
regions wish to maintain, and preferably grow, the contribution of tourism to their
economies.

These tourism regions face significant competition for the leisure dollar, not just from
other emerging wine tourism regions, but also from increasing access to on-line wine
purchases, home entertainment, city-based wine and food events, art exhibitions and
concerts. As what is special about the Barossa and Clare Valley regions is imported
directly into the homes and cities of source markets, the need to visit them decreases.

There has been a significant decline in the number of day visitors to the Barossa Valley
over the past five years from a peak of 1.04 million in 1999 to 841,000 in 2003.
Traders in the towns reported the economic impacts of this reduction in visitors. Given
that each day visitor spends $84 on average(1), this represents a potential annual loss
of expenditure in the order of $1.5 m.

In the same period the statistics for Clare Valley show a slight increase in domestic day
visitors from 333,000 to 356,000. However, a decline in the level of total expenditure
was noted between 2000 and 2003(1). More people are visiting for the day but they are
spending less.

The number of overnight trips for domestic travellers has remained relatively static for
the past five years. The one bright spot in this statistical picture is the increase of
visitor nights and the extension of the average length of stay in both regions.

These trends provide clear evidence of the urgent need for a strong co-ordinated
approach across all sectors to prevent a further decline in the number of visitors in
order to maintain the viability of local businesses and tourism enterprises.




(1)
        Tourism Research Australia 2003




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           UNDERSTANDING THE THREATS TO TOURISM

           The matrix below provides a range of alternative scenarios that could affect the future
           viability of tourism in the region. These scenarios are not intended to be exhaustive
           but indicate the vulnerability of the regions to a loss of market share in response to
           external and internal threats.

Matrix 1: Alternative Scenarios for Tourism in the Region

Scenario              Explanation                          Vulnerability   Implications

Competitor            Could be the Hunter Region           Modest          Loss of market share.
region is             introduces children’s product, new                   Loss of investment as it is
radically             cheap airfares direct to Otago                       channelled elsewhere.
strengthened          Region, major heritage tourism
                      experience becomes a wine region.
Major extended        With drought comes downturn in       Modest          Loss of food and wine quality or
drought               agricultural productivity, water                     quantity, higher operating costs,
                      restrictions and perhaps bushfire.                   lower landscape amenity.
                                                                           Drop in visitation to coastal
                                                                           competitors.
Major new             A mainstream resort is constructed   Low to          Increase in marketing of region.
mainstream            in the Barossa Region as part of a   Moderate        Shift in market mix towards
development           major winery. The development                        mainstream market.
                      changes the market mix towards a
                                                                           Pressure to create supporting
                      mainstream leisure and business
                                                                           mainstream experiences.
                      market.
Residential           People seeking a sea change          High            Introduction of additional services
development           stimulate the sub-development of                     (shopping centres, road works
                      several rural landscapes into                        etc).
                      residential development (as is                       Loss of market share to competitor
                      happening in NSW).                                   wine region.
Large scale           To meet the increasing demands for   High            Increased heavy vehicle traffic.
winery and            wine production in the Barossa                       Loss of visual character of rural
industrial            Valley.                                              landscape.
development
                                                                           Loss of market share to other
                                                                           regions seen as more relaxing and
                                                                           scenic.
                                                                           Clare may benefit at the expense
                                                                           of the Barossa.




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FOCUSSING ON WHO WE WANT TO VISIT OUR REGIONS

The strategies in this Plan are based on having clearly defined who we want to have
visit our regions given the likelihood that they will become repeat visitors to the region
and on the nature and level their expenditure on tourism related items.

These groups are our target markets since they are the most important people for the
regions to attract in order to maintain and grow tourism. This does not imply
abandoning those markets who already visit the regions. We must continue to provide
these visitors with what they have come to know and love.

Our primary challenge is to reach those who are not visiting the regions currently and
get them to think differently about the regions. Young people aged 18-30 and families
with children are currently under-represented among those visiting the regions.

We are focussing our target investment strategy on those new markets that will grow
into our existing target markets. This is especially important given that some of our
existing market segments are getting older and will reduce in size over time.

The Barossa in particular is seen as perhaps a little staid and conservative with little to
do for families. Wineries are seen as places where children get bored easily and
parents can’t relax.

While more young people visited the Clare Valley Wine Area in 2003, there still
appears to be a lack of awareness of existing opportunities for families with children.
Only 11% of all visitors to the Clare Valley were travelling with children.

In fact a web search using the words “family friendly tourism” yielded two results for the
Barossa and none for the Clare Valley. We know it is not the true picture, but how do
we get our message across to those who don’t know?




HOW WILL WE GET THEM TO COME? (what about a big grape?)

Often we think a single major tourism product will reverse the decline. “Build it and
they’ll come” has been the motto in the past in some regions. Sadly there are quite a
few “Big” items up for sale around Australia demonstrating the failure of this premise.
This Strategic Plan recommends building on the regions’ existing strengths, adding to
and reinvigorating their core products to increase their appeal to the target markets.




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   The research identified that the target market needs are deeper than drinking wine,
   eating food and looking at landscapes and buildings. The dominant motivations of the
   target markets are for connection, reinvigoration and achievement.

   The need to connect represents the strongest competitive advantage, largely because
   so few competitor wine regions have managed to position themselves as a people
   connector.

   Each region offers different opportunities for connection based around its culture,
   history, evolution and the qualities of their people and places. The Barossa and Clare
   Valley regions already have the base product from which to add a little more value
   making connection more likely. Positioning the Barossa and Clare Valley regions so
   that they tap into peoples’ needs for connection and reconnection to themselves, their
   families and to places and communities that evoke nostalgia for less complicated times
   will be a key task for those responsible for implementing the marketing and positioning
   strategies in the Plan.

                 Food and Wine                                Heritage Immersion




Lunch at Maggie Beer’s Farm Shop                              Mongolata Gold Mine




   BUILDING A CULTURE OF TOURISM IN BUSINESS AND THE COMMUNITY

   Tourism is Everybody’s Business

   All businesses derive an economic benefit from visitors to the region. The quality and
   consistency of service at every point of interaction and the warmth and welcome
   provided by local residents are essential ingredients in a positive visitor experience.



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While the majority of businesses and residents surveyed in this project considered
tourism to be important to their businesses, this was not universal. The visitor
experience is often compromised by the poor quality of personal service, uncertain
opening hours and the lack of information about what is available in the town and in the
wider region to meet their needs.

Communities need to stop assuming they know what visitors want and ask them. Most
of them are looking to make authentic and real connections to the places they visit.
Local people are the primary means of achieving these connections.




PROTECTING VALUED ENVIRONMENTAL ASSETS AND LANDSCAPE
QUALITIES

The community and tourism operators noted, with concern, the impact of increasing
industrial style development and residential expansion in the Barossa due to the
growth of the winery industry. Traffic conflicts between heavy freight vehicles and
tourist traffic and the loss of the visual amenity of the Barossa landscape were
considered to be significant threats to the future of tourism.

The Strategic Plan has identified regional ecological assets and established an
environmental management framework to assist Councils and developers to minimise
the risks of development. The protection of valued ecological assets and landscape
values is the foundation of sustainable tourism.

                                                       Scenic Landscapes




                                              Polish Hill River Valley from Paulett’s Winery




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  PLANNING POLICIES THAT FACILITATE SUSTAINABLE TOURISM
  DEVELOPMENT

  Currently Council Development Plans contain a number of unnecessary
  inconsistencies relating to tourism development policies, non-complying lists and
  definitions of types of development.

  Policies are also needed to manage the forecast expansion of the wine industry in the
  Barossa region in ways that do not detrimentally impact on those rural, environmental
  and heritage values that are vital to both the success of export wine marketing and the
  critically important tourism industry.

  A key outcome of this project is a Statement of Investigations provided as a separate
  document to enable Councils to pursue changes to their Development Plans to better
  facilitate sustainable tourism outcomes.



  CREATING OUR SUCCESS

  The Barossa will be known as Australia’s premier wine tourism destination where
  visitors connect through experiencing iconic wines, innovative regional food and culture
  and traditions that continue in the present.

  The Clare Valley will be known for the intimate connections and wellbeing opportunities
  provided by small scale wineries, accessible landscape and cultural heritage and the
  fascinating stories of its people and places.

  The regions will work together and establish productive partnerships that help to create
  a sense of welcome and belonging and enable memorable connections to their people
  and places.




Members of Regional Leaders Forum working and networking at first meeting at
                     Wheatsheaf Pub, Allendale North



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A BLUEPRINT FOR SUCCESSFUL TOURISM

        Target those we want to visit our regions, especially young people aged 18-30
        years, families with children, and couples seeking indulgence and escape.

        Reposition the regions so that the wine, food, landscape and heritage brands
        convey their ability to satisfy the needs of visitors for connection and
        reinvigoration.

        Make sure our marketing material conveys our essential message with passion
        and flair to the visitors we wish to attract.

        Develop and/or reinvigorate our core products so that they appeal to our target
        markets:

        -     make positively memorable food and wine experiences an integral part of
              every visit;

        -     provide and promote opportunities to contribute to the health and wellbeing of
              our visitors;

        -     celebrate and share our rich and diverse cultural heritage;

        -     welcome families with children and support their meaningful interaction with
              each other and our regional attractions;

        -     address gaps in accommodation types to better cater to the needs of target
              markets.

        Work together beyond local and regional boundaries for the benefit of visitors and
        local communities.

        Build a tourism culture within our communities and businesses so that across the
        regions we acknowledge that “tourism is everybody’s business”.

        Adopt an environmental management framework that supports access and use of
        natural landscapes that does not diminish their habitat and biodiversity.

        Improve planning legislation, policies and practices to facilitate a range of desired
        forms of tourism development.

        Ensuring Councils’ Development Plans facilitate vision and encourages integrated
        value add development.




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IMPLEMENTATION

To ensure the successful adoption of the Strategy by the project partner organisations
and other key stakeholders, it is recommended that:

        an Implementation Management Group is established;

        the Regional Leaders Forum is maintained and supported by the creation of task
        groups to progress specific strategy areas;

        collaborative approaches are pursued to seek and manage funding for specific
        actions;

        regional economic data on jobs and expenditure is obtained and used to measure
        the performance of this Strategic Plan;

        improvements are made to the way data on visitors is collected and analysed so
        that it enables comparison against the proposed market segmentation system.

The strategies in this Plan will only be realised if all of those with an investment
in the success of the regions are committed to productive partnerships.

It is only by working together that the Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions
will create a sense of welcome and belonging through enabling memorable
connections to our special people and places.




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                                                How to Read This Document and Accompanying Reports




HOW TO READ THIS DOCUMENT AND ACCOMPANYING REPORTS

This Document is the Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Integrated Strategic
Tourism Plan. It builds upon previous documents provided to the Project Steering
Committee, especially The Progress Report (8 October 2004) and the Strategic
Directions Discussion Paper (18 November 2004).


Material from those documents not included in this Strategic Plan has been provided in
a separate Appendix. These Appendices should be read in conjunction with the
Strategic Plan.


In addition, the consultants have prepared two separate documents:

        a Consultation Report that summarises the methodology and findings of the
        processes used throughout the project to obtain constructive input and feedback
        from stakeholders;

        Statement of Investigations that provides the basis for future amendments to
        Council Development Plans.

The diagram below shows the range of documents and the links between them. The
accompanying CD provides a copy of each document. The titles in bold in the diagram
identify the relevant file.

                                   Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions

                                          Integrated Strategic Tourism Plan




                                                    Appendices
                                      Literature Review
                                      Regional Audit
                                      Tourism Market Analysis
                                      Environmental Management Framework
                                      Tourism Market Segmentation Systems
                                      Food & Wine Product Development
                                      Health and Wellbeing
                                      Cultural Tourism and Heritage
                                      Product for Families with Children


                                                                              Consultation
        Statement of
       Investigations                                                           Report




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                                                                   Acknowledgements




ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The Consultant Team wishes to acknowledge the invaluable assistance of the
following individuals and organisations:

Project Steering Committee

Peter Beare, Chief Executive Officer, Light Regional Council

Judith Jones, Chief Executive Officer, The Barossa Council

Mark Goldstone, Chief Executive Officer, Clare & Gilbert Valleys Council

Rob Veitch, Clare & Gilbert Valleys Council

John Brak, Regional Council of Goyder

Stuart Skevington, Barossa Light Development Board

Paul Weymouth, SATC




Staff of the SATC:

        Michelle Hocking

        Fiona Cartwright

        Denise Van Wald

        Peter Cahalan

        David Crinion

        Stephanie Denton

        Richard Trembath

        Mark Gill




Regional Marketing Managers

        Meg Barker

        Rachael Klitscher



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                                                                  Acknowledgements




Members of the Regional Leaders Forum

        Dave & Di Palmer, Skillogallee

        David Cowper-Thwaite

        Graham Mill, Clare Valley Tourism Marketing

        Ian Falkenberg, National Parks & Wildlife - Burra

        John Heneker, Barossa Marketing

        Kirsty Dudley, Mid North Regional Development Board

        Linda Carter, Mid North Regional Development Board

        Margaret Lehmann, Peter Lehmann Wines

        Maureen Wright, Burra Heritage Cottages

        Meg Barker, Clare Valley Tourism Marketing

        Patricia Gordon-Stevens, The Wheatsheaf Pub

        Paul Anderson, Dynamic Potential Consulting

        Paul McClure, Sevenhill Cellars

        Racheal Klitscher, Barossa Marketing

        Robin Shaw, Winemakers Federation of Australia

        Robyn Masterman, Clare Country Club

        Ross Dawkins, Maison Cottages

        Sal Hawker, Bungaree Station

        Tony Thorogood, Thorogoods Apple Wines

        Ross Vogt, Kapunda Museum




Other Council Staff for input to the review of Development Plans and assistance with
organising meetings and media releases


Focus Group Participants




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                                                                    Acknowledgements




Visitor Information Centre staff and Volunteers for assistance with surveys


Residents and business operators who completed face-to-face surveys


Visitors to the region and to South Australia who completed surveys and in particular,
the Grosvenor Hotel and Marineland Holiday Village for their assistance


Research Assistants Aaron Curtis and Monica Hazebroek for undertaking and
analysing surveys


Irene Jones for word processing and report production




Thank you all for your contribution to this important project.




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                                                                                   Introduction




1             INTRODUCTION

1.1           SCOPE AND PURPOSE OF THIS PROJECT


The Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Integrated Strategic Tourism Plan has
been prepared to provide a strategic and innovative planning policy framework that will
help attract sustainable tourism investment to the Regions.


Sustainable tourism provides benefits to both visitors and host communities, while
protecting and enhancing natural and cultural attributes.


South Australia’s sustainable tourism strategy is guided by 12 clear principles, based
on the Triple Bottom Line. Sustainable tourism is characterised by:

        differentiation: clearly distinguishing these regions from competing destinations
        by building on inherent strengths to achieve this sense of difference;

        authenticity: genuine experiences that are relevant to the history, industry,
        culture and natural resources of the regions;

        being reflective of community values so that visitors experience a sense of
        belonging to a living and dynamic community;

        niche opportunities involving the development of specialised products based on
        the inherent attributes of an area;

        positive experiences that provide a sense of learning and discovery and the
        ability to participate in activities that challenge and stretch;

        adding value to the existing qualities by “bundling” attractions to increase
        opportunities for visitors and diversify the regions’ economic base;

        being resource sensitive so that existing and future development activities
        respect natural and cultural values and ecological processes;

        providing mutual benefits to visitors and hosts so that local communities are
        engaged in contributing to enjoyable experiences that generate additional tourism
        business;

        “telling the story” to provide a richer and more rewarding experience for the
        visitor;

        a mutually beneficial alliance between the economics of tourism and
        conservation outcomes;




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                                                                                Introduction




        excellence in design that results in a relatively unique and authentic experience
        which is respected and valued by the visitor, and for which they will pay a
        premium.




Map 1 shows the boundary of the study area which includes the two Tourism Regions
of the Barossa and Clare Valley. Please note that the boundaries of the two Regions
do not follow LGA boundaries exactly so that depiction is approximate.




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                                                Introduction




        The Clare Valley
        Tourism Region




                            The Barossa
                            Tourism
                            Region




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                                                                                 Introduction




The Strategic Plan provides an integrated approach to:

        establishing a clear vision, goals and strategic actions to achieve sustainable
        tourism;

        increasing the economic contribution of tourism to the regions;

        market segmentation, differentiation, branding and positioning;

        developing new tourism product and/or reinvigorating existing product;

        promoting strong cross-regional links that enhance visitor experiences and
        increase the benefits to local communities;

        building a culture of tourism across regional businesses and communities to
        capture an increasing share of the benefits of tourism;

        identifying and supporting the regional leaders in tourism to build the capacity of
        the tourism industry to embrace change;

        preparing a consistent framework for Development Plan policies that facilitate
        appropriate forms of tourism development; and

        managing environmental risks and protecting valued landscapes when planning
        and providing for future tourism activities.




1.2           PROJECT PARTNERS

The project was a co-operative initiative of the South Australian Tourism Commission,
The Barossa and Light and Mid North Development Boards and the four Local
Government Authorities of the Barossa, Clare and Gilbert Valleys, Goyder and Light.

Jointly funded by these partners, the project was managed by a Steering Committee
comprising the following members:

        Mr Peter Beare, Chief Executive Officer, Light Regional Council;

        Mr Mark Goldstone, Chief Executive Officer and/or Mr Rob Veitch, Clare and
        Gilbert Valleys Council;

        Mr John Brak, Planner, Regional Council of Goyder;

        Ms Judith Jones, Chief Executive Officer, The Barossa Council;

        Mr Stuart Skevington, Barossa Light Development Board;

        Mr Paul Weymouth, South Australian Tourism Commission.



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1.3           STUDY TEAM

The study commenced in July 2004 with the engagement of a consultant team
comprising:

        Urban & Regional Planning Solutions:
        -     project management, statutory and strategic planning, tourism research and
              consultation.

        Missing Link Tourism Consultants:
        -     market identification, economic analysis, product development, positioning and
              branding.

        Ecological Associates and Resource Environmental Management:
        -     environmental assessment and management of natural assets.

        Kristine Peters Project Management

        -     social analysis, industry development and community strengthening.



1.4           STUDY APPROACH

The study involved:

        working closely with the Project Steering Committee to develop a shared vision for
        tourism;

        establishing and facilitating a Regional Leaders Forum involving key players in
        tourism, business and the community in identifying the regions’ strengths,
        weaknesses, challenges and opportunities and in testing strategic directions;

        review of relevant research, strategies and policy initiatives (see Appendix 1 for
        Literature Review);

        undertaking a five day targetted audit of regional product and a family based day
        trip (see Appendix 2);

        an analysis of the economic contribution of tourism to the region;

        market and core product analysis;

        analysis of environmental assets and landscape values and development of an
        environmental management framework;




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                                                                                Introduction




        consideration of existing capability and capacity of those involved in tourism
        businesses, other businesses and the broader regional community to contribute to
        the changes that will be required to maintain and grow tourism opportunities in the
        future;

        a review of State Government planning policy directions and Council Development
        Plans;

        the preparation of a Draft Statement of Investigations to provide the basis for
        changes to Council Development Plans to facilitate sustainable tourism;

        the Development and Testing of Draft Strategic Directions with the Regional
        Leaders Forum and invited focus group participants in the four Council areas;

        consideration of the regions’ branding and positioning in the context of State
        initiatives; and

        the development of an Implementation Strategy.




Consultation Process

To assist in understanding the needs of visitors to the regions and of those visiting
South Australia but who might not necessarily have visited the regions, surveys were
undertaken with 90 visitors. Surveys were also completed by 141 residents and
businesses in 8 major towns in the regions to provide information on the level of
understanding of the role of tourism to their business and/or to the local economy and
their awareness of the tourism assets of the regions that attract and sustain repeat
tourist visitation.

As previously mentioned, four focus groups were held in Burra, Clare, Kapunda and
Tanunda to discuss the Draft Strategic Directions. Media releases were used to invite
comments from the wider community on the Discussion Paper which was available on
Council websites and offices.

A separate Consultation Report has been prepared that documents the consultation
process and outcomes.




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                                              Current Situation and Rationale for Change




2             CURRENT SITUATION AND RATIONALE FOR CHANGE

This section of the report synthesises the key findings of the literature review, surveys,
analysis of existing market research, the field based audit of the region’s attractions
and input by a range of staff from the South Australian Tourism Commission including
Regional Marketing Managers. Further details are provided in the Appendices to this
report.

Our analysis of the existing conditions in the tourism industry in the Clare Valley and
Barossa Regions provides the rationale for change and future management. This
rationale underpins our strategic actions.



2.1           WHO IS CURRENTLY VISITING THE REGION

Domestic Overnight Visitation

The average number of overnight domestic trips to the Barossa over the past 3 years
is 245,000 and for the Clare Valley this is 173,000. The average number of visitor
nights for the same period is 581,000 for Barossa and 391,000 for the Clare Valley.

While the number of overnight trips in both regions has remained largely static, recent
trends appear to indicate an increase in visitor nights in both regions. Both regions
have performed well in increasing the potential yield from tourism by extending the
average length of stay.




Domestic Day Trips

The Barossa generates on average over twice as many day visitors as the Clare
Valley. There has been a significant decline in the number of day visitors to the
Barossa over the past 5 years from a peak of 1,038,000 in 1999 to 841,000 in 2003.
There has been a slight reversal of this decline over the past three years. In the same
period, the Clare Valley has slightly increased its number of day visitors from 333,000
to 356,000. Over the same period there has been a decline in total day trips for both
South Australia and Australia.




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International Visitation

Over the past three years, an average of 22,000 international visitors spent one or
more nights in the Barossa and approximately 4,000 international visitors stayed in the
Clare Valley. In addition, in 2003 the Barossa attracted approximately 119,000 day
trips from international visitors that did not stay overnight in the region.

Appendix 3 contains detailed information on the Characteristics of Visitors and
Visitation Trends to the Regions. The majority of the overnight stays by holiday visitors
and people visiting Friends and Relatives (VFR) are generated by intrastate visitors
comprising 66% of all overnight domestic holiday visitors in the Barossa and 70% of
domestic holiday visitors in the Clare Valley coming from metropolitan Adelaide and
regional South Australia.




2.2           THE ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION OF TOURISM TO THE REGIONS

Direct Spending By Tourists

Recently released figures from Tourism Research Australia indicate that spending by
domestic overnight visitors to the Barossa was $101 million or $167 per visitor night
and the total spend by domestic day trippers was $70 million or $84 per visit.

Day trip visitors to the Clare Valley had a total expenditure in 2003 of $23 million or an
average expenditure per day trip in 2003 of $64.

Figures for domestic overnight expenditure were not published for the Clare Valley in
2003 due to issues of sample size and reliability.

Expenditure per night for domestic overnight visitors for the Barossa was $167.00,
which was the highest figure for any of the regions in South Australia, excepting the
Adelaide Tourism Region.

Domestic overnight expenditure includes airfares and long distance transport costs.

These recent figures confirm the Barossa as a high yield destination for the domestic
overnight market.

Source: Tourism Research Australia, 2003.




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Employment

It is generally known that regionally based tourism businesses tend to be small but
highly integrated into the local economy. This means that almost every person
employed is a local resident, purchasing local goods and services. Most of the
businesses employ less than five people. The largest tourism employers are the
largest accommodation and restaurant operators, employing between 20 and 50
people.

In 2001, the wine industry in the Barossa and Light Council areas employed
approximately 3,000 people in wine manufacturing, grape growing and wine retail
(Wine Industry Impact Review, 2004).

Unfortunately, neither the Barossa or Clare Valley Regions keep a record of the
number of tourism businesses in the region, nor any detailed economic data such as
how many people they employ and in what capacity, and what approximate scale of
turnover is being generated. Such a study would be extremely useful to determine the
strength of the industry, and to assist in industry development. The Wine Industry
Review notes that there are 641 jobs in accommodation, cafes and restaurants in the
Barossa and Light Council areas, many of which could be considered to be tourism
related.

It is understood that the State Government is currently undertaking regional economic
profiling where tourism will be considered as an industry in its own right. This will
enable regions to establish targets for increased employment and expenditure in the
tourism sector and to monitor the impact of implementing these strategies in this Plan
on the achievement of these targets.

Tourism is a service industry, so it has a greater capacity to employ people than
manufacturing and mining. It is estimated that every additional $1M of tourism
expenditure creates between 6 and 8 additional jobs, compared to less than one job in
manufacturing and less than half a job in mining.

Source: Bureau of Tourism Research – BTR Occasional Paper No.33




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Increasing the Economic Contribution of Tourism to the Regions

Increasing the economic contribution of tourism to the regions requires a two pronged
approach. Firstly, those already visiting the region need to be encouraged to stay
longer and spend more money on experiences within the regions. Secondly, it is
important to attract those who are currently not visiting our regions by positioning the
regions so that visiting the Clare Valley and/or Barossa regions is seen as the best way
to meet their strongest needs for connection and reinvigoration.




Who is Currently Not Visiting the Regions

Young people aged 15-24 comprised 10% of visitors to the Barossa and 15% of
visitors to the Clare Valley in 2003. People aged 25-44 comprised 37 and 38% of
visitors to the Barossa and Clare Valley respectively in 2003. Many of these are
travelling as a couple without children, reflecting the role of the regions as a destination
for relaxation and escape. Without decreasing the importance of this market, the
regions could seek to attract these couples to make a repeat visit with their children.
Recent statistics show that parents and children comprised between 12 and 15% of all
visitors. This is significantly less than might be expected given that families comprised
45.6% of all households in the Adelaide Statistical Division.      (Source: ABS Census 2001 and
SATC Regional Profiles 2003.)




Understanding the Competition

Traditionally, tourism operators have perceived their competition as ‘the place next
door’. But increasingly it is competition much further away, and even competition in
other leisure sectors, which poses the greater threat. People are generally working
harder and have lost rather than gained leisure time. Consequently, for the Barossa
and Clare Valley Regions, key competitors now include:

        home entertainment (particularly large flat screens combined with DVD’s and
        home computers) as they remove the need to travel to feel stimulated;

        wine clubs and wine superstores, as they make it possible to feel connected to the
        wine sector without having to visit; and

        city-based art exhibitions and major cultural, food and wine events, as they make
        it possible to obtain a region’s flavour without needing to visit.




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As what is special about the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions is imported directly into
the homes and cities of source markets, the need to visit them decreases. The regions
have to harness authentic ways for people to experience them, that meet market
needs and are not easily copied.




How Do We Attract Those We Want to Visit?

We have identified those who are not currently visiting the region that we want to visit
as our target markets. These are the 18-30 year olds and 31-40 year olds described
as Generation X and Y Discoverers in Section 4. In addition to the visitors seeking
wine based experiences and indulgent relaxation, these groups are the primary focus
of product development and reinvigoration and of marketing and positioning strategies.

Table 1 below provides an overview of the proposed tourism market segmentation
based on the Wine Visitor Characteristics analysed by the 2003 Cellar Door Survey
(Colmar and Brunton).




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  Table 1: Proposed Market Segmentation System for Barossa / Clare Regions

Characteristic                Wine focussed             Indulgers                              Browsers                      Generation Y Discoverers        Generation X Discoverers              VFR
Life cycle                    Mid life 31 – 50 yrs      Mid life 41 – 50 yrs                   Older age 50+                 20 – 30 years, early /          31 – 40 years career focussed,        Across all age
                                                                                                                             emerging career and             building wealth and / or young        groups.
                                                                                                                             generally not married           mortgage, mostly married – 33%
                                                                                                                                                             with children.
Motivation                    Strong interest in        Predominantly couples focussed         Range of experiences that     Experiencing special            Experiencing special character of     Driven by SA
                              tasting, learning about   on rest & relaxation, eating and       will stimulate the senses –   character of region while       region while connecting with          residents with an
                              and purchasing wine.      drinking and spending quality time     eating, drinking, art,        socialising with friends        partner, family or friends in short   interest in
                              Travel in small groups    together.                              leisure shopping, nature      Sampling iconic brands of       but intense time                      entertaining
                              with interest in          Often escaping for a short break       and wildlife.                 food and wine                   May not have visited the wine         visiting friends
                              celebration and           from a busy lifestyle.                 Also interested in history                                    region before but have heard          and relatives
                              socialising               May be interested in high standard     and heritage of the region.                                   about it. Word of mouth is an
                                                        of service in unique                                                                                 important driver.
                                                        accommodation.
Activity interests            Wine tasting at cellar    Wine tasting at cellar doors,          Wine tasting at cellar        Wine tasting at cellar doors    Wine tasting at family owned cellar   Wine tasting at
                              doors, purchasing         restaurants, regional cuisine          doors                         of iconic brands, learning      door                                  cellar doors,
                              wine, meeting wine        Quality specialised                    Art galleries, museums,       basics of wine and what’s       Short walks in nature                 cafes and
                              makers                    accommodation                          craft shops, farmers          behind personal tastes                                                restaurants
                                                                                                                                                             Children’s experiences that are
                                                        Health retreats / spas                 markets, food and wine        Moderately challenging          locally inspired with elements of
                                                                                               trails,                       nature based activities         creativity and opportunity for
                                                                                               Cycling and bushwalking       Typically travel in groups      parents to join in
Origin                        75% from SA               78% from SA                            73% from SA                   50% from SA                     40% from SA                           73% from SA
                              21% staying overnight     32% staying overnight in region        28% staying overnight in      26% interstate                  34% interstate                        11% staying
                              in region                                                        region                        34% international               36% international                     overnight in
                                                                                                                                                                                                   region
Transport                     Hire vehicle              Self-drive, usually in their own car   Own car / hire bus            Self drive, charter bus, hire   Mainly self drive, 30% hire car /     Book a tour or
                                                                                                                             car / campervan                 campervan, bus / coach.               hire a vehicle




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  Table 1: Continued

Characteristic                Wine focussed           Indulgers                        Browsers              Generation Y Discoverers       Generation X Discoverers
Accommodation                 Guest house / bed and   Bed and breakfast, guest house   Caravan parks         Friends and Relatives,         Self contained cabins, cabins in    Hotel / motel
                              breakfast                                                                      Hotels and caravan parks       caravan parks and hotels / motels
                                                                                                             (on site vans / cabins), Bed
                                                                                                             and Breakfasts
Average stay                  3 nights                2 nights                         4 nights              1 night                        1 – 2 nights                        2 nights



  Adapted from South Australian Tourism Commission (2004d) with additional information provided by SATC Research Unit




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Section 2.3 contains an analysis of core tourism product and a summary of the existing
match between available regional product and the needs of both target and current
market sectors.




2.3           TOURISM PRODUCT ANALYSIS

Tourism product is the experience offered to meet the needs of a target market. It
therefore needs to be described in terms of what the customer does, feels and benefits
from. Every region typically contains a huge variety of tourism product, but some plays
a much larger role in attracting and satisfying target markets than other product. The
most important product is that which provides the region with a sustainable competitive
advantage, usually symbolised by its ability to differentiate the region from competitors,
attract target markets and generate high yielding economic impact. This strategic plan
focuses on the most powerful of this product, and the product that has the most
potential. To do this, some of the product is set aside and the emphasis is on core
product.

Our assessment of the core products for The Barossa and Clare Valley is based on the
regional audit, a review of marketing material and input from key stakeholders. The list
in Table 2 was tested and refined with the Project Steering Committee and Regional
Marketing Committees.

Core product demonstrates the strongest regional differentiation and market appeal to
make the region competitive, and is the most difficult for competitors to copy. Core
product is used to focus and drive regional positioning and branding.

Supplemental product adds value to the core product through additional
differentiation and market appeal, but isn’t necessarily as distinctive, appealing and
readily adopted by the target market.

Table 2 lists the core product of the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions and its key
attributes. What becomes immediately apparent from this analysis of the core product
is the emphasis on social interaction between customers and local hosts, and between
customers – the food, wine, events, trails and heritage are all vehicles from which to
deliver this benefit. Intimate scale quality hosted accommodation available in both the
Barossa and the Clare Valley strengthens the opportunity for connection and social
interaction.




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Table 2: Core Product and Key Attributes

Core product                                  Differentiating attributes that meet needs of target market
                                                    Stories exchanged between wine maker and customers
1. Tasting and
   interaction at family                            Learning about the local characteristics of wine growing and production
   owned cellar doors
                                                    An environment that reflects the owners, operators, heritage, traditions
                                                    and local characteristics of the region
                                                    Safe introduction to wine for newcomers
2. Tasting and
   interaction at iconic                            Stories told by wine maker’s staff
   cellar doors with high
                                                    World renowned innovations in wine production and manufacturing
   brand recognition
                                                    Special access into the property to see production and manufacturing
3. Guided immersion                                 side, making customer feel special
   into a winery
                                                    Experience of traditional methods continuing today
                                                    Experience of innovation in wine making technology
                                                    Authentic and nostalgic setting reflecting local character
4. Welcoming country
   pubs                                             Heavily populated by locals who are relaxed and enjoying themselves
                                                    Some locals socially interact and share stories with visitors
                                                    Food has strong locally authentic and fresh characteristics
5. Eating locally grown
   food prepared using                              Grower interacts with customers and shares local context to the food,
   traditional methods                              and the local context of their local life (such as why they live there, their
                                                    vision and passion)
                                                    Well conserved but sometimes adapted heritage that can be physically
6. Heritage immersion                               experienced
                                                    Stories that are personal, nostalgic and symbolic of region
                                                    Connections to lost familiarity, memory and experience
                                                    Opportunity to learn more about oneself through stories and connections
                                                    Snapshot of local food, wine, culture and lifestyle
7. Barossa Vintage
   Festival                                         Reflection of multi-culturalism of the region
                                                    Meeting locals as stall holders and fellow customers
                                                    Being part of a long standing tradition
                                                    Alternative connector to local wineries, villages and heritage
8. The Riesling Trail
                                                    Exercise and fresh air (to work off eating)
                                                    Safe, easy, adjustable effort and children friendly




Product Market Match

A product market match is a subjective evaluation of how well certain products appeal
to certain markets, based on what is known about the characteristics of the products
and the needs of the markets. Tables 3 to 5 present product-market matches for the
Barossa, the Clare Valley Wine Region and the Clare Valley Cultural Heritage Region
(mainly Kapunda and Burra).




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What can be drawn from the Barossa product-market match is that:

        the family owned cellar doors and eating locally grown and prepared food have
        the widest match across the target markets;

        the iconic wineries and welcoming country pubs have a strong match to two of the
        growth target markets, probably a stronger match with other non-target leisure
        markets and business markets;

        heritage immersion matches all markets but doesn’t achieve a strong match with
        any of the growth markets;

        the strongest match is with the Browsers, though these are a consolidated market;
        and

        the weakest match is with the Visiting Friends and Relatives market.




What can be drawn from the Clare Valley wine region product-market match is that:

        the strongest matches are family owned cellar doors, the Riesling Trail and eating
        locally grown and prepared food;

        heritage immersion matches strongly across several markets; and

        welcoming country pubs are a strong match with two of the growth target markets.




What can be drawn from the Clare Valley heritage regions of Kapunda and Burra in
terms of product-market match is that:

        there is a much narrower product range because of the removal of wine tasting
        and any major event or recreational facility;

        the wine focussed and indulger markets are largely absent because of the
        different nature of the available product; and

        the region is dependent on two core products and these attract Browsers (an
        ageing market), Generation Y Discoverers (a young market) and VFR (a
        potentially low yield market).




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Table 3: Product Market Match of Barossa Core Products to Target Markets

                                                                                            Target markets for the Barossa
Core products of the Barossa                                                Growth target markets                                   Consolidated target markets
                                                        Wine focussed   Indulgers       Gen X Discoverers   Gen Y Discoverers     Browsers                VFR

Family owned cellar doors

Iconic cellar doors

Guided immersion in a winery

Welcoming country pubs

Eating locally grown food

Barossa Vintage Festival

Heritage immersion



Key:

                       Strong match

                       Modest match

                       Limited match

                       No match




  Likely to attract business marks / Opportunities for new investors
  Likely to attract business marks / Opportunities for new investors



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Table 4: Product Market Match of Clare Valley Wine Region Core Products to Target Markets

                                                                                          Target markets for Clare Valley
Core products of the Clare Valley wine
                                                              Growth target markets                                         Consolidated target markets
region
                                              Wine focussed    Gen X Discoverers      Gen Y Discoverers        Indulgers            Browsers              VFR
Family owned cellar doors

Iconic cellar doors


Guided immersion in a winery


Welcoming country pubs


Eating locally grown food


Riesling Trail

Heritage immersion



Key:

                       Strong match

                       Modest match

                       Limited match

                       No match




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Table 5: Product Market Match of Kapunda / Burra Core Products to Target Markets

                                                                                     Target markets for Burra / Kapunda
Core products of Kapunda / Burra part
                                                           Growth target markets                                          Consolidated target markets
of the Clare Valley
                                                                                                                    (1)                        (2)
                                              Browsers      Gen X Discoverers      Gen Y Discoverers       Indulgers           Wine focussed            VFR
Welcoming country pubs


Eating locally grown food


Heritage immersion




Key:

                       Strong match

                       Modest match

                       Limited match




(1)
      & (2) These markets are very small for the Burra / Kapunda areas of the Clare Valley Tourism Region and the absence of product that appeals to them
              such as 4-5 star resorts, gourmet food and wine means there is no product / market match.




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Landscape Character

The regions’ core products are supported by the quality of the natural environment and
visual amenity of the landscape and built form.

The floor of the Barossa Valley is highly developed with vineyards, wineries and
associated facilities and the main townships of Tanunda and Nuriootpa. The volume of
heavy vehicle traffic on the main Barossa Valley Way detracts from any sense of
relaxation or escape. Off the main road, the drives to wineries in the eastern foothills
and the Menglers Hill Scenic Drive to Angaston provide an important contrast. Views
from the look-out over the Valley provide an attractive mosaic of vineyards and built
form.




                                              View from Menglers Hill

The road to Seppeltsfield with its historic avenue of palm trees and the unique walk to
the Mausoleum is a very attractive feature of the area.




                              Seppeltsfield from the Seppelt Family Mausoleum




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The Clare Valley provides a very different landscape experience with the hills on both
sides of the Main Road to Clare providing a real sense of enclosure. The proximity of
the towns between Auburn and Clare provides a sense of discovery with each town
having its own character. The vegetation and topography of the Skilly Hills acts as a
very important visual backdrop to the Main Road and more intense development
fronting the road. The Spring Gully Conservation Park allows direct experience of this
landscape.




                                              Spring Gully Conservation Park

The Riesling Trail traverses a range of different landscapes offering rural experiences
travelling through vineyards and pastoral lands with scattered gums and more urban
qualities on the edges of townships.

The topography and mature gum trees provide for an attractive scenic drive between
Clare and Burra.

For total contrast, the drive east of Burra to the Mongolata Gold Mine exposes the
visitor to a huge expanse of mallee and bluebush country, stretching all the way to the
River Murray, a silvery gleam in the distance. With its red earth, it offers a foretaste of
the Outback.




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The approach to Kapunda from the south provides a real sense of arrival and the
ability to look down over the town from a number of vantage points reinforces the
town’s sense of containment. The Pines Reserve provides an extremely tranquil
experience which raises lots of unanswered questions about its history and context.




                                              Pines Reserve, near Kapunda




                                      Historic Building Adjacent to The Pines



2.4           ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

The Environmental Analysis for this project involved the following tasks:

•       the identification of ecological assets and their classification by sensitivity;

        a review of selected tourism infrastructure types and development policies based
        on initial work by the consultant team and the emerging strategic directions;

•       the identification and classification of ecological assets at risk with respect to
        ecological and water-use / wastewater impacts; and




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•       the development of recommendations related to appropriate levels of
        infrastructure provision and development to ensure that ecological assets are
        adequately protected and managed.




Tourism Infrastructure

Tourism infrastructure is the built structures and facilities such as roads, trails and
accommodation on land and water that assist in providing tourism experiences. Table
6 describes the types of infrastructure that may be appropriate in the regions and their
likely landscape settings. Any facilities would require extensive market feasibility and
testing. The numbers suggested in this table are not intended to be prescriptive or
indicative or demand. Specialised facilities such as a Destination Day Spa would need
to be subject to environmental assessment.




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  Table 6: Tourism Infrastructure and Landscape Setting

Infrastructure                                                Likely Landscape Setting
Serviced Cabins
High quality self-contained cabins designed for               Likely to be located close to existing services,
several nights accommodation by small groups and              especially at the periphery of towns, possibly
families with showers and flush toilets.                      associated with existing caravan parks. Likely
Likely to be used as a base to visit other sites, and is      to have mains water supply and to be
not an attraction in its own right.                           connected to sewer or STEDS facilities.
Likely to be developed in clusters of 5 to 8 cabins.          Likely to be located in park-like vegetation (i.e.
                                                              mature trees with cleared understorey).
'Eco-hut'
Cabins designed as a staging site on walking or               Likely to be located distant from towns, in or
cycling trails, for one or two nights accommodation.          near modified or unmodified native vegetation
Facilities limited to bunk beds, composting toilets,          and close to natural attractions (NPWS /
rainwater. Probably no mains power.                           forestry reserves, walking / cycling trails).
Likely to be developed in clusters of up to 5 huts.
Retreat/Eco-Lodge Accommodation
Retreat or lodge accommodation designed to manage             Likely to be located distant from towns, in or
environmental impacts. Quality furnishings. May               near modified or unmodified native vegetation
utilise mains infrastructure or rely on alternative           and close to natural attractions (NPWS /
sustainable technologies such as solar power and              forestry reserves, walking / cycling trails).
aerobic waste treatment systems.
Small scale development in clusters of 3-10 units.
Medium scale development of 11-50 units.
Resort / Country Club
Major facility with cabin and motel accommodation of          Likely to be located in modified landscapes in
up to 100 units, conference facilities. Likely to include     or near existing facilities such as wineries. Will
on-site recreation attractions such as golf, tennis,          require mains water, sewer facilities and mains
swimming pool.                                                electricity.
Walking Trails
Constructed trails to facilitate both short walks to          Individual natural attractions (e.g. NPWS /
particular sites and sustained overnight walking trips.       forestry reserves), established trails (Mawson,
                                                              Heysen, Riesling)
Cycling Trails (road and off-road)
Constructed trails or off-road areas for short cycle          Individual natural attractions (e.g. NPWS /
journeys or overnight cycle tours.                            forestry reserves), established trails (Mawson,
                                                              Heysen, Riesling)
Camping Facilities
Camping in designated areas in natural settings.              NPWS reserves, forestry reserves, Council
Facilities likely to be limited to bins, picnic tables,       reserves.
possibly watering points and composting toilets.
Horse Riding Trails
Constructed designated trails for horse riding on             NPWS / forestry reserves, Council reserves,
public and private land by agreement with associated          roadsides, private property
parking and unloading areas, watering points.




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    Table 6: Continued

Infrastructure                                                            Likely Landscape Setting
Recreational Vehicles Access Routes
Designated gravel roads and tracks suited to off-                         Dry-weather roads, unsealed roads, unmade
road vehicle use.                                                         road reserves, private property, Council
                                                                          reserves and NPWS / forestry reserves.
Roads and Bridges
Construction to facilitate development activities                         Existing roads could be sealed, widened,
including tourism, industry expansion, agricultural                       straightened and bridges upgraded.
pursuits.


    Ecological Assets

    A detailed description of the regions’ ecological assets is provided in Appendix 4. This
    section of the report briefly summarises the conservation importance and impact
    sensitivity. Appropriate uses are identified for each asset class.

              Asset Class                                      Examples                    Appropriate Tourism
                                                                                              Infrastructure
    Conservation sites and                        Conservation Parks                  Constructed and sign posted
    areas                                         Native Forest Reserves              trails for foot and cycle access

                                                  Sites on the Register of the
                                                  National Estate
                                                  Land subject to Heritage
                                                  Agreements
    Unmodified remnant                            Ridgelines                          Walking trails
    native vegetation not                         Riparian areas along major          Cycle tracks
    currently managed for                         water courses                       Low impact visitor facilities such
    conservation purposes
                                                  Pastoral areas to east of Burra     as picnic tables, rubbish bins,
                                                  and Mount Bryan                     composting toilets, eco huts and
                                                                                      lodges
    Mixed use conservation                        Council Reserves such as Burra      Camping facilities
    sites                                         Creek Gorge                         Walking and cycling trails
                                                  Road and Rail Reserves              Built development such as eco
                                                  Forestry & SA Water Reserves        huts, retreats and lodges,
                                                  Recreation Parks (eg Para           clusters of cabins in areas of
                                                  Wirra)                              disturbed or less significant
                                                                                      vegetation subject to clearance
                                                  Private land
                                                                                      approval
                                                                                      Recreational horse trails
                                                                                      constructed to appropriate
                                                                                      standard




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          Asset Class                                    Examples                   Appropriate Tourism
                                                                                       Infrastructure
Highly modified native                        Most Council Reserves, eg The    Caravan and camping grounds
vegetation or scattered                       Pines, Kapunda                   Facilities for a variety of
remnant vegetation on                         Areas along the Riesling Trail   recreation activities including off-
public and private land                       and adjacent to vineyards and    road bicycles, 4WD access and
                                              townships in the Barossa         horse riding
                                              Rail and Road Reserves with      Built development – resorts,
                                              modified native vegetation and   cabins, eco huts, subject to
                                              no understorey vegetation        approval to clear vegetation



Gaps In Infrastructure Provision

The South Australian Tourism Commission has undertaken signage audits that have
identified problems with consistency and confusion. The actions identified in the audits
will need to be progressed through the provision of appropriate levels of funding.

Infrastructure will be required to support future product development as indicated in
this Strategic Plan. This will include roads, trails, visitor amenities and signage.

The Barossa Valley Way requires urgent maintenance due to existing conflicts
between heavy vehicles and local and tourist traffic. Future winery related
development will only exacerbate this situation. A separate heavy vehicle route is
needed to reduce the real safety risks of conflict between trucks and slow moving
tourist vehicles enjoying the countryside and looking for the entrances to wineries.



2.5           SOCIAL ANALYSIS

Business and Community Attitudes

Surveys of business operators and residents in eight towns provided a good insight
into attitudes toward, and the underlying capacity of the region to respond to the
expansion of tourism opportunities.

Face to face surveys were completed with 78 business owners/operators and 63
residents in Burra, Clare, Eudunda, Kapunda, Mount Pleasant, Angaston, Nuriootpa
and Tanunda. Detailed summaries of these surveys are provided in the Consultation
Report.




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Importance of Tourism

Tourism was not universally recognised as being important to business by 88% of the
businesses surveyed, with only 12% of business respondents not considering tourism
to be important to their business.

Businesses that are less likely to see tourism as important included clothing and
hardware shops, butchers and petrol stations – a worrying finding considering that
petrol stations are one of the most important sources of local information for visitors,
and that local shops are often seen as good opportunities to get in touch with the
authentic experience of a region and to buy products that are best considered at
leisure, a luxury not always available to busy city people.

Tourism was recognised as being very important by 72% of all residents who
responded to the survey.

The greatest benefits of tourism for businesses were the financial and economic
benefits (42% of responses). Other benefits frequently-mentioned by businesses
were: keeping the town alive/vibrant/more people around (19%), increased awareness
and promotion (14%), and benefit to all businesses in the town (12%).

Residents also recognised economic benefits (69% of respondents), along with more
people/better services/enhanced community (27%). Employment was mentioned by
16% of residential respondents, compared to only 6% of businesses.




Understanding What Appeals to Visitors

Residents identified heritage and history to be the most appealing aspect of their region
and saw the retention of town character and a healthy environment as a good way of
encouraging visitors to return.

There was general agreement that providing good quality friendly service and creating
a positive first impression by attention to detail and presentation are the main
ingredients in an enjoyable visitor experience. The availability of good food and
affordable accommodation are also seen as important. Respondents also noted the
need to educate locals to appreciate tourists and provide a welcoming approach and
good information. Visitors also noted their appreciation of friendly and responsive
service, consistency and information specific to their interests.




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Tourism related developments that are large scale, garish, and not in keeping with the
character and heritage of the area were considered to be inappropriate. Large scale
housing or industrial developments were seen as potentially detracting from tourism.
Residents and businesses considered that heritage areas should be protected, as
should highly visible areas such as town gateways and main streets.




Current Weaknesses and Gaps in Meeting the Needs of Visitors to the Region

The following gaps and weaknesses were identified by the Regional Leaders Forum
and through the business and community surveys and regional audit. It is perceived
that there is a/an:

        lack of awareness by the community about their involvement in tourism and by
        tourism operators to enable better promotion of what’s available in the region;

        inconsistency in the quality of the personal service provided to visitors;

        lack of certainty in opening hours, particularly of food venues, but also retail and
        hospitality;

        lack of a collective approach to sharing information and building cross-referrals
        between businesses that service tourist needs;

        inconsistent approaches by staff and volunteers in the Visitor Information Centres;

        insufficient accommodation in the $75-$150 per night price range;

        lack of family friendly activities, and/or awareness and promotion of existing
        activities and venues that are family friendly;

        potential conflict between passenger vehicles and heavy freight vehicles reducing
        the amenity of tourist routes;

        lack of packaged information bringing together accommodation and attractions,
        particularly to appeal to potential growth markets and the self-drive market from
        Adelaide;
        lack of a cross-regional view, resulting in duplication and limited knowledge of
        tourism product in neighbouring areas, which means that visitors tend to pass
        through the regions rather than staying for longer periods.




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3             ALIGNMENT

The Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions Integrated Strategic Tourism Plan is
an initiative of South Australia’s Sustainable Tourism Package. This Regional Plan is
aligned with the State Tourism Plan and will assist in achieving its objectives at the
regional level.




State Tourism Plan

The South Australian Tourism Plan 2003-2008 identifies four key themes and eight
complementary themes as the basis for tourism experiences.

The Barossa and Clare Valley Regions offer opportunities for tourism experiences
related to the core themes of:

        wine and food;

        festivals and events;

and the complementary themes of:

        arts and culture;

        history and heritage;

        rural / country living;

        sports tourism;

        healthy lifestyle;

        special interest markets (eg antiques, bird watching, fossicking).

There are also some opportunities for nature based and/or ecotourism in association
with the conservation parks, and the existing Heysen and Mawson walking and cycling
trails and other trails developed to create loops and links. The mallee and saltbush
country east of Burra and through the ranges also offers an accessible outback
experience for the independent 4WD traveller. For those seeking to get “off the beaten
track” within a half a day of Adelaide, this area remains relatively undiscovered.

Both regions are well positioned to take advantage of the “substantial growth in the
tourist ‘drive market’”.




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The Sustainable Tourism Package consists of 16 aligned initiatives and projects
designed to ensure the sustainable development of tourism consistent with South
Australia’s vision.




Wine Tourism Strategy 2004-2006

This Strategy was released to the industry through a series of Wine and Food Tourism
Road Shows held across the State’s wine regions during August 2004.

The Strategy seeks to “maintain South Australia’s position as Australia’s wine and food
state, to ensure that South Australia is the first choice for wine visitors and that wine
and food are an essential component of the South Australian experience”.

The other key goals are to “enrich the wine and food experience” and to “empower
wine and food businesses with tourism knowledge and skills and implement a
supportive policy and planning framework”.

The Barossa Region and Clare Valley Wine Area within the Clare Valley Region are
key contributors to the State’s success as a wine and food tourism destination. This
Regional Strategy focuses on making positively memorable wine and food experiences
a part of every visit to the Regions.




Draft Cultural Tourism Strategy 2003-2008

“Cultural tourism is a demonstrably significant component of South Australia’s tourism
market and tourism positioning. It is now understood to encompass much more than
the consumption of arts and heritage product”. (Unpublished Draft Cultural Tourism
Strategy 2003-2008, SATC).

This Draft Strategy seeks to define culture and heritage holistically as everything we do
and the stories we tell. It proposes that South Australia “shifts from an almost
exclusive emphasis on the Early Days (of White settlement) to a more mixed approach
reflecting the strong and long tradition of Aboriginal peoples, the large sweep of 20th
Century history and our contemporary lifestyle and experience”.

This shift is not only a more responsible way to communicate and educate, but
increases the appeal of South Australia to the target markets (particularly children).



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The Draft State Strategy provides an overarching framework for regional strategies for
the Barossa and Clare Valley, particularly those related to fostering styles of
interpretation and visitor experiences which are fresh and local, rather than formal and
standardised.

This Regional Strategy seeks to support South Australians who are engaged in
greeting and guiding visitors to “become good story tellers and good cultural
ambassadors and hosts”.




Sustainable Tourism Development in Regional South Australia – Discussion
Paper (2002)

In 2002, the South Australian Tourism Commission in partnership with Planning SA,
prepared the “Sustainable Tourism Development in Regional South Australia
Discussion Paper”.

The Discussion Paper considered how new Development Plan policies for tourism
might be developed and implemented that will assist South Australia to capitalise on its
unique assets and tourism opportunities.

The Discussion Paper identifies a range of policy gaps including a number of
recommendations. Section 5 of the Discussion Paper provides input into:

        regional / local strategy planning and Council PARs;

        Ministerial PAR;

        regulation amendments to support PARs;

        planning bulletin; and a

        developer guide.

This Discussion Paper has been reviewed and utilised by the consultancy team,
particularly in respect to planning policy recommendations.




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4.            VISION, GOALS AND STRATEGIC ACTIONS

CREATING SUCCESS

The Barossa will be known as Australia’s premier wine tourism destination
where visitors connect through experiencing iconic wines, innovative regional
food and culture and traditions that continue in the present.

The Clare Valley will be known for the intimate connections and wellbeing
opportunities provided by small scale wineries, accessible landscape and
cultural heritage and the fascinating stories of its people and places.

The regions will work together and establish productive partnerships that help to
create a sense of welcome and belonging and enable memorable connections to
their people and places.




4.1           TARGET MARKET IDENTIFICATION

Existing Market Segmentation Systems

There is no single market segmentation system that fully describes the visitors to the
Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism Regions. The SATC uses the BDA Typology 111 to
monitor interstate and overseas visitors to South Australia. Holiday visitors are
described by their main motivation for travelling and the length of their stay. Appendix 5
contains a description of the region’s current markets, and specifically the holiday
typology market segments used by the SATC and their application to the Clare Valley
and Barossa Regions(1).

Other market segmentation approaches were explored to select one that could provide
greater understanding of the motivations and behaviours of the majority of visitors who
are South Australians. The Cellar Door Survey undertaken by the SATC in 2003
updated and tracked changes in the wine tourism market since the first survey in 2000.
Almost 900 surveys were conducted at Cellar Doors in six regions including Barossa
and the Clare Valley.




(1)
       It should be noted that interstate and overseas visitors comprised only 40% of the total overnight visitors
      to the Clare Valley and 34% in the Barossa in 2003




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Proposed Tourism Market Segmentation System

The wine tourism market segmentation utilised to analyse the Cellar Door Survey is
considered to best reflect the nature of visitors to the Barossa and Clare Valley wine
regions, and is thus proposed to be used as the main domestic holiday segmentation
system for this Plan.

Appendix 5 contains a description of the wine tourism market segmentation system
and how this is related to the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions. It is acknowledged
that some non-wine related visitors are not directly captured by these descriptors,
however, further analysis of the types of activities that groups such as “browsers” and
“discoverers” participate in, demonstrates that this segmentation approach could be
adapted to include those parts of the region where wine is not part of the product
offering.

Table 1 in Section 2.3 presents an adaptation of the wine tourism market
segmentation, which this Tourism Strategy proposes as the primary basis for
monitoring intrastate and interstate visitation. The existing BDA Holiday Typologies will
continue to be used by SATC for monitoring interstate visitation. Greater use should
be made of this system to target preferred visitors to the regions.

Referring to Table 1, it can be seen that the authors of this Plan have split the
Discoverer segment into Generation Y and Generation X(2) aged markets, to recognise
the vastly different characteristics and subsequent needs of Discoverers in the two age
segments. Those using this segmentation system should recognise that each segment
is not static. Each is aging and each is not necessarily ‘topped up’ by the same type of
people. As Generation Y ages they will not automatically become Generation X,
because they are fundamentally different people. The strong socialisation traits of
Generation Y are likely to see them evolve into the Wine Focussed segment. The
stronger focus on career and wealth creation of Generation X is likely to see them
evolve into the Indulger segment. This knowledge can be used to cultivate one market
into another and thus keep them as ongoing visitors to the region.




(2)
        Generation X is the term used to apply to the generation after the “baby boomers” born between 1961
        and 1975 generally aged 30-45 and in the family raising, mortgage establishing phase of their lives.
        Generation Y is used to describe the 20-30 year olds born 1975-1985 who are still studying or in their
        first jobs, post-tertiary study. They are predominantly single and focussed on connecting with others
        and their environment.




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The Need for Target Markets

It is not possible to be all things to all people – target markets are essential to honing
precious resources into attracting and satisfying the visitors who have a natural interest
in the region and a high chance of staying overnight and generating maximum
economic impact. The industry uses target markets to refine product and its
marketing, and tourism planners use target markets to identify ways to maximise the
economic contribution of tourism. Target marketing does not discourage other markets
from visiting, but it does place them second priority in terms of allocating limited
development and promotional resources. If you focus on productive high yielding
segments, other markets may become secondary aspirational segments.




Proposed Proportional Representation of Target Market Segments

Table 6 presents the benchmark and desired future proportional representation of each
target market segment. It should be noted that a reduction in proportional
representation does not imply a reduction in visitation, providing visitation increases
overall. These relative proportions should be used to:

        adjust the positioning, product (images and text) and target markets being
        presented in promotional material;

        adjust marketing effort (human and to some extent financial); and

        establish a benchmark to enable comparison using visitor surveys that track data
        that presents the relative proportion of each target market across actual
        customers surveyed.


Implicit in the reductions of some segments is that they are becoming consolidated
markets, and implicit in the increasing proportions is that marketing needs to grow
them further to maximise the economic impact of tourism in the region.




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Table 7: Existing and Desired Future Proportional Distribution of Tourism Target
Markets for the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions 2004 to 2008

Segment                           South       Barossa   Barossa       Clare Valley       (a) Clare Valley        (b) Clare
                                Australia      2004      2008             2004                    2008          Valley 2008

Wine focussed                      14%         14%       15%                13%                   15%                5%

Indulgers                          19%         18%       25%                30%                   33%               10%

Browsers                           22%         22%       21%                23%                   20%               40%

VFR                                22%         26%       15%                 9%                    5%                3%

               (3)
Discoverers                        23%         21%       24%                25%                   27%               42%

Gen Y Discoverers                  11%            -       6%                   -                  11%                4%

Gen X Discoverers                  13%            -      18%                   -                  16%               38%

Source: Cellar Door Survey, 2003 and Wine Tourism Strategy Research 2004
              Additional cross tabs run by Research Unit SATC
              Desired future proportions developed by consultants.
1
         Figures split for 2008 forecasts into Gen X and Gen Y.


(a) – Clare Wine Region; (b) Burra/Kapunda




Goal 1: Target those we want to visit our regions, especially young people aged
18-30, families with children and couples seeking indulgence and escape

Strategic Actions                                                           Responsibility               Timeframe
Identify target interstate and overseas markets                            SATC                          2006
Identify target interstate markets for the Barossa
and Clare Valley regions using the BDA Holiday
Typologies.
Monitor success of marketing campaigns                                     SATC                          2006
Develop a monitoring tool to track performance of                          Regional
SATC interstate campaigns in converting                                    Marketing
preference intent to actual visitation in the Clare                        Committee
Valley and Barossa Regions.
Develop regional market segmentation system                                Barossa                       2007
Adapt the wine tourism market segmentation                                 Marketing
system into a regional segmentation system and                             Clare Valley
introduce a monitoring system to check on the                              Marketing
proportions being achieved.




(3)
      Presented to generate forecasts of new segments Generation Y and Generation X Discoverers




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Strategic Actions                                                     Responsibility     Timeframe
Undertake quarterly surveys in regions                               SATC Research      2006`
SATC to assist the regions in developing a                           Unit
quarterly survey instrument that includes a                          Regional
measure of expenditure.                                              Marketing
Regions to work with operators to collect data                       Committees
which SATC will analyse against regional                             Tourism
segmentation system. This could be similar to the                    Operators
“Tourism Activity Index” that was collected by
operators.
Provide up-to-date information on who is                             SATC Research      2006 and
visiting regions                                                     Unit               ongoing
Publicise the results of the segmentation                            Regional
monitoring on the SATC website and regional                          Marketing
websites and include them in the Annual Regional                     Committees
Tourism Profiles.




4.2           POSITIONING AND BRANDING THE REGIONS

Current Positioning

Positioning is the image that a product has in the minds of the consumers, relative to
competing products. Imagine:

                                 when the market thinks of a product they think of...

We need to be able to “get inside the consumer’s head” to understand what influences
their destination choice. They are thinking about the benefits for them and we need to
be able to position ourselves as the preferred place for delivering those benefits.

Research by the South Australian Tourism Commission in 2000 found stronger brand
recognition of the Barossa than the Clare Valley Region, and stronger brand
recognition among the intrastate market generally. The study specifically found that:

        The Barossa Region is primarily associated with wine tasting and cellar doors,
        supported by activities such as restaurants, bed and breakfast accommodation,
        arts and crafts and antiques. It is more likely to be associated with romantic
        escapes, regional food, historic towns and buildings and a link with the past than
        some other regions.




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        The Clare Valley Region is associated with wine, supported by historic villages,
        quality guesthouses and B&B accommodation and the Riesling Trail. It is also
        strongly associated with peace and quiet, historic towns and buildings and with
        being a place friends would like to visit.




Current Branding

Marketing plans being developed for the respective regions discuss the Barossa brand
and Clare Valley brand. Table 8 summarises this current branding. It must be
acknowledged that the Barossa has very strong recognition as one of Australia’s oldest
wine producing regions and an international position because of its high quality shiraz.
Further interpretation of Table 8 suggests that the emerging Marketing Plans for the
Barossa and Clare seek to brand the respective regions as ‘number one or close to it’.
This is not a strategic or creative position because many wine-based regions will be
seeking this. The sub-branding of food, heritage and culture is also not a strategic
position to take because other wine-based regions possess the same product
categories and it could be argued that many have strategic competitive advantages
beyond what the Barossa and Clare Valley regions can generate (such as the natural
dimension in places such as the Fleurieu Peninsula and Margaret River).

Table 8: Marketing Plan-driven branding for Barossa and Clare Valley Regions

Region                            Branding              Sub-Branding
Barossa                           The premier wine      Distinctive “lifestyle attributes” – including our quality
                                  tourism destination   regional food, German and English heritage,
                                                        festivals and events that build on traditions of wine,
                                                        food, heritage, music and art.
Clare Valley                      Experiencing the      Wine, food, heritage and trails. Diversity of
                                  best of life          landscapes and experiences.




Recent research undertaken for the SATC by the Marketing Science Centre involved
an extensive review of all marketing material to identify what is distinctive about each
tourism region apart from quality food and wine.

For the Barossa, the theme was identified as “history that flows through to today” with
key characteristics that create the brand being local produce, regional foods, food
identities such as Maggie Beer, the historic towns and architecture and the experience
of the different cultural influences of German and English Settlement.



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For the Clare Valley, the dominant theme was “Experience the Best of Life” based on
an experience that was personable and accessible with more smaller boutique
wineries, cycling and walking trails and regional food and restaurants.

The South Australian Tourism Commission has engaged the R&D initiative, based at
the University of South Australia to develop Brand SA. This will involve a 6 month
international consumer driven research process to create Brand South Australia. This
State Brand needs to position the regions within an overall destination brand for South
Australia. This suggests that structured activities to reposition the regions should be
undertaken in the second year of this Plan so that they are informed by and consistent
with the position created by the new Brand SA.




Repositioning the Two Regions

To gain a strategic competitive advantage, regional branding needs to derive a deeper
dimension of authenticity than the broad categories identified in Table 9, and it needs
to do so in a way that directly taps into the needs of the target market. This strategic
plan proposes to build onto the consumer’s image of each region the dominant
motivations of the target market, which are listed in Table 9. This means that the core
products are further refined and subtly marketed in ways that demonstrate how the
target market needs are met. This repositioning strategy is key to a sustainable
competitive advantage.

Table 9: Dominant Motivations and Needs of the Target Markets

Connection                                    Reinvigoration                    Achievement
Spend time with partner or                    Relax and unwind                  Sense of achievement / time
family                                                                          spent has been worthwhile
Social interaction and                        Improve wellbeing / health /      Having a story to share with
friendship to feel special                    exercise                          others on return home
Romance                                       Experience generosity
Reconnection with family                      Feel secure
roots
Connecting with something                     Nostalgia for time spent in the
that is real to learn and satisfy             country
curiosity
Reconnection with self –
spiritual dimension




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Table 9 suggests that target market needs are deeper than drinking wine, eating food
and looking at landscapes and buildings – these activities are the stage from which
needs are hoping to be met – they are a means to an end. Table 8 sorts the
underlying needs into three groups – connection, reinvigoration and achievement. The
need to connect represents the strongest competitive advantage, partly because
reinvigoration is already present in many regions (such as food experiences and
retreats on Kangaroo Island and in the Hunter Valley), but largely because so few
competitor wine regions have managed to position themselves as a people connector.
The core product of both regions is already evolving towards this positioning, and
reinvigoration strategies are logically going to progress towards this direction.




Progressive Repositioning

Subject to the outcomes of the Brand SA research project, it is proposed that the
regions:

        Maintain the dominant brand of wine, BUT;

        Reposition the core products to suggest how they help visitors reinvigorate
        themselves and re-connect with each other and with themselves.




Figure 1 differentiates the existing positioning and the repositioning of the two regions.
Repositioning of the Kapunda / Burra parts of the Clare Region would result in an
immersion in heritage, supported by sub-brands of getting closer to people and driven
by a market need for connection. Figure 1 suggests that the target market needs
would drive the brand – the core products would illustrate the brand.

“A destination’s key strength / differentiation is in its brand (ie Barossa is wine and
Anglo-German heritage – a Lutheran spire among the vineyards would be the most
readily identified of all imagery – no place else in Australia has this – it is distinctly
Barossa). We must give people what they know (ie, a recognised and positive
association with wine) and then give them what they don’t know about the destination
(ie, the complementary experiences of food, cycling, walking, heritage). These refresh
and add value to the tried and true brand (pers. comment David Crinion, SATC, 2005).




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Figure 1: Existing positioning and proposed repositioning for Barossa and Clare
                                              Valley Regions

EXISTING POSITIONING


    Barossa Brand                               Barossa sub-brands
                                                    Festivals & events
                                                    Nature based
    Premier wine destination
                                                    Heritage, arts and culture
                                                    Recreation
                                                                                           Target market needs
                                                                                               Connection
                                                                                               Reinvigoration
                                                                                               Achievement
    Clare Brand                                 Clare sub-brands
                                                    Food
    One of Australia’s best known                   Heritage
                                                    Culture
    wine production and farming
                                                    Riesling Trail
    regions




REPOSITIONING

    Barossa Brand                               Barossa sub-brands
                                                    Iconic wine                            Target market needs
    Premier wine destination
                                                    Innovative food                        1. Reinvigoration
    Connecting through food and                     Celebrating success                    2. Achievement
    wine                                            “Living” traditions                    3. Connection
                                                    Cultural landscapes
                                                    Well known people and
                                                    places



    Clare Valley Brand                          Clare Valley sub-brands
                                                    Getting closer to people               Target market needs
                                                    and places                             1. Connection
    Intimate connections                            Accessible landscape                   2. Reinvigoration
                                                    diversity from the vines to            3. Achievement
                                                    the bush
                                                    Stories about people told
                                                    by local people about their
                                                    culture and history




These repositioning statements are strategic concepts and not intended to be used
literally. Further development will be required to give them tangible expression.

The following conceptual approaches for moving from brand awareness to conversion
(ie buying the brand) are adapted from the SA Tourism Plan. They have been applied
to two of the regions’ core products.




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         Awareness                                    Consideration                          Conversion
“Tell me who you are”                         “Tell me what you have to           “Now give me a reason to come”
                                              offer”
The Barossa is                                The Barossa has world               The Barossa Vintage Festival
Australia’s premier                           renowned wine, especially           held at the end of harvest every
wine destination with                         Shiraz; regional foods and          second year (odd years).
an Anglo-German                               international food identities
culture and wine                              such as Maggie Beer, historic
making tradition that                         towns and architecture that
spans more than four                          reflect the different cultural
generations.                                  influences of German and
                                              English heritage.
The Clare Valley                              Opportunities to improve your       The Riesling Trail – a 25 km
provides personable                           health and wellbeing while          walking and cycling trail running
and accessible wine,                          enjoying award winning              between the towns of Clare and
food and heritage                             Riesling and other wine styles      Auburn and providing easy
experiences in a                              from friendly boutique style        access to some of the region’s
diverse and appealing                         wineries, relaxing in your bush     great wineries, restaurants and
landscape.                                    retreat style accommodation         accommodation.
                                              and tasting regional produce.




Goal 2: Reposition the regions so that the food, wine, landscape and heritage
brands convey their ability to satisfy the needs of visitors for connection and
reinvigoration.

Strategic Actions                                                                Responsibility       Timeframe
Ensure alignment between regional brands and                                     BTMC, CVTMC         2005
Brand SA
Provide input to the Brand SA project being
conducted by SATC based on the findings of this
regional strategy.
Further develop regional positioning                                             BTMC, CVTMC,        2006
statements                                                                       SATC
Reflect the outcomes of the Brand SA project in the
positioning statements for Regional Marketing
Plans and subsequent branding initiatives.
Introduce repositioning elements to industry                                     Marketing           2006
and target markets                                                               Managers
Introduce the repositioning elements of connection
and reinvigoration to Regional Marketing
Committees and industry networks and explore
ways to include these in the messages used to
communicate the essence of the regions.




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4.3           MARKETING MATERIAL THAT REFLECTS POSITIONING AND BRANDING

There is no point in repositioning if marketing collateral stays the same – it becomes an
academic exercise. Repositioning needs to be backed up with refining promotional
collateral to the core product that demonstrates the brand and meets the needs of the
target market. Promotion and supporting images need to demonstrate the meeting of
market needs and avoid the generic images of wine in a glass or bottle (unless it is
positioning Barossa’s iconic wineries that possess major brand recognition).
Repositioning could then progressively expand emphasis as core product is
reinvigorated in line with the recommended strategies in this Plan. Fundamental to this
being possible is reinvigorating product to increase connection and reinvigoration.




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Goal 3: Make sure our marketing material conveys our essential message with
passion and flair to the visitors we wish to attract

Strategic Actions                                          Responsibility      Timeframe
Create images that reflect target markets’                 BM, CVTM           2006
motivations
Undertake a photographic exercise to shoot
connection and reinvigoration experiences for new
hero shots for promotions. Place target markets in
suitable locations and activities to reflect the
repositioning, core product and target markets.
Refine regional websites and brochures                     BTMC, CVTMC        2006
Create a new section called “Favourites of the
Barossa and Clare Valley”. This would describe
each of the core products and provide leading
examples of each.
Incorporate a special section on trails that link
experiences within and adjacent to region,
recommending activities, attractions,
accommodation and food and beverage.
Establish consistent standards in Visitor                  Regional           2005 and
Information Centres                                        Marketing          ongoing
Redevelop the introductory displays in each locality       Committees
to focus on what binds the entire region and what          Visitor
makes each locality different.                             Information
Re-train staff and volunteers on positioning, core         Centre
product, target markets and product market match.          Managers

Create an exchange programme between the VIC’s             SATC
so that staff and volunteers move between centres
and become more familiar with each other’s
product.
Introduce a uniform or at least component of a
uniform for the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions.
Investigate ways to ensure information is available
outside of the VIC opening hours, eg, partnership
with Internet Café, service station or other centrally
provided business, automated phone service with
menu options, etc.




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4.4           DEVELOP AND/OR REINVIGORATE OUR CORE PRODUCTS

The following sections describe the regions’ core products in greater detail and provide
strategic actions for developing and/or reinvigorating these in ways that appeal to our
target markets.




4.4.1         Memorable Food and Wine Experiences

Food and wine experiences have been identified as core product for the region, with
strong attraction to several of the target markets. The competitor analysis identified
that the two regions stood to lose market share if they:

        stopped innovating, and in particular, if they did not create more sophisticated
        ways for visitors to connect with local authenticity in food and wine; and

        if they limited the opportunities for personal connections and learning.

This strategy therefore seeks to refine this core product by further differentiating the
food and wine experiences. One of the ways to assist differentiation of the wine
experience is to focus product development and positioning across a progression of
experiences that assist people to evolve from introductory wine tourism consumers
towards the higher yielding and ‘brand’ loyal Wine Focussed target market:

1.      Introduction to wine would provide a basic introduction through tasting and
        interaction at iconic cellar doors with high brand recognition. This experience
        would target the Generation Y Discoverers and Browsers.

2.      Exploring wineries would provide a structured but straightforward means of
        understanding more about how wine is produced and how this affects the final
        product. This experience would target the Generation Y Discoverers and
        Browsers that have undertaken the Introduction experience.

3.      Interacting with the wine makers would provide an informal experience highlighted
        by a guaranteed opportunity to meet and talk with a person involved in the wine
        making process. This would provide the opportunity to share stories and learn
        about the local characteristics of wine growing and production. This experience
        would target the Generation X Discoverers and Wine focussed target markets.

 This continuum would be used as a focus for regional marketing and industry
 development.




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   Goal 4: Make positively memorable food and wine experiences an integral part
   of every visit

Strategic Actions                                             Responsibility    Timeframe
Identify wineries that provide required experiences           Wine Industry     2005
for target markets                                            Associations
Select representative samples of the three progressive        Regional
experiences on the wine tourist continuum to promote to       Marketing
the respective target markets. These operations would         Committees
also act as regional champions and icons.

Assist selected wineries to develop experience                Regional          2005
                                                              Development
Assist the chosen wineries prepared to provide the
                                                              Boards / TAFE
Exploring winery experience by delivering them short (2
day) courses in interpretation skills specific to wineries.
The course should feature the development and
presentation of an individual storytelling experience for
each respective business.

Produce guide to locally grown food that highlights           Regional          2006
the producers and outlets                                     Marketing
                                                              Committees
Develop connections between the culinary supply chain
(ie producer, retailer, and restaurateur) and the             Regional Food
consumer via the production of a guide to the locally         Groups
grown food that features in: retail outlets, restaurants
that feature locally grown food; and cellar doors that
offer food matching with wine tasting. The guide should
also include who is behind the food.
Release new editions of the Guide at the Barossa              Festival
                                                                                2007
Vintage Festival.                                             Committee

Promote and explain regional produce on restaurant            Restaurateurs     2005
menus
                                                              Regional Food
Encourage restaurateurs to explicitly identify regional       Groups
produce and ingredients on their menus, especially in
the context of naming dishes to lead with / feature the
local ingredients they use.
Tell the stories behind the food                              Restaurateurs     Ongoing
When time is available, discuss with restaurant
customers what makes food locally authentic (how it is
grown, chosen, prepared, cooked and presented, and
who is behind the food).
Encourage integrated development                              Wine Industry,    Ongoing
Foster single destination specialised experiences that        Regional Food
enable people to taste and buy wine and regional              Groups,
product and enjoy this produce cooked in traditional          Operators
and/or innovative ways.



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Strategic Actions                                               Responsibility   Timeframe
Improve wine and food matching                                  Restaurateurs    2006
Introduce training programmes and / or printed                  TAFE/Regional
information for restaurant staff to continually refresh their   Training
knowledge of local wines and how best to assist                 Providers
customers match them with the food being offered.               Wine Industry
Encourage the wine industry to provide restaurant/              Associations
catering industry specific exposure and training
                                                                Regional
opportunities at wine shows/wine industry events.
                                                                Development
                                                                Boards
                                                                Individual
                                                                wineries


Better matching wine and food products to the                   SATC             2006
needs of target markets                                         Regional
Undertake a Product Audit of Wineries and how they              Marketing
match target market needs based on the wine                     Committees
segmentation characteristics.
                                                                Regional         2007
Feature the matching products in the Regional brochure
                                                                Marketing
and use a map and coding system to differentiate wine
                                                                Committees
and food varieties at each venue so people can better
target venues
Introduce a competition to develop market ready                 SATC             2007
food and wine products                                          Regional Food
Explore the potential to introduce a food and wine              Groups
category in the Product Development Section of the
SATC Regional Awards.
Investigate the potential to create a regional product
development ‘competition’ . In this competition, industry
stakeholders are encouraged to develop new market
ready products and experiences with a wine and food
theme (see Appendix 6).

Breathe new life into country pubs                              Regional         2008
                                                                Development
Reinvigorate a set of country pubs so that they reflect
                                                                Boards
the needs of the Generation X and Y Discoverer target
markets.                                                        Regional
                                                                Marketing
Focus on adding to existing high profile pubs such as           Committees
those in Freeling, Allendale North and Auburn by
creating links with others towns in Burra, Clare and the
Barossa towns. Identify key business operators to be
invited to participate in a Pub Promotional Campaign.




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Strategic Actions                                              Responsibility      Timeframe
Foster the development of local food and wine                 Food SA              2007
based experiences by food establishments                      Wineries
These establishments might undertake to stock at least        Regional Food
five local wines, have staff appropriately trained with       Group
knowledge about local wines and produce, and where
                                                              TAFE
possible, utilise local and regional produce in their
menus.



   4.4.2         Health and Wellbeing

   Health and well being is a major growth sector offering significant opportunities for
   regional tourism. Recreation trails offer opportunities for exercise and exploring the
   region via activities such as walking, cycling, running and riding. A prime example is
   The Riesling Trail in the Clare Valley, which helps people exercise and access wineries
   and associated attractions. Expanding this concept into a network will inter-link more
   experiences, differentiate the region and increase the length of stay.

   Another health and well being product to increase length of stay is the Destination Spa.
   These are a form of health retreat, offering both day treatments (one hour massage
   and beauty rejuvenation) and residential programs (relaxation, diet, exercise and
   personal growth)(4). Recent international research from the Canadian Tourism
   Commission estimates current annual worldwide growth in spa demand of between 8 –
   9%. Australian research shows that visits to spas grew by 17.5% between 2002 to
   2003. This growth is being driven by: an ageing population refocussing on a healthier
   lifestyle; an increase in stress related illness; a shift towards preventative health care;
   and increasing disposable income.

   The markets most attracted to Destination Spas are Indulger Baby Boomers,
   Generation X and Generation Y markets. So a Destination Spa offers a powerful way
   to grow the X and Y Discoverer markets. The increased spend and increased length of
   stay results in significant positive economic impact to regions.

   The locations where Destination Spas are growing most rapidly are nature-based
   (such as The Daintree Ecolodge in Tropical North Queensland) and winery-based
   (such as The Golden Door in The Hunter Valley). A key success factor for Destination
   Spas is reflecting the local characteristics of the area in development, design,
   treatments, ambience and customer service. In addition to finding a location with




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   significant local character, inspirational landscape and ambience, a key development
   decision is whether to establish a single entity or an adjunct to an accommodation
   entity. Single entities are usually developed when there is significant day treatment
   demand from a regional town – this is unusual. The ideal approach for the adjunct
   option is to develop as an extension to an already successful indulger accommodation
   (such as The Daintree Ecolodge). The alternative is to develop both operations
   simultaneously (such as The Golden Door in the Hunter Valley).


   Goal 5: Provide and promote opportunities to contribute to the health and
   wellbeing of our visitors

Strategic Actions                                                       Responsibility       Timeframe
Establish a destination spa for the indulger                       SATC, Regional            2006 –
target market                                                      Development Boards        2008
See Appendix 7 for a proposed approach to
developing this product.
Develop the Barossa Wine Trail for walking                         Barossa & Light           2005
and cycling in the Barossa                                         Councils, BLD Board,
                                                                   Wineries, Businesses,
Seek funding to develop the Barossa Wine
                                                                   Office of Recreation
walking and cycling trail in the Barossa Region.
                                                                   and Sport, SATC
Stage One to focus on Angaston to Tanunda
providing links to the Nuriootpa Linear Park and
wineries. Stage Two to incorporate the
Seppeltsfield Road, Para Road loop to build on
initiatives by existing wineries and businesses in
those locations to promote these destinations.
Links should be investigated to the North Para
River Footbridge and Walking Trails being funded
by the SATC Tourism Development Fund.

Select locations that value add tourism appeal                     Barossa Council,          2005
to leisure and recreation facilities provided for                  BLDB, Private sector,
local communities                                                  Office of Recreation
                                                                   and Sport
Investigate the provision of leisure and recreation
facilities in the Barossa region in a location that
would meet community and visitor needs.
Examples could include sites adjacent to existing
caravan parks or recreation reserves that attract
high levels of use.

Further Develop the Riesling Trail                                 Office of Recreation &    2005
                                                                   Sport, SATC, CVTMC,
Extend the trail and provide additional links to
                                                                   Clare & Gilbert Valleys
wineries, restaurants and accommodation.
                                                                   Council

   (4)
           Not to be confused with the tub of bubbling hot water, also called a spa.




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Strategic Actions                                        Responsibility         Timeframe
Identify opportunities to cater for the emerging     Jesuit Order, SATC,        2005 and
market desire for spiritual reconnection             Clare Valley Tourism       ongoing
                                                     Marketing Committee
Upgrade the retreat facilities at St Aloysius, the
home of the Jesuits at Sevenhill Cellars to cater
for visitors seeking to combine a spiritual
dimension with reconnection and reinvigoration.




   4.4.3         Cultural Tourism and Heritage

   The Barossa Region has a strong cultural heritage drawn from the distinct patterns of
   British and German (Prussian) settlement in the 1840’s. This heritage is reflected in
   food and wine experiences and in the buildings, townscapes and landscapes of the
   Barossa. Visitors are able to directly experience these cultural influences in heritage
   accommodation, cellar doors at wineries and in restaurants as well as through
   spending time in churches, cemeteries and museums. The Barossa Heritage Trail
   crosses the Barossa and Clare Valley Regions including sites in Freeling and
   Kapunda.

   The Clare Valley Tourism Region includes the very important mining heritage towns of
   Burra, Kapunda and Mintaro. These towns and the Gulf Road that linked Burra to Port
   Wakefield are important features of South Australia’s Mining Heritage Trails – a
   Primary Industries and Resources South Australian publication produced in partnership
   with a range of State and regional organisations in 2003.

   Heritage mining places attract significant visitation across Australia as people seek to
   experience the past by seeing well conserved and presented buildings and dramatic
   industrial landscapes, and by stimulating ways to learn about the social history that
   they represent.

   In 2000, the Australian Heritage Commission, commissioned a case study of three
   towns with mining heritage to examine the “Economic Value of Tourism to Places of
   Cultural Heritage Significance”. Burra was chosen as one of the three towns to be
   examined along with Maldon in Victoria and Charters Towers in Queensland. A key
   finding was the significant economic impact on the wider region with an estimated
   41,000 visitors generating a gross regional product impact of $4.8 M and 333 jobs
   based on an average expenditure of $109 per head. This was the highest expenditure




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per head in any of the case study towns. (Source: CRC for Sustainable Tourism,
2000).

This study demonstrated the economic contribution of tourism to mining towns such as
Burra and Kapunda. It also highlighted opportunities to increase the value of this
market by increasing the proportion of visitors aged under 40 as these comprised less
than 35% of the total survey sample; providing more packages; and opportunities for
expenditure on other entertainment, shopping and guided tours.

The Clare Valley Wine Region has a distinctive heritage based on its settlement by
Catholic immigrants from Ireland and Prussia.

Visitors do not tend to separate culture and landscape. The stories of people and the
land need to be integrated through working closely with the managers and holders of
the knowledge about places. An example in the region is the fossil heritage that is
being uncovered and protected at Redbanks Conservation Park, a site that has
significance to Aboriginal peoples and in European pastoral history.

Professor Rod Wells from Flinders University is engaged with the SATC, DEH and the
Regional Council of Goyder in exploring opportunities for interpretation and managed
access.

Viewing cultural heritage as an attraction generates modest yield. Experiences of a
more engaging interactive form create greater yield, while experiences based on
adaptive reuse tend to create even greater yield (Hall and McArthur 2000). Examples
of adaptive reuse include accommodation (Tiver’s Row), food and beverage (Bungaree
Shearing Shed) and theatre productions and music performances (concerts in the
Redruth Gaol and churches in the Barossa).

The report identified several core heritage tourism products as having reached a
mature or declining stage in their lifecycle.

This Strategy seeks to reinvigorate these products through more stimulating
interpretation, and creating more adaptive reuse projects, so that this core product can
regain its competitive advantage, and attract forecast target markets and their
subsequent valuable economic impact.




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  In particular, the traditional museum has limited appeal to Generation X and Y markets
  who associate the word “museum” with boring collections of undifferentiated items
  inflicted on them during school excursions or by diligent parents seeking to instil a
  sense of history. We need to move away from both the term and the concept and
  rebadge encounters with history to be more entertaining, educative and relevant.

  Festivals and events provide opportunities for visitors to connect with the culture and
  history of the region while experiencing the best of contemporary food, wine and
  music. The region will continue to find ways to incorporate the built heritage and
  cultural landscapes into these festivals and events. Historic buildings can provide
  unique and culturally appropriate venues for concerts, fairs and festivals. The natural
  landscape can create an exceptional setting that generates a memorable atmosphere.

  The regions need to give priority to those events and festivals that authentically reflect
  their culture and heritage and add value to their appeal as a destination for visitors,
  especially our target markets.

  Goal 6: Celebrate and Share Our Rich and Diverse Cultural Heritage

                              Strategic Actions               Responsibility      Timeframe
Employ a Cultural Interpreter to help locals tell             SATC, Heritage     2006
the stories                                                   SA, Councils
Fund the position of Cultural Interpreter to work with
the National Trust, Councils, Museum committees
and tourism and hospitality businesses to collect the
stories, identify and train the story tellers and develop
fresh and exciting visitor experiences that bring
regional cultures to life.
Develop tourism experiences related to the                    SATC, DEH,         2005 and
Redbanks fossil discovery                                     Goyder Council,    ongoing
Continue the development of value adding visitor              Flinders
experiences to the fossil discovery at Redbanks by            University
providing interpretive facilities in an appropriate
location in Burra, guided tours to the site and longer
stay opportunities for interested visitors to participate
in the archaeological research (similar to the Earth
Watch or Conservation Volunteers Australia models
where participants pay to be part of a packaged
experience).
Reinvigorate the Burra Passport                               National Trust,    2005
Rewrite the interpretive content of the Burra Passport        SATC, Goyder
into a more humanistic orientation with contemporary          Council
themes, to cover stories featuring interesting people.



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                              Strategic Actions           Responsibility      Timeframe
Program multi-level stories so that people can
choose between alternative themes.
Convert the publication into an audio guide. Add in
sound effects and music as necessary. Utilise
Acoustiguide technology (ranges from handheld
wands to headphone players). (See Appendix 8.)
Continue to refocus the Barossa Vintage Festival          Barossa Vintage    Current
on the region’s distinctive attributes                    Festival
Continue the current focus on local content and           Committee,
broader experiences across the region.                    BTMC

Reintroduce quirky competitions that demonstrate
cultural diversity, especially around food and wine.
Reinvigorate Bungaree Sheep Shearing Function             CVTM,              2005
Venue                                                     Bungaree
Establish a joint venture with a function / existing      Station, Local
food and beverage provider capable of running as a        food and wine
separate business.                                        industry

Position and market separately to other parts of
Bungaree operation.
Reinvigorate Kapunda Museum                               Kapunda            2006-2007
Reduction in exhibits to make space for a                 Historical
programmed set of interpretive activities within          Society,
museum and surrounding area.                              Kapunda
                                                          Tourism
                                                          Association,
                                                          SATC, Light
                                                          Regional
                                                          Council
Develop the Pastoral Heritage Experience at               Kapunda Tourist    2005
Anlaby Station                                            Association,
Work with the owners and managers of the property         Light Regional
to increase opportunities for visitors to make an         Council, CVTM
interactive and experiential connection through tours
and appropriate events such as garden fetes,
musical afternoons.
Redevelop the Unicorn Brewery                             Regional           2005
Seek a public-private sector partnership to conserve      Council of
and adaptively reuse the site as a specialised beer       Goyder,
venue.                                                    National Trust,
                                                          Private lessees
Venue should provide regular cost effective
entertainment (eg. soloist guitar / singer and
storyteller of local legends and events) co-funded
with local government or National Trust




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                              Strategic Actions               Responsibility     Timeframe
Strengthen the focus on Sir Sidney Kidman                    Light Regional     2006
Develop and promote a self-guided audio tour of key          Council, CVTM,
sites in association with an interpreted collection of       SATC, BLD,
Kidman memorabilia.                                          Kapunda Tourist
                                                             Association
Identify links with other key locations across Australia
featured in the Kidman Story and find ways to tell
these stories through web-based and audio visual
media.
Focus on festivals and events that add value to              Regional           2005
the region’s positioning                                     Marketing
Review existing festivals and events and give priority       Committees
in promotion and support to those that add value to          Councils
the regions essential elements of food and wine,             Festival and
culture and heritage, and meet target market needs           event organisers
for connection, reinvigoration and achievement.
Develop criteria as a basis for deciding which future        SATC, Regional     2006
festivals will be actively promoted and supported by         Marketing
SATC and the regions.                                        Committees
                                                             Councils



  4.4.4         Families With Children

  The Progress Report identified that the region could be losing market share because
  when certain target markets (Generation X Discoverers) returned with their children,
  they found limited opportunities for children at the same places that the adults wanted
  to go (such as wineries and attractions). The traditional approach has been to provide:

          children friendly experiences (with limited appeal to adults);

          adult friendly experiences (with limited appeal to children).

  The more innovative operators place children’s experiences close by adult experiences
  (such as games inside the cellar door or play equipment outside within view of
  parents).

  It is easier for the region to adapt some of its product to appeal to certain adult target
  markets and their children, and thus keep the adult target markets, than it is to attract
  new replacement markets. The film industry has realised this and developed film
  product such as Shrek and The Incredibles, specifically to appeal to both markets at
  the same time. The real innovation for the region’s tourism sector is to do the same –
  create experiences for children, that fit comfortably within the adults experience, and




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ideally adds to it. This close integration is about helping parents and children connect.
One of the key ways to do this is through creating interpretation-driven challenges or
games that are played out over a series of locations. Each location should fit together
to add value to each other while remaining flexible enough to work as one stop,
multiple stops and multiple orders of the stops.

Goal 7: Welcome families with children and support their meaningful interaction
with each other and our regional attractions

Strategic Actions                                             Responsibility     Timeframe
Establish a Family-Based Regional Interpretive              Regional             2006
Programme                                                   Marketing
Seek participation from a set of wineries that are          Committees,
willing to offer individual yet interconnected parts of     Wineries, SATC
a total programme, building on each other through
a series of inter-connected challenges (see
Appendix 9 for further detail).
Prepare a brochure of family activities                     Regional             2005
Produce a brochure of family activities that cross          Marketing
regional boundaries and appeal to parents and               Committees
children in different age groups.



4.4.5         Address Gaps in Accommodation Types to Meet The Needs of Target
Markets

The consultants’ audit of existing accommodation product and the analysis of the
choice of accommodation preferred by our target markets has highlighted several key
areas for reinvigorating or augmenting the style of accommodation available.

The regions appear to have an adequate supply of bed and breakfast style
accommodation, although the Clare Valley appears to be doing better at meeting the
needs of the Indulger Market for high quality self-contained houses or cottages than
the Barossa. There would appear to be an opportunity to provide more opportunities
for the Indulger market in the Barossa. While converting existing motels or hosted bed
and breakfast accommodation may offer an avenue to meet this gap, great care needs
to be taken because Indulgers are seeking a total package of landscape amenity,
views, high quality furnishings and fittings, generous gourmet provisions at a price that
still reflects value for money. A converted motel room at $270 a night is still a
converted motel room!




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The region has some very good caravan parks that have been adapting themselves to
meet market demand for ensuite facilities and higher standard cabins. This product is
especially appealing to the budget conscious Discoverer and Browser travel segments
and there would appear to be opportunities to continue to improve these facilities in
Kapunda, Clare and Burra in particular. Additional self-contained cabins suitable for
families and small groups could be located adjacent to the Riesling Trail or other
similar trails that could be developed such as the proposed Shiraz Trail in the Barossa.

Consideration may need to be given to medium and larger scale resort style
accommodation suitable for events, conferences, corporate functions and packaged
tours for golf, horse racing or other sporting competitions. This could be provided in
association with an existing winery, cellar door or golf course facilities. Detailed
business feasibility and environmental impact assessment would be a prerequisite for
planning such a significant investment.

One of the emerging trends is the focus on health and wellbeing including spiritual
connection. The Clare Valley and Barossa Regions have the potential to meet these
needs either by building on an established Christian tradition for retreats and spiritual
guidance such as exists at St Aloysius’ Retreat House at Sevenhill or creating an
environment that reflects the connection between humans and nature and the spiritual
dimensions of this connection, associated with eco-lodges or retreats.

Historic houses and cottages provide an opportunity for visitors to directly experience
the heritage of the region. Families also enjoy staying in historic houses but those with
active young children could benefit from heritage properties that provide more robust
and less valuable heritage décor.




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Goal 8: Address gaps in accommodation types to better cater to the needs of
target markets

                               Strategic Actions             Responsibility     Timeframe
Develop additional self contained cabin style               Private sector     2006
accommodation                                               investors,
Dwellings need to provide two bedrooms (one for             Councils,
adults, one for young children). Best location is           Regional
close to the Riesling Trail or similar recreation           Development
facility, in association with existing caravan parks or     Boards, SATC
at least offering scenic views of the authentic
landscapes of the region. Create a cluster so that
children can interact with each other through shared
facilities and services, perhaps even with a child
minding service for night time.
Develop eco lodges and retreats                             Private sector,    2006 –
A limited number of small to medium scale eco-              Councils, SATC     2008
lodges or retreat style developments comprising
separate accommodation units would meet the
needs of Indulgers and the Generation X and Y
Discoverers. (See Statement of Investigations for
more detail on the nature of such developments.)
Eco-lodges and retreats require an exceptional
natural setting and are designed to minimise their
impact on this setting.
Develop additional serviced historic houses and             Private sector,    2005 and
adapted buildings suitable for families                     Councils,          ongoing
Renovate to lighten off the heritage décor for              Heritage SA (if
something still complementary, but less valuable and        relevant)
more robust.
Develop additional cabins in the Kapunda                    Light Regional     2005
Caravan Park                                                Council
Locate with superior views and separated from
residential area. Enhance the design and standard
from existing cabins to achieve greater sense of
authenticity and quality (to obtain an additional star).
Feature balconies with retractable shade cloth.
Reinvigorate Clare Valley and Barossa Caravan               Caravan Park       2005
Parks                                                       owners and
Introduce games, bike hire, activities and film nights      operators
during holiday periods and if successful, on
weekends.




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                               Strategic Actions           Responsibility      Timeframe
Investigate demand for and viability of additional        Private sector,      2007-2008
country club resort style accommodation                   Investor, BLDB,
Undertake business feasibility and site planning for      MNDB
additional country club resort style accommodation in
the Clare Valley.
Refine accommodation room supply and demand               SATC, Regional       2006
system                                                    Marketing
Add into the regional room stock supply additional        Committees,
categories for resort and self contained cottages.        Accommodation
                                                          operators
Conduct an annual questionnaire across a relevant
sample of the regions’ accommodation operators to
forecast room stock.



4.5           CROSS REGIONAL LINKS AND PARTNERSHIPS

 “No man is an island, but some of us are long peninsulas”. (Ashleigh Brilliant,
Cartoonist). Successful regional tourism has no place for “island or peninsula” style
thinking. As part of the heartland of South Australia, the Clare Valley and Barossa
Regions need to work together with adjoining regions to develop packages that
combine complementary products and experiences for visitors. The kind of packages
envisaged are those that have itinerary based information to allow people to choose
products that deliver the experience they are seeking. As one component of a Grand
Tour or Big Tour experience for interstate visitors, the Clare Valley and Barossa can
capture additional visitor nights by working with tourism marketers and operators in the
Riverland, Flinders Ranges, Yorke Peninsula and Adelaide Hills. People are passing
through or nearby to the Clare Valley and Barossa. The regions’ task is to find ways to
encourage them to stop and spend for a while, sending them on to the next stage of
the journey with excellent information about what there is to see and do in the adjoining
regions.

Within the region there is a very significant opportunity to increase the level of
collaborative marketing, cross selling and packaging of products to appeal to specific
markets. Some operators have begun to work together to assemble packages but
there is a need for a stronger, more co-ordinated approach.

Visitor Information Centres across the Clare Valley and Barossa Regions would benefit
from a more formal networking approach involving joint training, cross regional
experiences and electronic booking and information links. Strategies related to Visitor
Information Centres are contained in Section 4.6. Connect SA will be launched shortly



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as a booking system that provides an integrated electronic response. It is
recommended that VIC’s maximise their access and utilisation of this system.

The development of additional driving, cycling and walking loops and links to existing
Trails such as the Heysen and Mawson Trails will provide cross regional experiences
and if promoted to specialist target markets such as 4WD groups, cycle tourists and
nature enthusiasts can increase visitation. They will only, however, increase the value
of tourism to the region if they are associated directly with tourism product such as
accommodation, purchase of provisions and equipment or guided tours.

The success of this Plan will depend on cross regional implementation. Section 5 of
this report proposes a mechanism to continue the collaborative working relationships
that have supported the development of this Strategic Plan.

Goal 9: Work together beyond local and regional boundaries for the benefit of
visitors and local communities.

Strategic Actions                                          Responsibility      Timeframe
Develop cross regional promotion and                       SATC, Regional     Late 2005
packages to appeal to target markets                       Marketing
Convene a meeting of Regional Marketing                    Managers
Managers from Clare Valley, Barossa and adjoining
regions to explore opportunities for cross regional
promotion and packages to appeal to the target
markets of Gen X and Gen Y Discoverers (See
Section 4.4).
Establish mid week packages in the Clare                   Regional           2005 – 2006
Valley and Barossa                                         Marketing
Package the most distinctive assisted experiences          Committees and
with matching accommodation (eg Mongolata Gold             Tourism
Mine Tour and Burra Tiver’s Row), Barossa Food             Operators
and Wine Master Classes and Hot Air Balloon
Flight with lodges and homesteads; and self-
contained cabins with bike hire for Riesling Trail) as
a range of itineraries from which visitors can self-
select components that meet their needs.
Use distribution channels such as Adelaide-based
tour operators and coaches linking to Flinders
Ranges to target Generation Y Discoverers




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Strategic Actions                                        Responsibility       Timeframe
Add Value to Loops and Links to the Heysen            Clare Valley            2005
and Mawson Trails                                     Tourism Marketing
Continue to explore opportunities for self-drive      Committee
loops and links to the Heysen and Mawson Trails       (CVTMC), Barossa
that generate an economic yield by being              Tourism Marketing
promoted with appropriate accommodation/dining        Committee, Light
options.                                              Regional Council,
                                                      Regional Council of
                                                      Goyder, BRPTA
Promote links to Conservation Parks and Forestry
Reserves by working closely with DEH Park             DEH, Forestry SA
Managers and Forestry SA.
Drop off and pick up service transport links          Councils, Private       2005 –
Investigate the potential for a commercial tour       tour operators,         2006
operator to provide a drop-off and pick up “fee for   CVTMC
service” link to the Heysen and Mawson Trails
from Burra and Kapunda.
Explore the potential for Connect SA to               SATC                    2005 –
strengthen regional bookings and information          Visitor Information     2006
networks.                                             Centres
Visitor Information Centres to work with SATC to
ensure the regions benefit from Connect SA for
bookings and information provision.




4.6           BUILDING A CULTURE OF TOURISM ACROSS THE REGIONS

The process of building a culture to underpin tourism development in the Clare and
Barossa Valleys is multi-layered and should recognise that, in rural regions, ‘the
tourism industry’ and ‘the community’ are not separate. It is important that the
community at all levels receives consistent core messages: tourism is good for our
community, we’re all involved in tourism, work together and listen to the visitors!

This section identifies a range of strategies that could be implemented in the regions to
build a strong tourism culture. The key elements of these strategies are based on the
need to work together as regions so that:

        There are common service and product standards;

        The community as a whole is aware of tourism products and attractions across the
        regions and uses this knowledge to keep people in the area longer, and get them
        to spend more money while they’re here;



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        There is greater access to funding to support a steady focus on building tourism
        capacity in the regions.




Goal 10: Build a tourism culture within our communities and businesses so that
across the regions we acknowledge that “tourism is everybody’s business”.

Awareness

One of the main barriers to tourism development is the mindset that tourism only
concerns the people who own or manage ‘tourism’ services.

A good visitor experience means that from the first contact with the community – which
might be a visit to the local deli to buy a drink, or to the service station to get petrol, or
to the Visitor Information Centre, or even just talking to a local on the street – the visitor
receives a positive, welcoming feeling, and gets the item or information they are
seeking. In order for this to happen, the entire community needs to be informed about
their region, know how to provide information to visitors, and give excellent customer
service at all times.

There are four key messages that need to get out to the community:

        Tourism keeps our region vibrant, it is an important part of our economy - bringing
        wealth and employment.

        Everyone is involved in tourism – whether you are helping a visitor with directions,
        volunteering at the Visitor Information Centre or operating a Petrol Station.

        Competing against the next town will damage tourism, work together to bring
        more visitors and get them to stay longer.

        Listen to what visitors are asking for, tell tourism operators what you learn.




Building Community Awareness

In order for communities to change, there needs to be an increase in the benefits and a
reduction in the barriers to desired behaviours. Building awareness of the desired
behaviours is the first stage.




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Strategic Actions                                     Responsibility           Timeframe
Adopt the key messages and include              Councils, RDBs, Tourism       2005
them at every opportunity                       groups, individual
Use local newspapers to reinforce these         businesses, Barossa
messages in What’s On columns, editorials       Riverland Mid North Area
and ads.                                        Consultative Committee
                                                (BRMACC)
Use the messages as the basis of good
news stories on local TV and radio.
Work with schools to identify ways of
reinforcing the messages with children and      Schools
young people



The research conducted in the development of this Tourism Strategy found that
residents and businesses in some towns were less likely to see the benefits of tourism,
or did not see small retail and service businesses to be a part of the tourism product.

Strategic Actions                                      Responsibility          Timeframe
Target the towns that don’t value tourism         Regional Marketing          2005
Get information about the outcomes that           Managers, Councils,
result from declining tourism and use it to       RDBs, BRMACC
“shock” people into action, use a co-
ordinated media and community campaign to
raise interest and identify strategies to
address decline.
Work with communities that need a boost           Councils                    March 2005
Apply for a Community Builders grant from
the Office of Regional Affairs in the next
round (2005) and use it to work with the
communities that need a boost.



Building Industry Awareness

Some sectors (particularly general retailers and community service providers) typically
don’t see that they have an important role in tourism even though some businesses
gain a significant proportion of their income from visitors. Unfortunately, without their
support, the overall visitor experience is diminished. An active campaign is needed to
target those sectors that don’t see themselves in tourism.




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Strategic Actions                                     Responsibility         Timeframe
Target business sectors that don’t see                                      2005
themselves in tourism                                                       onwards
Capitalise on events, use these to involve        Councils, RDBs,
the businesses that wouldn’t normally get         Regional Marketing
involved.                                         Managers
Run competitions to identify good local visitor
spots, make non-involved businesses a core
part of the competition.
Present examples of how to improve the            Regional Marketing
tourist experience to retail groups and           Managers, business
business associations by finding out how          groups, Regional
other regions do this.                            Leaders Forum



The key messages outlined above should seem obvious to good tourism operators, but
as with many businesses, quite often the theory is lost among the day-to-day
pressures. It is therefore important to reinforce these messages in a more specific way
with the tourism industry.

Strategic Actions                                     Responsibility         Timeframe
Develop Collaborative Packages                    Regional Marketing        2005
Develop collaboration within the regional         Committees, tourism       onwards
tourism industry to deliver packages that         operators, Regional
people want:                                      Leaders Forum

        Hold a product and service/ packaging
        expo;
        Hold quarterly industry development
        workshops and packaging sessions;
        Do familiarisation visits and discuss
        packaging opportunities on the bus.
Share information across the industry             Regional Marketing        2005
Establish feedback loops so that information      Committees, Regional
can be fed to Regional Leaders, businesses,       Leaders Forum, Project
tourism operators.                                Officer




Poorly-run businesses are unlikely to provide good customer service, or a stable
product that visitors can rely on. Developing the business capacity of the region will
provide better returns from tourism.




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Strategic Actions                                       Responsibility          Timeframe
Support the growth and maintenance of
successful businesses
Expand the capacity of existing business           Training Providers,          2005 and
development and training programmes to             BRMACC, RDBs,                ongoing
assist tourism related businesses.                 Regional Marketing
Promote existing mentoring and networking          Committees
opportunities to new and emerging
businesses.
Encourage operators to comply with
accreditation processes and industry               SATC, RDB, Regional          2005 and
standards.                                         Marketing Committee          ongoing




4.7           ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

The Environmental Analysis of Key Regional Assets undertaken by the consultant
team is described in Section 2.4 and in Appendix 4.

These regional assets include some of the landscape areas that are most valued by
visitors to the region and the local community. It is therefore important to manage
infrastructure provided to support visitor activities and tourism developments so that
these have minimal acceptable impacts on environmentally sensitive areas.




Key Biodiversity Areas

These areas comprise a high proportion of remnant vegetation, a high species
diversity, the potential for long term viability and have a high priority for conservation.
They provide habitat for protected species and there is good connectivity between
remnant patches. Within the Clare and Barossa Districts, the Biodiversity Plan for the
Northern Agricultural Districts and the Biodiversity Plan for the Mount Lofty Ranges
recognises several key biodiversity areas (see Appendix 4).

These are broad management areas that encompass a range of tenure types and a
range of native vegetation cover and condition (included in the categories shown in
Table 10). Development in these areas should be sensitive to maintaining the scenic
and landscape values of these areas and tourism activities should promote their
biodiversity values. Cycling and walking trails and scenic routes for vehicles with
interpretive signage would promote the natural values of these areas. General
management or protection strategies for these areas include:



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        conserve areas that provide habitat for threatened species or comprise plant
        communities with a high conservation priority;

        avoid the further fragmentation of remnants;

        protect roadside vegetation that provides corridors linking smaller fragments;

        retain paddock trees and trees along drainage lines and valley floors;

        avoid clearance of riparian and wetland vegetation;

        limit the spread of pest plants and animals; and

        include appropriate species in revegetation programmes, particularly in grassland
        areas.

Table 10 provides a summary of the ecological assets in the Clare and Barossa
Regions and the suggested management approach for alleviating or minimising
potential impacts.

Maps 1 to 4 following Table 10 show the spatial arrangement of environmentally
sensitive areas ranging from conservation parks through Recreation Parks and Forest
Reserves and highly modified landscapes such as many Council parks and gardens
and private land that has been cleared for agricultural or pastoral activities.




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Table 10: Summary of ecological assets in the Clare and Barossa regions and the potential impacts of tourism activities.

Ecological asset                  Significance   Examples             Appropriate           Potential Impacts                                     Management
                                                                      Tourism
                                                                      Infrastructure
Conservation                      Very high      Conservation         Walking and               Trampling of native vegetation                       Designated walking trails
areas                                            Parks                cycling trails            Spread of weeds and disease                          Apply a buffer zone to significant tourism
                                                                                                Lighting of fires                                    developments
                                                 Heritage             Eco-huts in                                                                    Appropriate rubbish collection
                                                 Agreement sites      adjacent areas
Undesignated                      High           Native vegetation    Walking and               Trampling of native vegetation                       Designated walking trails
remnant                                          on private land      cycling trails            Spread of weeds and disease                          Protection of areas comprising threatened
                                                                                                Lighting of fires                                    species or plant communities of high
vegetation                                                            Eco-huts in                                                                    conservation priority
                                                                      adjacent areas                                                                 Apply a buffer zone to significant tourism
                                                                      Low impact visitor                                                             developments
                                                                      facilities                                                                     Appropriate rubbish collection
Mixed                             Moderate       Recreation Parks     Walking trails            Trampling of native vegetation                       Designated walking trails, cycling trails and
                                                                                                Spread of weeds and disease                          horse trails
conservation                                     Forest Reserves      Cycling trails
                                                                                                Lighting of fires                                    Restrictions on camping during fire ban
areas                                                                 Horse riding trails                                                            seasons
                                                                                                Erosion
                                                                      Camping facilities        Littering                                            Vegetation clearance only in modified
                                                                      Eco Huts                  Effluent                                             vegetation and with significant offset
                                                                      Eco-lodges and            Clearance of native vegetation                       obligations
                                                                                                Localised increases in foot and cycling traffic      Appropriate rubbish collection and effluent
                                                                      Retreats                                                                       disposal
Highly modified                   Low            Scattered trees on   Walking trails            Trampling of native vegetation                       Vegetation clearance only in modified
                                                                                                Spread of weeds and disease                          vegetation and with significant offset
vegetation                                       cleared land (e.g.   Cycling trails
                                                                                                Lighting of fires                                    obligations
                                                 many council         Horse riding trails                                                            Appropriate rubbish, stormwater and
                                                                                                Erosion
                                                 reserves)            Camping facilities        Littering                                            effluent disposal
                                                                      Eco Huts / Lodges         Effluent
                                                                      Access routes for         Clearance of native vegetation
                                                                      recreational              Localised increases in foot and cycling traffic
                                                                                                Sediment load to watercourses
                                                                      vehicles, retreats,
                                                                                                Stormwater run-off to watercourses
                                                                      cabins, resorts



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Table 10: Continued

Ecological asset                  Significance   Examples            Appropriate        Potential Impacts                                 Management
                                                                     Tourism
                                                                     Infrastructure
Key Biodiversity                  High           Mid North           (Site dependent)       Fragmentation of remnant vegetation              Protection of areas comprising threatened
                                                                                            Disruption of wildlife corridors                 species or plant communities of high
Areas                                            Grasslands
                                                                                            Disturbance to threatened species and plant      conservation priority
                                                 Kapunda / Tothill                          communities                                      Protection of important wildlife corridors
                                                 Range                                      Inappropriate revegetation                       Vegetation clearance only in modified
                                                 Mount Crawford                             Clearance of native vegetation                   vegetation and with significant offset
                                                 area                                       Spread of weeds and disease                      obligations
                                                                                                                                             Designated walking trails, cycling trails and
                                                                                                                                             horse trails




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         LINWOOD             Kapunda/Tothill Range                                                       DUTTON




                                                                                                   Eastern Hills
                                                                                                          TRURO




                                                                                     STOCKWELL



                     FREELING                          GREENOCK

                                                                     NURIOOTPA                          MOCULTA
     TEMPLERS

                                                                                    PENRICE

                                                                                    ANGASTON

                       SHEA OAK LOG
                                                                TANUNDA

      ROSEWORTHY



                                ROSEDALE


                                                                    Barossa Range


                                             LYNDOCH
      GAWLER




                                                                                                    EDEN VALLEY




                                             WILLIAMSTOWN



                         South Para
                                                                                                  SPRINGTON


                                                                                              Eastern Hills
                                                        Mt Crawford Complex




                                                                                      MOUNT PLEASANT

                                   KERSBROOK

                                                   FORRESTON


TEA TREE GULLY
                                                                  BIRDWOOD                TUNGKILLO
                                             GUMERACHA

         Legend

            Very highly sensitive areas
            Highly sensitive areas                             Barossa District Council
            Moderately sensitive areas
            Low sensitivity areas / Unclassified
            Key Biodiversity Area boundaries
                                                                                       LEIGHTON

                   BOUCAUT
                                                                                                                   BURRA

                                                                HILLTOWN
               BRINKWORTHROCHESTER


                                                                                       SWAMPY FLAT
  CONDOWIE                                                 Midnorth Grasslands
                                                                                                        HANSON


                                                                                      GUM CREEK SOUTH
                                               STANLEY FLAT WHITE HUT

                                          BENBOURNI
                                                      ATHERLEY                                  FARRELL FLAT
                                                   ARMAGH CLARE

                                 BLYTH

                                                          GILLENTOWN
                                                                                                                EMUVILLE
                                                              SEVENHILL
                                                                                                         BLACK SPRINGS
                                                                                   MINTARO
                                     KYBUNGA                     PENWORTHHAM



                                                                  WATERVALE
EVERARD CENTRAL
                                                                                                                WATERLOO
                                                                                                      MANOORA

     MOUNT TEMPLETON       WAINAPPE
                                                                           Clare
                                                   HOYLETON                AUBURN




                                                                                             SADDLEWORTH
                     WATCHMAN             HALBURY                                                               HORSHAM

      WHITWARTA
                                                                                                           SPRINGFIELD
                                                                                                                MARRABEL
                    BALAKLAVA                                               RHYNIE
                                                                                       RIVERTON

                                          THE ROCKS
                                                                SALTER SPRINGS

                                                                                        NAVAN
                   ERITH                                                                                        HAMILTON

KALLORA


                                                                 ALMA                        TARLEE
                                               OWEN
      AVON
                                                       STOCKYARD CREEK
                              PINERY

                                                                                     STOCKPORT                   KAPUNDA
                                                        BARABBA
                                                                           HAMLEY BRIDGE LINWOOD
          Legend
               LONG PLAINS

            Very highly sensitive areas
            Highly sensitive areas
                                                      District Council of Clare and Gilbert Valleys
            Moderately sensitive areas
            Low sensitivity areas / Unclassified
            Key Biodiversity Area boundaries
          BELALIE NORTH
                                                      FRANKLYN
                                  TEROWIE

                 CANOWIE BELT
JAMESTOWN
                               WHYTE-YARCOWIE


    BELALIE EAST

                OLD CANOWIE
                                ULOOLOO

                                             PEPPERMINT GULLY
                 CANOWIE                        MOUNT BRYAN EAST
                                HALLETT




                                                                                    Limit of vegetation mapping
     HACKLINS CORNER
            NORTH BOOBOROWIE
SPALDING
             Midnorth Grasslands
                                MOUNT BRYAN              TRACY
                 BOOBOROWIE
                                                       MONGALATA
   ANDREWS

                  LEIGHTON

                                     BURRA         DOUGLAS
                                                       RED BANKS
    HILLTOWN


                  SWAMPY FLAT
                            HANSON

    WHITE HUT    GUM CREEK SOUTH
STANLEY FLAT
                      FARRELL FLAT                    WORLDS END
  CLARE
                                                                                                                  FLORIETON
ARMAGH
  GILLENTOWN
   SEVENHILL     BLACK SPRINGS EMUVILLE
             MINTARO                    EMU DOWNS
PENWORTHHAM              PARR WELL APOINGA

     WATERVALE
                                                         ROBERTSTOWN
                           MANOORA
                                      TOTHILL BELT
                                                                                                                                  MORGAN
  Clare AUBURN
                                                                                                                                EBA
                                                      POINT PASS
                    SADDLEWORTH
                                                       AUSTRALIA PLAINS         MOUNT MARY
                   TOTHILL CREEK HORSHAM JULIA
                                                                          BOWER
                SPRINGFIELD
                            MARRABELTARNMA    HAMPDEN PEEP HILL
          RHYNIE
                                                              SUTHERLANDS
                RIVERTONKapunda/Tothill Range    EUDUNDA
    SALTER SPRINGS                      BUCHANAN
                                                         Eastern Hills
                   NAVAN                        KOONINDERIE
                                HAMILTON ANLABY                                                                                WOODS FLAT
                                                                   NEALES FLAT BROWNLOW
                                                  HANSBOROUGH
                                                                                                                              SINCLAIR FLAT
     ALMA            TARLEE
                                                                         FRANKTON
 STOCKYARD CREEK

                 STOCKPORT           KAPUNDA                                    STONEFIELD
 BARABBA                                                                                                                      BLANCHETOWN
            Legend LINWOOD                              ST KITTSDUTTON      DUTTON EAST

               Very highly sensitive areas
               Highly sensitive areas                                    Goyder Regional Council
               Moderately sensitive areas
               Low sensitivity areas / Unclassified
               Key Biodiversity Area boundaries
         Clare                      NAVAN                                                                      KOONINDERIE
                                                                                          ANLABY
                                                                 HAMILTON



                                                                                                           HANSBOROUGH



ALMA
                                            TARLEE                Kapunda/Tothill Range
                                                                                                                                     Eastern Hills




                                 STOCKPORT
                                                                            KAPUNDA

                                                                                                                          ST KITTS        DUTTON
                 HAMLEY BRIDGE
                                          LINWOOD




                                                                                                                                          TRURO




                                                                                                                  STOCKWELL



                                                     FREELING                  GREENOCK

                                                                                               NURIOOTPA                                 MOCULTA
                                     TEMPLERS
                   WASLEYS

                                                                                                                PENRICE
Legend

   Very highly sensitive areas
   Highly sensitive areas                               Light Regional Council
   Moderately sensitive areas
   Low sensitivity areas / Unclassified
   Key Biodiversity Area boundaries
                                                                            Strategic Plan
                                                       Vision, Goals and Strategic Actions




Goal 11: Adopt an environmental management framework that supports access
and use of natural landscapes that does not diminish their habitat and
biodiversity values.

Strategic Actions                                        Responsibility      Timeframe
Recognise and protect the value of ecological            Councils           2005
assets in planning policy
Recognise the ecological value and sensitivity of
sites and areas identified in this Plan and ensure
that these are adequately protected through
planning policies.
Increase managed access to key biodiversity              DEH, Councils,     2005 and
areas where appropriate                                  Private land       ongoing
Identify appropriate opportunities to increase           owners
managed access to key biodiversity areas
consistent with the level of risk posed by the
infrastructure associated with the activity.
Require effective management practices for               Councils,          2005 and
sustainable development                                  Relevant State     ongoing
Encourage a high standard of environmental               Government
management practice by private landholders and           agencies
proponents of tourism related developments to            including EPA,
protect the integrity of ecological assets.              DWLBC, DEH
                                                         and Planning
Promote the use of the Sustainable Tourism               SA, SATC
Guidelines for Developers.
Minimise impacts of infrastructure upgrades on                              Ongoing
tourism and ecological values
Give active consideration to the potential impact of     Councils
upgrading road and bridge infrastructure for
industry expansion and development on visitor
amenity and safety.
Maintain the rural landscape quality of scenic           Councils
drives, links and loops that contribute to positive
visitor experience.




4.8           PLANNING POLICY IMPROVEMENTS

A review of participating Councils’ Development Plans highlights a number of
unnecessary inconsistencies across the region relating to definition of terms, policies
relating to tourist developments and non-complying lists.




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Investigations have highlighted a need for planning policies that promote quality
sustainable retreat style type accommodation within attractive environments. These
investigations have also identified the need to amend some non-complying lists within
Councils’ Development Plans to ensure quality sustainable developments are not
unnecessarily discouraged.

As identified by the Wine Impact Study commissioned by The Barossa Light Regional
Development Board in association with The Wine Industry, the Barossa Wine Region is
now at a major cross-road and faces unprecedented pressure in terms of winery scale
and population growth with resulting impacts on its valued landscapes. The Wine
Industry has recognised that its strength lies in its brand appeal and mystique as a
destination. While growth is essential and desirable, operations of a scale that
contributes to the region developing an industrial character are not seen as
appropriate. This has the potential to destroy the rural, environmental and heritage
values that are vital to the continuing success of export wine marketing and the
critically important tourism industry.

Goal 12: Improve planning legislation, policies and practices to facilitate a
range of desired forms of tourism development.

Strategic Actions                                        Responsibility      Timeframe
Update Definitions in the Development                    Planning SA        2005
Regulations
Update Development Regulations definitions to
better reflect existing tourism terminology.
Introduce Definitions into Council Development           All Councils or    2005
Plans                                                    Planning SA
If the above action is not implemented, introduce a
range of definitions into Councils Development
Plans. These definitions should clarify the
difference between small, medium and large scale
tourism accommodation to assist in formulating
policies at zone level.
Initiate Planning Policy change to manage large          The Barossa        2005
scale winery expansion                                   Council, Light
Implement a joint Barossa and Light Regional             Regional
Councils’ PAR that seeks to limit large scale winery     Council
expansion in the Barossa and encourage such
expansion to occur in suitable areas within the
Light Regional Council.




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Prepare Strategic Actions                              Responsibility      Timeframe
Planning Policies that promote quality                 All Councils or    2005
sustainable tourism accommodation                      Planning SA
Implement a joint Councils PAR to update
Development Plan policy with a particular focus on
introducing new Objectives and Principles of
Development Control that promote quality
sustainable tourism accommodation. Fine tune
non-complying lists by deleting reference to small
scale tourism uses in some non-sensitive areas.
Ensure planning policies facilitate value adding       All Councils       2005
Update Development Plan policy to introduce            Planning SA
Objectives and Principles of Development Control
that facilitate specialised developments that add
value to existing enterprises such as restaurants,
specialist retail, accommodation and conference
and meeting facilities.
Build the capacity of Councils and Developers          Tourism SA and     2005 and
to facilitate sustainable tourism development          Regional           ongoing
outcomes                                               Development
With the use of guidelines, case studies and           Boards
workshops, build capacity of Council staff, State
Government Agencies, Development Assessment
Panels and developers to promote sustainable
tourism developments.




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                                                                           Strategic Plan
                                                                  Implementation Strategy




5.            IMPLEMENTATION

Section 4 of this Strategic Plan provides details of the Strategic Actions required to
achieve the regions’ vision for sustainable tourism.

This implementation strategy provides details of the mechanisms required to ensure
successful adoption of the Strategic Plan by the project partner organisations and other
key stakeholders. It recommends approaches to governance, the involvement of
regional leaders and obtaining funding for regional tourism related initiatives. It also
proposes directions for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the Strategic
Plan.




Governance

This project has been managed by a Steering Committee involving all Councils and the
Mid North and Barossa Regional Development Boards. While there has been close
liaison with the Regional Marketing Committees through the Marketing Managers, their
presence on the Steering Committee would have been an advantage.

It is therefore recommended that an Implementation Management Group be
established comprising:

        Council CEO’s or their nominees from The Barossa, Clare and Gilbert Valleys
        Councils, Regional Council of Goyder and Light Regional Council;

        Senior staff of the Barossa Light Development and Mid North Development
        Boards;

        Regional Marketing Managers for Barossa and Clare Valley Tourism Marketing
        Committees.

This group should be responsible for:

(1) Obtaining endorsement of the Strategic Plan by Councils, Boards and Marketing
        Committees;

(2) Publicising the Plan through local media, industry newsletters and Council, Board
        and regional tourism websites and brochures;

(3) Establishing working groups to drive specific strategic actions such as a Regional
        Planners Group to progress the Plan Amendment Report process to facilitate a
        regional approach to liaison with Planning SA and SATC;




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(4) Putting together collaborative funding submissions to pursue cross-regional
        initiatives and providing support to tourism proposals occurring in one Council
        area that will deliver a broader benefit to the regions;

(5) Working with the SATC to monitor and evaluate the performance of the Strategic
        Actions in achieving the Plan’s Vision and Goals.




Involvement of Regional Leaders

The Regional Leaders Forum established to assist in providing input, advice and
support for this project brought together over 20 leaders in the tourism industry,
regional organisations, food and wine industries and heritage associations.

There is a significant value in continuing this involvement and seeking to expand the
contribution of regional leaders to successful tourism outcomes.

It is recommended that the Regional Leaders Forum be retained and that the
Implementation Management Group convene a meeting in the second quarter of 2005
and at 6 monthly intervals thereafter to discuss progress on key identified strategic
directions. At the first meeting of the Forum following the release of the Strategic Plan,
it is recommended that four Task Groups be set up to pursue strategies that cross
regional boundaries, namely:

        Activities for Families with Children;

        Food and Wine;

        Cultural heritage immersion experiences;

        Driving, cycling and walking trail loops and links.

Other task groups may emerge over time and in accordance with the priority assigned
by the Implementation Management Group to the strategic actions in this Plan.




Funding and Budget Allocations

The Strategic Plan has identified organisations with responsibility for undertaking the
actions. It is expected that in most cases, funding will involve a partnership approach.




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It is recommended that each Council review these strategies against their Strategic
Plan and identify priority actions that align with Council’s corporate and community
directions in order to allocate resources from their Annual Budget.

This Strategy was prepared based on the understanding that the regions would have
available a shared resource for product development, ie, a person to drive and co-
ordinate selected product development initiatives.

Since this project proposal did not receive the Commonwealth funding sought, it is
recommended that the SATC work with the Regional Marketing Managers across the
four regions previously identified, to use the available limited funds to employ a project
officer for 6 months to scope and develop an identified product. This will involve
effectively engaging the necessary partners including the State Government, Councils
and the private sector to build a business case for investment and to leverage funds
from the Commonwealth, State and Local Government.

During this project, a strong preference was expressed for a project that would be
cross-regional in its application. One suggestion that received support was a focus on
adding value to the Heysen and Mawson Trails by developing loops and links,
providing land based transport and developing itineraries for 3-7 days that include
accommodation and dining options in towns adjacent to the trails.

The SATC has funding and support available through a number of avenues to assist in
research, marketing, product development and with specific initiatives in areas such as
food and wine and cultural heritage tourism, eg, the SATC Tourism Development
Fund. Regional Marketing Managers provide the most effective conduit to the SATC
personnel who can provide guidance in accessing relevant funding programmes.

The Australian Government also has funding available through a range of sources.
One avenue that could be considered by the Implementation Management Group is an
Australian Tourism Development Programme (ATDP) grant through AusIndustry
(Department of Industry, Tourism and Resources). This funding could pay for a project
officer to work with the Marketing Managers and Councils to co-ordinate the
implementation of the Action Plan. ATDP projects:

        Fill a gap in existing products and services and / or add significantly to a suite of
        attractions and facilities;

        Contribute to long term employment, economic growth and development;




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        Facilitate collaboration and partnerships between tourism organisations and / or
        operators to more effectively capture market opportunities;

        Have spill-over benefits to other tourism and non-tourism businesses;

        Show effective business planning and market research-based tourism
        development planning;

        Support the development of ‘Platinum Plus’ products (ie exceptional experiences
        with superior standards) that are consistent with the ‘Brand Australia’ theme.

The Clare and Barossa Regions would need to seek funding under Category 2:
Integrated Tourism Development Projects. Projects funded under this category should
aim to be large scale, multi-faceted activities that involve collaboration in the
development and / or implementation of effective strategies for tourism market
development. Grants of $100,000 (GST exclusive) to a maximum of $500,000 (GST
exclusive) will be provided for approved projects. (http://www.ausindustry.gov.au).




Monitoring and Evaluation

During this project, the consultant team highlighted the lack of regional data for a range
of tourism attributes that would enable a meaningful assessment of the impacts of
these strategies on regional economic growth and employment in the tourism sector.

It is recommended that Regional Development Boards liaise with the State
Government Department for Trade and Economic Development to obtain economic
data for tourism at a regional level including the number of jobs in tourism related
employment, direct expenditure in tourism and indirect expenditure derived through
input-output modelling.

Once this data has been provided it should be used as the baseline for the future
assessment of the impact of this Strategy on jobs growth and direct expenditure. An
annual benchmark survey should be undertaken of selected employers / tourism
operators to enable an evaluation of trends in the tourism sector. This survey should
be undertaken by the Regional Development Boards with support from the State
Department for Trade and Economic Development.




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Currently Tourism Research Australia (TRA) publishes data on visitor spend for the
Clare Valley aggregated with the Kangaroo Island and Adelaide Hills Regions. To
accurately assess the economic value of tourism to the Clare Valley, it is
recommended that the SATC disaggregate the data and provide up-to-date information
on overnight holiday visitor expenditure for the Clare Valley Region.

It is also recommended in the Strategy that Regional Marketing Committees undertake
quarterly surveys of selected operators to identify trends in visitation segmented
against the adapted wine tourism segmentation system. It is recommended that the
SATC Research Unit work with the Regional Marketing Unit and Marketing Managers
to develop and pilot a suitable survey instrument and to analyse and interpret the data.
This could be a revamp of the Visitor Index Survey.

The Regional Marketing Committees will use the results of these surveys collated
yearly to inform the review of their Marketing Plan and assist in developing their Annual
Work Programme. SATC could incorporate these within the Regional Profiles so that
those involved in planning and providing tourism accommodation and experiences are
kept up-to-date with changes in the market composition so they can adapt their
offerings to meet emerging needs.

Partnerships Are the Path to Success

This project has brought together key players across the regions and has succeeded in
helping to overcome some of the perceived and real historical barriers. We have
identified synergies and complementarities that will encourage visitors to stay longer in
the broader region. The Plan has focussed on identifying destinational experiences
that will include new product to be developed outside of the townships. It has also
recognised that for those seeking connection, meaningful stops along the way help to
make the journey more memorable.

The strategies in this Plan will only be realised if all of those with an investment
in the success of the regions are committed to productive partnerships.

It is only by working together “that the Clare Valley and Barossa Tourism
Regions will create a sense of welcome and belonging through enabling
memorable connections to our special people and places”.




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