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CPA issue surfaces in race for auditor
BY VIRGINIA YOUNG • vyoung@post-dispatch.com > 573-635-6178 | Posted: Wednesday, August 4, 2010
5:13 pm

JEFFERSON CITY -- Tom Schweich was savoring his win as the GOP nominee for state auditor today when the
Democratic incumbent, Susan Montee, revved up the fall campaign by saying that the auditor should be a CPA.

Montee is a CPA as well as a lawyer. Schweich is a lawyer but not a CPA.

The issue often surfaces in the race for auditor. Some past auditors, such as Republican Margaret Kelly, were
certified public accountants while others, such as Democrat Claire McCaskill, were not.

In an interview, Montee said that because she is a CPA, she actually works on audits and oversees auditing
standards. As a non-CPA, Schweich would “have to hire a deputy who actually makes the decisions,” she said.

Schweich shot back that he has managed private investigations into financial misdeeds, both as a corporate
lawyer and State Department official. He said he can better spot fraud because he has

a law enforcement background, which Montee lacks.

"If you look at Claire McCaskill, Kit Bond and John Ashcroft, they were all auditors and they were not CPAs,"
Schweich said.

Schweich, of Clayton, took 58.6 percent of the vote to defeat Rep. Allen Icet of Wildwood, for the GOP
nomination. On Tuesday night, Icet‟s campaign posted a gracious note on Icet‟s website. But in an interview
shortly after he conceded, Icet said he wasn‟t sure he would back Schweich.

Schweich had pummeled Icet in TV ads for taking trips funded by lobbyists. Icet, the House Budget Committee
chairman, said the ads were “really slick in twisting the facts.”

Even so, the party‟s top banner carrier, Senate nominee Roy Blunt, predicted a unified GOP front for Schweich
in the fall.

“I don‟t think the wounds are deep at all,” Blunt said.




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Impact of Tea Party not entirely clear
TONY MESSENGER • tmessenger@post-dispatch.com > 573-635-6178 | Posted: Thursday, August 5,
2010 12:00 am

ST. LOUIS • The Tea Party has grown up.

In effect, that was the message state Sen. Jane Cunningham offered Tuesday night when asked about the
overwhelming success of Proposition C, the anti-ObamaCare measure that passed more than 2-to-1.

Is this a Tea Party success, I asked her?

Sort of, said the Chesterfield Republican, who managed the media with aplomb at an upscale Town and Country
home on election night.

"They got to the point where they weren't just parties in the park anymore," Cunningham said of the Tea Party
movement that got going in earnest last summer with grass-roots meetings where anger toward President
Barack Obama's administration was fomented by Republican Party regulars who hitched along for the ride. "This
was more about the Patriot movement. They were the boots on the ground."

Cunningham's point: The initial success of the Tea Party groups begat new groups, called Patriots, and together,
with a little help from the Republican Party, the grass-roots movement in Missouri found perhaps its biggest
success yet with the passage of Proposition C.

Such success has been difficult to gauge. While the Tea Party activists started as a group protesting federal
spending in the bailouts and the rising deficits that will be paid down eventually by future generations, the
Patriots took the movement in a purer constitutional direction.

They started talking about states' rights. The 10th Amendment. They didn't — and don't — want Washington in
their business.

"It's not the government's business to tell me how to take care of myself," said Dwight Janson, 53, of Glendale,
who celebrated the Proposition C victory with Cunningham.

Janson says the movement — Tea Party, Patriot, whatever — is here to stay.

But what about that elusive success at the ballot box?

In the Show-Me State on Tuesday, the results were decidedly mixed.

State Sen. Chuck Purgason, R-Caulfield, had built his entire long-shot campaign on the help of Tea Party and
Patriot groups. But without money, and without the support of the Republican establishment that fanned the
flames of last summer's anger, he garnered only 13 percent of the vote against seven-term Congressman Roy
Blunt.




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Similarly, state Rep. Allen Icet, R-Wildwood, lost the statewide vote to newcomer Tom Schweich, who was
endorsed by the "country club" Republicans so often scorned by the Tea Party and Patriot movements.

But then there's Proposition C. Its success wasn't unexpected. But its margin sent the sort of message that will
have a lasting effect on Missouri politics.

When Cunningham and state Sen. Jim Lembke, R-Lemay — two of the Missouri Senate's staunchest
conservatives — return to the Capitol in January, they'll likely be joined by a couple of similar-minded former
House members who appear poised for victory in November.

And that 71 percent victory in Proposition C will hang over the Senate all session long.

"I think the new members coming over from the House are of like mind," said Lembke. "This may be the
precursor to bigger and better debates."

In the end, Proposition C benefited from the same dynamic as last summer's explosion of Tea Party anger.
When true grass-roots anger is combined with the financial support and organization of the Republican Party
apparatus, the movement has serious momentum.

In other words, when a "ground-up" movement — as Cunningham called Proposition C — combines with the
power, reach and money of the politicians that Cunningham said 'sidled up" to the ballot issue, success is within
reach.

Left to its own, however, the Tea Party movement becomes like so many other fast-moving comets in political
history: a nice little party in the park, with no impact beyond the next election.

"Those of us left will eventually be judged not just by the Nov. 2 election, but more by Nov. 3. Can Tea Parties
hold Republicans accountable? Can they back conservative Democrats at the local and state level, or will they
eventually be subsumed into the Republican Party structure, pulling the party rightward fiscally but ultimately
being spent as a force?" asks conservative St. Louis blogger Jim Durbin, who like many of his local Tea Party
cohorts backed Blunt but stayed quiet about it.

"No one knows yet."




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Endorsements don't come easy for
primary winners
Cory de Vera • News-Leader • August 5, 2010

Republican Billy Long and Democrat Scott Eckersley each won decisive victories in the primaries, but each may
have some work to do to unite their parties.

Eckersley -- who once worked in the office of Republican Gov. Matt Blunt --made a point of telling voters that he
really considered himself an independent.

He defeated Democrat Tim Davis with 62.7 percent of the vote.

On his campaign website, Davis wrote: "To answer queries on the subject -- I have chosen to make no
endorsements at this time."

A message left for Craig Hosmer, chair of the Missouri Democratic Party, was not returned.

Billy Long, who garnered 36.5 percent of the Republican vote won an unequivocal endorsement from Sen. Gary
Nodler, but not from all the GOP candidates against whom he ran.

Asked if he was ready to support Long, Greene County Prosecutor Darrell Moore said simply, "I'm not ready to
answer that question today."

Mike Moon said he is a Republican at heart, and he likes Billy Long as an individual, but he also likes Scott
Eckersley as an individual -- at least what he knows about him so far.

But Moon said he aligns himself with people who share his values, and he hopes Billy is that man. Debates, said
Moon, will shed light on the candidates.

"As I mentioned all throughout the campaign, I think we need a constitutional conservative," said Moon. "Scott, I
would imagine, is very well-versed in the Constitution. Billy will have to do his homework."

Several messages left for Sen. Jack Goodman Wednesday were not returned. On Tuesday night, Goodman
stopped short of endorsing Long, saying, "I think everybody's kind of got their own races to process tonight."

Jeff Wisdom said he was not endorsing Long, but did not want to say why, at least not on the record. "People
have spoken. They chose Billy Long as the Republican nominee, and I respect that."

Gary Nodler, who during the primaries often sparred with Long over the issue of whether it was better to send an
experienced politician to
Washington or a newbie, said he has always supported the Republican ticket, and called Long Tuesday night to
congratulate him.

"The Republicans are going to win in Missouri in a landslide from the top of the ticket to the bottom," said Nodler.



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Nodler said one of the reasons he was not nominated is that voters were clearly voicing opinions against career
politicians, and Billy Long
is the outsider they want.

"Eckersley was part of a political office, so he's the career politician in that race. Plus, he's controversial: a party-
switcher. There's a loyalty question with him.

"The 7th District race is over," said Nodler. "Billy Long is the next congressman, period."




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Republican National Committee meeting
in KC this week to set strategy for
November (from Kansas City Star)

The Republican National Committee will spend the next three days meeting in Kansas City.
The focus of the group‟s annual summer meeting: building solid grassroots networks to elect GOP candidates
this fall.
The group and its 168 members will be meeting at the Kansas City Marriott Downtown, 200 W. 12th St.
And yes, GOP Chairman Michael Steele will be here.




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Missouri Senate race a referendum on
Washington (from Jefferson City News-
Tribune)
By David A. Lieb, Associated Press

Missouri's Senate campaign is shaping up as a referendum on Washington -- whether about the policies of
President Barack Obama and the Democratic-led Congress or the political culture of the nation's capital.

Missouri primary voters delivered a strong rebuke Tuesday of Obama's top policy accomplishment by
overwhelmingly passing a ballot measure defying a federal mandate for most Americans to have health
insurance. That bodes well for the Republican senatorial nominee, U.S. Rep. Roy Blunt, who has made the
health care law and Obama's various policies the central theme of his campaign.

The challenge for the Democratic candidate, Secretary of State Robin Carnahan, will be to turn that voter
frustration back on Blunt by linking him to a Washington culture symbolized by lobbyist largesse and a coziness
with corporate bigwigs.

Tuesday's election indicated that at least some voters are passionate about the policies in Washington.

Proposition C, the measure that attempts to reject key provisions of the federal health care law, passed with 71
percent of the vote -- drawing an even larger turnout than the Senate primaries atop the partisan ballots. It
passed everywhere except in St. Louis and Kansas City, two Democratic strongholds that had particularly low
voter turnout.

The Missouri measure sets up a conflict with a federal law requiring most Americans to have health insurance or
face penalties, starting in 2014. The Missouri law may have little legal effect, because federal laws generally
supersede those in states. But it sent a clear signal of political disapproval to Washington.

What's the message for Carnahan? "I think she's in serious trouble, is what it comes down to," said George
Connor, head of the political science department at Missouri State University.

"The vote on health care suggests that she needs to distance herself from the president in general, broad terms,"
Connor said. "However, President Obama is still popular in Kansas City and St. Louis, and she absolutely has to
crank out the Democratic base in Kansas City and St. Louis" to have a shot at winning the general election.

For Carnahan the key is to focus the race not on Obama and his policies, but on Blunt's actions during his 14
years in Congress -- most of which he spent as part of the House Republican leadership. That's why Carnahan
has been highlighting Blunt's distinction as one of the leading recipients of lobbyist contributions and his role in
negotiating the 2008 bill bailing out banks and other financial institutions.

Carnahan's message must be: "If you're upset with Washington, he -- Blunt -- is more Washington than I," said
Terry Jones, a political science professor at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.


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The race toward the Nov. 2 general election officially began Wednesday, a day after Blunt and Carnahan each
cruised to primary victories over lesser-known opponents.

Blunt flew around the state for campaign events, denouncing the policies coming from Washington and
suggesting that Carnahan would follow lockstep behind Obama, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate
Majority Leader Harry Reid.

"The agenda of the other side is so extreme and so job-killing that you don't have the private-sector job creation
that needs to be the focus of the country today," Blunt said during a news conference at his Jefferson City
campaign office.

Blunt added: "We want to live in a country where the people are bigger than the government -- not in a country
where the government is bigger than the people."

Carnahan, who was celebrating her 49th birthday Wednesday, kept a low-key public agenda. She planned to
attend a "house party" Wednesday evening in Florissant, one of dozens of such low-dollar fundraisers her
campaign was hosting around the state. Her mother, former U.S. Sen. Jean Carnahan, sent out a campaign e-
mail Wednesday framing the election as one about the culture of Washington.

"I'm sure you're aware of Congressman Blunt's reputation for being the ultimate Washington insider -- a loyal
advocate for big oil, big banks, and big corporations," Jean Carnahan wrote in a pitch for people to contribute
$49 as a celebration of her daughter's birthday.

The common denominator of the campaigns? Washington.

"You don't see the Blunt or Carnahan camp disagreeing about where the public is -- it's each trying to take that
situation and use it to the best possible advantage," Jones said.




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Primary picks winner in many state
races
Thursday, August 5, 2010
By CHRIS BLANK ~ The Associated Press
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. -- Nearly half the seats in the Missouri Legislature up for election this year already have
essentially been decided through the primary election.

Voters cast ballots for all 163 members in the state House and half of the 34-member state Senate on Tuesday.
In many of those races, the only competition was between members of the same political party. Others will face
only a Libertarian or Constitution party challenger in the fall election.

Of the 17 Senate seats up for election, three Republicans face no opponent in November and two others face
either a Libertarian or Constitution party member. Two Democrats also wrapped up their campaigns by winning
primaries and another must beat a Libertarian.

Sen. Brad Lager, a Republican from Savannah, had no challenger in the primary and is uncontested in the
general election. House Speaker Ron Richard also was unchallenged in his bid for a Senate district representing
Joplin.

Two others won four-way party primaries and face no opponent in November. Republican Mike Kehoe won his
primary for a Jefferson City-area district. Democrat Maria Chappelle-Nadal, a state House member, won her
contest for a St. Louis-area seat.

In the state House, 42 Republicans and 28 Democrats either will face no opponent or only a third-party
challenger in November. It takes 82 members to the control the chamber, which Republicans have led since
2003.

Voters knocked off three current House members in their primaries.

Complete but unofficial election results showed that St. Louis Democrats James Morris and Hope Whitehead lost
their re-election bids. Morris was elected in 2008 and was defeated by Penny Hubbard, whose son held the seat
before Morris.

Whitehead took office in February to replace Democrat Talibden El-Amin, who resigned after pleading guilty to a
federal bribery charge. She was defeated by Democrat Karla May.

No Republican has filed to run in either House district.

In southwestern Missouri, Republican Nita Jane Ayres finished third in a three-way Republican primary for a
district in Stone and Taney counties. Ayres took office in February after Republican Dennis Wood resigned to
accept an appointment to be a county commissioner.

Don Phillips, a retired trooper for the Missouri State Highway Patrol, won that Republican primary and does not
have an opponent in the general election.


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BLOG ZONE
Blunt's campaign exults in "historic
turnout" for GOP
BY VIRGINIA YOUNG • vyoung@post-dispatch.com > 573-635-6178 | Posted: Wednesday, August 4, 2010
12:43 pm

JEFFERSON CITY -- GOP Senate nominee Roy Blunt made clear this morning that his fall campaign will try to
harness the fever that propelled Proposition C to a big victory yesterday.

Visiting the capital as part of a six-city swing, Blunt said the results of the referendum on the federal health care
law showed that the state rejects Democrats' "extreme" agenda.

"I've never seen people more engaged and more concerned about the future, and the loudest message
Missourians can send to Washington DC is this Senate seat," he told supporters at a Jefferson City stop.

Ann Wagner, Blunt's statewide campaign chair, said the primary election produced "historic turnout numbers" for
Republicans.

She noted that Blunt got about 100,000 more votes than Democratic nominee Robin Carnahan and her two
primary foes combined. Since 1944, Wagner said, GOP turnout has surpassed Democratic turnout in only two
elections -- but never by as much as yesterday.

"There are a lot of people fired up and upset about the liberal path this administration is taking us," Wagner said.

Even so, overall turnout didn't set any records. The secretary of state's office said 22.9 percent of registered
voters cast votes on Prop C. That's higher than in 2006 and 2008 but lower than in 2004, when the gay marriage
amendment triggered a 34.7 percent turnout.




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GOP marks shared Obama, Carnahan
birthday with special cake delivery
Jake Wagman • jwagman@post-dispatch.com > 314-340-8268 | Posted: Wednesday, August 4, 2010 1:21
pm

Turns out Robin Carnahan and Barack Obama have more in common than just party affiliation.

Today is the president's birthday -- as well as Carnahan's. Not only were they born on the same day, they were
born on the same exact day -- August 4, 1961.

Both Obama and Carnahan, who secured the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate last night, turn 49 today.
To mark the occasion, Robin's mother Jean, a former U.S. Senator herself, sent Robin's supporters an email
asking for a donation of $49.

Republicans, of course, had a different approach.

Lest they miss a chance to link the president's sagging poll numbers with their competition in November, the
Missouri GOP used the shared birthday as a hook for a new release seeking to tie the two together on policy
issues as well.

The icing on the cake was an actual cake: The GOP had a festive dessert delivered to Carnahan's campaign
office in Clayton today.

"Happy Birthday Barack Obama and Robin Carnahan," the blue icing says.

Wonder if the Carnahan campaign will list the offering as an "in-kind" donation -- even if wasn't meant to be kind.




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Beyond the results, scoring who else
won and lost in Tuesday's primary
BY JAKE WAGMAN • jwagman@post-dispatch.com > 314-340-8268 | Posted: Wednesday, August 4, 2010
9:45 am

Not all election results are evident from the vote tallies. Beyond the official count, there were several winners
and, in effort not to be harsh, what we'll call non-winners in Tuesday's primary.

First, the fortunate ones:

      Mayor Francis Slay. He endorsed six candidates in Tuesday's election. All six won. A golden touch -- or
       does Slay just stay away from long shots?
      John Bowman. The former state representative was forced out of the State House after he was indicted
       on bank fraud charges. After receiving probation, he's resurrected his career as a political consultant, and
       Tuesday led State Rep. Maria Chappelle-Nadal's successful campaign for State Senate in a crowded
       primary field.
      Sam Fox and friends. The wealthy Clayton businessman and national GOP benefactor was among the
       prominent Missouri Republicans who gave big to Tom Schweich's campaign for state auditor. Money
       talks: Schweich plowed through the competition, defeating State Rep. Allen Icet, R-Wildwood, by a wide
       margin in Tuesday's primary.
      Tommy Sowers. The Rolla Democrat was unopposed in his Congressional primary. But an unknown
       Republican, Bob Parker, was able to take 35 percent of the vote in the GOP primary against incumbent
       U.S. Rep. Jo Ann Emerson. A ray of hope? Yes. The bad news for Sowers, though, is that Emerson
       received 20,000 more raw votes than Sowers, suggesting voters in the southeast Missouri district remain
       overwhelmingly Republican.
      Republicans running in November. Thanks to Prop. C, the GOP candidates in the fall now have a new
       mantra: A majority of Missouri voters rejected a key premise of the White House's health care plan.
       Never mind that turnout hovered at around 25 percent in most places. Don't vote, can't complain.

And those who might be scratching their heads this morning:

      Don Calloway. The first-term state representative had several years of legislating before term limits
       caught up with him. But, buoyed by his visible role in attempting to reform the troubled Northeast Fire
       District, Calloway jumped into the fray of a crowded State Senate primary. The gamble did not pay off.
       Calloway came in third in the Senate primary, and now no longer has a House seat either.
      Sam Page. After losing by a significant margin to Lt. Gov. Peter Kinder two years ago, the Creve Coeur
       Democrat regrouped and raised more than $720,000 to replace State Sen. Joan Bray. But it was county
       councilwoman Barbara Fraser -- who raised about $400,000 less -- who easily captured the Democratic
       nomination.
      Police and firefighters union. The guns n' hoses crowd teamed up to back James Long, a former
       police sergeant running for State Senate against Joe Keaveny, a vocal proponent of moving control of
       the police department from the state to City Hall. The police and fire unions typically have strong sway at
       the ballot box, especially in light turnout elections like Tuesday's. Only, this time, Keaveny beat them
       back, with the help from the mayor's political apparatus.


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   Joe the Plumber. Samuel Joseph Wurzelbacher, a.k.a. "Joe the Plumber" of 2008 campaign fame,
    waded into Missouri politics this summer, stumping for Icet and funding a commercial for U.S. Senate
    candidate Chuck Purgason. The Plumber was 0 for 2 -- in addition to Icet's loss, Purgason, challenging
    Roy Blunt in the primary, lost every county but the one where his hometown is located.
   Mariano V. Favazza. What will the St. Louis courthouse do without the loquacious clerk -- and his
    famous tussles with the judiciary? Favazza would regal visitors with stories of his time at night law school
    and, more recently, his impressive weight loss after moving to a liquid only diet. Unfortunately for
    Favazza, after a dozen years as the court's top elected administrator, he didn't have enough juice to hold
    off challenge in the Democratic primary from lawyer Jane Schweitzer. While Favazza plans his next
    move, the circuit court judges -- who sparred openly and often with Favazza -- are toasting his departure.




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         MISSOURINET
Differing opinions on the Tea Party’s
impact on the U.S. Senate race
by Ryan Famuliner on August 5, 2010

in Politics & Government

Tuesday‟s primary offered the first opportunity for the Tea Party movement to make its presence known at the
polls in Missouri.

State Senator Chuck Purgason said he was a member of the Tea Party long ago, and while he wasn‟t endorsed
by the party itself, the relative unknown was able to get 13% of the Republican primary vote. He faced 7 other
people, including Congressman Roy Blunt, who won the nomination.

“Somebody asked me earlier today, „what about the votes Chuck Purgason got?‟ I said, „you know, he may have
got those votes because people like him,‟ and that‟s OK. You know, every campaign doesn‟t have to be about
voting against somebody, it can be about voting for somebody,” Blunt said at a victory celebration in Jefferson
City Wednesday.

Blunt thinks that the Tea Party movement will help his case for the U-S Senate, as he says they stand for many
of the same values he does, including keeping spending down.

“They‟re focused on that, they‟re focused on the constitution, they‟re focused on the proper role of government at
all levels and I think they‟re going to be very helpful. I personally think we got a significant number of votes
yesterday from people in the movement and I think we‟re going to get almost all their votes in November,” Blunt
said.

Blunt also says the Tea Party is energizing conservatives, which the man he hopes to replace says could be
very beneficial.

“People are fired up in the Tea Party; people are fired up everywhere I‟ve gone in Missouri. People are stopping
me and saying, „what can you do to stop it?‟ I‟ve told them, the political answer is, I‟ve told them, „elect Roy
Blunt,‟” said Senator Christopher Bond, who is retiring from the Senate this year.

Senator Claire McCaskill, the Democrat who will become Missouri‟s senior Senator once Bond steps down,
doesn‟t think the votes that went to Purgason will necessarily go to Blunt.

 “It would not surprise me if many of Senator Purgason‟s voters ended up taking a hard look at the Constitution
candidate and Libertarian candidate,” McCaskill said.




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Purgason congratulates Blunt, won’t
discuss backing him
by Brent Martin on August 4, 2010

in Politics & Government

A long-shot bid for a big upset in the Primary Election fell far short. State Senator Chuck Purgason, a Republican
from Caulfield, has talked to the Missourinet about his loss in the Republican primary for United States Senate.

Worries about the country‟s fiscal policies drove Purgason during his uphill battle against veteran southwest
Missouri Congressman Roy Blunt in the Republican primary. Purgason says even his experience on primary
election day, campaigning outside a polling station, brought home the dangers debt poses the country.

“Realizing that every young child that walks into that polling booth currently owes $340,000 of the national debt
ought to wake people up and begin the process of working to get this country back in shape.” Purgason tells the
Missourinet.

Purgason received only 13.1% of the primary vote, receiving 75,390 votes. Blunt won nearly 71% of the ballots
cast in the Republican primary Tuesday, 409,806. Seven other Republicans ran in the primary. None of the
remaining Republican candidates broke into double digits.

He says he‟s humbled by the volunteers who put in so many hours in his campaign.

Purgason sidesteps the question of whether he will back Blunt in his general election campaign against
Democrat Robin Carnahan.

“You know, I‟m going to work for a lot of Republican candidates that I believe will go out and work on
conservative values,” Purgason says.

Purgason will only congratulate Blunt on his campaign and wish him well in the future.




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Bridge repairs, replacements speed
forward
by Bob Priddy on August 4, 2010

in Transportation

Missouri‟s program to rebuild or replace more than 800 of the state‟s worst bridges is almost one-fourth of the
way done and picking up speed. A Lee‟s Summit contracting company is doing most of the work. In the first
fifteen months of the program it has repaired or replaced 192 bridges. The Transportation Department says
that‟s one bridge every two-and-a-half days.

Department spokesman Bob Brendel says some economies of scale can be applied to most of the projects
because the bridges are about the same size and common segments are being used.

He says the average replacement project requires 60 to 90 days but contractor KTU is averaging 39 days for
construction of each entirely new bridge. He says the company that hopes to complete more than 160 bridges
this year hopes to complete more than 200 of them next year.

The bridges, on average, are about 60 years old.




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Superintendents’ salaries not linked to
student performance
by Jessica Machetta on August 5, 2010

in Education

A Missouri think tank has put together a study that shows public school superintendents‟ salaries aren‟t
necessarly linked to student performance.

The Show Me Institute is a free market think tank that suggests changes to public policy in efforts to benefit
Missourians. Spokeswoman Audrey Spalding says the group has compared superintendent contracts with salary
information from school districts throughout the state.

Spalding says the study shows urban areas pay their superintendents an average of 12 percent more than rural
districts.

The highest paid superintendent salary is in St. Louis City at 225 thousand dollars. The lowest paid is in
Gasconade County at 55 thousand. Spalding says some pay much less than that simply because it‟s not a full
time position.

She says Missourians spend nearly $50 million on school superintendents each year, not counting costs other
than salary, such as health benefits, annuities, and car allowances.

She says in the survey of superintendent contracts, out of more than 500 districts throughout the state, more
than 450 responded. They got the salary information from the Department of Elementary and Secondary
education.

“Though the paper digs into the specifics of certain superintendents‟ compensation, the findings are general, and
apply to all Missouri public school districts,” Spalding said. “School superintendents act as the CEOs of their
districts, and are extremely influential. In fact, according to a national survey, nearly 90 percent of
superintendents reported that their school boards accepted their recommendations 90 percent to 100 percent of
the time. Meanwhile, one of the main tasks for school board members is to hire and manage the school
superintendent. One of the documents that indicates how a school board is managing its superintendent is the
superintendent‟s employment contract. There, the school board lays out the responsibilities, compensation, and
future expectations of the superintendent.”

The study shows 12 percent of school boards appear to award future salary amounts to superintendents
automatically.

“That is, superintendent contracts can include not only the salary for the current year, but also often stipulate
future substantial salary increases,” she said. “Another 10 percent receive salary increases based on the
district‟s teacher salary schedule. It is telling that school boards are awarding pay increases to superintendents
with no knowledge of their district‟s future budget situation or their superintendent‟s future performance.”


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Additionally, Spalding added, superintendents oversee school district budgets, which together total more than $8
billion (the total of public school expenditures in Missouri in 2009, not including charter schools).

“We should take an interest in how these managers are paid, and how school boards manage them,” she said.
“For example, many superintendents were awarded the exact same percentage raise as that awarded to
teachers. Thinking about the incentives, we would expect higher salary expenditures in a school district
managed by a leader who knew his raise was tied to whatever raise was awarded to the employees he
managed. Is this really the best way for a school board to reward its superintendent?”

The Show Me Institute has posted all the underlying contract documents and salary data online for anyone to
compare the salary and structure of their superintendent‟s compensation to that in other districts.

For more about the Show Me Institute, visit www.showmeinstitute.org.




          News Clips online: www.senate.mo.gov/snc — Subscribe via: newsroom@senate.mo.gov
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USA TODAY MISSOURI NEWS
Monday, August 2, 2010 -- Columbia — The 33rd annual National Bikers Roundup is expected to bring about
35,000 visitors to the Boone County Fairgrounds. The roundup is Tuesday through Saturday night. The city's
Convention and Visitors Bureau has told retailers to be prepared for the influx.

Tuesday, August 3, 2010 -- Jefferson City — State programs, like lawmakers, have term limits. And
the clock is running low for several of them. A 2003 state law gives new government programs and tax
credits a maximum six-year life span with an option for up to another 12 years if legislation is approved
to extend the program.

Thursday, August 5, 2010 — Columbia — Students and faculty at the University of Missouri can now rent
hybrid vehicles and other cars from a campus parking lot. The We Car rental program was created to help
freshmen who are required to live on campus get around town more easily.




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